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Help Your Kids with Computer Coding

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Take your kids from browsing to building the web with the latest in DK's award-winning Help Your Kids series: "Help Your Kids With Computer Coding." Computer programming is one of the fastest-growing industries and highest paid college degrees, and learning to code promotes a way of thinking helpful for every budding brain. Yet 9 out of 10 schools don't even offer computer Take your kids from browsing to building the web with the latest in DK's award-winning Help Your Kids series: "Help Your Kids With Computer Coding." Computer programming is one of the fastest-growing industries and highest paid college degrees, and learning to code promotes a way of thinking helpful for every budding brain. Yet 9 out of 10 schools don't even offer computer science classes to students, according to code.org. Help correct this disparity by introducing your kids to the world of computer programming early, with a fun and approachable method. This book begins by introducing the essential concepts of programming with simple instructions, and without specialized computer lingo. Fun projects throughout let kids start putting their computer skills into practice and build their own code using Scratch programming and Python, the two most popular languages. Also included are profiles on coding stars and insights in technology such as the Raspberry Pi mini computer. In typical DK fashion, colorful graphics and step-by-step instructions assist readers in starting to think like their computers.


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Take your kids from browsing to building the web with the latest in DK's award-winning Help Your Kids series: "Help Your Kids With Computer Coding." Computer programming is one of the fastest-growing industries and highest paid college degrees, and learning to code promotes a way of thinking helpful for every budding brain. Yet 9 out of 10 schools don't even offer computer Take your kids from browsing to building the web with the latest in DK's award-winning Help Your Kids series: "Help Your Kids With Computer Coding." Computer programming is one of the fastest-growing industries and highest paid college degrees, and learning to code promotes a way of thinking helpful for every budding brain. Yet 9 out of 10 schools don't even offer computer science classes to students, according to code.org. Help correct this disparity by introducing your kids to the world of computer programming early, with a fun and approachable method. This book begins by introducing the essential concepts of programming with simple instructions, and without specialized computer lingo. Fun projects throughout let kids start putting their computer skills into practice and build their own code using Scratch programming and Python, the two most popular languages. Also included are profiles on coding stars and insights in technology such as the Raspberry Pi mini computer. In typical DK fashion, colorful graphics and step-by-step instructions assist readers in starting to think like their computers.

30 review for Help Your Kids with Computer Coding

  1. 5 out of 5

    C

    Very basic, but a good intro for young kids.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Suphatra

    Great book for beginners. My son has been coding in Scratch for the past couple years, so I found the intermediate section, about beginning Python, to be really helpful for him to transition out of Scratch and into text-based programming.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Jimmy

    I would still like to make the game with python in the back of this book. Might check it out again when I have time.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Mrs C

    My husband, who is a computer programmer said, "I want to own this book." This book is an excellent tool to introduce computer programming to your kids. Age 6 and up would benefit from this lovely book. Be warned though, the book is most effective if one of the parents is an actual programmer. Regular folks would be able to use it, but to make the most out of it, it's best if a parent/tutor is familiar with computer programming. I'm excited for the kids who would take an interest on this book, h My husband, who is a computer programmer said, "I want to own this book." This book is an excellent tool to introduce computer programming to your kids. Age 6 and up would benefit from this lovely book. Be warned though, the book is most effective if one of the parents is an actual programmer. Regular folks would be able to use it, but to make the most out of it, it's best if a parent/tutor is familiar with computer programming. I'm excited for the kids who would take an interest on this book, highly recommended! This book came out in May and I already ordered this book for our library!

  5. 5 out of 5

    Jenna

    Didn't get to finish this, as a kid came into the library wanting a book very similar to this (which we didn't have in at the moment)...so he got to take this book home, instead. Didn't get to finish this, as a kid came into the library wanting a book very similar to this (which we didn't have in at the moment)...so he got to take this book home, instead.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Regina Frese

    Help Your Kids with Computer Coding As society proceeds through the 21st Century, more and more people are becoming connected. Connected not just with the Internet, but with all devices which utilize computer technology in some way to function. As a result of this connectivity there is a thrust in Education to not only use technology in the classroom, but to teach and create with computer science. In Help Your Kids with Computer Coding, (Vorderman, C., Woodcock, J., McManus, s., Steele, C., Quig Help Your Kids with Computer Coding As society proceeds through the 21st Century, more and more people are becoming connected. Connected not just with the Internet, but with all devices which utilize computer technology in some way to function. As a result of this connectivity there is a thrust in Education to not only use technology in the classroom, but to teach and create with computer science. In Help Your Kids with Computer Coding, (Vorderman, C., Woodcock, J., McManus, s., Steele, C., Quigley, C., & McCafferty, D., 2014), one is guided through the process of coding, which allows children to not just be users of technology, but creators of technology. “If we learn to code, we can make our own digital masterpieces” (Vorderman, et.al., 2014). Through the expertise of this book’s authors, we learn how to code in basic and easy to follow steps. The authors include Carol Vorderman, Jon Woodcock, Sean McManus, Craig Steele, Claire Quigley, Daniel McCafferty. Their keen desire is to promote and educate students understanding and ability in coding. Five of these individuals hold both bachelors’ degrees and Ph.Ds. Carol Vorderman has a degree in Engineering, Jon Woodcock has a degree in Physics and a Ph.D. in Computational Astrophysics, Craig Steele, Claire Quigley, and Daniel McCafferty all have degrees in Computer Science. Some of the coauthors have previously published works. Sean McManus and Jon Woodcock have authored several books on computer science. Carol Vorderman is a well-known author for children’s nonfiction literature, one of her books coauthored with Rob Young is Carol Vorderman’s Guide to the Internet. Besides Carol Vorderman’s interest in education, Craig Steele, Claire Quigley, and Daniel McCafferty contribute time to the CoderDojo movement: a global movement involving free, volunteer-led, community based programming clubs for young people (Vorderman, 2014; Wikipedia, 2016). Help Your Kids with Computer Coding introduces individuals to the basic concepts of coding, going from simple to complex forms of coding, with easily understandable language, step by step instruction, and the use of simple graphics. The book is divided into 5 sections which are color indexed. The first section briefly explains computer programing and provides a brief explanation of how to break down commands into their simplest forms in order for a computer to perform code satisfactorily. The second and third sections specifically deal with the programing languages covered in the book. The first language introduced is Scratch. Scratch is a simple system which utilizes preprogramed blocks of code that can be dragged into place to create programs. The second language is Python. Python is an actual text-based programing language which is used in the real world to make many different types of programs including those used by Google, NASA, and Pixar (Vorderman, et.al, 2014). Section 4 briefly explains other aspects of Computer Science, such as, the different parts of a computer, binary code, symbols, logic, and processors. The final section, Section 5, covers real world programing. Some of the topics include other computer languages, computer games, making apps, and bad programs: viruses, trojans and other malware. This book’s purpose is to instruct individuals in creating code, and it does so succinctly and clearly. Both sections on coding explain how to download the programing software. It clearly explains each segment of the program development and how it will affect the program. Computer terms and definitions are provided; helpful hints are expressed. Instructions are provided for saving projects online and offline. What is especially appealing is the sequential building of the programs, each step is built on the previous step. Each project also introduces harder concepts and coding functions. Scratch coding, which is the simpler of the two languages, is logically presented first. It requires little typing, and scripts are created using preprogramed blocks stacked together. Little characters called Sprites perform within the programs created. There are three guided projects: game creations. The first project provides direction for creating movement, creating a variable, and adding sound. By the end of the third project, coders have been introduced to more complicated programming, such as, Boolean expressions and nested loops. Throughout the course of the projects, the authors encourage the manipulation and experimentation of changing commands and variables. The last segment of the section encourages the coders to create their own program. For those who cannot come up with their own ideas, the authors suggest looking at code that has already been written and then altering it in some way. “Looking at other programs is a great way to learn” (Vorderman, et. al., 2014, p.82). Programs are shared at Scratch.com. The Python programming section follows a similar format as that of Scratch with a few exceptions. To begin with Python’s code is typed out, and is a professional programming language with many uses. One added element to the format includes the insertion of correlations between Python code and Scratch code making the transition from Scratch to Python easier. However, learning Python goes beyond the scope of Scratch. Some of its coding includes escaping from loops, lists, variables and functions, drawing and coloring, as well as, making windows and detecting key strokes. Besides typing code, learning Python includes finding and debugging errors. Debugging is also addressed in this section. Suggestions are made at the end of this section which include reading through the code of others, building a personal library of code, experimenting with changing the projects done from the book, and creating games from the PyGame library, which can be downloaded (Vorderman, et. al., 2014). Even though the instructions for Scratch and Python are sequential, progressive, and easy to follow, there are some areas for improvement. There should be a centralized area for explaining how to save the programs created; directions were within the reading and not easy to find. While achievements of programing were listed at the end of the first project in Scratch, which gave the beginner confidence and a sense of accomplishment, they were not consistently listed for each program. Also, written in the United Kingdom, there was also some terminology used which was not consistent with American usage; perhaps a footnote should have been inserted to address the different terminology. Overall, Helping Your Kids with Computer Coding provides an easy and understandable way to learn basic coding and would be helpful for any person, third grade reading level and above, who wishes to learn coding. Resources CoderDojo. (2016, April). Retrieved July 01, 2016, from https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/CoderDojo Vorderman, C., Woodcock, J., McManus, S., Steele, C., Quigley, C., & McCafferty, D. (2014). Help Your Kids with Computer Coding. New York, NY: DK Publishing.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Karla Winick-Ford

    well organized starting with scratch, playing with python,...well referenced a LOT of information, as many of these books tend to have for good reason illustrations are helpful I'd recommend this- when needing help while working on a computer, it's a great resource to have in hand! well organized starting with scratch, playing with python,...well referenced a LOT of information, as many of these books tend to have for good reason illustrations are helpful I'd recommend this- when needing help while working on a computer, it's a great resource to have in hand!

  8. 5 out of 5

    Becky Gabany

    This was a fantastic book for gaining a (very) basic understanding of coding and computers. I learned new terminology and felt like this would be an excellent guide for working with your kids as they get older and want to learn more about computers. I picked this book up because of my own ignorance and fascination with coding and programing and this was exactly what I was hoping for and needed.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Emily

    It was really confusing. It took me 3 1/2 hours to read 217 pages! The reason it took me 3 1/2 hours is because there were lots of little notes and grasp the basic idea I had to read it at least twice. Especially when it talked about binary code. I get that it's zeros and ones, but I don't get how it translates. Python would be fun to learn. Also this book DOES NOT teach you how to hack. It's just programming. It was a pretty good book overall. It was really confusing. It took me 3 1/2 hours to read 217 pages! The reason it took me 3 1/2 hours is because there were lots of little notes and grasp the basic idea I had to read it at least twice. Especially when it talked about binary code. I get that it's zeros and ones, but I don't get how it translates. Python would be fun to learn. Also this book DOES NOT teach you how to hack. It's just programming. It was a pretty good book overall.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Tj

    Helpful as a guide for parents wanting to introduce kids to coding. Would be tough for young kids to go through on their own. Very focused on mechanics and examples over explanation of what is being done. That works ok for Scratch since its structures are simple. It makes the Python section problematic. Feels like paint by numbers rather than learning.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Heather

    This is a great book! I borrowed it from the library and I want to own it. It is a great introduction to coding. I thought it was probably best for middle grades and parents to do together or even just someone looking for an easy introduction to coding.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Ginny Pennekamp

    Great book -- yes, I'm 37, so not a kid, but I'm also learning Python with the intent of making computer games, and... this book taught me so much that nothing else mentioned. It will be great for Finn! Great book -- yes, I'm 37, so not a kid, but I'm also learning Python with the intent of making computer games, and... this book taught me so much that nothing else mentioned. It will be great for Finn!

  13. 5 out of 5

    Anne

    This is a fantastic book! I was able to very quickly learn how to use Scratch and I am beginning to work through the section on Python. The explanations are clear and the sample projects are fun (and easy and fun to customize, at least in Scratch).

  14. 5 out of 5

    Sam

    A good collection of step through tutorials written to be accessible to kids and adults. The illustrations are good and clear.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Tracie

    Remember for coding club

  16. 5 out of 5

    Corrie

    Easy to understand and has a great layout. I used this with a small group of 4th grade students interested in learning more advanced coding and it went well! We used the Python section.

  17. 5 out of 5

    lisette rivera

  18. 5 out of 5

    Chris Kleinfelter

  19. 5 out of 5

    Daniel Scott

  20. 4 out of 5

    Dillon

  21. 4 out of 5

    Martin Kanstrup

  22. 5 out of 5

    Lin Wang

  23. 4 out of 5

    Simon Sandén

  24. 4 out of 5

    Kevin

  25. 4 out of 5

    Christy

  26. 5 out of 5

    Jovany Agathe

  27. 5 out of 5

    Pbs

  28. 4 out of 5

    Sir

  29. 5 out of 5

    Juyoon Yi

  30. 5 out of 5

    Steven Fleischman

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