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Slightly Bad Girls of the Bible: Flawed Women Loved by a Flawless God

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Good Women Behaving Badly A spiteful boss, a defiant employee, a manipulative mother, a desperate housewife, an envious sister…honey, we know these women. We’ve lived with them, worked with them, or caught a glimpse of them in our mirrors. Now let’s take a look at their ancient counterparts in Scripture: Sarah mistreated her maidservant, Hagar despised her mistress, Rebekah Good Women Behaving Badly A spiteful boss, a defiant employee, a manipulative mother, a desperate housewife, an envious sister…honey, we know these women. We’ve lived with them, worked with them, or caught a glimpse of them in our mirrors. Now let’s take a look at their ancient counterparts in Scripture: Sarah mistreated her maidservant, Hagar despised her mistress, Rebekah manipulated her son, Leah claimed her sister’s husband, and Rachel envied her fertile sister. They were far from evil, but hardly perfect. Mostly good, yet slightly bad. In other words, these matriarchal mamas look a lot like us. “A Slightly Bad Girl is simply this: a woman unwilling to fully submit to God. We love him, serve him, and worship him, yet we find it difficult to trust him completely, to accept his plan for our lives, to rest in his sovereignty.” —from Slightly Bad Girls of the Bible


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Good Women Behaving Badly A spiteful boss, a defiant employee, a manipulative mother, a desperate housewife, an envious sister…honey, we know these women. We’ve lived with them, worked with them, or caught a glimpse of them in our mirrors. Now let’s take a look at their ancient counterparts in Scripture: Sarah mistreated her maidservant, Hagar despised her mistress, Rebekah Good Women Behaving Badly A spiteful boss, a defiant employee, a manipulative mother, a desperate housewife, an envious sister…honey, we know these women. We’ve lived with them, worked with them, or caught a glimpse of them in our mirrors. Now let’s take a look at their ancient counterparts in Scripture: Sarah mistreated her maidservant, Hagar despised her mistress, Rebekah manipulated her son, Leah claimed her sister’s husband, and Rachel envied her fertile sister. They were far from evil, but hardly perfect. Mostly good, yet slightly bad. In other words, these matriarchal mamas look a lot like us. “A Slightly Bad Girl is simply this: a woman unwilling to fully submit to God. We love him, serve him, and worship him, yet we find it difficult to trust him completely, to accept his plan for our lives, to rest in his sovereignty.” —from Slightly Bad Girls of the Bible

30 review for Slightly Bad Girls of the Bible: Flawed Women Loved by a Flawless God

  1. 4 out of 5

    K.J.

    I LOVED Ms. Higgs' fictional series, and thought it was time to read her "Bad Girls" books. I'm glad I did!! I'm ready for another!!! She has such a fascinating way of capturing the "character's" hearts/motives/desires/flaws in a real-life way that the reader can relate to. She has a gift, and I'd definitely recommend ANY of Liz Curtis Higgs' books!! I LOVED Ms. Higgs' fictional series, and thought it was time to read her "Bad Girls" books. I'm glad I did!! I'm ready for another!!! She has such a fascinating way of capturing the "character's" hearts/motives/desires/flaws in a real-life way that the reader can relate to. She has a gift, and I'd definitely recommend ANY of Liz Curtis Higgs' books!!

  2. 4 out of 5

    Jennifer DuBose

    My opinion probably makes me a “slightly bad girl” but I think most of these women were victims of a brutal patriarchal society and idk... I can’t blame them for having bad attitudes because of it. Like, the author outright calls Leah, of the Rachel and Leah story, a “bad girl” because she slept with the dude who wanted to marry Rachel. Ummm.... how about she was forced??? Like she literally did not have a say because her creep [email protected] father snuck her into his tent to satisfy this man’s appetite. T My opinion probably makes me a “slightly bad girl” but I think most of these women were victims of a brutal patriarchal society and idk... I can’t blame them for having bad attitudes because of it. Like, the author outright calls Leah, of the Rachel and Leah story, a “bad girl” because she slept with the dude who wanted to marry Rachel. Ummm.... how about she was forced??? Like she literally did not have a say because her creep [email protected] father snuck her into his tent to satisfy this man’s appetite. Then the same creep [email protected] father, in pursuit of more free labor, forces her to SHARE this man with her sister who he is clearly more attracted to and prefers. There are some good tidbits in here about dealing with the hand you’re dealt, patience, and trust. I feel like I’d be able to learn lessons about these admirable qualities from the women without calling them “bad girls”, though. As if I haven’t made myself clear already, I don’t think it’s fair to call them “bad girls”. I also learned that men back then were utter trash except for Isaac - who I learned was basically the only monogamous dude of the Old Testament because he actually loved Rebecca and evidence seems to point to him being a decent man. The actual writing is a bit cheesy but I know the intended audience eats it up. (The author calls you “sister” a lot). I will be continuing this series, though. I’m wondering if the “bad girls” and “really bad” girls of the next books are also just women forced into terrible situations or if they actually were sinful.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Mary

    Covers Sarah, Hagar, Rebekah,Leah and Rachel. No big surprises here for characters however the author presents these women as fully human, with all the feelings and motivations we find in ourselves. Well written and researched with loads of study notes and excellent references for further examination. Writing style is easy to read and absorb.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Audrey

    Together with Liz we study the lives of Sarah, Hagar, Rebecca, Leah, and Rachel. We usually think of them as women of faith but they were human just like us. They often struggled with their sinful natures but God never gave up on them. He continued to love and forgive them despite their flaws. This is an encouraging and inspiring book of the life lessons those women can give us for today.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Shelia

    good study - sometimes I think she could be more clear on which parts are opinion vs actually written in the bible - a flaw that I didn't find in her other book - very easy to read. good study - sometimes I think she could be more clear on which parts are opinion vs actually written in the bible - a flaw that I didn't find in her other book - very easy to read.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Valerie Yoh

    This book is one among a series of books about women in the Bible ("Unveiling Mary Magdalene", "Bad Girls of the Bible", and "Really Bad Girls of the Bible"). It primarily addresses five women from Genesis (Sarai/Sarah, Hagar, Rebekah, Leah, and Rachel). The emphasis of this book is keyed by the subtitle: "Flawed Women Loved by a Flawless God". The overall concept was good and I was glad to become more closely acquainted with the stories of these women. I also liked the "modern day" analogies sh This book is one among a series of books about women in the Bible ("Unveiling Mary Magdalene", "Bad Girls of the Bible", and "Really Bad Girls of the Bible"). It primarily addresses five women from Genesis (Sarai/Sarah, Hagar, Rebekah, Leah, and Rachel). The emphasis of this book is keyed by the subtitle: "Flawed Women Loved by a Flawless God". The overall concept was good and I was glad to become more closely acquainted with the stories of these women. I also liked the "modern day" analogies she presented to show how these women weren't necessarily so different from us today. However, there were many times when I thought the author stretched too far into the assumptions she made about these women and their circumstances. I appreciated this book far more for the discussion it inspired during my group study sessions than the book itself. The book would have been much stronger if the author would have stuck to just historical background and the content presented from the Bible.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Donna

    We have been using this book in a women's small group for a few months. Interesting discussion material about women if the Bible and their human difficulties, emotions and how God used them, love them and forgive them. We have been using this book in a women's small group for a few months. Interesting discussion material about women if the Bible and their human difficulties, emotions and how God used them, love them and forgive them.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Kristin

    Maybe these girls aren't bad enough? I've had this one for awhile and I haven't finished it. But, it's not the book....just too much else to read! Maybe these girls aren't bad enough? I've had this one for awhile and I haven't finished it. But, it's not the book....just too much else to read!

  9. 4 out of 5

    Hilary

    There's a lot to learn from the Biblical matriarchs, and while it's easy to see some of their lessons, it's harder to recognize them as whole, flawed people who sometimes do well and sometimes do not. They are all people who make some poor decisions, who are affected by those around them and their families, who must choose God and His way over making their own path. I always like Liz Curtis Higgs' books. She has a very casual style, often translates issues into modern language or situations, isn' There's a lot to learn from the Biblical matriarchs, and while it's easy to see some of their lessons, it's harder to recognize them as whole, flawed people who sometimes do well and sometimes do not. They are all people who make some poor decisions, who are affected by those around them and their families, who must choose God and His way over making their own path. I always like Liz Curtis Higgs' books. She has a very casual style, often translates issues into modern language or situations, isn't afraid to give examples from her own life, and usually gives study guides which you can use for personal reflection or to discuss in a small group. This is no exception. Well worth a read if you want to understand Sarah, Hagar, Rebecca, Leah and Rachel. (Added bonus: plenty of footnotes if you want to follow up on other sources and commentaries.)

  10. 4 out of 5

    Kathy

    The book has some insights into some of the women of the bible, but I find parts of the author's theology troublesome. She advocates a strangely passive life. She advocates that these women should have waited on the Lord and not tried to solve their problems on their own. I want to throw up my hands and ask how they should have known. She also at times is very inconsistent. Leah is excused for sending her servant to sleep with Jacob but Rachel is wrong for doing the same thing. It seems to me th The book has some insights into some of the women of the bible, but I find parts of the author's theology troublesome. She advocates a strangely passive life. She advocates that these women should have waited on the Lord and not tried to solve their problems on their own. I want to throw up my hands and ask how they should have known. She also at times is very inconsistent. Leah is excused for sending her servant to sleep with Jacob but Rachel is wrong for doing the same thing. It seems to me that in that culture they both did what was expected of them. Finally she seems to teach occasionally from what is not in the bible. Just because something isn't there doesn't mean it didn't happen even if it not happening fits the author's point.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Lori

    Higgs delivers another top-notch look into the lives of five women of the Bible: Sarah, Hagar, Rebekah, Leah and Rachel. An interesting look into the lives of Abraham and his descendants as seen through the wives and daughters. Each woman is flawed, much as we are, but have redeeming qualities that shine through as they navigate their lives and influence the lives of their husbands and sons. Enjoyable and thought-provoking.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Angelique

    I loved this entire series. Liz Curtis Higgs does not disappoint. Her insight into human nature is spot on. She gives these characters a narrative that is not taught in churches or Bible Studies. Any woman or man who can't see themselves in these flawed women is blind. We all have our bad habits that God delivers us from. Liz reminds us that deliverance isn't a requirement to be included in His plan. I loved this entire series. Liz Curtis Higgs does not disappoint. Her insight into human nature is spot on. She gives these characters a narrative that is not taught in churches or Bible Studies. Any woman or man who can't see themselves in these flawed women is blind. We all have our bad habits that God delivers us from. Liz reminds us that deliverance isn't a requirement to be included in His plan.

  13. 5 out of 5

    kathy

    This book was very absorbing for me. I enjoyed visiting the early old testament characters in these women. I like how the author did a little fictional story in the beginning that was contemporary as a parallel to the story in the Bible that she discussed later in the chapter. I really learned a lot about each of these women! Even though they were “slightly bad girls” of the Bible, God still used them! That’s the message I got from this book.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Mirranda Anderson

    This book has humorous and heart rending examples of woman in the Bible, good/bad/ugly of slightly bad girls. Reminds me we as humans are not perfect but can be blessed and used by a perfect God, perfectly. That we don't have to come from perfection or be perfect to be useful to a sovereign God. I looked over the study guides and will probably study them later. They seem useful for in depth study. This book has humorous and heart rending examples of woman in the Bible, good/bad/ugly of slightly bad girls. Reminds me we as humans are not perfect but can be blessed and used by a perfect God, perfectly. That we don't have to come from perfection or be perfect to be useful to a sovereign God. I looked over the study guides and will probably study them later. They seem useful for in depth study.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Wai-kit Ng

    A brilliantly written book. The story telling is amazing. Although the stories - of Sarah, Hagar, Rebecca, Rachel & Leah - were all familiar, but it was retold with a fresh pair of eyes. And the insights are amazing. Wonderfully written. Though, I must note, this is part of the author's girlfriend theology and written for women in mind. A brilliantly written book. The story telling is amazing. Although the stories - of Sarah, Hagar, Rebecca, Rachel & Leah - were all familiar, but it was retold with a fresh pair of eyes. And the insights are amazing. Wonderfully written. Though, I must note, this is part of the author's girlfriend theology and written for women in mind.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Sarah Smith

    I loved this book cover to cover! This was an encouraging, in-depth, well-researched look into the complicated lives of some of the key women in the book of Genesis. The sections on each woman open with a modern-day retelling of their lives and situations so we can more easily relate to the bizarre circumstances these women found themselves in. Totally worth 5 stars.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Emily Hatfield

    I absolutely love Liz Curtis Higgs!!! She is the ultimate woman to go to for encouragment, love, humor, ect. This is my first book I have conpleted by her and it was wonderful. She relates these biblical women to us in a way that is not condemning to who we are, but in a way that we can relate to. Definitely recommend!!

  18. 5 out of 5

    Barbara Abdoo

    Loved Bad Girls of the Bible but this one didn’t measure up. The historical part about the biblical women was very interesting but the comparison to a current experience was unrelatable. I think it was all too much of a stretch.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Lisa Nickle

    This gave me a totally new perspective on Leah, Rebecca, and Rachel of the Old Testament. It was amazing!

  20. 4 out of 5

    Veronica

    Gotta love Liz! She makes our mistakes less when she shows us the forgiving power of our Lord.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Mary Matthews

    Very interesting book. We used this for a Bible study....

  22. 5 out of 5

    Emily

    Favorite chapters were about Leah. I learned things I never knew about her .

  23. 5 out of 5

    Linda

    Covers Sarah, Hagar, Rebekah, Leah, and Rachel. Looks deeply into their motivations.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Diana Larsen

    It really brings the some what bad girls of the Bible to everyday issues some women deal with everyday.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Virginia

    In office back wall right side bottom shelf.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Lauren

    I did the first two books and and with my women's bible study. They were the first Bible studies I'd ever done, we really enjoyed them and even incorporated some of our snacks to go along with the studies. Like when we studied Eve our snacks contained apples. The studies brought us close together, once we finished the first two books though we wanted to move on to something else. I really wish we could've done this one as a group as well. I did this study on my own three years later fo I did the first two books and and with my women's bible study. They were the first Bible studies I'd ever done, we really enjoyed them and even incorporated some of our snacks to go along with the studies. Like when we studied Eve our snacks contained apples. The studies brought us close together, once we finished the first two books though we wanted to move on to something else. I really wish we could've done this one as a group as well. I did this study on my own three years later for my current lenten study. It was a fairly fast paced read. It brought us the stories of Sarai (Sarah) - Hagar - Rebekah - Leah and Rachel. Funny thing is this whole family is technically related and each generation had a "slightly bad moment" happen. What Liz Higgs does is simplifies the stories using different versions of the Bible to make it easy to understand. I had the pleasure of meeting Liz Higgs in person at my friend's church at a women's conference last spring. She is exactly how she is percieved to be from her books, very funny. When we read the first book together we thought she was really young..in her 40's. We were VERY surprised to learn that she was much older then she seemed. I read her fiction novels based on the stories of Leah and Rachl. I love those books as well. Looking forward to the next book of hers that is coming out!

  27. 5 out of 5

    Kayce

    If you follow this blog, you’ve seen the recent reviews of Bad Girls of the Bible and Really Bad Girls of the Bible. I enjoyed them so much I wanted to read the final book in the series before moving on to something else. Slightly Bad Girls of the Bible covers fewer women, but a more detailed study of them. Sarah, Rebekah, and Leah get two chapters each while Hagar and Rachel get one chapter. Because Sarah and Hagar’s stories are intertwined (as are Hagar and Rachel’s) it’s a nice twist on how t If you follow this blog, you’ve seen the recent reviews of Bad Girls of the Bible and Really Bad Girls of the Bible. I enjoyed them so much I wanted to read the final book in the series before moving on to something else. Slightly Bad Girls of the Bible covers fewer women, but a more detailed study of them. Sarah, Rebekah, and Leah get two chapters each while Hagar and Rachel get one chapter. Because Sarah and Hagar’s stories are intertwined (as are Hagar and Rachel’s) it’s a nice twist on how the stories are told. I love getting stories from both sides, rather than just one person. Slightly Bad Girls of the Bible felt more like a bible study and in depth than the others and I suppose that’s because you’re spending longer with the characters. Either way it’s another fascinating book that will make you think. Liz Curtis Higgs used so many resources in compiling her facts and insights, just looking at the Notes section in the back of the book is overwhelming! Regardless of a characters motives, thoughts, actions, and what we think may have happened “behind the scenes”, what’s obvious is how God continues to work His Will out regardless of how we may muck it up. I once heard God’s got a mind to do what He wants whether you are on board or not. And that’s true of anything. We’re all bad at some point; nobody is perfect, this we know. But the grace of God is humbling and awe-inspiring. Personally, I love spending so much time in the Old Testament, studying the culture, the people, the lands. So this was a fascinating study and series to embark upon. Higgs remains one of the most humble authors I’ve read, as she is very candid about her own sordid past (her own words). Her honesty is striking. And she’ll make you laugh out loud with every woman’s story.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Michelle

    This book might be a little hokey for some, but I enjoyed it. Higgs deconstructs the Biblical stories of Sarah, Hagar, Rebekah, Leah, and Rachel, carefully demonstrating their relevance to modern day life. One way that she does that is to tell fictional stories that are something of a modern update on the Bible stories. She shows how the same circumstances would look in modern times. She demonstrates how modern people are no better or worse than the people who fell short as long ago as Genesis. This book might be a little hokey for some, but I enjoyed it. Higgs deconstructs the Biblical stories of Sarah, Hagar, Rebekah, Leah, and Rachel, carefully demonstrating their relevance to modern day life. One way that she does that is to tell fictional stories that are something of a modern update on the Bible stories. She shows how the same circumstances would look in modern times. She demonstrates how modern people are no better or worse than the people who fell short as long ago as Genesis. Moreover, while I knew these stories, Higgs tells them in such a way that they make much more sense than they have in the past. Higgs references multiple Bible translations as well as the works of respected Biblical scholars to support her work. She appropriately shares her own history of struggles, using a healthy dose of humility and humor. This is one of a series and I look forward to finding the companion volumes. This would be an excellent book for Bible Study groups big or small.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Ashley McCall

    While I didn't find it as funny as the other "Bad Girls" books, it remained informative, thought-provoking, and humorous in all the right places. Liz Curtis Higgs uses the mothers of Judeo-Christian beliefs - Sarah, Hagar, Leah, and Rebekah - as the subjects of this book. The one thing that amazes me is how the book changed the way I looked at Leah and Rebekah. Growing up in Sunday School, you always think of Rebekah as the good girl and Leah as the bad girl. But poor Leah was taken advantage of While I didn't find it as funny as the other "Bad Girls" books, it remained informative, thought-provoking, and humorous in all the right places. Liz Curtis Higgs uses the mothers of Judeo-Christian beliefs - Sarah, Hagar, Leah, and Rebekah - as the subjects of this book. The one thing that amazes me is how the book changed the way I looked at Leah and Rebekah. Growing up in Sunday School, you always think of Rebekah as the good girl and Leah as the bad girl. But poor Leah was taken advantage of left and right, and Rebekah had some major flaws - even if she was Jacob's favorite wife. While Leah had her flaws as well, it also amazes me that God chose her to give birth to Judah (the tribe that would produce the lineage of Jesus). Just a cool read.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Jennifer Tse

    Just as great as her first book, Liz covers Genesis in this book. After reading this book, I am more familiar with the women in Genesis and how God worked in their lives. I especially liked the story about Leah and Rachel. Although God cannot change Isaac to love Leah more, I really saw how God was still with Leah through Liz's thorough analysis. She also included lessons at the end of every chapter and thought provoking questions for discussions or for you to answer them yourself as a Bible stu Just as great as her first book, Liz covers Genesis in this book. After reading this book, I am more familiar with the women in Genesis and how God worked in their lives. I especially liked the story about Leah and Rachel. Although God cannot change Isaac to love Leah more, I really saw how God was still with Leah through Liz's thorough analysis. She also included lessons at the end of every chapter and thought provoking questions for discussions or for you to answer them yourself as a Bible study tool. Excellent book! Favorite Quote: "Leah didn't complain, become irritable, demanding, or become embittered. She endured with hope and faith, showing us how a godly woman can offer up praises rather than protests." Chapter 7

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