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Motoqueiro Fantasma: Estrada para a Danação

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O Motoqueiro Fantasma foi enviado ao inferno! Quando o misterioso Malachi lhe oferece a possibilidade de se libertar das garras de Satã, essa oferta tem um preço. Como pagamento pela sua redenção, o Motoqueiro deve derrotar o demônio e seu fantoche, o bilionário corrupto Earl Gustav. O equilíbrio entre Céu e Inferno está se rompendo e apenas o herói, também conhecido como O Motoqueiro Fantasma foi enviado ao inferno! Quando o misterioso Malachi lhe oferece a possibilidade de se libertar das garras de Satã, essa oferta tem um preço. Como pagamento pela sua redenção, o Motoqueiro deve derrotar o demônio e seu fantoche, o bilionário corrupto Earl Gustav. O equilíbrio entre Céu e Inferno está se rompendo e apenas o herói, também conhecido como Espírito da Vingança, tem poder para reestabelecer a ordem do Universo. Este volume rúne as edições 1-6 de Ghost Rider (vol. 4).


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O Motoqueiro Fantasma foi enviado ao inferno! Quando o misterioso Malachi lhe oferece a possibilidade de se libertar das garras de Satã, essa oferta tem um preço. Como pagamento pela sua redenção, o Motoqueiro deve derrotar o demônio e seu fantoche, o bilionário corrupto Earl Gustav. O equilíbrio entre Céu e Inferno está se rompendo e apenas o herói, também conhecido como O Motoqueiro Fantasma foi enviado ao inferno! Quando o misterioso Malachi lhe oferece a possibilidade de se libertar das garras de Satã, essa oferta tem um preço. Como pagamento pela sua redenção, o Motoqueiro deve derrotar o demônio e seu fantoche, o bilionário corrupto Earl Gustav. O equilíbrio entre Céu e Inferno está se rompendo e apenas o herói, também conhecido como Espírito da Vingança, tem poder para reestabelecer a ordem do Universo. Este volume rúne as edições 1-6 de Ghost Rider (vol. 4).

30 review for Motoqueiro Fantasma: Estrada para a Danação

  1. 4 out of 5

    A.J. Anders

    One of Garth Ennis’ most disappointing outings. I usually love anything this dude writes, especially his more mainstream superhero books from the Big Two, but this one was all over the place and carried by Clayton Crain’s art. A confusing mess of a story that is only getting 3 stars because there was some pretty sweet gore for this not being a Marvel Max book, it had some pretty hilarious moments, and, as I said earlier, Clayton Crain’s art is just fucking fantastic and carries the whole thing. One of Garth Ennis’ most disappointing outings. I usually love anything this dude writes, especially his more mainstream superhero books from the Big Two, but this one was all over the place and carried by Clayton Crain’s art. A confusing mess of a story that is only getting 3 stars because there was some pretty sweet gore for this not being a Marvel Max book, it had some pretty hilarious moments, and, as I said earlier, Clayton Crain’s art is just fucking fantastic and carries the whole thing. His painted style help splash pages pop, and the slight bits of gore and violence we do get is gnarly as fuck. I’ve always liked his work, but his Ghost Rider books with Ennis are definitely some of his best outings. Johnny Blaze has been trapped in hell for two years, but is freed to be sent on a mission by the angel Malachi to stop a demon called Kazaan from bringing hell to Earth. Other than the aforementioned pretty art hilarious moments, this book doesn’t do a whole lot of anything, especially with Ghost Rider and the Marvel Universe in general, and the ending flat out sucks. Ennis doesn’t care about Johnny Blaze at all, which is fine and shouldn’t be a shock to most that knows his opinions on superheros, but I would’ve liked a little more of anything substantial here. Batman: Reptilian works so well for me because Ennis takes full advantage of Batman’s absurd mythos to craft a crazy story he enjoys in a world he usually doesn’t. While I get Ghost Rider doesn’t exactly have the mythos Batman does, anyone who has read Preacher before like I have knows there was more Ennis could have done with this character. I like when he is poking fun at how ridiculous superheroes are as much as the next guy, and I will admit he did well enough with doing that very shit to Ghost Rider at certain points in here, but it doesn’t change the fact this is one of his weakest superhero stories. It’s still funny, has cool action, and one or two solid character moments, but it just didn’t really come together in the end for me. While the story isn’t exactly a masterpiece, the art, as I said multiple times, is utterly fantastic, and there are some gorgeous splash pages and action scenes throughout. The villain, while majorly underdeveloped and cliché as hell, did give us some incredible visuals as well, and the final battle in the last two issues is pretty fun. Well, until the ending comes along after the fun action and leaves a very sour taste in your mouth, but it was a good time until then. Even though I’m a huge fan of the guy, this is a very middle-of-the-road Garth Ennis book, with his script frankly being carried by Clayton Crain’s gorgeous art. There, ironically enough, just isn’t enough meat on the bones of this Ghost Rider story.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Sam Quixote

    A couple of scheming angels free Johnny Blaze the Ghost Rider from Hell to stop a powerful demon, Kazann, from doing something evil on Earth before a couple of Heaven and Hell bounty hunters - Ruth the Archangel and Hoss the demon tracker-scout - do. It’s a race against time full of vagueness and half-baked ideas! I love Garth Ennis but this Ghost Rider book isn’t among his best efforts. The plot is too convoluted for a six-issue limited series - I know what Ghost Rider wants but it’s unclear wh A couple of scheming angels free Johnny Blaze the Ghost Rider from Hell to stop a powerful demon, Kazann, from doing something evil on Earth before a couple of Heaven and Hell bounty hunters - Ruth the Archangel and Hoss the demon tracker-scout - do. It’s a race against time full of vagueness and half-baked ideas! I love Garth Ennis but this Ghost Rider book isn’t among his best efforts. The plot is too convoluted for a six-issue limited series - I know what Ghost Rider wants but it’s unclear what the majority of characters get out of doing whatever they’re doing. Worse, once we get to the end, the revelations only further muddy the waters leaving only more questions behind. The book definitely has an overly-contrived flavour to it. As anyone who’s read Ennis before knows he does not care for superheroes much - which is understating things! So I’m surprised he chose to write Ghost Rider especially as he doesn’t seem to like the character in the least. He mocks his name, relegates him to a supporting player in his own book, and makes him look like a gullible fool, easily manipulated by others as a stooge/pawn. If you’re a fan of Ghost Rider, you probably won’t be impressed with Ennis’ portrayal! Because the story is so nebulous, I couldn’t get into it at all and ended up just noticing the Preacher references dotted throughout. There’s the questionably “good” angels/celestial angle for a start, the Texas setting, a character called Buttview (whose head is literally up his own arse!), and a preacher who blows up his church and congregation. I wonder why Ennis included all of these parallels though - was he also bored by his own story and got more out of throwing in Easter Eggs? By far the saving grace of this comic is Clayton Crain’s fabulous painted artwork which at times looks almost like 3D art, it’s so polished. He draws the single best Ghost Rider I’ve ever seen as well as stunning character designs for the angels, and the demons aren’t too shabby either. Though the mostly dark colouring does take away some of the detail, The Road to Damnation has some absolutely remarkable visuals throughout. Ennis’ Ghost Rider is choc-full of one-dimensional characters, boring exposition and a poorly constructed plot with bizarre references to his creator-owned books and a neener-neener tone towards the main character that might put me some people off. Crain’s art is outstanding but isn’t reason alone to check this one out. The road to hell is paved with mediocre comics…

  3. 5 out of 5

    Jim Ef

    6.6/10 Interesting plot with, the expected from Ennis, dark humour. The art is good for the most parts and in some panels more than just good. I would want to see more of the Ghost Rider, supposed to be his story but it doesn't feel that way. 6.6/10 Interesting plot with, the expected from Ennis, dark humour. The art is good for the most parts and in some panels more than just good. I would want to see more of the Ghost Rider, supposed to be his story but it doesn't feel that way.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Gavin

    The art...oh my. Hella great. Even my wife, who doesn't read comics, was like wow, that's amazing...and it's a flaming skull on a bike surrounded by the demons of hell. I expected a "what the hell is that?" But got a much better reaction. Garth Ennis also manages to avoid a lot of the silliness and Over the Top shit that usually derails my enjoyment of his stuff, other than the fact he tries to make this into a version of Preacher...(Buttface, evil preacher who blows up church, hillbilly killer, e The art...oh my. Hella great. Even my wife, who doesn't read comics, was like wow, that's amazing...and it's a flaming skull on a bike surrounded by the demons of hell. I expected a "what the hell is that?" But got a much better reaction. Garth Ennis also manages to avoid a lot of the silliness and Over the Top shit that usually derails my enjoyment of his stuff, other than the fact he tries to make this into a version of Preacher...(Buttface, evil preacher who blows up church, hillbilly killer, etc.) Ghost Rider can stand on his own merits, thanks Garth. Too much ego. The story is simple, an Angel needs the Rider free from Hell, to stop a formless demon. He tricks Johnny (thank God it's not Danny) into a deal to ride onto Earth and stop the Demon before Heaven or Hell's assassins can get there... Texas Preacher parallels. The demons are scary looking enough, but Ennis portrays Blaze as somewhat lacking in smarts, which I don't quite appreciate. However, in the end, it's an unlikely pairing that gives the Rider something in return for his service. 5-stars for art, begrudging 3 for writing, because there aren't enough Ghost Rider books, I forgive the Ennis ego and Preacher retreads.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Judd Karlman

    Why can't anyone write a decent Ghost Rider? Satanic stunt biker with a flaming skull...how does one fuck that up? Why can't anyone write a decent Ghost Rider? Satanic stunt biker with a flaming skull...how does one fuck that up?

  6. 4 out of 5

    47Time

    Holy crap, the graphical detail on this comic. It's a sight to see. Unless you're eating. Then just finish your meal. The angels are worse when they punish the mortals just for being able to see their true appearance. It's just too bad that Ghost Rider is such a bore. He has no memorable lines, less personality than his bike and is stupider than a rock. Hoss is a barrel of laughs, though, and is by far the most enjoyable character. Everything else is crap not worthy of Ennis's name. Ghost Rider h Holy crap, the graphical detail on this comic. It's a sight to see. Unless you're eating. Then just finish your meal. The angels are worse when they punish the mortals just for being able to see their true appearance. It's just too bad that Ghost Rider is such a bore. He has no memorable lines, less personality than his bike and is stupider than a rock. Hoss is a barrel of laughs, though, and is by far the most enjoyable character. Everything else is crap not worthy of Ennis's name. Ghost Rider has been trying to escape hell for a long time, but has been unsuccessful. The demon Kazann also wants to escape hell, because he hates playing by its rules, and relocate to Earth so he can shape it to suit him. Malachi springs Ghost Rider out of hell and sends him to capture Kazann before the tracker-scout Hoss of hell or the archangel Ruth from heaven do. (view spoiler)[Ghost Rider defeats Kazann who reveals he was Malachi's brother before he joined Lucifer. The two communicated after Lucifer's fall and were promoted. Kazann threatened to reveal this and ruin Malachi, so the latter wants to cover everything up. In the end Malachi is punished by Ruth. Ghost Rider draws the shortest straw - he was used just to 'muddy up the waters' when in reality Hoss and Ruth also worked together to get promotions. (hide spoiler)]

  7. 4 out of 5

    Martel

    The artwork deserves 5 stars, the storyline one or two, tops.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Sooraya Evans

    This is the first hardcover Marvel book I ever bought even though I'm not a huge fan of the Ghost Rider. The cover really stood out as it was my first exposure to the digital painting style of Clayton Crain. Road to Damnation is a tale of betrayal. Brutal story. Brutal art. This is the first hardcover Marvel book I ever bought even though I'm not a huge fan of the Ghost Rider. The cover really stood out as it was my first exposure to the digital painting style of Clayton Crain. Road to Damnation is a tale of betrayal. Brutal story. Brutal art.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Scott

    Good but messy story. Different direction of Ghost Rider from what I have read, much more mystical. Great artwork though.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Mitchell Juers

    I truly will never be interested in Marvel’s attempts at inserting Christian mythos into their comics. Leave that to the indie companies. I don’t want to read about Lucifer and the angel Gabriel or whoever fighting in the same world as Spider-man. Just stick with your goofy devil knock-offs like Mephisto.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Ivan Lex

    This book is definitely soooooo Garth Ennis, dark humor, irreverence, occult stuff, I understand why Marvel gave him the title but other than that I have to admit it's a bad story, if it weren't for the beautiful art by Clayton Crain, I would stopped reading this after the first issue. We all know that angels are manipulative bastards, at least it is the idea that was exploited a lot at the beginning of the century and this comic is the clear representation ... A demon is planning his ent This book is definitely soooooo Garth Ennis, dark humor, irreverence, occult stuff, I understand why Marvel gave him the title but other than that I have to admit it's a bad story, if it weren't for the beautiful art by Clayton Crain, I would stopped reading this after the first issue. We all know that angels are manipulative bastards, at least it is the idea that was exploited a lot at the beginning of the century and this comic is the clear representation ... A demon is planning his entry to the earth plane with the help of a rich and selfish man who would sell all of humanity to walk again... On the other hand, the angels want to avoid that world catastrophe without getting their hands dirty, and the best way to do it is by taking a confined to hell human-demon to fuck the devil and save the day... This is how after many years in hell, Johnny Blaze manages to make a brief getaway to earth and maybe buy his freedom... Basically that's what the comic is about, maybe it doesn't sound too bad but it just doesn't catch me...

  12. 5 out of 5

    Emma Gear

    If you like Garth Ennis's commonly used tropes then well you're going to love this. Road to Damnation follows the titular character as he's been trapped in hell for quite some time. Every day he's offered the opportunity to escape if he can drive fast enough, but every day he fails and is tortured all over again. It's an agonizing, monotonous life and he hates it but every day he attempts to escape again when he is offered believing that this time is going to be the one that does it. And then he' If you like Garth Ennis's commonly used tropes then well you're going to love this. Road to Damnation follows the titular character as he's been trapped in hell for quite some time. Every day he's offered the opportunity to escape if he can drive fast enough, but every day he fails and is tortured all over again. It's an agonizing, monotonous life and he hates it but every day he attempts to escape again when he is offered believing that this time is going to be the one that does it. And then he's visited by an angel. In hell. An offer is made to take Johnny back to Earth where he would have to kill a demon who has been recently summoned. If he does so, he'll not only be brought back to life, but he'll have the spirit of vengeance removed from him so he can lead a normal life once again. Naturally he takes this offer, and soon finds he's not the only person trying to track down and kill this demon. Another demon from hell is also on the run, as well as a different angel from heaven. I loved it, myself. Both the demon and the angel hold no regard for the lives of ordinary people whatsoever and are perfectly okay with fucking over or killing people to accomplish their own goals while Johnny now has to contend with them being on the same trail he is. The only difference between the two really is that the demon relishes in the opportunity to take a life while the angel views people as so far beneath her that she sees no problem killing them en masse in her attempt to complete her task. There's definitely some religious commentary buried in there. But of special note I'd like to point out the artist. Clayton Crain is a guy who I feel has some issues when it comes to drawing people, but for some of the gorgeous vistas on display in this series he does fantastic work. The demonic monsters as well with bodies made of black goo and fused bone are as beautiful as they are grotesque. This definitely is one I'd recommend to anyone who likes Garth Ennis's style of writing, and one I'd like a physical version of if it weren't so expensive everywhere!

  13. 5 out of 5

    Jack Bumby

    Garth Ennis hates religion. If that wasn't obvious through his work on 'Preacher', it will be after this. 'Road to Damnation' sees Ennis turn his talents to Johnny Blaze and the Ghost Rider. And he's probably perfect for the job. He has the edgy still to really pull it off - in a 'Spirit of Vengeance' type of way. I guess he might take it a bit far in some people's eyes, especially if you're not used to his humour. But the writing is far more hit than miss in my eyes, with some genuinely darkly Garth Ennis hates religion. If that wasn't obvious through his work on 'Preacher', it will be after this. 'Road to Damnation' sees Ennis turn his talents to Johnny Blaze and the Ghost Rider. And he's probably perfect for the job. He has the edgy still to really pull it off - in a 'Spirit of Vengeance' type of way. I guess he might take it a bit far in some people's eyes, especially if you're not used to his humour. But the writing is far more hit than miss in my eyes, with some genuinely darkly hilarious moments. So the writing is good, the story is cool. But he kind of wastes the main character. It's meant to be a Ghost Rider comic, but he spends the whole story being tricked and used by the other characters. It's fine that Ennis wants to say something about religion, and uses the various hellish and heavenly characters to do so, but not at the detriment to the protagonist. It'd be better if Johnny had a little more agency in the overall plot. But the art is astounding. It's the 3D kind that can look bad sometimes, but here every panel is a work of art. It's so detailed and brimming with style - the scenes of demons and hell resembling a renaissance painting and not a mainstream comic book. Overall, it could be a 'Preacher' spinoff. It covers the same themes and the angel characters could be straight from Jesse Custer's world. And it's set in Texas! It just falls a little short, perhaps if it was eight issues and spent a little more time with Johnny Blaze himself, I could recommend it a little more. As it stands, it's opened my eyes to some fantastic art and yet more Garth Ennis work. Check it out if you like his work, or of you enjoyed the insane Nic Cage 'Spirit of Vengeance'.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Tiago Castro

    I had never read Ghost Rider before, and even without knowing him that much I can say this is not a Ghost Rider story. Yes he's the main character, but he adds nothing to the story. The focus of the plot stands on the side characters, who are phenomenal, from Ruth to Hoss, the angels and the demons (The main bad guy was kinda of meh, though). The plot is not amazing, but it's good enough to make you want to know how the story evolves and it keeps you interested untill the very end. However I have I had never read Ghost Rider before, and even without knowing him that much I can say this is not a Ghost Rider story. Yes he's the main character, but he adds nothing to the story. The focus of the plot stands on the side characters, who are phenomenal, from Ruth to Hoss, the angels and the demons (The main bad guy was kinda of meh, though). The plot is not amazing, but it's good enough to make you want to know how the story evolves and it keeps you interested untill the very end. However I have a problem with many of Ennis's books, because I think he often tries to be phlosophical but sometimes can't accomplish that correctly. (Believe me, I love a good philosophical comic book: "Watchmen" and Snyder's run on "Batman") As for the artwork, it is great. I mean, when an artist can "draw" perfectly a guy whose head is a skull on fire riding a bike (also on fire) in hell while escaping hordes of demons (I know, right?) you have to give him at least some credit. Concluding, although the book is pretty good, it's not one of my favorites and I won't come back to it any time soon.

  15. 4 out of 5

    J.

    Ennis' Ghost Rider does manage to avoid some of the silliness associated with the character, but his mythology seems like pretty standard fare, so there's nothing particularly fresh there. And Crain's artwork is alternatingly awesome and inscrutable, depending on the panel. A good Ghost Rider book, but there's better stuff out there in the same vein. Ennis' Ghost Rider does manage to avoid some of the silliness associated with the character, but his mythology seems like pretty standard fare, so there's nothing particularly fresh there. And Crain's artwork is alternatingly awesome and inscrutable, depending on the panel. A good Ghost Rider book, but there's better stuff out there in the same vein.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Ty Payne

    Honestly, I love Ghost Rider. However, Road to Damnation doesn't seem to be a story about Ghost Rider and more a story with the character used to it. Johnny Blaze is not even present, which always takes away from the Rider overall. The story is lacking in my own opinion, but the art is gorgeous. Complicated sets of panels the are shadowed to perfection. Honestly, I love Ghost Rider. However, Road to Damnation doesn't seem to be a story about Ghost Rider and more a story with the character used to it. Johnny Blaze is not even present, which always takes away from the Rider overall. The story is lacking in my own opinion, but the art is gorgeous. Complicated sets of panels the are shadowed to perfection.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Derrick McDonald

    I read lots of Ghost Rider as a kid but this series is exceptional, not only in art but in story as well. Poor Ghost Rider getting owned in a comedic way and tortured by Mephisto...the devil. Everyday his hopes being crushed then revived. Ghost Rider never gives up until he achieves his revenge.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Anga Kyla

    Gave up on it after one issue. The art is absolutely amazing but I could already tell the story wasn’t going to be for me. As a Christian I didn’t like the portrayal of angels in this book, and I just generally don’t like demented representations of Christian figures and themes so I dropped it.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Daniel DeLappe

    Love Ghost Rider and Ennis. This was Meh

  20. 5 out of 5

    Caleb Abel

    Really fantastic October read. Loved the art and really fun story about angels and demons for that Halloween mood.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Paul

    Really enjoyed it... The artwork was amazing and the story was quite funny in places. I Will read more, Ghost rider great character

  22. 4 out of 5

    Saifullah Ahmed

    Art work was good.Ruth is such a fine lady.Damn I would let her crush my head

  23. 5 out of 5

    Jdetrick

    My goodness, this book is gorgeous. This is the sort of story that Garth Ennis does well, but it's Clayton Crain's beautiful art that really makes this story stand out from other Ghost Rider tales. My goodness, this book is gorgeous. This is the sort of story that Garth Ennis does well, but it's Clayton Crain's beautiful art that really makes this story stand out from other Ghost Rider tales.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Francisco Becerra

    Stunning art mixed with a lot of theological misconceptions beget this not so good story arc. A real shame: some simple research into christian beliefs and angeleology would have bring a better narrative. However, this book weights gold for the art. It is magnificent.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Erin *Proud Book Hoarder*

    Written by none other than the creator of Preacher and current writer of Punisher, Garth Ennis brings us a tale of the Ghost Rider trapped in Hell, never able to escape. Night after night he's ripped apart by ghastly demons, thinking that maybe - just maybe - this time he can reach the 'gate' in time to free his tormented soul. When offered the chance at salvation, he takes it hungrily, not seeing the traps and lies laid ahead before him. Clayton Crain gifts the story with amazing artwork, colorf Written by none other than the creator of Preacher and current writer of Punisher, Garth Ennis brings us a tale of the Ghost Rider trapped in Hell, never able to escape. Night after night he's ripped apart by ghastly demons, thinking that maybe - just maybe - this time he can reach the 'gate' in time to free his tormented soul. When offered the chance at salvation, he takes it hungrily, not seeing the traps and lies laid ahead before him. Clayton Crain gifts the story with amazing artwork, colorful images on glossy pages that make the over-eager fanboy (or fangirl, whichever the case may be) sit up and take note. There's violence galore, with detailed bloodshed and darkly injected humor. The story doesn't lag and is a different enough one, staying relatively true to the vein of the Ghost Rider legend. Rather than the way the movie depicted it, the tortured being takes no delight in his existence, trapped in this cursed state. On the downside, the dialogue could have been better. There's Ennis' trademark humor and religious jabs, but nothing overtly sensational in terms of character interaction. Also, even if it doesn't lag, the story isn't the best it could be, and more ooph wouldn't have hurt. Overall Ghost Rider is a fascinating legend that's fun to read different takes on. Here we see him as many others do, if not a little more naive than usual. I would have enjoyed seeing more of him here, especially with his take-charge, kick-ass attitude, but what I did see was enjoyable. There is plenty of pizazz in the art department, but sometimes I wondered if they put more focus on that and less on some areas for substance. Oh well, still a very good read that most Ghost Rider fans will devour eagerly.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Jon Arnold

    In which Ghost Rider is turned into a Vertigo character for six issues. Gone are the character’s brash origins, in are the demons and trademark ‘both sides are bastards to humans’ of DC’s adult line. It’s distinctly out of place with Marvel’s usual supernatural hierarchy – it doesn’t fit the universe of the pantomime villain types like Mephisto and Thanos too well. The bigger problem is that the title character is largely reduced to a bystander in his own story. He has absolutely no impact on th In which Ghost Rider is turned into a Vertigo character for six issues. Gone are the character’s brash origins, in are the demons and trademark ‘both sides are bastards to humans’ of DC’s adult line. It’s distinctly out of place with Marvel’s usual supernatural hierarchy – it doesn’t fit the universe of the pantomime villain types like Mephisto and Thanos too well. The bigger problem is that the title character is largely reduced to a bystander in his own story. He has absolutely no impact on the plot but to take a road trip with a demon. His situation at the start is the same as at the end. He plays no part in resolving the crisis in the story – it’s a change of heart from a human character that solves everything. It doesn’t open up any new understanding or fresh perspective, it simply reads as if Ellis is on Vertigo autopilot here, replete with deliberately nasty moments and pointless attempts to shock. On the other hand, I loved the artist’s style, even if it’s a tad close to Giger and sundry bad metal album covers at times. A wrong turn then, and not a particularly interesting one.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Arno Callens

    I've been wondering as of late if there's anything great about Ghost Rider beyond that he looks cool. Sadly this book didn't help. While all the Ennis-isms are in place - political and physical conflict between heaven and hell, grotesque violence and characters, foul-mouthed self-deprecating language - and the art is often astounding, the bottom line of this story is that Johnny Blaze is superfluous to it. All we learn about him is that he's a selfish prick just like every other character who wan I've been wondering as of late if there's anything great about Ghost Rider beyond that he looks cool. Sadly this book didn't help. While all the Ennis-isms are in place - political and physical conflict between heaven and hell, grotesque violence and characters, foul-mouthed self-deprecating language - and the art is often astounding, the bottom line of this story is that Johnny Blaze is superfluous to it. All we learn about him is that he's a selfish prick just like every other character who wants to get out of hell and doesn't care about anything else. This book could have used him as a voice of reason and human conscience - none of which are represented in any way amidst the endless slaughter - but instead he's a pawn in his own tale, and could have been replaced by anyone else. I enjoyed some of the twists and turns here, and characters like Hoss and Ruth steal the show, but if you come looking for an insight into Ghost Rider here, you won't find it, and might as well stare at the gorgeous images alone.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Brian Rosenberger

    Johnny Blaze burns up the pavement in this 6 issue collection. Blaze is trapped in Hell at the story's start. An angel offers him an out, only it comes with a price - Blaze has to hunt down a troublesome demon who's about to create a real Hell on Earth. Already on the hunt is Heaven's ice-hearted Archangel Ruth and Hell's fatback tracker Hoss along with his aptly named road buddy Buttview. Other characters are introduced, the body count rises, the race is on. Typical outrageous Garth Ennis actio Johnny Blaze burns up the pavement in this 6 issue collection. Blaze is trapped in Hell at the story's start. An angel offers him an out, only it comes with a price - Blaze has to hunt down a troublesome demon who's about to create a real Hell on Earth. Already on the hunt is Heaven's ice-hearted Archangel Ruth and Hell's fatback tracker Hoss along with his aptly named road buddy Buttview. Other characters are introduced, the body count rises, the race is on. Typical outrageous Garth Ennis action accompanied by the eye-popping digital art of Clayton Crain. Seriously, if there's a negative, it's the comic format is too small to capture Crain's talent. This would make a great motion comic; Crain's that good. Note: this is set outside of continuity so no Dan Ketch, no Spirits of Vengeance convoluted history. If you like Ennis and are an old school Ghost Rider fan, sit back and enjoy the ride. This one's a scorcher.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Terry Collins

    If one tosses out every scrap and fiber of the original Ghost Rider series, and sees this is something 100% new ... well, it's still kind of mediocre -- especially from Garth Ennis, who seemed to have no feel at all for the character except as a pawn to be shoved about in his larger story about heaven and hell and rogue angels and blahblahblah seen it all before. Every human we encounter is also a waste of space, so there's really no one to root for except poor Johnny Blaze, who has the deck sta If one tosses out every scrap and fiber of the original Ghost Rider series, and sees this is something 100% new ... well, it's still kind of mediocre -- especially from Garth Ennis, who seemed to have no feel at all for the character except as a pawn to be shoved about in his larger story about heaven and hell and rogue angels and blahblahblah seen it all before. Every human we encounter is also a waste of space, so there's really no one to root for except poor Johnny Blaze, who has the deck stacked against him from page one and since the reader is aware of such, the reading becomes more or less a quest to see if Ennis will allow Blaze a kinda/sorta happy ending. The answer is "nope." Striking artwork, but also hard to follow at times due to being so darn DARK and MUDDY.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Silas

    Ghost Rider is generally not my jam. I have read several stories, and the whole Heaven and Hell thing just doesn't do it for me, since it doesn't match my own world-view. This does stick to that theme, but puts Ghost Rider in between a Heaven and a Hell that are equally bad from a human perspective, and opens with Johnny Blaze stuck in Hell and trying to get out, which is an important part of this story. The art style is one that I generally didn't like in X-Force, but it works a bit better for Ghost Rider is generally not my jam. I have read several stories, and the whole Heaven and Hell thing just doesn't do it for me, since it doesn't match my own world-view. This does stick to that theme, but puts Ghost Rider in between a Heaven and a Hell that are equally bad from a human perspective, and opens with Johnny Blaze stuck in Hell and trying to get out, which is an important part of this story. The art style is one that I generally didn't like in X-Force, but it works a bit better for Ghost Rider. Some of the things that happen here are frankly ridiculous (view spoiler)[ particularly Buttview (hide spoiler)] , but if you can put some of that aside, this is a reasonably good volume of Ghost Rider, which from my perspective, does not happen very often.

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