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The Battle of Versailles: The Night American Fashion Stumbled into the Spotlight and Made History

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A Washington Post Notable Book of 2015 "It was a big deal when American fashion went to Versailles. Who better than Robin Givhan to tell this captivating story?" - Diane von Furstenberg On November 28, 1973, the world's social elite gathered at the Palace of Versailles for an international fashion show. By the time the curtain came down on the evening's spectacle, history ha A Washington Post Notable Book of 2015 "It was a big deal when American fashion went to Versailles. Who better than Robin Givhan to tell this captivating story?" - Diane von Furstenberg On November 28, 1973, the world's social elite gathered at the Palace of Versailles for an international fashion show. By the time the curtain came down on the evening's spectacle, history had been made and the industry had been forever transformed. This is that story. Conceived as a fund-raiser for the restoration of King Louis XIV's palace, in the late fall of 1973, five top American designers faced off against five top French designers in an over-the-top runway extravaganza. An audience filled with celebrities and international jet-setters, including Princess Grace of Monaco, the Duchess of Windsor, Paloma Picasso, and Andy Warhol, were treated to an opulent performance featuring Liza Minnelli, Josephine Baker, and Rudolph Nureyev. What they saw would forever alter the history of fashion. The Americans at the Battle of Versailles- Oscar de la Renta, Bill Blass, Anne Klein, Halston, and Stephen Burrows - showed their work against the five French designers considered the best in the world - Yves Saint Laurent, Hubert de Givenchy, Pierre Cardin, Emanuel Ungaro, and Marc Bohan of Christian Dior. Plagued by in-fighting, outsized egos, shoestring budgets, and innumerable technical difficulties, the American contingent had little chance of meeting the European's exquisite and refined standards. But against all odds, the American energy and the domination by the fearless models (ten of whom, in a groundbreaking move, were African American) sent the audience reeling. By the end of the evening, the Americans had officially taken their place on the world's stage, prompting a major shift in the way race, gender, sexuality, and economics would be treated in fashion for decades to come. As the curtain came down on The Battle of Versailles, American fashion was born; no longer would the world look to Europe to determine the stylistic trends of the day, from here forward, American sensibility and taste would command the world's attention. Pulitzer-Prize winning fashion journalist Robin Givhan offers a lively and meticulously well-researched account of this unique event. The Battle of Versailles is a sharp, engaging cultural history; this intimate examination of a single moment shows us how the world of fashion as we know it came to be.


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A Washington Post Notable Book of 2015 "It was a big deal when American fashion went to Versailles. Who better than Robin Givhan to tell this captivating story?" - Diane von Furstenberg On November 28, 1973, the world's social elite gathered at the Palace of Versailles for an international fashion show. By the time the curtain came down on the evening's spectacle, history ha A Washington Post Notable Book of 2015 "It was a big deal when American fashion went to Versailles. Who better than Robin Givhan to tell this captivating story?" - Diane von Furstenberg On November 28, 1973, the world's social elite gathered at the Palace of Versailles for an international fashion show. By the time the curtain came down on the evening's spectacle, history had been made and the industry had been forever transformed. This is that story. Conceived as a fund-raiser for the restoration of King Louis XIV's palace, in the late fall of 1973, five top American designers faced off against five top French designers in an over-the-top runway extravaganza. An audience filled with celebrities and international jet-setters, including Princess Grace of Monaco, the Duchess of Windsor, Paloma Picasso, and Andy Warhol, were treated to an opulent performance featuring Liza Minnelli, Josephine Baker, and Rudolph Nureyev. What they saw would forever alter the history of fashion. The Americans at the Battle of Versailles- Oscar de la Renta, Bill Blass, Anne Klein, Halston, and Stephen Burrows - showed their work against the five French designers considered the best in the world - Yves Saint Laurent, Hubert de Givenchy, Pierre Cardin, Emanuel Ungaro, and Marc Bohan of Christian Dior. Plagued by in-fighting, outsized egos, shoestring budgets, and innumerable technical difficulties, the American contingent had little chance of meeting the European's exquisite and refined standards. But against all odds, the American energy and the domination by the fearless models (ten of whom, in a groundbreaking move, were African American) sent the audience reeling. By the end of the evening, the Americans had officially taken their place on the world's stage, prompting a major shift in the way race, gender, sexuality, and economics would be treated in fashion for decades to come. As the curtain came down on The Battle of Versailles, American fashion was born; no longer would the world look to Europe to determine the stylistic trends of the day, from here forward, American sensibility and taste would command the world's attention. Pulitzer-Prize winning fashion journalist Robin Givhan offers a lively and meticulously well-researched account of this unique event. The Battle of Versailles is a sharp, engaging cultural history; this intimate examination of a single moment shows us how the world of fashion as we know it came to be.

30 review for The Battle of Versailles: The Night American Fashion Stumbled into the Spotlight and Made History

  1. 4 out of 5

    Madeline

    In the autumn of 1973, a fundraiser to refurbish the dilapidated palace of Versailles was conceived. The organizers arranged a fashion show, where ten designers - five French, five American - would be invited to showcase their collections. The show was originally intended to be a neutral showcase, but as soon as the press became aware of the American designers that were invited, the event was blown into an all-out competition between the two factions - and what was originally billed as the Grand In the autumn of 1973, a fundraiser to refurbish the dilapidated palace of Versailles was conceived. The organizers arranged a fashion show, where ten designers - five French, five American - would be invited to showcase their collections. The show was originally intended to be a neutral showcase, but as soon as the press became aware of the American designers that were invited, the event was blown into an all-out competition between the two factions - and what was originally billed as the Grand Divertissement a Versailles became the Battle of Versailles. Givhan gives us a quick primer on the history of couture, and then throws us right into the intense planning and strategizing that went into this event. Nothing was simple, from the question of who should be invited, to the set list, to the hotel arrangements for the models. In addition to the logistical headaches that come with any large-scale event, this was also the fashion event of the year, and dealing with the oversized personalities and egos of everyone involved was a task in itself. Unfortunately, Givhan's book isn't nearly as exhaustive as I wanted it to be. She'll mention offhandedly that part of the arrangements for the show involved weeks of negotiating and cajoling the various designers, but then breezes right past that statement. The show itself, from beginning to end, takes up just one chapter. One of the best history books I've ever read ( Vienna, 1814) is great because the author goes in-depth into all the petty personal squabbles that were going on between these huge historical figures, and how that inter-personal drama changed history forever. That was what I wanted The Battle of Versailles to be - I wanted to hear all about the massive egos, the fights, the negotiations, who was sleeping with who, etc. I wanted Givhan to give us the dirt, but she mostly skims over that, maybe out of a fear that her audience wouldn't care. But I assure you, I care very much. It takes us almost to the very end of the book – practically the epilogue – before Givhan finally gets down to the thesis of The Battle of Versailles: that the success of the show can be attributed, not to the designers, but to the black women who modeled in the American designers' show. The ten women who walked the runway at Versailles revolutionized the way fashion shows were staged and performed, and this should have opened up a new world of diversity within haute couture. Instead, they were left behind, and nonwhite models to this day struggle to earn their place in the high fashion world. You can see another book peeking out from behind the pages of this one - an exhaustive history of black influence on high fashion and how that influence has been minimized and uncredited for decades, where the Battle of Versailles is merely a chapter or two of a much larger work. The Battle of Versailles is a perfectly serviceable introduction to high fashion in the 1970s, but ultimately it can't decide which story it wants to tell.

  2. 5 out of 5

    A

    Givhan is a beautiful writer, so the actual act of reading was relatively painless. Unfortunately, it wasn't clear who she wrote this book for -- a total fashion addict or a more general reader with an interest in cultural history -- and I think both camps would come away from this feeling unsatisfied. Fashionistas will find little they didn't already know -- true to her position as a journalist in Washington, D.C., Givhan is ever politic in her judgements of and gossip about even the most awful Givhan is a beautiful writer, so the actual act of reading was relatively painless. Unfortunately, it wasn't clear who she wrote this book for -- a total fashion addict or a more general reader with an interest in cultural history -- and I think both camps would come away from this feeling unsatisfied. Fashionistas will find little they didn't already know -- true to her position as a journalist in Washington, D.C., Givhan is ever politic in her judgements of and gossip about even the most awful, narcissistic boors -- and the lack of photos (especially color ones) is a huge miss for those interested in the visual spectacle of it all. (A documentary about Versailles '73 came out last year which I think might be of more interest to the budding Halstons among us.) Similarly, someone interested in the racial/sexual cultural upheavals of the 70s will not find a very strong through-line to sustain their interest here, as much of the book is focused on what effectively amounts to reciting the LinkedIn profiles of several of the designers. Yes, In the last few chapters, Givhan tries to extend the book's scope to take on a larger conversation about the past, present, and future of people of color in fashion, but it felt a bit tacked on and unconvincing as a fully fleshed out argument -- the "Black is Beautiful" moment deserves its own book, for sure, and Givhan deserves a more expansive place to expand on her thoughts.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Carla Remy

    The "Battle" was a fashion show in France in 1973, where five French designers showed, then five American designers. It wasn't truly a competition, but the Americans, with their movement and their energetic Black models, definitely won it. The French assumed they would be victorious, so it was really a case of the old world versus the new world. The old world didn't die, but it had to change. Givhan writes amazingly about the shifts which were to come in fashion and culture. The "Battle" was a fashion show in France in 1973, where five French designers showed, then five American designers. It wasn't truly a competition, but the Americans, with their movement and their energetic Black models, definitely won it. The French assumed they would be victorious, so it was really a case of the old world versus the new world. The old world didn't die, but it had to change. Givhan writes amazingly about the shifts which were to come in fashion and culture.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Cynthia

    “The Battle of Versailles” is an entertaining snap shot of at time, 1973, when American fashion designers and their models stepped into the limelight. It was a show that featured five designers some of who were new and practically unknown and some who were quickly approaching iconic stature. These five Americans were pitted against five high profile French designers. France never saw these Americans coming since they’d dominated the fashion world for quite awhile. The French were still entrenche “The Battle of Versailles” is an entertaining snap shot of at time, 1973, when American fashion designers and their models stepped into the limelight. It was a show that featured five designers some of who were new and practically unknown and some who were quickly approaching iconic stature. These five Americans were pitted against five high profile French designers. France never saw these Americans coming since they’d dominated the fashion world for quite awhile. The French were still entrenched in Haute Couture, the Americans were moving toward dressing the masses for their new lifestyles in affordable off the rack clothes. This charity show was not formally called a competition but it evolved into one. Givhan’s writing is clear and engaging and she supplies lots of facts in short amount of time. I especially enjoyed how she highlighted the models as well as the designers. This was a time when race relations were evolving so it was surprising that almost a third of the models who went to France were African-American. It was the era of the disco and everyone was on the move but at the Versailles show the Americans played contemporary music and the models move to the beat. This was juxtaposed against the sedate movements that the French models traditionally were accustomed to. There is a section towards the last part of the book where Givhan goes into details of post show events were things get slow but she picks it up again in the last 30 pages. I kept wishing there were more pictures included but net searches quickly brought up the images I was interested in. Thank you to the publisher for providing an ARC.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Hank Stuever

    I don't think there's a single fact or detail about this important night in fashion history that my intrepid friend and colleague Robin Givhan has not chased down here. This is a great book for anyone who believes in the strange power that comes from singular events and the legends/stories that flow from that event. Men write books all the time about this phenomena, usually about a sports event in the past. So think of this book like that -- a historical excavation of a competition like no other I don't think there's a single fact or detail about this important night in fashion history that my intrepid friend and colleague Robin Givhan has not chased down here. This is a great book for anyone who believes in the strange power that comes from singular events and the legends/stories that flow from that event. Men write books all the time about this phenomena, usually about a sports event in the past. So think of this book like that -- a historical excavation of a competition like no other, that set the tone for fashion (i.e., what we looked like, what we came to define as beauty, etc.) for many years to come, told in absolutely solid context of the history and industry that preceded it.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Anna

    "The tale unfolds in France, but the story is wholly American: a culmination of social shifts, racial conflicts, politics, ambition, idealism, and magic." Robin Givhan, The Battle of Versailles "The tale unfolds in France, but the story is wholly American: a culmination of social shifts, racial conflicts, politics, ambition, idealism, and magic." Robin Givhan, The Battle of Versailles

  7. 4 out of 5

    Martha

    This book was so well paced and the ending is absolutely marvelous.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Jill Meyer

    Robin Givhan, the fashion reporter for the Washington Post, writes an interesting book, "The Battle of Versailles: The Night American Fashion Stumbled into the Spotlight and Made History". It's the story of a sort "Battle of the Bands", but this was a "Battle of the Designers"; French vs American. The French went into the November 1973 evening as the winners, but as the long evening ended, the Americans emerged victorious. The competition, set up by American fashion publicist Eleanor Lambert with Robin Givhan, the fashion reporter for the Washington Post, writes an interesting book, "The Battle of Versailles: The Night American Fashion Stumbled into the Spotlight and Made History". It's the story of a sort "Battle of the Bands", but this was a "Battle of the Designers"; French vs American. The French went into the November 1973 evening as the winners, but as the long evening ended, the Americans emerged victorious. The competition, set up by American fashion publicist Eleanor Lambert with the assistance of French aristocrat Marie-Helene de Rothschild, was held in the Theatre Gabriel in the Chateau de Versailles. It was ostensibly a benefit for charity; the evening would be dinner and a fashion show. But what a fashion show; five designated French designers vs five designated American designers. Both would present a show to the 800 or so guests, combining fashion with a bit of showmanship. The guests would declare a winner. The early 1970's, when the competition occurred was a changing time in the fashion world. Many of the old-world designers like Chanel and Dior had died - Dior in 1957 and Chanel in 1971 - and the lives of many of the wealthy women who had been devoted customers of haute couture had changed; no longer were they changing their clothes three and four times a day. Life was simplified and ready-to-wear was coming into it's own. The American designers were moving into these designs perhaps a bit more rapidly than their French counterparts. Now was the time to see who had the vision of the future. While most of Givhan's book is about the ten fashion designers chosen to compete, she gives a lot of space to the models, particularly those used by the American designers. Robin Givhan, who is African-American, writes of the 10 African-American models brought to Paris. Some were established models - or as much as black models could be in those days - and others were breaking into the business. (This was the days before "super-models"; these models didn't MIND "waking up for less than $10,000 a day") But all were gorgeous (I had to look them up on Wiki because the readers copy of the book I was reading didn't include pictures other than a few on the inside front and back covers. The published copies of the book will have 16 pages of pictures.) And all knew how to move and to show the designs off with a flair perhaps lacking in their French counterparts. Was the American success at the show less the great clothes by the American designers and more the great moves that showed them off? Was the "showmanship" the designs...or the models? Givhan's book is an interesting read to all us "fashionistas" out there. Will the book appeal to those not interested in fashion and society. No, probably not as much. But I enjoyed it. And if you're reading this review, you probably will, too. Comment Comment | Permalink

  9. 4 out of 5

    Hannah

    i found the thesis of this book very compelling and interesting; it illuminated a lot of things that i, as a modern person, take for granted about the current landscape of fashion. the writing is very enjoyable and easy to understand, and the personalities of the clothes, models, and above all the designers whips up to a frenzy by the actual show. ultimately, the climax felt rushed - but maybe that was the point. it was just one night in itself, book-ended by years and years on either side. its i found the thesis of this book very compelling and interesting; it illuminated a lot of things that i, as a modern person, take for granted about the current landscape of fashion. the writing is very enjoyable and easy to understand, and the personalities of the clothes, models, and above all the designers whips up to a frenzy by the actual show. ultimately, the climax felt rushed - but maybe that was the point. it was just one night in itself, book-ended by years and years on either side. its significance is so contextual, you know? the other issue i had was how repetitive it seemed to be, but in the absence of visuals of a HIGHLY visual industry, it did help to revisit things already touched on to put the picture back in your head, or lend some clarity. for anyone interested in a fun, vibrant read about a crucial moment in fashion, this was a delight :)

  10. 4 out of 5

    Joey

    I liked the book. I loved the story. But what I think the lack of photos was detrimental to the book. This was about a spectacle of fashion in the 70s. There should have been dozens more photos. I also thought the book lacked cohesiveness. I loved the inclusion of the African-American element but Givhan did not adequately weave that into the Versailles narrative. It’s almost as if she realized she was writing a book on African-American fashion stars half way into writing a book about the Versail I liked the book. I loved the story. But what I think the lack of photos was detrimental to the book. This was about a spectacle of fashion in the 70s. There should have been dozens more photos. I also thought the book lacked cohesiveness. I loved the inclusion of the African-American element but Givhan did not adequately weave that into the Versailles narrative. It’s almost as if she realized she was writing a book on African-American fashion stars half way into writing a book about the Versailles spectacle.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Enid

    This book was both boring and snarky- an interesting combination. The author obviously favored some designers over others- I do not appreciate personal opinions coming through in this type of non-fiction. I gave up about halfway through- there are too many other books out there I want to read to make myself keep plodding through this. And I would not have made it that far if it hadn't been for a book club. Well, the description of the book sure sounded interesting :-) This book was both boring and snarky- an interesting combination. The author obviously favored some designers over others- I do not appreciate personal opinions coming through in this type of non-fiction. I gave up about halfway through- there are too many other books out there I want to read to make myself keep plodding through this. And I would not have made it that far if it hadn't been for a book club. Well, the description of the book sure sounded interesting :-)

  12. 5 out of 5

    Juanita

    I’ve long been a fan of Robin Givhan’s writing — particularly her fashion writing. In this book, she tells not only the story of the greatest fashion even of the 20th Century but also tells the history of fashion in the last 60 years.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Gretchen

    Thoroughly enjoyed the historical fashion competition between the Americans and the French. Impressed that the fashion industry was instrumental in the preservation and renovation of such an historic building. Having been at Versailles on numerous occasions, I easily visualized the worthwhile efforts made to the palace and theater. I was fortunate that my sister shared her copy of The Battle of Versailles with me.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Cathy

    Meh. I hoped it would be a dishy, trash-talking backstory of the fashion biz in Paris - sort of a Kitchen Confidential of Haute Couture. Instead it was a rather bland affirmation of American design. Fashion, how we present ourselves to the world, can be fascinating.

  15. 5 out of 5

    thefourthvine

    I know nothing about fashion. My level of familiarity with the subject matter of this book was “I’ve heard of ... almost all the designers featured at the actual Versailles show? But hang on let me google a couple of them real quick.” I still really enjoyed this. It’s not just about the show itself, or even mostly about the show itself; it’s about what the fashion world, especially the couture world, was like before this watershed period, and during, and after. And it is very much about race and I know nothing about fashion. My level of familiarity with the subject matter of this book was “I’ve heard of ... almost all the designers featured at the actual Versailles show? But hang on let me google a couple of them real quick.” I still really enjoyed this. It’s not just about the show itself, or even mostly about the show itself; it’s about what the fashion world, especially the couture world, was like before this watershed period, and during, and after. And it is very much about race and fashion, race and couture, race and modeling. It took a while for the book to pick up for me, mostly because Givhan spends some time setting a stage for an audience she presumes to be at least slightly into fashion, and I am definitely not that audience. But after I keyed into it, I was fascinated. It was still the slowest read ever for me, though, and I will tell you why. Fashion is a visual medium. Givhan describes collections and dresses and designers’ styles, but mostly in sketch format — reminding everyone of this person’s clean lines and that person’s floral flounces and this one dress’s amazing hemline. She expects that everyone is going to know about that Gucci show in 1996! And that de la Renta dress from Sex and the City — everyone remembers that, right? Nope. I did not know about that show, and I did not know about that dress, and I did not know about any of the many many other shows or collections or dresses mentioned in this book, and one is mentioned basically every other sentence. So I pretty much evenly divided my time between reading and googling things like “Halston collection 1969.” But! I saw a lot of interesting clothes. I learned many interesting things. And I enjoyed this book. Just, wow, read it only if and when you have unfettered access to google.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Kerri

    I don't read much non-fiction, but this was on NPR's book concierge a couple years ago, and was "in" at the library. Remember when you first read "The DaVinci Code" and you spent half your time looking up the sculptures/paintings/buildings Brown was describing? I was like that but pulling up haute couture and designers and models while reading this book. It was the 70's... American Women were starting to go to work, and Anne Klein was designing "separates"... a wholly new concept in fashion, and I don't read much non-fiction, but this was on NPR's book concierge a couple years ago, and was "in" at the library. Remember when you first read "The DaVinci Code" and you spent half your time looking up the sculptures/paintings/buildings Brown was describing? I was like that but pulling up haute couture and designers and models while reading this book. It was the 70's... American Women were starting to go to work, and Anne Klein was designing "separates"... a wholly new concept in fashion, and being made fun of by her contemporaries. Design houses up to that point were primarily stuck up snobs creating dresses that were essentially French knock-offs. Enter the 70's... disco fever, the sexual revolution, equal rights and civil rights were creating American fashion and turning convention on its ear. Then (booming voice) a competition between five French designers and five American designers at the famed Versailles Palace showed who had the chops for the fashion future. PS: This was back before hollywood starlets filled the seats at fashion shows. Versailles was packed with French and British royalty and "money so old it smelled stale." Donna Karan (Anne Klein's protoge) said "the tiaras were wearing tiaras!". Funny how much I liked it (as I sit in my goodwill jeans and thrift store turtleneck :D )

  17. 4 out of 5

    Joyce

    While I had heard bits about this epic battle on a podcast, it was after watching Halston that I went in search of a book just about that night. What a treasure! I absolutely loved the book and devoured it in a couple of days. This book highlights not just the designers, but Eleanor Lambert, who conceived the idea and had been working to put American fashion on the same par as Paris, and the models who were so integral in making that night a turning point in fashion. The diversity of the models While I had heard bits about this epic battle on a podcast, it was after watching Halston that I went in search of a book just about that night. What a treasure! I absolutely loved the book and devoured it in a couple of days. This book highlights not just the designers, but Eleanor Lambert, who conceived the idea and had been working to put American fashion on the same par as Paris, and the models who were so integral in making that night a turning point in fashion. The diversity of the models and their personalities made the success possible for the designers and gave a newfound respect for American Fashion. It seems as if fashion has gotten a bit less progressive since that night. The book is so much more than a fluff piece about a fashion show. It was so well researched with such a wealth of material. An excellent and satisfying read.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Karl

    The title sets the scene and hints at the themes behind the Battle of Versailles, but the author weaves in so much interesting backstory and context that the sum is greater than the parts. Givhan covers the history, the political situations, the economy, the social structures and a whole bunch of amazing detail that makes this all very three dimensional. I love the author’s writing in the Washington Post and wanted to read this longer work. It was worth the time.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Kayla Tornello

    This book centers around a single event, a fashion show at Versailles, featuring both French and American designers. I was really frustrated by the lack of photos. I wanted to see the fashions and see the people, not just read about them. Also, this fashion show was interesting and influential, but perhaps not enough material for an entire book. I received this book as a Goodreads giveaway. Yay!

  20. 5 out of 5

    sonalidalal

    That night at Versailles has making of a cinema. For someone like me who is not enamoured by fashion, it came as a pleasant surprise. Wish more pages were devoted to that night and days preceding it. For me book ended with that triumphant night , as later part of the book becomes too journalistic and miss story telling elements. Sometimes writing becomes too banal and looses the grip it has over the reader. Good story teller could have made meatier book out of it.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Lisa James

    This was a bit of a hard slog, the details were painstaking. It was a trip through fashion history, & the explosion of the American fashion industry on the world stage. It outlines the histories of labels that have become staples, & the back stories of the men & women who founded them, who they apprenticed with, worked for before they branched out on their own.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Lisa

    This was an intensely amazing book. I loved every word of it. Givhan brings more than you can imagine to explain and illuminate every detail and nuance of the importance of this event on culture, society and fashion. Brilliant.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Chris

    An informative and glamorous look into a time that cannot be repeated. Society personalities, monster egos, and some extremely talented and creative people came together and made something wonderful. And it had an impact that resonates through our culture to this day.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Raquel

    I liked it, but think it would have been much more effective as a long magazine article (or documentary film) --- it was repetitive and it felt in parts as if Givhan was too obviously trying to pad it out. HOWEVER, Givhan is a wonderful writer, and the topic is interesting.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Angelica

    If you love fashion history, this is a fantastic book for you. She covers a pivotal point in the American fashion industry with clarity and sensitivity. Robin captures fashion and culture better than anyone else.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Laura Falby

    Heavy focus on how much the 1973 fashion show at Versailles uplifted the confidence of the American designers, and especially whether or not it increased the visibility and viability of black models in the fashion industry.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Jinjer

    Oh! Oh! Oh!!! They included this in that amazing Halston series on Netflix starring Ewan McGregor!!! I'm so excited to know about this book! Thank you, MG @ Reading is not the Challenge! http://marista.blogspot.com/2021/06/j... Oh! Oh! Oh!!! They included this in that amazing Halston series on Netflix starring Ewan McGregor!!! I'm so excited to know about this book! Thank you, MG @ Reading is not the Challenge! http://marista.blogspot.com/2021/06/j...

  28. 4 out of 5

    Susan

    Be sure you check out the subtitle. This is about fashion, not Versailles!

  29. 4 out of 5

    Kyle Fitzpatrick

    A history of American race and style by a master.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Kara

    Its like Bottle Shock, but with fashion instead of wine.

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