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Killing for Klimt

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In this first in the Megan Crespi Mystery Series, retired art history professor Megan Crespi, an expert on the Viennese artist Gustav Klimt, becomes involved in a race to recover the Secretum, a "shameful, secret panel" stolen from the artist's studio the night after his death in February of 1918. Her travels, at the behest of New York's Moderne Galerie Museum, owner of th In this first in the Megan Crespi Mystery Series, retired art history professor Megan Crespi, an expert on the Viennese artist Gustav Klimt, becomes involved in a race to recover the Secretum, a "shameful, secret panel" stolen from the artist's studio the night after his death in February of 1918. Her travels, at the behest of New York's Moderne Galerie Museum, owner of the famed 1907 "golden" Klimt portrait of Adele Bloch-Bauer, take her from the high desert of Santa Fe, New Mexico, to Switzerland's Ascona, as well as to New York, Vienna, Helsinki, Paris, Montreal, and Girdwood, Alaska. Megan is shadowed by two different assassins hired by fanatical Gunther Winter. Owner of Alaska's Alpenglow Hotel, he keeps his secret art collection in an annex basement. Several killings occur involving the interested criminal parties and naive owners of Klimt artworks. Finally setting up a trade-Winter's Secretum for the golden Adele-Crespi and two colleagues fly to Alaska. They bring with them two crates: one purporting to contain the Adele portrait, and a larger one to receive the Secretum panel. But there, greed leads to unexpected and colossal consequences. Will Megan survive the final killing for Klimt? (Includes Readers Guide) Distinguished Professor of Art History Emerita at Southern Methodist University in Dallas, Texas, Alessandra Comini was awarded Austria's Grand Medal of Honor for her books on Viennese artists Egon Schiele and Gustav Klimt. Her Egon Schiele's Portraits was nominated for the National Book Award and her The Changing Image of Beethoven is used in classrooms around the country. Her travels, recorded in the memoir, In Passionate Pursuit, extend from Europe to Antarctica and are reflected in this, her first mystery novel."


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In this first in the Megan Crespi Mystery Series, retired art history professor Megan Crespi, an expert on the Viennese artist Gustav Klimt, becomes involved in a race to recover the Secretum, a "shameful, secret panel" stolen from the artist's studio the night after his death in February of 1918. Her travels, at the behest of New York's Moderne Galerie Museum, owner of th In this first in the Megan Crespi Mystery Series, retired art history professor Megan Crespi, an expert on the Viennese artist Gustav Klimt, becomes involved in a race to recover the Secretum, a "shameful, secret panel" stolen from the artist's studio the night after his death in February of 1918. Her travels, at the behest of New York's Moderne Galerie Museum, owner of the famed 1907 "golden" Klimt portrait of Adele Bloch-Bauer, take her from the high desert of Santa Fe, New Mexico, to Switzerland's Ascona, as well as to New York, Vienna, Helsinki, Paris, Montreal, and Girdwood, Alaska. Megan is shadowed by two different assassins hired by fanatical Gunther Winter. Owner of Alaska's Alpenglow Hotel, he keeps his secret art collection in an annex basement. Several killings occur involving the interested criminal parties and naive owners of Klimt artworks. Finally setting up a trade-Winter's Secretum for the golden Adele-Crespi and two colleagues fly to Alaska. They bring with them two crates: one purporting to contain the Adele portrait, and a larger one to receive the Secretum panel. But there, greed leads to unexpected and colossal consequences. Will Megan survive the final killing for Klimt? (Includes Readers Guide) Distinguished Professor of Art History Emerita at Southern Methodist University in Dallas, Texas, Alessandra Comini was awarded Austria's Grand Medal of Honor for her books on Viennese artists Egon Schiele and Gustav Klimt. Her Egon Schiele's Portraits was nominated for the National Book Award and her The Changing Image of Beethoven is used in classrooms around the country. Her travels, recorded in the memoir, In Passionate Pursuit, extend from Europe to Antarctica and are reflected in this, her first mystery novel."

35 review for Killing for Klimt

  1. 4 out of 5

    Jane

    Comini certainly writes what she knows - manymany parallels between herself & Crespi. A few plot holes, but I'm not going to spoiler. Very good writing per se. Comini certainly writes what she knows - manymany parallels between herself & Crespi. A few plot holes, but I'm not going to spoiler. Very good writing per se.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Joy

    Disappointing. I love the idea behind this, and am impressed with how much art history info is relayed through a mystery novel! Unfortunately, the writing didn’t work for me — it felt heavy and was not easy to read. I ended up scanning a lot of this. I don’t think I will read more by this author, though I wish I had liked this. (Also, the font was atrocious—the whole thing was written in an Art Deco type of font, which was very hard to read.)

  3. 5 out of 5

    Susan

    A fun, easy beach read, especially for lovers of art history. Dr. Comini was one of my professors and there are a lot of similarities between herself and her main character in this art-historical inspired fictitious murder mystery.

  4. 4 out of 5

    PALMA

    LIKED THE ART WORLD MYSTERY MIX!!

  5. 5 out of 5

    Luann

    This was enjoyable. I love a good art history mystery, and it started off promisingly. The author really knows her stuff and it was amusing to see how she weaves fact and fiction together. The characters are very well drawn. At some point in the last quarter or so she seems to get bored with the actual mystery part, and that section seemed rushed and unrewarding. I'll read another in the series. I found the Alix London books to be much more satisfying, however, if you are looking for more in thi This was enjoyable. I love a good art history mystery, and it started off promisingly. The author really knows her stuff and it was amusing to see how she weaves fact and fiction together. The characters are very well drawn. At some point in the last quarter or so she seems to get bored with the actual mystery part, and that section seemed rushed and unrewarding. I'll read another in the series. I found the Alix London books to be much more satisfying, however, if you are looking for more in this genre.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Marilyn Eisenhardt

  7. 5 out of 5

    Michael A.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Barbara B. Brenner

  9. 5 out of 5

    Laura Archer

  10. 4 out of 5

    Greg McConeghy

  11. 5 out of 5

    Vicki

  12. 5 out of 5

    Alessandra Comini

  13. 5 out of 5

    Marilyn

  14. 4 out of 5

    Joedy

  15. 5 out of 5

    Serena Magliano

  16. 4 out of 5

    Anna Hardinge

  17. 5 out of 5

    Kym

  18. 4 out of 5

    Eileen

  19. 5 out of 5

    Ian Donnelly

  20. 4 out of 5

    Олена Дрозд

  21. 5 out of 5

    Barbara

  22. 5 out of 5

    Toni Moore

  23. 5 out of 5

    Betsy Evans

  24. 4 out of 5

    Leslie Rortvedt

  25. 4 out of 5

    Sukie

  26. 5 out of 5

    Bg Geist

  27. 4 out of 5

    Greg

  28. 4 out of 5

    Woolfardis

  29. 4 out of 5

    Pia Pausch

  30. 4 out of 5

    Dawn Green

  31. 4 out of 5

    Julie

  32. 5 out of 5

    Jeanine Gaston

  33. 4 out of 5

    Courtney Mlinar

  34. 5 out of 5

    Jinx:The:Poet {the Literary Masochist, Ink Ninja & Word Roamer}

  35. 5 out of 5

    Christina Crouch

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