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Here Are The Young Men

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Here are the Young Men tells the story of four young men: Cocker, Rez, Kearney and Matthew. Facing into the void that is the rest of their post-school lives, they spend their first summer of freedom in an orgy of self-destruction. Each of them in their own way struggles to keep their connection to reality – a reality they despise, but which conceals a chaos they cannot fac Here are the Young Men tells the story of four young men: Cocker, Rez, Kearney and Matthew. Facing into the void that is the rest of their post-school lives, they spend their first summer of freedom in an orgy of self-destruction. Each of them in their own way struggles to keep their connection to reality – a reality they despise, but which conceals a chaos they cannot face. That chaos is personified in Kearney, a sociopath who moves seamlessly between the ultraviolence of his Grand Theft Auto inner life and the real world. Drifting aimlessly through the city, always seeking escape from family, indulging in as much drink and drugs as their money can buy, all four are poised on the edge of a decisive moment in their lives. An accidental moment of violence is the catalyst for Kearney’s transformation from fantasist into real-world psychopath. Murder, suicide, rape and torture suddenly take a very real shape in their lives, leaving them with a single way out that carries profound moral consequences.


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Here are the Young Men tells the story of four young men: Cocker, Rez, Kearney and Matthew. Facing into the void that is the rest of their post-school lives, they spend their first summer of freedom in an orgy of self-destruction. Each of them in their own way struggles to keep their connection to reality – a reality they despise, but which conceals a chaos they cannot fac Here are the Young Men tells the story of four young men: Cocker, Rez, Kearney and Matthew. Facing into the void that is the rest of their post-school lives, they spend their first summer of freedom in an orgy of self-destruction. Each of them in their own way struggles to keep their connection to reality – a reality they despise, but which conceals a chaos they cannot face. That chaos is personified in Kearney, a sociopath who moves seamlessly between the ultraviolence of his Grand Theft Auto inner life and the real world. Drifting aimlessly through the city, always seeking escape from family, indulging in as much drink and drugs as their money can buy, all four are poised on the edge of a decisive moment in their lives. An accidental moment of violence is the catalyst for Kearney’s transformation from fantasist into real-world psychopath. Murder, suicide, rape and torture suddenly take a very real shape in their lives, leaving them with a single way out that carries profound moral consequences.

30 review for Here Are The Young Men

  1. 4 out of 5

    Lynx

    Matthew and his three friends are facing their first post graduation summer. What should be the beginning of fun and freedom instead gives way to restlessness and unease. With exams a bust and job prospects nonexistent each rely on their usual combo of booze, drugs and video games to help counter their apathy toward humanity, oblivious to the fact that it instead fuels their disconnect. With one friend suffering from severe depression and another showing signs of psychosis, Matthew spends his da Matthew and his three friends are facing their first post graduation summer. What should be the beginning of fun and freedom instead gives way to restlessness and unease. With exams a bust and job prospects nonexistent each rely on their usual combo of booze, drugs and video games to help counter their apathy toward humanity, oblivious to the fact that it instead fuels their disconnect. With one friend suffering from severe depression and another showing signs of psychosis, Matthew spends his days with a terrible sense of foreboding but how does one fight a tidal wave? Doyle creates a bleak but honest look at society in the Internet age, where sex and violence are treated as daily doses of entertainment and positive messages and role models are scarce. While I think Doyle needs to work on creating strong, more 3 dimensional female characters overall I found his debut disturbing and very powerful. Looking forward to his next one. *Thank you Bloomsbury and Netgalley for this review copy.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Chey

    DNF. Life is too short to finish books you don't like. DNF. Life is too short to finish books you don't like.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Allan

    I'd bought this debut Irish novel having been intrigued by the subject matter while reading reviews on release, despite some of said reviews having some reservations about the narrative. While I share some of the same reservations, it still is a very promising start to Doyle's publishing career. Set in the summer of 2003, the narrative follows three primary characters-Matthew, whose chapters are written in the first person, and Rez and Kearney, who we read about in the third person. Along with th I'd bought this debut Irish novel having been intrigued by the subject matter while reading reviews on release, despite some of said reviews having some reservations about the narrative. While I share some of the same reservations, it still is a very promising start to Doyle's publishing career. Set in the summer of 2003, the narrative follows three primary characters-Matthew, whose chapters are written in the first person, and Rez and Kearney, who we read about in the third person. Along with their friends Cocker and Jen, they spend much of the early summer after finishing the Leaving Cert in a drink and drug fuelled haze-your typical teen angst tale so far. Things take a turn for the worse, however, with depression and psychosis taking a hold of some of the group, and we meet an increasingly abhorrent bunch of characters as the narrative progresses to what I'd call a pretty far fetched ending. While well put together, I thought that, as Doyle got further into the novel, he was trying too hard to shock the reader-I wouldn't be surprised if he's read a lot of Brett Easton Ellis and Irvine Welsh, because these were the writers that came to mind while I was reading, subject wise anyway. Saying that, I felt that he did a good job in his portrayal of the Dublin of the time, and of finding the voice of his characters-I just didn't feel that, even with their journey further and further off the rails, the descent that they were party to would've happened. Not anywhere near my favourite Irish read, but I'll definitely be interested in checking out Doyle's next novel whenever it gets a release.

  4. 5 out of 5

    John Kelly

    Usually, when I'm writing a review of a book or a film, I try to be a bit lenient and say "well, this person wrote a book and I haven't, so they're clearly doing something better than me!" Except I can't feel this way about this book. I'd be ashamed to put my name to this thing. The story is about a bunch of one-dimensional stand-ins for various aspects of teenage lives. There's the clever, bookish one. There's the violent misanthrope. There's the boring generic one. And they all go around Dublin Usually, when I'm writing a review of a book or a film, I try to be a bit lenient and say "well, this person wrote a book and I haven't, so they're clearly doing something better than me!" Except I can't feel this way about this book. I'd be ashamed to put my name to this thing. The story is about a bunch of one-dimensional stand-ins for various aspects of teenage lives. There's the clever, bookish one. There's the violent misanthrope. There's the boring generic one. And they all go around Dublin, doing drugs and being surly. The few female characters are just as one-dimensional as the male characters - they're there to have sex with and to make the boys feel bad. The entire book is dreadfully dull and badly written. And then suddenly, it takes a last-act swing into American Psycho territory. Like the author read over his manuscript up until that point and said "fuuuuuuck, nothing actually happens in this book!" and tried to make up for it with a completely unbelievable 'shock' conclusion. This book was all over the Irish/Sunday Times a couple of weeks ago, and having now finished it, I'm feeling a definite case of the emperor's new clothes here. God-awful. Avoid.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Blair

    In Ireland circa 2003, a group of young friends have finished school and are thrust into the 'real' world. Matthew is uncertain – smart and sensitive, but prone to trouble, with little idea of what he wants to do with his life. Rez is empty, going through the motions, unsure if he's able to feel anything anymore. Kearney is a powder keg, obsessed with fantasies of violence. Unwilling to face adulthood or work, the boys spend their days drinking/smoking/taking pills, devising pranks, and (increas In Ireland circa 2003, a group of young friends have finished school and are thrust into the 'real' world. Matthew is uncertain – smart and sensitive, but prone to trouble, with little idea of what he wants to do with his life. Rez is empty, going through the motions, unsure if he's able to feel anything anymore. Kearney is a powder keg, obsessed with fantasies of violence. Unwilling to face adulthood or work, the boys spend their days drinking/smoking/taking pills, devising pranks, and (increasingly) getting into fights. I loved Rob Doyle's This is the Ritual, and I'd always intended to go back and read his debut at some point. The news that his next book, Threshold, is due to be published in January gave me the push I needed. Though Here Are the Young Men is less sophisticated than Ritual, I liked it just as much. The books share a from-the-margins approach to literature, and I was pleased to see there are even references to some of the invented writers more thoroughly appraised in Ritual. Similarly to Ben Brooks' Lolito, the book depicts the intermingling of media-reality and real-reality, showing how the boys slip numbly (but seamlessly) between the banality of their real lives and the extremes of videogames and porn. Rez views his friends and girlfriend as though they are automatons, performing actions copied from films and videos: 'the innocent gesture had been annihilated.' Kearney is obsessed with footage of the 9/11 attacks, an event he sees as the ultimate realisation of his nihilist worldview – an 'orgasm of hate'. When combined with a lack of opportunity and a world that doesn't seem to understand them, this detachment creates a deadly cocktail. Doyle is excellent at sketching the inexpressible sadness of these young men and the precarity of their situation. Matthew in particular is an effectively lifelike character. Only Kearney is somewhat one-dimensional; it's hard to dredge up any sympathy for someone so hateful, though his few flecks of guilt and doubt are captured effectively. The book dips in the middle – when Matthew is knocking about with a dealer named Scag, it all gets a bit loose and aimless – but that's a forgivable flaw. There are some really horrible scenes in Here Are the Young Men, so I can see why it's a polarising book. But I didn't feel any of these scenes were gratuitous or unnecessary. Instead I found the story astute and invigorating. I think Doyle's writing is fantastic, and this novel an important reflection of (a subsection of) our society. TinyLetter | Twitter | Instagram | Tumblr

  6. 4 out of 5

    Lynx

    Matthew and his three friends are facing their first post graduation summer. What should be the beginning of fun and freedom instead gives way to restlessness and unease. With exams a bust and job prospects nonexistent each rely on their usual combo of booze, drugs and video games to help counter their apathy toward humanity, oblivious to the fact that it instead fuels their disconnect. With one friend suffering from severe depression and another showing signs of psychosis, Matthew spends his da Matthew and his three friends are facing their first post graduation summer. What should be the beginning of fun and freedom instead gives way to restlessness and unease. With exams a bust and job prospects nonexistent each rely on their usual combo of booze, drugs and video games to help counter their apathy toward humanity, oblivious to the fact that it instead fuels their disconnect. With one friend suffering from severe depression and another showing signs of psychosis, Matthew spends his days with a terrible sense of foreboding but how does one fight a tidal wave? Doyle creates a bleak but honest look at society in the Internet age, where sex and violence are treated as daily doses of entertainment and positive messages and role models are scarce. While I think Doyle needs to work on creating strong, more 3 dimensional female characters overall I found his debut disturbing and very powerful. Looking forward to his next one. *Thank you Lilliput Press & Netgalley for this review copy.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Brenda

    heed this warning: this book is a triumph of complete fuck ups and slackers, and it gets into really dark and gritty territory. There are scenes involving date rape drugs, heavy drug usage, torture porn, and sociopathy. These characters are not your run-of-the-mill mischievous boys; there's some serious issues going on with each of them. It was a pretty gnarly read, simply put. These Irish teenagers are a very dramatic representation of a current issue with many in my generation (even though it's heed this warning: this book is a triumph of complete fuck ups and slackers, and it gets into really dark and gritty territory. There are scenes involving date rape drugs, heavy drug usage, torture porn, and sociopathy. These characters are not your run-of-the-mill mischievous boys; there's some serious issues going on with each of them. It was a pretty gnarly read, simply put. These Irish teenagers are a very dramatic representation of a current issue with many in my generation (even though it's set in 2001-ish). With no real goals and no real hardships to face, they are adrift. They have no aims, they have no ambitions. The result of this is that they are totally lost and losers. They cause trouble just to cause trouble, and spend all their days and nights getting wasted on drugs and alcohol. Which is all well and good. Had that been the extent of the story, it would have been incredibly repetitive. (Actually--it did get a bit repetitive in the middle portion, to the point I started to skim every few ages for a chapter or so.) It was just typical debauchery until one of the boys decides that he wants to kill. And this gets dark QUICK. Like, it was already pretty dark. But then it gets just plain morbid and creepy, so much so that you actively cringe and need a break from being inside these kids' heads. It's a brutal read, and it's a dark read. I think it takes a certain kind of person to enjoy this sort of book, and I am that kind of person.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Jamie

    Bought this out of curiosity after a friend had mentioned it to me in passing recently.It's without doubt one of the worst books I've read in quite some time, to the point where I'm actually angry at myself for wasting my time reading it. Flimsy, one dimensional characters and a predictable "cataclysmic twist" you can see coming pretty quickly. The depiction of teenagers here borders on the patronising,the idea it's supposedly holding up a mirror to Irish society is laughable, and a lot of the w Bought this out of curiosity after a friend had mentioned it to me in passing recently.It's without doubt one of the worst books I've read in quite some time, to the point where I'm actually angry at myself for wasting my time reading it. Flimsy, one dimensional characters and a predictable "cataclysmic twist" you can see coming pretty quickly. The depiction of teenagers here borders on the patronising,the idea it's supposedly holding up a mirror to Irish society is laughable, and a lot of the writing seems like it's trying hard to be shocking just for the sake of it - something it fails at being regardless. The writing overall I just found quite poor,and while obviously I understand the dialogue had to be written in a strong Dublin accent, some of it seems like a parody of how Dubliners talk. I'd stopped caring what happened about half way through and it was a chore to get to the end. Not one believable character in this book ("Rez" is a particularly cringeworthy take on the "depressed introverted teenager" stereotype), and I would have only been slightly older than them during the period it was set. Absolute garbage.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Uri

    AMAZING!!!

  10. 5 out of 5

    Alice

    With no plot, bad language in every sentence which begins to bore the reader, extensive drug and sex references and no character development, I give a book my first one star. I thought this book would be insightful but no... I regret buying this. However it is important to note that people do love this book and the author has achieved publishing and making money from this book but this just wasn't for me. With no plot, bad language in every sentence which begins to bore the reader, extensive drug and sex references and no character development, I give a book my first one star. I thought this book would be insightful but no... I regret buying this. However it is important to note that people do love this book and the author has achieved publishing and making money from this book but this just wasn't for me.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Sleepless Dreamer

    Signing up for courses is making me truly understand Hermione and her time-turner. Anyway, if you ever come across someone who tells you this is their favorite book, you should probably be concerned. So this book tells us about 4 Irish boys who essentially all go through an existential crisis, each one differently. Some parts were done well, the bit about kissing felt very relatable, I remember thinking that way as a teen as well. The scene where Rez talks about how we all want to know someone w Signing up for courses is making me truly understand Hermione and her time-turner. Anyway, if you ever come across someone who tells you this is their favorite book, you should probably be concerned. So this book tells us about 4 Irish boys who essentially all go through an existential crisis, each one differently. Some parts were done well, the bit about kissing felt very relatable, I remember thinking that way as a teen as well. The scene where Rez talks about how we all want to know someone who commited suicide, how we are all saying the words for what we believe we are was great, if somewhat inspired by Sarte. None of these boys care about anything. That's part of the appeal of the book. They mock everything, get drunk all the time, use lots of drugs, and mull about how nothing matters. I find that it's healthy to realize the meaningless of life every once in a while (who cares if I'm going to have to study math again, we're all going to die without leaving any kind of mark, we're all doomed!). I felt it provided some nice quotes and that during darker times, it would probably be a comfort. However, my problem with this book is the sheer amount of sexism, ableism and anti-homeless behavior. There's also some homophobia sprinkled through, because, of course there is. Treating people who are already in a disadvantaged position terribly isn't edgy. If your wild behavior includes hurting parts of society that the government already hurts more effectively, what's the point? It's pathetic. And that's the difference between this and American Psycho. In AP, the main character is attacking the power structures. Patrick Bateman is so entirely disconnected, such a pitiable character and he represents the rich businessmen. His crude violence scenes serve to show how numb everything is. This book however has 4 privileged teens who seem to have never dealt with any real issues, who are so wholly selfish that they literally can't understand that others have any emotions or thoughts. They take it out on disabled and homeless people for no reason other than a fuck ton of nastiness. And before you all start to go on about the world of literature and how it doesn't have to be accurate or pc, this is an author's work. An actual author who lives in our world and thinks that there is something edgy about women, homeless people and disabled people experiencing violence and prejudice. As if that doesn't happen literally all of the time. As if there's a woman out here who hasn't had a guy make her uncomfortable in a party, throw a temper tantrum because he felt his masculinity was hurt, been used for power plays between other men. It's boring and I'm so over this being seen as exciting. I want to see a Kearney like character who stands up for women because nothing matters, so why hold on to gender roles? A character that is so full of emptiness for life that they become a Robin Hood style person but still keep all of the drinking, drug abuse and cursing. And you know, it would be fantastic if it didnt have a happy ending, if ultimately, these characters would do these good deeds and still, life is hella meaningless and they are just in a void. When these characters act this way, they enforce this idea that part of being an edgy nihilist is being sexist, and ableist, that truly embodying these ideals means beating up homeless people. And I just can't accept that. I read most of this during my flight to London. It was a nice book to read there. Honestly, Fight Club or American Psycho are better. What I'm Taking With Me - The best way to sum up this book is that there's a scene where we meet two Norwegian girls and I was like 80% they would get raped because that's where it's all been going. - The ending is so pathetic, such a stupid way of wrapping it up that I'm going to ignore it and not even begin to analyze it. - Being in the uk again is so nice though. I miss seeing Cyrillic and like, I suddenly have the chance to see how similar it is to the states.  - Them calling other people junkies is highly hypocritical.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Kimbofo

    Rob Doyle’s Here are the Young Men should come with a warning: this is a very VERY dark novel. But it’s compelling and page-turning, and one of the most visceral books I have read in a long time. Set in the Dublin summer of 2003, it focuses on a group of teenage boys — Matthew, Rez, Cocker and Kearney — who have just finished school and are awaiting the outcome of their Leaving Cert exam results, which will determine their future lives. But these boys are Trouble. Matthew, for instance, has been b Rob Doyle’s Here are the Young Men should come with a warning: this is a very VERY dark novel. But it’s compelling and page-turning, and one of the most visceral books I have read in a long time. Set in the Dublin summer of 2003, it focuses on a group of teenage boys — Matthew, Rez, Cocker and Kearney — who have just finished school and are awaiting the outcome of their Leaving Cert exam results, which will determine their future lives. But these boys are Trouble. Matthew, for instance, has been barred from attending his graduation ceremony for “unacceptable behaviour” throughout the course of the school year, while Kearney, who has an obsession with death, has disturbing fantasies about killing people as if he is living in a violent video game. Now thrust into a post-school void, the gang of four hang out together, filling their time with drugs and booze and parties. They drift from day to day, dislocated and alienated from their communities and their parents, struggling to see any future for themselves despite the abundance of jobs and opportunities open to them. (The book is set at the height of the Celtic Tiger, when Ireland was awash with cash and affluence.) The only thing that holds the group together is their shared need to escape reality. To read the rest of my review, please visit my blog.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Tama-te-ra

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. Before the last three chapters I was almost in awe, hoping it was just going to be a mad decline of a group of youths. It ended kind of well... it had a normal sort of arcing end, I would've commended this book much more if it didn't end satisfyingly. :( The way that the final plot point was at such a pinnacle of drama felt inauthentic. Monsters should remain present every now and then. It had a similar feel to ‘Threshold’ but the moments that made me go WOW were shock value stuff in ‘Here Are th Before the last three chapters I was almost in awe, hoping it was just going to be a mad decline of a group of youths. It ended kind of well... it had a normal sort of arcing end, I would've commended this book much more if it didn't end satisfyingly. :( The way that the final plot point was at such a pinnacle of drama felt inauthentic. Monsters should remain present every now and then. It had a similar feel to ‘Threshold’ but the moments that made me go WOW were shock value stuff in ‘Here Are the Young Men’ I don’t think I wanted to read some of this stuff, mainly the porno description. :/ The sex scenes are a better version of different but not shocking. The scene with Scag and the European Girl was like: “fuckin hell.” Somebody on here said the characters were all stereotypical. I feel like Matthew has depth, the other two MCs were totally built around one big character trait, does that warrant being called stereotypes? Kearney was particularly depthful, just the side characters were thin. The females were not paid much respect in the authoring of them, why couldn't Rez be one of the boy's but as a girl, or something? Definitely a big level higher than that novel about youths ‘Manstealing for Fat Girls.’

  14. 4 out of 5

    Laura.125Pages

    Original review at www.125pages.wordpress.com *I received a copy of this book in exchange for an honest review. 2.5 Stars Matthew, Kearney, Rez and Cocker have just finished high school and are looking forward to a summer of drugs, apathy and sex. Content to do nothing other than get high they cannot handle when reality starts to intrude. Rez can’t turn off his mind and Kearney seems to be losing his. As they descend deeper and deeper they discover there may be no way out. I was very intrigued by t Original review at www.125pages.wordpress.com *I received a copy of this book in exchange for an honest review. 2.5 Stars Matthew, Kearney, Rez and Cocker have just finished high school and are looking forward to a summer of drugs, apathy and sex. Content to do nothing other than get high they cannot handle when reality starts to intrude. Rez can’t turn off his mind and Kearney seems to be losing his. As they descend deeper and deeper they discover there may be no way out. I was very intrigued by the description of this book. As a fan of Bret Easton Ellis I was hoping for a smart, sexy disturbing novel. Unfortunately this tried way too hard to be cool. Like a teenage boy encased in a cloud of body spray, less would have been better. I found the desperate want to be edgy distracting. The pacing was spot on, but the story told from so many perspectives (some first and some third) made the storytelling disjointed. This book could have been amazing, but instead kept trying to tell you how cool and special it was, which made it neither.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Susan

    How is this misogynist trope heralded as brilliant work? It's violent fantasy. The blurbs for this book would have you believe that Rob Doyle is some sort of literary genius, capturing the voices of most of today's teenage boys in a must-read masterpiece. This is not most of today's boys, and while it's almost interesting, it's really difficult to look past Doyle's graphic and gleeful and constant portrayal of rape. What would his writing be without the sickness? The characters are one-dimension How is this misogynist trope heralded as brilliant work? It's violent fantasy. The blurbs for this book would have you believe that Rob Doyle is some sort of literary genius, capturing the voices of most of today's teenage boys in a must-read masterpiece. This is not most of today's boys, and while it's almost interesting, it's really difficult to look past Doyle's graphic and gleeful and constant portrayal of rape. What would his writing be without the sickness? The characters are one-dimensional cartoons, nothing new or interesting about them, and this is not worth the time it takes to read it. How did it receive such critical acclaim??

  16. 5 out of 5

    Bessies Book Reviews :)

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. Here Are The Young Men by Rob Doyle I started this book intrigued by both the good reviews and the bad reviews. I figured I must read the book myself to form my own opinion on it, but I did have a clear overview of what occurred in the novel. The book revolves around four young men who live in Ireland. Due to this case, Rob Doyle writes very aggressive and heavy Irish accents which can disorient you as you continue reading. I did enjoy how it made the characters more realistic as the story conti Here Are The Young Men by Rob Doyle I started this book intrigued by both the good reviews and the bad reviews. I figured I must read the book myself to form my own opinion on it, but I did have a clear overview of what occurred in the novel. The book revolves around four young men who live in Ireland. Due to this case, Rob Doyle writes very aggressive and heavy Irish accents which can disorient you as you continue reading. I did enjoy how it made the characters more realistic as the story continued. The main character is a young man named Matthew, who struggles with the people he has surrounded himself with. His best friends are out of control and do not keep his or their own best interests in mind. They soon become addicted to drugs and alcohol, making bad decisions as the book continues. I praise Rob Doyle for his ability to write these characters. They each- except for Matthews trouble maker of a friend, Kearney- have a tremendous character ark and begin to grow up and regain purpose and individual strength. I personally related to one of the characters, Rez, who becomes a very relatable character when you continue reading. He is a very good example of what happens in society when it comes to masculinity and men. His friends are uncomfortable discussing mental health so Rez makes a decision that scares his friends and reminds them to be wary and kind to one another. Each boy gets a happy ending- except for Kearney, but you will be jumping with glee when you reach the end of the wonderfully written story. I highly recommend this book for a read as i found myself pulled into the great mystery of drugs and fragile masculinity which stumps men of every generation. Rob Doyle did an excellent job at writing this book and I praise him for his good work.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Romy

    This book is a master piece. I have no other words. Doyle draws you into the story of these boys and shows how lost we can feel after leaving school, the dark and twisted roads of not knowing what comes next, the pressure, the pain and the temptation. Apart from the gripping storyline Doyle describes Dublin in an amazing way. If you've ever been to Dublin and read this book after you can see yourself wandering through the streets just as he describes them. He shows the good, the bad and the ugly. This book is a master piece. I have no other words. Doyle draws you into the story of these boys and shows how lost we can feel after leaving school, the dark and twisted roads of not knowing what comes next, the pressure, the pain and the temptation. Apart from the gripping storyline Doyle describes Dublin in an amazing way. If you've ever been to Dublin and read this book after you can see yourself wandering through the streets just as he describes them. He shows the good, the bad and the ugly. This book is a raw, dark and honest representation of this generation's youth and a love letter to Dublin. This book truly changed my life. I can only recommend it

  18. 5 out of 5

    Demetzy

    Found this in a charity shop- a quick read and was actually much better than expected- starts of typically teenage stuff and got really dark and twisted in the end.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Patrick

    This is the kind of book that makes you feel groggy at work the next day after staying up to read it

  20. 4 out of 5

    Tracy Hollen

    3.5 stars

  21. 4 out of 5

    Trelawn

    First off, this is not usually my type of book at all. It is dark, graphic and unrelenting but for all that I found myself turning page after page. The story follows the exploits of Rez, Kearney and Matthew as they navigate through the limbo between finishing their Leaving Cert. and getting their results. They inhabit a netherworld between childhood and adulthood and with little or no parental input or guidance, they decide the best course of action is to get drunk and stoned at every possible o First off, this is not usually my type of book at all. It is dark, graphic and unrelenting but for all that I found myself turning page after page. The story follows the exploits of Rez, Kearney and Matthew as they navigate through the limbo between finishing their Leaving Cert. and getting their results. They inhabit a netherworld between childhood and adulthood and with little or no parental input or guidance, they decide the best course of action is to get drunk and stoned at every possible opportunity. Before you roll your eyes, let me point out these characters are not stupid or one dimensional. They are bored and seeing the world through the distorted lense of the internet, video games and porn. They have never experienced much for themselves and therefore can't decipher what is real and what is fiction. This is particularly true of Rez and Kearney. The latter has almost entirely retreated into the world of video games. He talks to a fictional character in his head and indulges in fantasies of unspeakable violence and depravity. Rez on the other hand is scared that everything he sees and feels are merely illusions and figments from films or music. Both ultimately suffer from their detachment from reality. Matthew, speaks to us in the first person and it is this character that we most sympathise with. He tries hard to follow some sort of moral compass but doesn't always succeed. He is the middle ground between two extremes. The book is peppered with other well drawn characters, most notably Jen and Scag the philosophising dealer/poet who solemnly tells Matthew to never get out of bed for less than you got into it for. The structure of this book is one of its strong points. It regularly switches PoV which keeps things fresh. You never have to dwell too long inside Kearney's head. Doyle constantly plays with the themes of reality and fiction through reference to video games, drug fuelled hallucinations, fantasies and Rez's break with reality. At points in the novel even the reader is in doubt as to what is real. You find yourself asking "did this happen, or is it another of Kearney's fantasies?".The other triumph is Doyle's effortless use of Dublin vernacular. It sets an authentic note for the narrative. Rob Doyle is clearly a talented writer but it's hard to say I enjoyed this book, although I certainly appreciate it's message.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Patricia

    As others have said.... life is too short for this novel. Giving up on it.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Joe

    If I was to compare Rob Doyle to any writer it could be Bret Easton Ellis, because of his cheap-shock tactics, gratuitous violence and depictions of privileged teenagers getting high and drunk while maintaining that they are depressed (I call the characters in Here Are the Young Men privileged because they are graduating from secondary school at the height of the Celtic Tiger, 2003, and the world is pretty much their oyster if they play their cards right). I found this debut to be disappointing. If I was to compare Rob Doyle to any writer it could be Bret Easton Ellis, because of his cheap-shock tactics, gratuitous violence and depictions of privileged teenagers getting high and drunk while maintaining that they are depressed (I call the characters in Here Are the Young Men privileged because they are graduating from secondary school at the height of the Celtic Tiger, 2003, and the world is pretty much their oyster if they play their cards right). I found this debut to be disappointing. The characters were largely one-dimensional; for example, only for Matthew being the narrator of the book I wouldn't have been able to discern him from, say, Cocker. I was very close to just skipping Rez's parts near the end because he was such an irritating, clichéd character whose existentialist ponderings proved a bit much, if I'm to be honest. The teenagers stand around complaining about how 'shite' Ireland is, are drunk or stoned 24/7 and ponder on the meaning of their existence... And that's it, really. Apart from the homicidal, Patrick Bateman-esque antics of Kearney, there's not a whole lot going on here. I really wanted to enjoy this, and while there are some positives (I have to admit that I did enjoy the psychotic Kearney) this is largely a mediocre novel. The writing could be better (a good few unnecessary adverbs are thrown in at the end of dialogue - usually the mark of a tentative writer) and a lot of the violence was a bit laughable in how blatantly gratuitous it was, as well as the language and misogynistic and racial tendencies from Kearney. Blatant shock value that just had the opposite effect. The dialogue was well crafted, but the actions and attitudes of the characters was not. They just didn't come across as being very realistic to me. Got the impression that Doyle was just using the characters to vent some of his own existentialist views, because after all, the man does have an honours degree in Philosophy. That was one main problem for me; something that should never happen - I could feel the presence of the author everywhere.

  24. 5 out of 5

    J.S. Dunn

    A fast read, for which one can be grateful. Also kudos to the author for shining a bright light on what results from disinterested parenting, an outmoded education model, and a moral vacuum left where the strong [ dire?] influence of the Church formerly guided behavior and personal choices. It's so uncool to say anything in support of the Church these days, am sure this review will generate some hate mail. The irony is that I don't regularly practice any religion so your aim when insulting me wi A fast read, for which one can be grateful. Also kudos to the author for shining a bright light on what results from disinterested parenting, an outmoded education model, and a moral vacuum left where the strong [ dire?] influence of the Church formerly guided behavior and personal choices. It's so uncool to say anything in support of the Church these days, am sure this review will generate some hate mail. The irony is that I don't regularly practice any religion so your aim when insulting me will have to be broad. The young men depicted are simply lost, and for a few hours the reader is lost with them. The feral, useless young bastards in this story can barely read and write. They can be found all over Ireland in city, town, and village. They are too lazy to have a job or play rugby or GAA sports, but they line the streets at night around the pubs to hiss at passersby and put one in fear of some pending random evil. Turning out young men like this is a waste of a national resource, and further, cannot be blamed on the Sassenach... The reader is able to return to reality, whatever the hell that is, but the young men are forever stuck in that story.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Cameron

    While an entertaining read, with a brilliant ending, this post-modern Clockwork Orange was often too tastelessly repulsive to maintain interest. It contained some solid philosophical insight as conveyed through the lives of its three protagonists, Irish school-leavers, and its striking and distinctive portrayals of its (male) cast of wayward youth almost made it a good book. Unfortunately, the book goes too far too often, bogging down the pace midway so the author can overwrite on the horrible s While an entertaining read, with a brilliant ending, this post-modern Clockwork Orange was often too tastelessly repulsive to maintain interest. It contained some solid philosophical insight as conveyed through the lives of its three protagonists, Irish school-leavers, and its striking and distinctive portrayals of its (male) cast of wayward youth almost made it a good book. Unfortunately, the book goes too far too often, bogging down the pace midway so the author can overwrite on the horrible state of the world, and the female characters are uniformly identical. The book's woman problem isn't limited only to the fact that I couldn't discern the difference between any of the boy's love interests and female friends, down to their voices being pretty much identical, but also tasteless depictions of rape and murder, both depicted one-dimensionally and clearly for the use of cheap shock value. I did like that it swerved upwards in terms of idealism and cynicism towards the end, however, rising above the hipsterish stodginess of most of the other 'male lit' that deals with nihilism in the modern age.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Kit

    This book read somewhere between Irvine Welsh and Brett Eastin Ellis only utterly disappointing. A slow start, though some parts of the novel were very gripping, and about 100 pages in I found myself wanting to know what happened. This wasn't due much to the plot, and the racial and racist (and homophobic and misogynistic and violent) chapters from Kearney's point of view were off-putting... And not in a good way. It wasn't a thoroughly detestable read, and the author's descriptions of drug use This book read somewhere between Irvine Welsh and Brett Eastin Ellis only utterly disappointing. A slow start, though some parts of the novel were very gripping, and about 100 pages in I found myself wanting to know what happened. This wasn't due much to the plot, and the racial and racist (and homophobic and misogynistic and violent) chapters from Kearney's point of view were off-putting... And not in a good way. It wasn't a thoroughly detestable read, and the author's descriptions of drug use were on point. There are some beautiful segments of prose about it, and depression, and dissociation. But on the whole, the book felt like it valued shock value more than character development, and everything the novel did has been done a thousand times before. Still, I'm hoping the author puts out more work. The text itself was well-written, and I fully believe he could write something with more well-developed characters. There are real hints at his talents, which only made the conclusion of the story all the more disappointing.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Barry Pierce

    Here Are The Young Men by Rob Doyle is a vile novel. A work of such vivid bleakness that I struggle to even form words through my seething hatred. We follow a group of detestable young men around Dublin as they take more drugs than Hunter S. Thompson at a Grammys after-party. I’m not sure whether the author actually wanted us to sympathise with these delinquents but when he decided to have one character actually smile when 9/11 happens I officially went into auto-pilot with this novel. The fault Here Are The Young Men by Rob Doyle is a vile novel. A work of such vivid bleakness that I struggle to even form words through my seething hatred. We follow a group of detestable young men around Dublin as they take more drugs than Hunter S. Thompson at a Grammys after-party. I’m not sure whether the author actually wanted us to sympathise with these delinquents but when he decided to have one character actually smile when 9/11 happens I officially went into auto-pilot with this novel. The faults of this novel are purely in the characters and the non-existent plot. The writing is actually quite good, you can tell that Doyle is an accomplished writer but his narratives need work. This novel is an unfortunate blot on the Irish literary scene, it tries to be Trainspotting but ends up being Naval Gazing.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Alexandra Pearson

    I think this book is going to be like marmite - you'll either love it or you'll hate it. I loved it. Yes, it's dark and violent and crude, but it's so well written I could barely put it down, even in its most intense moments. To sum it up in a few words, it's American Psycho meets Trainspotting, but with teenagers in Dublin. It's a fantastic debut. I can't wait to see what Doyle does next, and I hope this book reaches the audience it deserves. I think this book is going to be like marmite - you'll either love it or you'll hate it. I loved it. Yes, it's dark and violent and crude, but it's so well written I could barely put it down, even in its most intense moments. To sum it up in a few words, it's American Psycho meets Trainspotting, but with teenagers in Dublin. It's a fantastic debut. I can't wait to see what Doyle does next, and I hope this book reaches the audience it deserves.

  29. 4 out of 5

    hannagbaker

    What, from the bottom of my heart, the hell

  30. 4 out of 5

    kanira

    i have a love and hate relationship with this book. girl bye i hate 99% of it. it's a fucking dark book. very unlikable characters, fuck ups situation, and the writing is just— no. there's alot of chapter that are sooo unnecessary especially with kearney's pov omg my brain can't handle that. i think i never hated a book this much. HOWEVER. i can't stop thinking about it. one thing i hate about reading is not finishing a book. with forcing myself to finished this, i feel attached with the charact i have a love and hate relationship with this book. girl bye i hate 99% of it. it's a fucking dark book. very unlikable characters, fuck ups situation, and the writing is just— no. there's alot of chapter that are sooo unnecessary especially with kearney's pov omg my brain can't handle that. i think i never hated a book this much. HOWEVER. i can't stop thinking about it. one thing i hate about reading is not finishing a book. with forcing myself to finished this, i feel attached with the character. i want to forget about them and move on, but they just stuck in my head all the time. overall i think this book is not worth to buy. but it's definitely a read that are wild out of your comfort zone. it is so wicked and disturbing, yet you're curious about what happens next. i think alot of people stop reading because of the writing. and i was gonna stop reading but i just can't stop and— like i said earlier that i hate not finishing a book. and omg the plot twist at the end blow my fucking goddamn mind. i put down my book and literally have to process what just happens. and i'm not okay. it's extremely different from what i usually read. and it's breaking my heart with the fact that there's people out there that's like this. i guess Rob Doyle really putting it a different perspective on teenagers. and i think i can respect that. i really really hate this book but i just can't forget about it. i'm not even gonna try to rate this.

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