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Adam: A Sensuous Coming of Age Tale

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Adam is a delightful 16-year-old who does well in school and spends his spare time practising the cello. Or that’s what his parents think. But there is another side to him, as farmer’s son Sylvain discovers when he meets Adam alone in the middle of a wood… The results of this chance encounter are explosive in this classic, passionate story of illicit romance and teenage se Adam is a delightful 16-year-old who does well in school and spends his spare time practising the cello. Or that’s what his parents think. But there is another side to him, as farmer’s son Sylvain discovers when he meets Adam alone in the middle of a wood… The results of this chance encounter are explosive in this classic, passionate story of illicit romance and teenage sex during one long, hot summer in the French countryside… Reviews: A fine and elegantly written work deserving of a wide readership irrespective of sexual orientation – What’s On UK A romantic, atmospheric tale of sexual awakening, with a keen sense of character and location – Boyz Magazine A warm, almost poetic tilt that makes this book an enjoyable treat – Rainbow Network


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Adam is a delightful 16-year-old who does well in school and spends his spare time practising the cello. Or that’s what his parents think. But there is another side to him, as farmer’s son Sylvain discovers when he meets Adam alone in the middle of a wood… The results of this chance encounter are explosive in this classic, passionate story of illicit romance and teenage se Adam is a delightful 16-year-old who does well in school and spends his spare time practising the cello. Or that’s what his parents think. But there is another side to him, as farmer’s son Sylvain discovers when he meets Adam alone in the middle of a wood… The results of this chance encounter are explosive in this classic, passionate story of illicit romance and teenage sex during one long, hot summer in the French countryside… Reviews: A fine and elegantly written work deserving of a wide readership irrespective of sexual orientation – What’s On UK A romantic, atmospheric tale of sexual awakening, with a keen sense of character and location – Boyz Magazine A warm, almost poetic tilt that makes this book an enjoyable treat – Rainbow Network

30 review for Adam: A Sensuous Coming of Age Tale

  1. 5 out of 5

    Jeff Erno

    Adam is a modern-day adolescent love story set in rural France. Adam is a sixteen year old boy from England who moves to France when his father's engineering company dispatches him to work on a bridge construction project. While there, Adam adapts rather quickly to the French language and culture and develops friendships with a handful of his school mates. He also meets an older boy, age 22, while exploring the countryside one afternoon. Adam's acquaintance, Sylvain, is ruddy and extremely manly. Adam is a modern-day adolescent love story set in rural France. Adam is a sixteen year old boy from England who moves to France when his father's engineering company dispatches him to work on a bridge construction project. While there, Adam adapts rather quickly to the French language and culture and develops friendships with a handful of his school mates. He also meets an older boy, age 22, while exploring the countryside one afternoon. Adam's acquaintance, Sylvain, is ruddy and extremely manly. At once Adam is attracted to him. Months earlier, while still residing in England, Adam had first discovered his homosexual attractions when he engaged in repeated sexual exploration sessions with his best friend Michael. When he begins to realize that Sylvain is attracted to him as well, he picks up where he left off in his pursuit of sexual self discovery. They embark upon an ongoing sexual relationship and ultimately fall in love. When Michael visits Adam a few months later, a mutual friend Sean tags along. For ages Adam has harbored a secret crush on Sean, and he is conflicted over how to reconcile these feelings with his relationship with (and commitment to)Sylvain. Adam ends up having sex with both Michael and Sean during their visit. Eventually, Adam has to face the reality that his father's temporary post in France is going to expire and the family will be moving back to England. He is distraught, not sure how to break the news to Sylvain. When he finally informs his lover that he will be soon leaving, Sylvain takes drastic measures, taking matters into his own hands as he attempts to force a solution to their dilemma which is anything but practical. This story was a mixed read for me. There are numerous things about the book that I honestly loved. The writing was superb. The romance and physical intimacy were beautiful presented. I was able to relate to Adam, and I grew to genuinely care for him, as flawed as he may have been. In my view, the author presented a touching story that depicted a teenager sampling three very powerful variations of love for the first time. His relationship with Michael represented an enduring, most often platonic love, a love that will likely continue throughout his life. They are best friends and share a connection most others are incapable of understanding. Sean represents infatuation. He's the unrequited lover (at least for a season), the one Adam pines for and fantasizes about. Sylvain is the person with whom Adam ultimately falls in love. I understood these distinctions, and although it was unsettling at times to see Adam approach sex so casually, I also accepted the context. My personal viewpoint is that there are many sixteen year olds who are sexual active, even promiscuous, but it didn't sit right with me as I tried to mentally frame his sexual behavior within the context of his overall identity. Adam seemed to be an intelligent, well-mannered, and possibly even fastidious young man. Then this other side of him made me think of him as being slutty and replete of any firm morals. I ended up questioning myself, wondering if perhaps my issues with this depiction were culturally based. Perhaps my attitude toward sex is far too Puritan as opposed to European. Setting this issue aside, I also took issue with the characterization in the story. Yes, the story is primarily told from Adam's POV, but I yearned to understand Sylvain more. I struggled a bit with their romance. Was it supposed to be a classic opposites attract type relationship? That certainly was the case, Adam being intellectual and a bit cultured while Sylvain was a simple farmer. Adam was younger with a slender, boyish body, and Sylvain was a grown man. Adam was a deep thinker who had big dreams while Sylvain could not see beyond his limited scope of experiences on the farm. Sexually Sylvain dominated, yet Adam was completely in control of the relationship. Adam had intellectual superiority, and the fact that he was proud of this fact made him at times seem snobbish. There was a part of me that hated him for this. Is such a relationship possible for two people who are so opposite one another? It seemed a stretch for me. If only I'd been able to see more of who Sylvain was, maybe I'd be able to "get it". Then again, maybe there was no more of Sylvain to show. That was the point. He was a simple person, with limitations, and love transcends such things. It also irked me that the author often used such verbosity in his prose. He provided a minutia of detail that was unnecessary and often included blocks of text (dialogue) that were in French. Perhaps a bilingual reader would be able to appreciate this. To me, though, it was confusing. I grew weary of trying to decipher the French quotations by using context and wished the author had simply translated them. Although the writing itself was beautiful, I think there is something to be said for the adage, "Less is more." Overall I enjoyed the challenge of this read. I was stirred emotionally and I learned some new vocabulary in the process. I also really did grow to care about the main character. I think readers who enjoy stories that are non-formulaic and atypical may appreciate this read. And readers who appreciate the beauty of the written word over the plausibility of the plot would rate this book highly. In other words, the writing can be appreciated even if the story itself is not.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Logan

    I'm really thankful for the community of people on this website. Without them, I wouldn't have all these great books to read. That being said, this book was fantastic! I fell quickly in the French country side that was painted for me so vividly I thought I was there. Words flowed effortlessly for this author, excellent follow-thru, this author spins words with such an eased Caress he is a beautiful poet. His characters were insightful, witty and had a voracious appetite for being young and using I'm really thankful for the community of people on this website. Without them, I wouldn't have all these great books to read. That being said, this book was fantastic! I fell quickly in the French country side that was painted for me so vividly I thought I was there. Words flowed effortlessly for this author, excellent follow-thru, this author spins words with such an eased Caress he is a beautiful poet. His characters were insightful, witty and had a voracious appetite for being young and using it to their full advantage. Making the same type of mistakes we all do at that age, regardless of how cliche it may be. This book had. Breakneck passion, impatience and the lack of cynicism we seem to impregnate ourselves with at such an early age now. Truly a breath of fresh air. I recommend this work to any and all.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Danni

    I'm at a bit of a loss about what to say because any words I string together sound a bit lame after reading this book. It really is beautiful. It tells the story of Adam, a rather precocious 16 year old who has moved to France temporarily with his family. So what can I say about Adam? He is intelligent, he is a talented cellist, and he likes wanking. Oh, he really likes wanking. He really, really likes it, be it on his own, up a rope in gym class, with his school mates, thinking about his school I'm at a bit of a loss about what to say because any words I string together sound a bit lame after reading this book. It really is beautiful. It tells the story of Adam, a rather precocious 16 year old who has moved to France temporarily with his family. So what can I say about Adam? He is intelligent, he is a talented cellist, and he likes wanking. Oh, he really likes wanking. He really, really likes it, be it on his own, up a rope in gym class, with his school mates, thinking about his school mates, in the woods, up trees, with the new rather delectable 22 year old farm boy (Sylvain) he meets in the woods...Did I mention he likes wanking? Yeah, he kind of does. Now, this of course makes it sound very PWP, and with the amount of orgasms Adam has in this book (I won't even try to count) in all honesty it could just be a smutty little coming-of-age tale, but the way it is written is so amazingly beautiful, it's not that at all. You see, Adam happens to fall in love with Sylvain (who incidentally has a mental age of 14) and Sylvain happens to fall in love with Adam. Which would be fine (actually, no it wouldn't because of a hundred problems inherent in the relationship) but the simple love affair it is, is also incredibly complicated, partly because of Adam's complete inability to keep it in his pants. And Adam's complete inability to form any coherent thoughts when the slightest hint of sex is involved (which for Adam is all the time). While this book is definitely erotic, it is not particularly explicit. Quite often in fact you are just told that 'they make love' but the fact that Adam's thoughts are so sexually charged makes the whole feel of the book pretty erotic, if that makes any sense whatsoever. The author writes so beautifully that you don't just 'read' this book, you 'feel' it. You feel the beauty of the countryside, you feel the confusing rush of emotions that are constantly bombarding Adam, you feel the intensity of first love, and you feel the absolutely undeniable thrill and pull of temptation. Now, a few reviewers have mentioned that the language is too descriptive, and this initially put me off reading the book. I tend to like fast-paced stories, without too much flowery language, but as soon as I started reading this I forgot all about my preferences for snappy little scenes and just enjoyed the absolute beauty of the language used. The occasional use of French adds to the atmosphere of the book, although I could see how it might be frustrating if you had no knowledge at all of the language, but in some cases I think it is necessary, such as (view spoiler)[Sylvain's words "Tu m'aimes plus" which are so much more heartbreaking delivered in his own language. (hide spoiler)] This author is truly a cut above. His use of language is beautiful. Beautiful, beautiful, beautiful. Oh, and did I mention it's beautiful? I think I may have done once or twice.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Dan

    I simply loved this book and fell in love with the writers poetic style.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Suki Fleet

    This is one of my all time favorite books. I cannot praise it enough. The writing is just so beautiful and evocative it swept me away- I feel I lived the rural French setting, the sensuousness of Adam's relationship with Sylvain. I found the ending a little strange but it did not detract from the novel, just puzzled me a little. Suki Fleet This is one of my all time favorite books. I cannot praise it enough. The writing is just so beautiful and evocative it swept me away- I feel I lived the rural French setting, the sensuousness of Adam's relationship with Sylvain. I found the ending a little strange but it did not detract from the novel, just puzzled me a little. Suki Fleet

  6. 5 out of 5

    Steven Hoffman

    AU NATURALE Knowing what I now know, I long to be in the first quarter of my life, not in the last, and live in Anthony McDonald's world. Nine months ago I stumbled across Adam's Star, the third book in McDonald's Adam Trilogy. I enjoyed it a lot, but felt it read too much like a gay soap opera (read the review, if you care too). Looking for another work of gay fiction that didn't fall within the m/m romance genre, I recalled that book and decided to go back and look at McDonald's first in this s AU NATURALE Knowing what I now know, I long to be in the first quarter of my life, not in the last, and live in Anthony McDonald's world. Nine months ago I stumbled across Adam's Star, the third book in McDonald's Adam Trilogy. I enjoyed it a lot, but felt it read too much like a gay soap opera (read the review, if you care too). Looking for another work of gay fiction that didn't fall within the m/m romance genre, I recalled that book and decided to go back and look at McDonald's first in this series and that led me to Adam's "sensuous coming of age tale." "Sensuous" is a bit of an understatement. I've now queued up to read Blue Sky Adam (Volume 2) and, while not in chronological order, I look forward to finishing this trilogy. McDonald's prose in volume one and three is quite consistently poetic and beautiful. As a writer he reminds me of André Aciman. I anticipate the middle tome will be no different. While "McDonald" isn't at all a French name, he draws deeply from French culture of which he seems intimately familiar and the story is set mostly in France. I somehow imagine that McDonald is a fan of the 18th Century's French philosophe, Jean Jacques Rousseau. Nature is a major focus in McDonald's writing. His story-telling is full of vivid lyrical descriptions of the natural world, both the scenic, as well as the myriad of creatures abound within it. It is in this natural world that McDonald describes love between boys and men which he values just as normal, shall I say, as "natural" as those humans who also have sex for pleasure and occasionally procreate to propagate our species. In fact, the two protagonists of this story, sixteen year old Adam and twenty-two year old Sylvain, meet when Adam literally drops from a tree he's climbed onto a wooded path and greets Sylvain strolling along it. Only moments later they experience their first acts of intimacy. For a great deal of this book the two of them have a lot of sex out among the birds, the flowers, the forest and the trees in the midst of nature. McDonald's confluence of gay sex "in harmony" with nature is not lost. As teenage Adam struggles with accepting himself, deals with the rage of his hormones, and negotiates his psychological safety in a straight and prejudicial world, I definitely intimately related to having been there (or close), done that (or similar) myself. Evidently so does many, many other people who've read this book which is why it's considered a classic of gay literature. I will guess because cell phones, not smart though, and other references, Adam is a millennial and the period time is early 21st century. I, myself am a baby-boomer so "coming out" was a very different thing when I was sixteen. Even so with Sylvain, Adam's secret lover who is six years his senior. (There is currently no statutory rape laws in France). Adam is also surrounded by group of friends his own age both in England and then in France when his father's job relocates the family to a rural area outside Paris where he meets Sylvain. They are all male with the exclusion of one, and all gay or "questioning" with the exclusion of one which seemed a bit contrived. And... the boys all have sex with Adam and some with each other and are knowledgeable of all these various trysts. They are also all much pretty o.k. with it. There's astonishingly little jealousy or rivalry between them. Mostly just a matter-of-fact acceptance that love need not always be connected to the sex act. "What is the nature of love in all its many forms?" seems to be the subject that McDonald wants to explore. This is my major criticism of the novel. Even in enlightened Europe in the new century, have the younger generations among us gone so far in rejecting the Victorian values laid upon them by previous generations? Some teens, some times, may experience some casual sex, but McDonald seems to just take it all a "shag too far." There's even a scene where recovering from the first severe hang-over of his life, worried that his "adult" lover may have actually kidnapped him, Adam can't control his urges and gropes a boy fourteen years old boy who happens upon him. He actually succeeds ultimately in exciting the young boy to orgasm without even touching him! At first, I was quite put off by this scene. It seemed completely out of context for the given circumstances in which Adam found himself. Alternatively, however, even in sexually uptight America it's true experimentation between adolescents is generally accepted up to a certain age. Maybe I'm naïve and McDonald has it right? Many, many times these boys find release without any overt stimulation. It's spontaneous orgasm. Merely physically pressing their bodies against one another produces the intended result. These encounters seem to be a daily occurrence with Adam et.al. and just defy believability. Still Adam's story has captivated me to the credit of McDonald's skill as a writer. I am as enamored of his experiences as an adolescent in this volume as I was of Adam the young professional celloist in the final volume. How Adam gets from horny teen (Volume 1) to a long-term relationship whose monogamy is challenged (Volume 3) is to be explained in volume two. I'm all in.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Peter

    A moving exploration of the confusions of gay adolescence. The book is sensual, but the sex scenes do not dominate the story. The characters are interesting, and the story stands alone, although there is a sequel and we are left interested enough to want to know what happens to the relationships. My only quibble is that all the main characters, including a 23 year old, are prodigiously productive, and if the author assumes this is normal, based on his own adolescence, then I feel sorry for the a A moving exploration of the confusions of gay adolescence. The book is sensual, but the sex scenes do not dominate the story. The characters are interesting, and the story stands alone, although there is a sequel and we are left interested enough to want to know what happens to the relationships. My only quibble is that all the main characters, including a 23 year old, are prodigiously productive, and if the author assumes this is normal, based on his own adolescence, then I feel sorry for the author's mother and her washing machine. But the book is not primarily about the orgasms. The focus throughout is the emotions, characters, and plot line, so it works very well as a novel. A delight to read.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Ron

    Well written book. The story and characters development was very good. An easy read that has a sense of reality. At times it stretched beyond reality.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Darius Chan

    Interesting take on teenage gay romance. On the entirety, this was a rather disjointed story. The ending could have included a bit more on Sylvain’s side of the story.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Lloyd

    I enjoyed the book ......well written and evocative of place (rural France) and adolescent discovery.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Cor Cordium

    3.25 Stars This was really difficult for me to rate. I liked it, it was well written, but way too wordy. It was distractingly wordy. I found myself scanning and skipping a lot of material to get to the story. Adam was really confusing. He's a 16 year old boy. He excels at everything he does. He's articulate, talented, intelligent and lives an extremely privileged life. He meets an obviously, mentally unstable man (who is constantly referred to as a boy) and develops a sexual and emotional relation 3.25 Stars This was really difficult for me to rate. I liked it, it was well written, but way too wordy. It was distractingly wordy. I found myself scanning and skipping a lot of material to get to the story. Adam was really confusing. He's a 16 year old boy. He excels at everything he does. He's articulate, talented, intelligent and lives an extremely privileged life. He meets an obviously, mentally unstable man (who is constantly referred to as a boy) and develops a sexual and emotional relationship with him. What sane man exposes himself to a child? Even a 16 year old would know this is inappropriate. The guy is disheveled and not too bright. He was 21 at the time, but he was a grown man. I would run like hell. At least run like hell after he fucks you into the ground hard enough to break your teeth. How does anyone confuse that with rape? The guy fucking raped him!!! Then, I thought...when I was 15, I was conned by an older man that he loved me more than anyone, I also believed that he was my world and he was the one and only. A person that young might be needy enough to believe it. Adam said how much he loved Sylvain then had sex with 2 friends, repeatedly, over a short holiday. I was incensed. How did this innocent kid turn into such a slut? Then I remembered...he is 16 years old, newly sexually active, confused and his hormones are running wild. There's no chance of pregnancy and (possibly) no disease...I say...GO FOR IT! Then completely out of the blue, Sylvain kidnaps Adam when he is supposed to go home. Adam is a victim (seemingly willing) with a full-blown case of Stockholm Syndrome. I realize that Sylvain was totally obsessed and I was really uncomfortable with him from the beginning, but to me, it did come out of left-field. There was too much black-out time after Adam was recovered...in my opinion. This is one of those stories that I think would have benefitted from a dual-POV...even minimally so. I would have liked to have seen Sylvain's mental illness mentioned. I would have liked a little glimpse of his thought process and obsession with Adam and his mental decline when he stopped his meds. I know this was a book about the 16 year old Adam, but it would have been helpful for a reader to understand a little perspective into what was going on with Sylvain. I guess my problem with issues in books such as mental illness, self-injury, sexual/physical/emotional abuse, suicide, etc, is they are very serious issues and should not be skated over. It's a real problem in our society. People are suffering every day from these issues and most people are privileged enough not to have to go through them. Maybe I take them too seriously. Anthony McDonald is a fabulous writer, it was just my feelings on the subject matter that I had a difficult time with.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Noel Roach

    Written in a 'literature' style rather than the more 'pulp fiction' style of most books with a gay theme. I have seen other reviews that criticise this as being 'too wordy.' Personally I rather enjoyed having to pay attention to what I was reading and grab the dictionary on occasion. The more formal use of language and idyllic rural French countryside setting give the book a historic or at least a timeless feel. It is only the mention of email, that allowed me to place the novel into a late 20th Written in a 'literature' style rather than the more 'pulp fiction' style of most books with a gay theme. I have seen other reviews that criticise this as being 'too wordy.' Personally I rather enjoyed having to pay attention to what I was reading and grab the dictionary on occasion. The more formal use of language and idyllic rural French countryside setting give the book a historic or at least a timeless feel. It is only the mention of email, that allowed me to place the novel into a late 20th/early 21st century time frame. I do get tired of what I call 'porn-with-a-plot-line' type gay novels, but I thought McDonald could have maybe given us an extra sentence of explicit sex activity at some points in the book; Adam's sexual activities are after all major plot and theme points in the book. Adam is a novel about a 16-year-old gay teenager exploring his sexuality using adult, intelligent and occasionally explicit sexual language and not the G-rated language of a YA novel or the XXX-rated trash of a 'one-handed-reading' porn story. This is not the best book I have ever read, but given some of the books I have rated 3 or 4-stars, I just had to give this one a 5-star rating.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Dana

    This is a fast read and kept me interested, but ulimately the plot was somewhat off-putting. The central romance is a little odd -- a 16-year-old boy and a 23-year-old with the apparent mental age of 14 -- so I found it hard to feel invested in it. Adam's bed-hopping didn't help, even if this fickleness is authentic teenage-boy behaviour. It seems like everyone Adam meets is gay, which is slightly unbelievable, as well as the fact that three different boys declare their love for him. Um why? He's This is a fast read and kept me interested, but ulimately the plot was somewhat off-putting. The central romance is a little odd -- a 16-year-old boy and a 23-year-old with the apparent mental age of 14 -- so I found it hard to feel invested in it. Adam's bed-hopping didn't help, even if this fickleness is authentic teenage-boy behaviour. It seems like everyone Adam meets is gay, which is slightly unbelievable, as well as the fact that three different boys declare their love for him. Um why? He's not that interesting. And since when do boys throw the "l" word (love, not lesbian) around like that?

  14. 5 out of 5

    Kim

    What an odd and fascinating book. Adam's relationship with Sylvain was crazy and inappropriate and I wasn't sure exactly who was the teenager and who was the adult at times. I did enjoy Gary's talks with Adam where he tried to make the teen see that he was behaving recklessly. There's a lot of wanking going on here (which, I guess makes sense when you're dealing with a sixteen-year-old boy and his male friends), I found the constant descriptions of this a little tiresome. I am looking forward to What an odd and fascinating book. Adam's relationship with Sylvain was crazy and inappropriate and I wasn't sure exactly who was the teenager and who was the adult at times. I did enjoy Gary's talks with Adam where he tried to make the teen see that he was behaving recklessly. There's a lot of wanking going on here (which, I guess makes sense when you're dealing with a sixteen-year-old boy and his male friends), I found the constant descriptions of this a little tiresome. I am looking forward to reading the next book in the series where Adam is in his early twenties.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Roxanne

    Everyone seems to like this book but i didn't get the fuss. I know it sounds weird but it was a bit too wordy, everything was over described and it didn't really add to the book. The plot was bizarre and not in a good way. The characters were awful, they seemed like horrible people, and it made you want to chuck the book. The ending was just as bad. Didn't get the fuss or the hype. Everyone seems to like this book but i didn't get the fuss. I know it sounds weird but it was a bit too wordy, everything was over described and it didn't really add to the book. The plot was bizarre and not in a good way. The characters were awful, they seemed like horrible people, and it made you want to chuck the book. The ending was just as bad. Didn't get the fuss or the hype.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Carol Trahan

    I’ve given this 4 stars for the beautiful writing, characterizations and well crafted story line. His descriptions of place are extraordinary. However there is too much explicit sex for my taste and therefore not 5 stars. This is the first book of a trilogy and this review is the same for the next two books - Blue Sky Adam and Adam’s Star.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Martin

    It took me a while to get used to the formal style but it didn't detract from my enjoyment. The characters and plot are fairly two-dimensional but its never boring. As far as sex is concerned, it's all very restrained; there's little to embarrass your grandmother. It took me a while to get used to the formal style but it didn't detract from my enjoyment. The characters and plot are fairly two-dimensional but its never boring. As far as sex is concerned, it's all very restrained; there's little to embarrass your grandmother.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Lester

    I really like this book in terms of setting, characters and storyline. Not sure if it would be realistic but still quite enjoyable. It was different than the typical us high school drama and all Goodread :-)

  19. 4 out of 5

    Joey

    I had to put this one down. I liked the characters, but I don't think I like where this is going. I may be getting tired of book series where the heroes challenge is his lover. Also, there seemed to be so much extraneous to this story that I found myself skipping ahead to get the real plot. I had to put this one down. I liked the characters, but I don't think I like where this is going. I may be getting tired of book series where the heroes challenge is his lover. Also, there seemed to be so much extraneous to this story that I found myself skipping ahead to get the real plot.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Vincent Dalton

    Cannot get enough of this author!!

  21. 4 out of 5

    Karl Cooke

    Read this book when I was 16. Completely connected with it. A fabulous read.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Brady

    Really liked it. Can't wait to read the sequel. Really liked it. Can't wait to read the sequel.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Peter

    Very well written - Great plot if a little difficult to appreciate the cultural antagonisms - Can't wait to read the sequel. Very well written - Great plot if a little difficult to appreciate the cultural antagonisms - Can't wait to read the sequel.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Alex

    I thought it was beautifully written, but the descriptions of Adam's lover were really off-putting, sounding patronizing and making fun of his poverty and dark skin. I thought it was beautifully written, but the descriptions of Adam's lover were really off-putting, sounding patronizing and making fun of his poverty and dark skin.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Robert

    First read October 2003. Re-read August 2009.

  26. 5 out of 5

    carioca

  27. 5 out of 5

    Lonnie Kelco

  28. 5 out of 5

    Bob B

  29. 5 out of 5

    David

  30. 4 out of 5

    Chris

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