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The Saeshell Book of Time, Part 1: The Death of Innocents

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Full color, 24 illustrations, Science Fiction/Fantasy blend in a large format hardcover book. Magical children will rule the Earth with their advanced intellectual and scientific powers. Two young people are betrothed at birth and forced by alien races to serve as the secret King and Queen of contemporary Earth: from the UK, Stefan, a seventh-grade artistic prodigy and fro Full color, 24 illustrations, Science Fiction/Fantasy blend in a large format hardcover book. Magical children will rule the Earth with their advanced intellectual and scientific powers. Two young people are betrothed at birth and forced by alien races to serve as the secret King and Queen of contemporary Earth: from the UK, Stefan, a seventh-grade artistic prodigy and from the US, Tova, a nineteen-year-old life sciences genius. Both were raised as humans and left to discover that they will become immortal at age nineteen. Using their emerging magic, they must protect the kingdom of Earth from unwanted alien intrusions. Shy, reclusive Stefan is ripped from his childhood and has eight weeks to learn to rule. Tova must do more than love Stefan - she must keep him sane or kill him to protect humans from his irrational use of his powers. In this first part of the four part serial storyline, Elof, an abused Tibetan-American science wizard must teach the magical children, Ty and Tyco, to use their talents ethically. Otherwise, Tova will destroy them to protect Earth. Ty, the mysterious, fearful third-grade son of a British Prime Ministerial aid, has an ancient knowledge given to him by 'ghosts'. Tyco, who is the fifth-grade son of a Mayan astronomer, must learn to keep his warrior impulses in check and protect his friend, Ty, from harm. While teaching these kids, Elof reconciles his own childhood with his sociopathic father. Does he have a magical inheritance he has yet to discover? Far grittier than Harry Potter, this story is an intellectual puzzle of mysteries and surprises for readers ready to meet the challenge. The HC Edition is a large format book with 24 Full Color illustrations enhanced by the author and color text effects. Some illustrations appear differently than in the softcover. The print is also slightly bigger than the softcover editions with better layout and other enhancements.


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Full color, 24 illustrations, Science Fiction/Fantasy blend in a large format hardcover book. Magical children will rule the Earth with their advanced intellectual and scientific powers. Two young people are betrothed at birth and forced by alien races to serve as the secret King and Queen of contemporary Earth: from the UK, Stefan, a seventh-grade artistic prodigy and fro Full color, 24 illustrations, Science Fiction/Fantasy blend in a large format hardcover book. Magical children will rule the Earth with their advanced intellectual and scientific powers. Two young people are betrothed at birth and forced by alien races to serve as the secret King and Queen of contemporary Earth: from the UK, Stefan, a seventh-grade artistic prodigy and from the US, Tova, a nineteen-year-old life sciences genius. Both were raised as humans and left to discover that they will become immortal at age nineteen. Using their emerging magic, they must protect the kingdom of Earth from unwanted alien intrusions. Shy, reclusive Stefan is ripped from his childhood and has eight weeks to learn to rule. Tova must do more than love Stefan - she must keep him sane or kill him to protect humans from his irrational use of his powers. In this first part of the four part serial storyline, Elof, an abused Tibetan-American science wizard must teach the magical children, Ty and Tyco, to use their talents ethically. Otherwise, Tova will destroy them to protect Earth. Ty, the mysterious, fearful third-grade son of a British Prime Ministerial aid, has an ancient knowledge given to him by 'ghosts'. Tyco, who is the fifth-grade son of a Mayan astronomer, must learn to keep his warrior impulses in check and protect his friend, Ty, from harm. While teaching these kids, Elof reconciles his own childhood with his sociopathic father. Does he have a magical inheritance he has yet to discover? Far grittier than Harry Potter, this story is an intellectual puzzle of mysteries and surprises for readers ready to meet the challenge. The HC Edition is a large format book with 24 Full Color illustrations enhanced by the author and color text effects. Some illustrations appear differently than in the softcover. The print is also slightly bigger than the softcover editions with better layout and other enhancements.

30 review for The Saeshell Book of Time, Part 1: The Death of Innocents

  1. 4 out of 5

    Wendy C

    The Saeshell Book of Time, Part 1: The Death of Innocents (Children of Sophista #1) by Rusty A. Biesele I really do not know what to say aboutThe Saeshell Book of Time, Part 1: The Death of Innocents (Children of Sophista #1) by Rusty A. Biesele. The concept of the book sounded interesting which is why I wanted to read it but I think the author failed to deliver. To me the book just seemed to be a jumbled up mess. You are given instructions on how to read the book (Right then and there I should h The Saeshell Book of Time, Part 1: The Death of Innocents (Children of Sophista #1) by Rusty A. Biesele I really do not know what to say aboutThe Saeshell Book of Time, Part 1: The Death of Innocents (Children of Sophista #1) by Rusty A. Biesele. The concept of the book sounded interesting which is why I wanted to read it but I think the author failed to deliver. To me the book just seemed to be a jumbled up mess. You are given instructions on how to read the book (Right then and there I should have known to put the book down. You should not be told to read a book a certain way to be able to understand it correctly.) I do appreciate that the author was trying to give his reader a different type of experience; however, I do think the unique way the book is written will most likely confuse a lot of young readers (who the book is geared towards). The other thing that I found a bit disturbing (since this is geared to young readers) was the relationship between a 12-13 year old boy and 19 year old girl and the little sexual innuendos passed between the two. I am sure some will call me a prude but that type of age difference, at that young age …….. I just felt wrong. I am sure the author put a great deal of thought and effort into writing the book and I applaud him for that. This book just was not my cup of tea and cannot recommend it. Still, there are those that did like the book and I suggest you read their reviews and decide if you want to read the book. Also, go to Amazon so you can read the first couple pages. If you like what you read in that little bit of a preview, then go for it; but if that little bit bugs you, it doesn’t get any better the longer the book goes on. *I won this book through Goodreads First Reads giveaway. In no way has this influenced my rating or opinion of this book.* 1 Star

  2. 5 out of 5

    Misty Ray

    If you value well-thought out descriptions, fleshed out characters and an engaging story...avoid this one. "Saeshell Book of Time" is what happens when you take an average book and throw it in the blender, then hit pulse. We begin with the book itself narrating to you, insulting you as a human, and threatening to turn your brains to charcoal if you harm it in any way. This preface could have been entertaining, but comes off as merely rude. Next we enter the bedroom of a boy whose mother is about If you value well-thought out descriptions, fleshed out characters and an engaging story...avoid this one. "Saeshell Book of Time" is what happens when you take an average book and throw it in the blender, then hit pulse. We begin with the book itself narrating to you, insulting you as a human, and threatening to turn your brains to charcoal if you harm it in any way. This preface could have been entertaining, but comes off as merely rude. Next we enter the bedroom of a boy whose mother is about to commit "atrocities" upon him, and has drugged/mind-controlled her husband into sleeping so he won't see what she's going to do to her son. Not exactly the scenario I want my young adults at home to read in detail. Immediately after, we're propelled into an alter-verse/alter-time/alter-civilization place thingy where people we don't know are talking telepathically, talking to computers, talking each other, teleporting randomly in and out of scene, referring to each other as "when I killed you", perhaps resurrecting others, cloning each other, and engaging in pseudo-sexual banter (as well as a seemingly sexual experience when a seventh-grader rubs his palm with a much older woman who proceeds to tell him she wants to take him home and that he has a magic hand that he's very capable with). This isn't your average YA novel. Apart from the many and numerous deaths along the way, the sexual relations of a 1,300 hundred year old 7th grader and a possibly human 19 year old girl, some more deaths, as well as more characters you can only identify by numbers after their names...I haven't mentioned the instructions one has to follow in order to read the book. If there's a diamond bullet before a typeface, it means telepathic communication. If there's a circle bullet, and another typeface, it means this. If there's just a different typeface, it means that. If there's an original typeface... There may be a plot in there somewhere. There may be a character or two. There may be illustrations that are so creepy that your children may believe are pictures of serial killers. (This is true, by the way, but leaning more toward genocidal than homicidal.) What there is not, however, is any good reason whatever to pick up this book at all. I have received a great many books as giveaways from Goodreads, but this is one I wish I had not entered the drawing for.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Sanchi

    I was chosen in a member giveaway on Library-thing for this book, I am completely in love with the cover to start. The book I would rate 4.5 out of 5 stars. I loved the story within the book, it was very animated and fun to read. The pictures within the book are simply amazing! My favorite part of the book was towards the end when the fairies are trying to save the main character Stefan from a meta-morphing catastrophe that would end up in him exploding and blowing up the world. This book is a v I was chosen in a member giveaway on Library-thing for this book, I am completely in love with the cover to start. The book I would rate 4.5 out of 5 stars. I loved the story within the book, it was very animated and fun to read. The pictures within the book are simply amazing! My favorite part of the book was towards the end when the fairies are trying to save the main character Stefan from a meta-morphing catastrophe that would end up in him exploding and blowing up the world. This book is a very sophisticated Fairy book and you must be paying very close attention to the characters in order to be able to follow what is going on. I think this book will make anyone who reads it tap into a higher intelligence to read it. I think this book was great if you love Sci Fi you will love this book. I would recommend it to anyone over the age 13-14 and I am 28 and I truly enjoyed it. The beginning of the book was also so funny I don't want to spoil it but the first chapter the book is literally speaking to you it's funny. So In closing I loved it and Yes would recommend it!

  4. 4 out of 5

    Micah Wilger

    Only once or twice has an author painted worlds so vivid, so fascinating and desirable that I myself want to live in them. Iain M. Banks did it for me, with his Culture novels. James A. Owen was an example from the high fantasy genre, with Here There Be Dragons, and Roger Zelazny did it in Lord of Light. The world of Sophista is one that has that very same pull. The concepts are fascinating and intelligent, the history of the world is well explained and the ambience is smooth and engaging. Of cou Only once or twice has an author painted worlds so vivid, so fascinating and desirable that I myself want to live in them. Iain M. Banks did it for me, with his Culture novels. James A. Owen was an example from the high fantasy genre, with Here There Be Dragons, and Roger Zelazny did it in Lord of Light. The world of Sophista is one that has that very same pull. The concepts are fascinating and intelligent, the history of the world is well explained and the ambience is smooth and engaging. Of course, atmosphere isn't everything. The main characters are more than human, but they also are fully human, in their emotions, their hopes their fears. The story seems somewhat tangled at first. Two boys are transported to another dimension where they are told a story. This story is an important story, one that will reveal to them more about who they are, the kinds of powers they are expected to control and why they're important in the first place. We follow along in the story of a young boy, Stefan, who is to become one of the most powerful entities in existence. While the plot becomes mysterious and mystifying at times, it is this quality which makes it appealing. I very much appreciate stories where the reader is expected to bring his or her brain along, expected to try and figure out all the pieces in the story's puzzle. And as it comes together, it is a story full of human emotion, otherworldly powers and a good dose of optimism in the face of dark circumstances. Rusty A. Biesele has painted in bold and vibrant colors. I would recommend this book to any young adult reader interested in being drawn in to something more complex than the typical fantasy/sci fi humdrum plot. The Saeshell Book of Time Part 1 is an exciting beginning to what I'm expecting will be a very good saga. I am looking forward to the day when more books come out, and I can return to the world of Sophista once more.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Rob Slaven

    As always, it should firstly be noted that I received this book free as a GoodReads giveaway under the 'first reads' program. Also as always I'm not letting this influence my review in any way. When I got this book in the mail I was enthusiastic that it was targeted at young adults because it meant I could engage my own young adults in reading and reviewing it. I gave it to my 13, 11 and 7-year-olds to look at in the car as we were driving and the reaction from the back seat was unprecedented. As As always, it should firstly be noted that I received this book free as a GoodReads giveaway under the 'first reads' program. Also as always I'm not letting this influence my review in any way. When I got this book in the mail I was enthusiastic that it was targeted at young adults because it meant I could engage my own young adults in reading and reviewing it. I gave it to my 13, 11 and 7-year-olds to look at in the car as we were driving and the reaction from the back seat was unprecedented. As with any children the first thing they latched on to were the illustrations. They described them as 'extremely creepy' and 'eerily like' some of the digital images they were used to seeing in games like The Sims. The first 30 minutes were spent making fun of the pictures and the book in general. My eldest read the first chapter aloud in the car and the reactions were varied: 7-year-old (girl): "It's got faeries!" 11-year-old (boy): "I have no interest in this book whatsoever" 13-year-old (girl): She's intrigued, wants to read more but would rather go off and read 1300 pages of Lord of the Rings first. She finds the illustrations rather put offing and extremely lame and comic. Personally, I wanted to read it first to facilitate discussion so I sat down to do so this afternoon but sadly (and I HATE to do this) I just couldn't finish. I managed about a third and found it to be such an untenable disaster that I had to put it down. The book attempts to be at the same time complex and brief so one ends up with criminally simplified descriptions of concepts like higher-dimensional space, genetics and cosmology that make me cringe to think what children who read it will really come away with. I applaud profusely the author's attempts to bring these concepts to young readers. This is what future scientists are made of, after all. But if you're going to do that you've got to make sure that it's ALL science. When you mingle science with psuedo-science or [insert tech here] then you end up with kids who don't know good from bad. At any rate, my eldest still wants to read it and when she does I'll update this review with her final opinion. So far though the outlook isn't brilliant.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Melissa

    I almost never don't finish books. I couldn't even remotely finish this one. I stopped somewhere in chapter 5, less than 1/4 of the way through the book. I think the best word to describe what's wrong with this book is "jarring". Almost everything about the writing kept taking me out of the story. The first chapter is allegedly the book itself addressing the reader directly. It's rude and condescending, without enough genuine wit and humor to justify the stance. The book is in present tense, and th I almost never don't finish books. I couldn't even remotely finish this one. I stopped somewhere in chapter 5, less than 1/4 of the way through the book. I think the best word to describe what's wrong with this book is "jarring". Almost everything about the writing kept taking me out of the story. The first chapter is allegedly the book itself addressing the reader directly. It's rude and condescending, without enough genuine wit and humor to justify the stance. The book is in present tense, and the author is *not* skilled enough to pull that off smoothly (if you want to see an author who *does* pull off present tense smoothly, look for The Night Circus...) The book has a bad case of tell-don't-show, and all of the descriptions of people feel like the author stopped, said "Here, have a complete description", then continued on with the story, instead of the descriptions feeling natural. The characters felt flat and interchangeable, and I wasn't able to get into any of their heads enough to give a flying flip about any of them. There are some potentially interesting concepts being played with, but I couldn't stand the writing long enough to figure out where the author was going with them. In short, the author seems to be trying a bunch of clever writing tricks, but doesn't even remotely have enough skill to pull them off, especially not all together.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Kitty Honeycutt

    Book Title: "The Saeshell Book of Time: Part 1, The Death of Innocents” Author: Rusty A. Biesele Published By: Self Published Age Recommended: 12+ Reviewed By: Kitty Bullard Raven Rating: 5 Review: Not only did this book have a fantastic and creative storyline but it also had some of the most amazing illustrations I’ve seen in a long time. The story of Saeshell Book of Time, The Death of Innocents is about a young 7th grade boy that is charged with the almost impossible task of deciding the fate of h Book Title: "The Saeshell Book of Time: Part 1, The Death of Innocents” Author: Rusty A. Biesele Published By: Self Published Age Recommended: 12+ Reviewed By: Kitty Bullard Raven Rating: 5 Review: Not only did this book have a fantastic and creative storyline but it also had some of the most amazing illustrations I’ve seen in a long time. The story of Saeshell Book of Time, The Death of Innocents is about a young 7th grade boy that is charged with the almost impossible task of deciding the fate of his mother’s unborn child. This book was a mixture of fae magic, science fiction and fantasy that was unlike anything I’ve ever read. The fact that the author allows the book to ‘speak for itself’ when you open the very first pages is amazing. I remember watching ‘The Neverending Story’ as a kid and thinking how great it would be to have a book like Bastian had, well this book made me think about that movie and took me back to a time when childhood magic was the hub of life. I would definitely recommend this book to both young and old! There’s no doubt you’ll be swept up in the story and read through it as fast as I did! Author Rusty Biesele has no doubt written a masterpiece that will stand the test of time. I can’t wait to read the next installment!

  8. 5 out of 5

    Corin

    This was a fun and interesting read - completely unlike anything else I have read! Aimed at a young & gifted audience, the characters displayed both intelligence and plenty of overexcitabilities. The first chapter or so is a little rough because there is so much to introduce, but eventually it grabbed me and by the end I was wanting to know what was going to happen in the next book. It's very difficult to write such a complex story, and I give credit to the author for his creative approach. I'd This was a fun and interesting read - completely unlike anything else I have read! Aimed at a young & gifted audience, the characters displayed both intelligence and plenty of overexcitabilities. The first chapter or so is a little rough because there is so much to introduce, but eventually it grabbed me and by the end I was wanting to know what was going to happen in the next book. It's very difficult to write such a complex story, and I give credit to the author for his creative approach. I'd recommend it for kids who enjoy a bit of SF, a bit of fantasy, a lot of technology, and characters and text that don't talk down to them. This is an especially good choice for those kids who need to be dragged away from their computer games to get them to read, instead.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Rusty Biesele

    I wrote the book so naturally I like it. However it you want to read the Kirkus Review on the book, I have posted it on my blog: http://www.childrenofsophista.com/201... If you want to read it on the Kirkus site: http://www.kirkusreviews.com/book-rev... Subscription may be required to read it here. It is a very intricate read, so it is not suitable for a night when you want to read something light. I will give one hint though. None of the dialog is random and the entire 4 part serial reads as a di I wrote the book so naturally I like it. However it you want to read the Kirkus Review on the book, I have posted it on my blog: http://www.childrenofsophista.com/201... If you want to read it on the Kirkus site: http://www.kirkusreviews.com/book-rev... Subscription may be required to read it here. It is a very intricate read, so it is not suitable for a night when you want to read something light. I will give one hint though. None of the dialog is random and the entire 4 part serial reads as a different book the second time through.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Mona

    This is an imaginative and entertaining story that will captivate young readers in its fantasy, and in its reality. "Death of Innocents" will give any child who has felt out-of-place because of their special gifts a sense of being understood and accepted. This is an imaginative and entertaining story that will captivate young readers in its fantasy, and in its reality. "Death of Innocents" will give any child who has felt out-of-place because of their special gifts a sense of being understood and accepted.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Pamela Scott

    i read this one with my little ones we enjoyed and cant wait to read the next one:}

  12. 5 out of 5

    Amanda

    My daughter read this book and absolutely loved it.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Chloe

    I am currently struggling through this book. I'm 14 years old, and I'm not quite sure if this is marketed towards me or not... I am around page 30, so perhaps things haven't really picked up yet. However, this world has really failed to pull me in. I am very confused about what is happening or why it matters, despite the explanations that are unsuccessfully incorporated into the plot. I feel like before the story can actually start, the author takes it upon himself to freeze all events and slowl I am currently struggling through this book. I'm 14 years old, and I'm not quite sure if this is marketed towards me or not... I am around page 30, so perhaps things haven't really picked up yet. However, this world has really failed to pull me in. I am very confused about what is happening or why it matters, despite the explanations that are unsuccessfully incorporated into the plot. I feel like before the story can actually start, the author takes it upon himself to freeze all events and slowly and poorly explain this new and not-so intriguing world. The relationships and characters aren't to my liking. Everyone feels a bit false. Two sets of relationships in particular are throwing me off. Stefan and his girlfriend(or whatever), Tova2, have a relationship that feels fake fake fake fake fake. I definitely get a pedophile vibe from their romantic encounters. Tova2 seems much older than Stefan and she is annoying. She frequently calls Stefan "Babe" and makes cheeky remarks. Not in a good or realistic way. The second set of relationships is between Tyco and Ty. I shall include some quotes that will say it all. "Though Tyco always attempts to display a warrior like facade, his looks betray that he cares deeply for Ty, as if Ty is a fragile younger brother." "'I'm going to kick his wimpy butt.' Tyco's belligerence hides his anxiousness to have Ty's safety under his control again." Everything is told in a dry, unappealing, and impersonal tone. Everything is spelled out to the point of pain. Okay, I'm sorry, I just have to include this terrible quote. "Tyco glares at Ty causing him to laugh loudly. Ty is somewhat embarrassed because unknown to everyone, he sometimes does jaunt to Tyco's house at night to check on Tyco's dreams. He tries to keep away the nightmares of the lizards torturing Tyco." And the illustrations are less than brag-worthy. Very creepy stuff. Again, I'm only at page 30, so things may improve, but the situation looks dire at this point in time. In several days I could only force myself to get this far. ****EDIT 5/7/13**** I give up. Didn't get much further. Sorry.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Madonna

    First of all, I received "The Saeshell Book of Time: Part I: The Death of Innocents (Children of Sophista, #1) from GoodReads for free (long name). I must say; if I had picked this book off the shelf in a store; I would have put it back after reading the first Chapter (four pages; yes, I would have read that much in the store.) However, since I hate to not give a free book a chance; I started reading. It took me awhile to get into the book since any distractions would cause me to lose what I was First of all, I received "The Saeshell Book of Time: Part I: The Death of Innocents (Children of Sophista, #1) from GoodReads for free (long name). I must say; if I had picked this book off the shelf in a store; I would have put it back after reading the first Chapter (four pages; yes, I would have read that much in the store.) However, since I hate to not give a free book a chance; I started reading. It took me awhile to get into the book since any distractions would cause me to lose what I was reading. I hate going back to see where I was going. As I got further into the book,it became easier to put together (who was talking and who was thinking) and understand what was happening to the children. I did not at all like the deaths of so many of the beings on the planets they invaded. I think the descriptions of this would be very disturbing to many people; not just younger children. I am sure some would say "that's just the way it goes". I think the blending could have happened in a different way. We all have our opinions! That said; I got into the book and enjoyed reading it. The ending was disappointing. I wanted to attend the Ceremony or at least see Stefan wake up since we all know he did...also did his parents survive? That was a little unclear. Who is pregnant and so forth? Guess that is why it is a series; but I did not like the end. It is a rather scientific book and will confuse many young readers if this is where the book is aimed. I hate that the author evidently thinks humans are less than dirt and feels that everyone should like that idea. He is human, isn't he. And why does the author think he needs to review this book; didn't he write it? Why did he post the same review on two successive days? Doesn't he remember doing it once. Do I want to read more? Lets just say I am courious where he is going; but not sure I want to spend time and money to find out.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Claire Steakley

    One of the many points/rules of writing is to keep your reader intrigued, always asking questions, for if there is no mystery, than why go any further into the book. Of course you do not want to completely disorientate your reader, for they will become discouraged. The perfect balance is often hard to find, but the mistake I most often find is I find myself bored with the questions, or repulsed by the lack of intrigue. This book does not contain that mistake. I can say I was never bored, discour One of the many points/rules of writing is to keep your reader intrigued, always asking questions, for if there is no mystery, than why go any further into the book. Of course you do not want to completely disorientate your reader, for they will become discouraged. The perfect balance is often hard to find, but the mistake I most often find is I find myself bored with the questions, or repulsed by the lack of intrigue. This book does not contain that mistake. I can say I was never bored, discouraged, or found myself wishing there was more mystery involved. All the information given was interesting and meaningful, and I always wanted more. The book is mostly filled with narratives of different characters lives. The beauty of this design is it seemingly gives you so much information, but you never feel fully satisfied. It makes you stay up late, yawning sleepily, thinking to yourself just one more chapter. I find myself comparing the questions I ask in the story to a Hydra from Greek mythology; you knock off one head, two more pop up. I also admire how much of the book is written in present tense. I find it strange how often I open up a book to find it is written in past tense. It seems to me, that present tense should make more sense, unless there is a specific reason for the past tense usage. I love the science fiction aspect that is so advanced it seems like magic. It gives the science fiction parts a lighter feel. The combination of drama and humor is balanced perfectly. Too much drama is too heavy. The humor is important to lighten the load. The characters are amiable, intriguing, and humorous at times. Though the book is mostly focused on the characters histories, there are enough characters that you always have at least two people you want to know more about. This book is written well, it is smart, and it keeps you interested. I plan to dive into and devour any more books Rusty Biesele is willing to write.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Kristina Franken

    Great book, easy to follow plot. I highly recommend this book for anyone FTC: I received a free copy of this book and was not reimbursed in any other way. Stefan, an advanced seventh-grader, shouldn’t have to decide the fate of his mother’s unborn child or prevent his adolescent anger from incinerating people. Unknowingly born a fairy, loving fantasy, magic, and art — and betrothed at birth to his mentor Tova2 — aliens force a metamorphosis and the two must travel to the distant planet, Sophista, Great book, easy to follow plot. I highly recommend this book for anyone FTC: I received a free copy of this book and was not reimbursed in any other way. Stefan, an advanced seventh-grader, shouldn’t have to decide the fate of his mother’s unborn child or prevent his adolescent anger from incinerating people. Unknowingly born a fairy, loving fantasy, magic, and art — and betrothed at birth to his mentor Tova2 — aliens force a metamorphosis and the two must travel to the distant planet, Sophista, or die. Tova2 must keep Stefan sane as he becomes the secret king of contemporary Earth — or the Saeshell Book of Time will destroy everyone. In part one, the fifth-grade son of a Mayan astronomer, Tyco, and Ty, the third-grade son of a British Prime Ministerial aid, must learn from their Tibetan-American teacher to use their powerful talents ethically. Otherwise, Tova2 will kill them. The Saeshell Book of Time is a four part serial story where each part is a full length novel. The four novels form the first story in the Children of Sophista book series. The story is a blend of Contemporary Fantasy, Science Fiction Horror, and Political Thriller. Age range: gifted 6th graders through adults.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Wendy Hinrichs

    I got this book in a library thing giveaway. I was so excited that I started right away. The first chapter is great, it literally speaks to the reader! What a fun way to start. What you get next is a great sci-fi read! the book is written in a way unlike any other book I've read so you have to pay attention to what's going on. It's not a quick ready. All the time is worth it. This is a story about different personalities interacting and 1 teen with more power and choices than he may be able to ha I got this book in a library thing giveaway. I was so excited that I started right away. The first chapter is great, it literally speaks to the reader! What a fun way to start. What you get next is a great sci-fi read! the book is written in a way unlike any other book I've read so you have to pay attention to what's going on. It's not a quick ready. All the time is worth it. This is a story about different personalities interacting and 1 teen with more power and choices than he may be able to handle. I would recommend this to anyone who want a good sci-fi read that's different, not a cookie cutter story. At the end all I could think was, "Where's the next one?!"

  18. 4 out of 5

    Lynn

    This was a totally different type of read for me, I especially liked The Book Speaks and its introduction to us humans and how a lot of us just won't be able to ever get through it or read it. Magic is more than just wonderful and what a way to create a perfect living specimen! And yet can we handle that type of living? Such wonderful concepts, ideas and then at the end..........a true dream or a true horror?? Only took me a day to read and I enjoyed it muchly and will go get the rest of the sto This was a totally different type of read for me, I especially liked The Book Speaks and its introduction to us humans and how a lot of us just won't be able to ever get through it or read it. Magic is more than just wonderful and what a way to create a perfect living specimen! And yet can we handle that type of living? Such wonderful concepts, ideas and then at the end..........a true dream or a true horror?? Only took me a day to read and I enjoyed it muchly and will go get the rest of the stories to see where it's going and what is going to be created as we continually evolve into a new species!

  19. 5 out of 5

    Patricia

    My mother was lucky enough to win a copy of this book. She liked it so much, she gave it to me to read. I like it so much, that I had to write a review. I absolutely love this book. This is not light reading, it's a very complex story. This book can easily be enjoyed by more advanced teen and adults. It was so refreshing not to read the run of the mill YA fantasy. Rusty A Biesele wrote a book that is not only new and different, but a beautiful story that you can get lost in it. This is a must rea My mother was lucky enough to win a copy of this book. She liked it so much, she gave it to me to read. I like it so much, that I had to write a review. I absolutely love this book. This is not light reading, it's a very complex story. This book can easily be enjoyed by more advanced teen and adults. It was so refreshing not to read the run of the mill YA fantasy. Rusty A Biesele wrote a book that is not only new and different, but a beautiful story that you can get lost in it. This is a must read and I recommend it.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Moon

    I think the story is very good, well thought out and very very creative... makes me want to know more about the characters. The style that it's written in sometimes makes it hard to follow (conversations within conversations within conversations)... that being said, the storyline kept me focusing back on the story because I wanted to know what happens next. :) All in all, I am happy to have won this in a Goodreads Giveaway, Rusty Biesele is a very creative man that has created a wonderful story! I think the story is very good, well thought out and very very creative... makes me want to know more about the characters. The style that it's written in sometimes makes it hard to follow (conversations within conversations within conversations)... that being said, the storyline kept me focusing back on the story because I wanted to know what happens next. :) All in all, I am happy to have won this in a Goodreads Giveaway, Rusty Biesele is a very creative man that has created a wonderful story!

  21. 4 out of 5

    Emily Boivin

    I WON THIS BOOK ON GOOD READS AND WAS AMAZED AT HOW WOUNDERFULL THE STORY AND ILLISTRATIONS ARE. THE MIX OF FANTASY AND SI FI IS WOUNDEFULLAND YOU BECOME FULLY ENTRALLED WITH THE CHARECTERS. I BELIEVE THIS IS GOING TO BE A SERIES AND I INTEND TO READ ALL OF THE FUTURE BOOKS AND ANYTHING ELSE BY THIS WOUNDERFULL WRITER. RUSTY KEEP ON WRITING.....

  22. 5 out of 5

    Margie Mcmahon

    This book is so good and amazing. It's a YA sci-fi/fantasy book, that adults can easily enjoy. If you want light easy reading, then no this book is not for you. It's a beautifully written, complicated and intricate story. I absolutely loved this book and would recommend it to anyone. This book is so good and amazing. It's a YA sci-fi/fantasy book, that adults can easily enjoy. If you want light easy reading, then no this book is not for you. It's a beautifully written, complicated and intricate story. I absolutely loved this book and would recommend it to anyone.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Richard

    In full disclosure I won this book in a Goodreads giveaway. The Saeshell Book of Time: Part 1: The Death of Innocents is a very unusual book. It is told mostly from the point of view of two young humans, Ty and Tyco, whose psychic powers are emerging and are being taught by an alien/fairy called Elof2. At first they are given a general history of the aliens, before learning about some of the important characters that have emerged in recent history, Stefan, Tova2 and Elof (Elof2’s younger self) My In full disclosure I won this book in a Goodreads giveaway. The Saeshell Book of Time: Part 1: The Death of Innocents is a very unusual book. It is told mostly from the point of view of two young humans, Ty and Tyco, whose psychic powers are emerging and are being taught by an alien/fairy called Elof2. At first they are given a general history of the aliens, before learning about some of the important characters that have emerged in recent history, Stefan, Tova2 and Elof (Elof2’s younger self) My first problem with this book was with the huge amount of world building crammed into the start; seriously the characters can't even eat breakfast without bringing more facts about their world to the reader. The first fifty pages or so are almost entirely devoted to world building, and the next fifty are split between world building and character history. This becomes boring after a while and confusing as you are given so much information all at once that you are trying to remember. Page 37 was ironic as the character reveals he "hates being a passive bystander when learning things", that was exactly how I felt. Most of the rest of the book was devoted to giving the history of characters with some world building thrown in. While this was more interesting and generally easier to follow it did have some problems. As all the action is happening in the past and we know the characters are alive and the world hasn't been destroyed, it kills any dramatic tension. Some of the early history of the supposedly good people/aliens was pretty brutal which made it hard to get behind them. The perspectives also shift rapidly throughout the book, and the distinction between thoughts and what was said wasn't always clear; this added to the need of very careful and close reading. There are many advanced topics in the book, mostly centered on the sciences, physics, chemistry and biology. The level it goes into is fairly high, especially considering this is a children’s book, but it touches on most of the subjects only briefly before moving onto the next one. Meaning you really need a good understanding of the science being talked about to be able to follow what is happening. The huge amount of world building, character history, coupled with the shifting perspectives and advanced concepts all adds up to the need of very careful and close reading. You simply can't read this book with any distractions (TV/music playing in the background, people talking to you), just before going to sleep or just read a few pages at the time, otherwise you will get very lost. As it is you will probably have to reread several paragraphs to follow what it happening. I did like the idea of how the author used different bullet points to show different types of telepathy, it made things a little easier to follow and stopped repetitive sentences. Because we are reading about characters who are watching other characters it gave me a hard time feeling attached to either group. Those who were being watched were hard to support because we don't get into their thoughts and feelings, and only see an overview of what is going on in their lives, and the watchers were hard to get behind because we don't get to see them do much other than observe. The characters where okay, but almost all the main characters were too nice all the time, making them less interesting then they could have been. Tova2 was probably the most interesting because she had a bit of a mean streak to her. I also found the characters to be overly emotional, they are usually either in deep depression, crying because of someone else’s suffering, or feeling deep happiness and love for those around them. I did enjoy seeing the characters that were British use U.K. English (using the word mum for example) and the American characters use U.S.A English (using the world mom instead) There is also no real antagonist in the story which made it harder to enjoy. I wasn't overly excited about the art, I would describe it as computer graphic design and I don't really like that in books. This was the black and white edition of the book, and from what I have seen of the colour art (on the authors page, front and back covers of the book) the colour adds a lot to it. The book ended a little earlier than I would have liked, one of the characters keeps telling the others that “all will be revealed after the ceremony” but we never get to that point in the story in this book so I found that a little disappointing. While this book is aimed at children I would say it's only suitable for older, intelligent children (15 or 16+ with a good understanding of sciences and avid science-fiction/fantasy readers) mostly due to the difficulty reading level. Adults with the same qualities will be able to enjoy this book too. Overall I did like this book and the character history was interesting, it was let down by some aspects, the huge amount of world building crammed into the start of the book; the constant viewing of the past leading to no dramatic tension and hard to support characters; the lightly touched on but highly detailed advanced science concepts; and the vanilla characters who were just all too nice. There were some nice features such as the use of bullet points and UK/USA English. As this is the authors first book I would still look out for the rest of the series as many authors get stronger in their later books and this appears it could be an interesting world, setup for great stories in the future.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Brenda

    The best I can say about this is that it's unusual. More accurately though I want to say it was just awkward. The first couple pages are the book dictating how it must be read, which was already kind of a red flag for me. If it's confusing enough that you need to have a key in the first pages, isn't that something to watch out for? There were different levels of interacting, mostly through telepathy. Also, the book makes it a point to tell you early on how stupid humans are, which I guess is onl The best I can say about this is that it's unusual. More accurately though I want to say it was just awkward. The first couple pages are the book dictating how it must be read, which was already kind of a red flag for me. If it's confusing enough that you need to have a key in the first pages, isn't that something to watch out for? There were different levels of interacting, mostly through telepathy. Also, the book makes it a point to tell you early on how stupid humans are, which I guess is only proven by how much time it took me to get used to the writing style. The artwork is highly unusual. It's not something I would have chosen for a book. It was very much like seeing a Second Life or Sims person. However, I can look past this. It's not necessary for the illustrations (or whatever they are) to be perfect to still enjoy the novel. Thing is, I still didn't enjoy it. The story starts up in a way that was confusing. I was trying to decipher who everyone was, and WHAT everyone was. Apparently there are clones, which took some getting used to seeing numbers in names. I felt like I was getting a science lesson more often than reading a children's book, and I won't lie: my eyes glazed over more than once while reading some of the lectures and such. It started to feel like how my science homework used to feel, which took the fun out of it for me. Not to mention the relationship between a 12-year-old and a 19-year-old was frickin' weird. Never got over that. But probably the biggest reason I gave it just 2 stars (although I think the other reasons are good) is pretty simple: I had to force myself to read the book. I love reading, and can read virtually almost anything. But this was just awkward. I didn't feel immersed, I didn't lose myself in the story. I didn't have a desperate need to find out what would happen next. In fact, I'd have to actively unglaze my eyeballs and force myself to focus. However, I see that I'm in the minority in this, and I'm glad. Just because it wasn't a fit for me doesn't mean others wouldn't enjoy it. (I received this in a First Reads giveaway.)

  25. 4 out of 5

    Heather

    This book was truly enchanting!!! I was enthralled from the moment I received it as a giveaway prize. The illustrations and color throughout the pages were mesmerizing. I truly cannot remember the last time the cover and illustrations alone brought me to the edge of my seat. I rarely scroll through the book pages before reading a single page, however I spent an hour just devouring the world of images before me. The story was even better than the illustrations. As a fan of this genre, I was delig This book was truly enchanting!!! I was enthralled from the moment I received it as a giveaway prize. The illustrations and color throughout the pages were mesmerizing. I truly cannot remember the last time the cover and illustrations alone brought me to the edge of my seat. I rarely scroll through the book pages before reading a single page, however I spent an hour just devouring the world of images before me. The story was even better than the illustrations. As a fan of this genre, I was delighted to discover another universe of such creative imagination, witty humor, and appealing characters. From page one, I was bespelled by the unique world I found myself immersed. I truly am excited to read more and start the next part of the series. Even more compelling on the diversity of this story was my son quickly stole my beloved book and began reading, which is something he rarely does. I am in debt to the author for creating a story any age can love and appreciate. Wonderful job!!!

  26. 5 out of 5

    Margaret Gaudio

    I received this book as a goodreads giveaway. This book was a little frustrating to get used to at first. After the first few pages I was able to fly along pretty quickly. I'd give this book 2.5 stars. Overall, I'd say the book was pretty enjoyable. The story was good, and I'd be interested to read the next book in the series. Part of why I said I'd give it 2.5 stars is that they constantly brought up things, and then said "you have to wait to learn about that, we'll tell later." It happened often I received this book as a goodreads giveaway. This book was a little frustrating to get used to at first. After the first few pages I was able to fly along pretty quickly. I'd give this book 2.5 stars. Overall, I'd say the book was pretty enjoyable. The story was good, and I'd be interested to read the next book in the series. Part of why I said I'd give it 2.5 stars is that they constantly brought up things, and then said "you have to wait to learn about that, we'll tell later." It happened often, and was annoying. Guess I'm like Tyco in that sense. I want to know now, I don't want to wait. In that sense, I feel like it could've been better written, but the story was enjoyable enough that I could forgive some of that. It was a quick read, and like I said before, given the chance, I'd read the next one in the series to see if with the back story out of the way, there would be less waiting for explanations.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Debra

    I won part 1 and part 2 of this book through GoodReads first reads giveaway. The covers are amazing as are the illustrations inside. After that it went downhill for our family. The letter to the reader was not too funny but it a good job describing what different conversations would look like in the book. The story, although highly imaginative and complex, fell flat for us initially. My son did not care for the book and I was left scratching my head at times. My son gave up but I kept reading so I won part 1 and part 2 of this book through GoodReads first reads giveaway. The covers are amazing as are the illustrations inside. After that it went downhill for our family. The letter to the reader was not too funny but it a good job describing what different conversations would look like in the book. The story, although highly imaginative and complex, fell flat for us initially. My son did not care for the book and I was left scratching my head at times. My son gave up but I kept reading so that I could give an honest review. It did take some time for me to get used to the writing and to "get into" the story. AT times it was a struggle, so much so that I will not be reading book 2. I did give both books to my nephew who is 15 and who I think would appreciate the book(s) more than my son and I did.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Rusty Biesele

    I wrote the book so naturally I like it. However it you want to read the Kirkus Review on the book, I have posted it on my blog: http://www.childrenofsophista.com/201... Indie Reader reviewed the book here: http://indiereader.com/2014/12/saeshe... If you want to read it on the Kirkus site: https://www.kirkusreviews.com/book-re... Subscription may be required to read it here. It is a very intricate read, so it is not suitable for a night when you want to read something light. I will give one hint t I wrote the book so naturally I like it. However it you want to read the Kirkus Review on the book, I have posted it on my blog: http://www.childrenofsophista.com/201... Indie Reader reviewed the book here: http://indiereader.com/2014/12/saeshe... If you want to read it on the Kirkus site: https://www.kirkusreviews.com/book-re... Subscription may be required to read it here. It is a very intricate read, so it is not suitable for a night when you want to read something light. I will give one hint though. None of the dialog is random and the entire 4 part serial reads as a different book the second time through.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Corin

    This was a fun and interesting read - completely unlike anything else I have read! Aimed at a young & gifted audience, the characters displayed both intelligence and plenty of overexcitabilities. The first chapter or so is a little rough because there is so much to introduce, but eventually it grabbed me and by the end I was wanting to know what was going to happen in the next book. It's very difficult to write such a complex story, and I give credit to the author for his creative approach. I'd This was a fun and interesting read - completely unlike anything else I have read! Aimed at a young & gifted audience, the characters displayed both intelligence and plenty of overexcitabilities. The first chapter or so is a little rough because there is so much to introduce, but eventually it grabbed me and by the end I was wanting to know what was going to happen in the next book. It's very difficult to write such a complex story, and I give credit to the author for his creative approach. I'd recommend it for kids who enjoy a bit of SF, a bit of fantasy, a lot of technology, and characters and text that don't talk down to them. This is an especially good choice for those kids who need to be dragged away from their computer games to get them to read, instead.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Jaime

    I really appreciated getting this book for free in the goodreads win but it just did nothing for me. I enter the contest because I read it had fairies in it, however the type of fairy stories I like are authors like Melissa Marr, Holly Black, & even Herrbie Brennan's Faerie Wars which fall in the category fantasy & paranormal. This book to me was completely sci-fi and I just did not really get into it. Just because I did not enjoy this book though doesn't mean you won't. We all like different th I really appreciated getting this book for free in the goodreads win but it just did nothing for me. I enter the contest because I read it had fairies in it, however the type of fairy stories I like are authors like Melissa Marr, Holly Black, & even Herrbie Brennan's Faerie Wars which fall in the category fantasy & paranormal. This book to me was completely sci-fi and I just did not really get into it. Just because I did not enjoy this book though doesn't mean you won't. We all like different things so I suggest giving it a try. In fact Im going to give this book to someone else who I think will enjoy this style of writing more. Thanks again for the win. I really do appreciate it.

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