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Born on the Bayou: A Memoir

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Coonass: [koon-as] (noun, slang, from the French conasse) A term of endearment and an expression of cultural and ethnic pride. So echoes this all-important definition throughout this good-humored memoir of growing up in the South. A rollercoaster rags-to-riches story, Blaine Lourd’s meaningful debut is both a nostalgic send-up of ’60s and ’70s Louisiana, and a heartfelt por Coonass: [koon-as] (noun, slang, from the French conasse) A term of endearment and an expression of cultural and ethnic pride. So echoes this all-important definition throughout this good-humored memoir of growing up in the South. A rollercoaster rags-to-riches story, Blaine Lourd’s meaningful debut is both a nostalgic send-up of ’60s and ’70s Louisiana, and a heartfelt portrait of one family’s coming of age. In honest, confessional prose, Born on the Bayou transports us to a pocket of the South where Lourd learns how to be a man from the two people he looks up to the most: his larger-than-life father, “Puffer,” a prominent figure in the oil business (coonass translation: awl bidness), and his successful older brother, Bryan. With an eye turned perpetually toward the gruff and distant Puffer, Lourd illustrates how those closest to us can cause the most hurt, even as we seek their approval. Whether he’s learning how to skin a duck at age ten, enjoying his first beer at thirteen, or detailing the finer points of ride-on lawn mowing, Lourd gets to the heart of being a Southerner with rawness and grace. From his early childhood through his eventual pilgrimage to the West Coast, he beautifully details what it means to have tangible roots to a place so ingrained it is a part of your own being. From barreling down the low country roads in a shiny Thunderbird to chasing women and learning to be a gentleman, Born on the Bayou is one man’s struggle against the forces of family love, loyalty and obligation, and the ties that keep us tethered to our roots no matter how far we run. As the saying goes, “a coonass always goes his own way.”


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Coonass: [koon-as] (noun, slang, from the French conasse) A term of endearment and an expression of cultural and ethnic pride. So echoes this all-important definition throughout this good-humored memoir of growing up in the South. A rollercoaster rags-to-riches story, Blaine Lourd’s meaningful debut is both a nostalgic send-up of ’60s and ’70s Louisiana, and a heartfelt por Coonass: [koon-as] (noun, slang, from the French conasse) A term of endearment and an expression of cultural and ethnic pride. So echoes this all-important definition throughout this good-humored memoir of growing up in the South. A rollercoaster rags-to-riches story, Blaine Lourd’s meaningful debut is both a nostalgic send-up of ’60s and ’70s Louisiana, and a heartfelt portrait of one family’s coming of age. In honest, confessional prose, Born on the Bayou transports us to a pocket of the South where Lourd learns how to be a man from the two people he looks up to the most: his larger-than-life father, “Puffer,” a prominent figure in the oil business (coonass translation: awl bidness), and his successful older brother, Bryan. With an eye turned perpetually toward the gruff and distant Puffer, Lourd illustrates how those closest to us can cause the most hurt, even as we seek their approval. Whether he’s learning how to skin a duck at age ten, enjoying his first beer at thirteen, or detailing the finer points of ride-on lawn mowing, Lourd gets to the heart of being a Southerner with rawness and grace. From his early childhood through his eventual pilgrimage to the West Coast, he beautifully details what it means to have tangible roots to a place so ingrained it is a part of your own being. From barreling down the low country roads in a shiny Thunderbird to chasing women and learning to be a gentleman, Born on the Bayou is one man’s struggle against the forces of family love, loyalty and obligation, and the ties that keep us tethered to our roots no matter how far we run. As the saying goes, “a coonass always goes his own way.”

30 review for Born on the Bayou: A Memoir

  1. 4 out of 5

    Shelby *trains flying monkeys*

    I'm dnf'ing this one with no rating. I rarely read memoirs and honestly don't remember requesting this one. If I am going to read one it is going to have to be about someone I'm interested in. I gave this one until 20% and it was not catching my interest. I set up hidden cameras in my house to see who was requesting books that my old lady brain can't remember. BUSTED! Book source: Netgalley in exchange for review I'm dnf'ing this one with no rating. I rarely read memoirs and honestly don't remember requesting this one. If I am going to read one it is going to have to be about someone I'm interested in. I gave this one until 20% and it was not catching my interest. I set up hidden cameras in my house to see who was requesting books that my old lady brain can't remember. BUSTED! Book source: Netgalley in exchange for review

  2. 5 out of 5

    Lolly K Dandeneau

    I imagine there will be women that find this book offensive as this really is a "guy's guy" sort of memoir. Particularly, with the donkey and the prostitute filled night, which likely recommends the book to men. The term coonass (though the title may be changed now to Born on the Bayou) is understandble to those from the south. I found his explannation of the bonds hunting creates between men who hunt makes sense and not just as a southern thing, I have family is Europe that feel likewise. The s I imagine there will be women that find this book offensive as this really is a "guy's guy" sort of memoir. Particularly, with the donkey and the prostitute filled night, which likely recommends the book to men. The term coonass (though the title may be changed now to Born on the Bayou) is understandble to those from the south. I found his explannation of the bonds hunting creates between men who hunt makes sense and not just as a southern thing, I have family is Europe that feel likewise. The south is a special place to grow up, be it in on the Bayou or elsewhere, there is something magical about being connected to the land. Blaine's father Harvey is a successful business man that eventually loses, and the author's final feelings about what true wealth is rings true. His father had some wild times, and Blaine has been a part of them too. This coming of age is one where Blaine (unlike his brother) chooses to walk in the footsteps of all the men he admires. The hunting, sometimes womanizing, money-making cajun blooded, land rooted men are the shining example of what he hopes to attain. As with any life, there are wins and losses, too there is a divorce and the shocking deaths of loved ones. Leaving Louisianna just isn't done- it's disloyal- but sometimes to understand one's path- you have to leave. I am not sure that this is for everyone, certainly those from the south will connect but others will be judgemental. Yeah, there is a sexist attitude that can be offensive so if you can't stomach that- then skip this. As with any memoir, I come in with an open mind. I connected to the southern feel and while as a woman some things didn't sit well with me, I can take it or leave it. Not a bad memoir.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Lori

    I was a goodreads first reads winner of "Born on the Bayou:A Memoir" I would give this a 3.5. Blaine Lourd grew up in New Iberia Louisiana during the 1960s and 1970s. Before I started reading this memoir, I thought this was about Blaine's childhood growing up on the Bayou. Part of it is about his childhood, but not what I was thinking. This is more about growing up in his family and the relationship he had with his father, Harvey "Puffer"Lourd. Blaine watched his dad go from living in a one bedr I was a goodreads first reads winner of "Born on the Bayou:A Memoir" I would give this a 3.5. Blaine Lourd grew up in New Iberia Louisiana during the 1960s and 1970s. Before I started reading this memoir, I thought this was about Blaine's childhood growing up on the Bayou. Part of it is about his childhood, but not what I was thinking. This is more about growing up in his family and the relationship he had with his father, Harvey "Puffer"Lourd. Blaine watched his dad go from living in a one bedroom house to a mansion,all because his dad worked his way up in the oil business. he dad was larger than life. He drank hard and gambled on the horses. Blaine found his niche with his dad by his love for hunting. Most of the book focuses on Blaine growing up in this family and the father son relationship. this is a pretty decent read. not quite what i thought it would be about but a good book about father's and sons. a warning this book can be a bit offensive in parts. i did not find certain parts amusing.{Like the donkey part.} it depends on individual's sense of humor.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Paul Pessolano

    “Born on the Bayou” by Blaine Lourd, published by Gallery Books. Category – Memoir Publication Date – August 18, 2015 If you are considered a “coonass” on the bayou it is a good thing. The term denotes a person who has both ethnic and cultural pride, a thing cherished in Louisiana. Blaine Lourd’s father, Harvey, was considered a coonass through and through. Harvey was a Cajun who enjoyed sports, drinking, and the camaraderie of his fellow man. He was a born salesman who by sheer perseverance made i “Born on the Bayou” by Blaine Lourd, published by Gallery Books. Category – Memoir Publication Date – August 18, 2015 If you are considered a “coonass” on the bayou it is a good thing. The term denotes a person who has both ethnic and cultural pride, a thing cherished in Louisiana. Blaine Lourd’s father, Harvey, was considered a coonass through and through. Harvey was a Cajun who enjoyed sports, drinking, and the camaraderie of his fellow man. He was a born salesman who by sheer perseverance made it big in the world of oil. Oil wells were booming in southern Louisiana and Harvey took full advantage of it. He set himself up in business and became a favored supplier of materials for the oil wells. Harvey made money, Harvey made lots of money. He moved his family up the social ladder, but never relinquishing his Cajun roots. He had money burning holes in his pockets. He became addicted to drink and the horses and it might have worked out except for the downturn in the oil business. Harvey though hung on and had made enough money to hopefully outlast the downturn. Things, however, continued to get worse as his wife left him and his money started to run out. Blaine tells about how he and his siblings lived in this environment. They were all different and responded in different ways, especially when the world comes tumbling down on Harvey Lourd. A memoir that will have special significance for those who live in the Deep South, however for those who do not know or live in that culture they will find the book of minor interest. This is a book geared for the country, not the city folk.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Heather

    I won this book from a Goodreads first-reads giveaway. What grabbed me when I entered this giveaway is that the book is likened to The Tender Bar which I really enjoyed, so I had to enter this giveaway. I liked this memoir, didn't love it. It revolved around the author's father, "Puffer" and his rise and fall in the oil business in Louisiana. The author who was the 2nd of 4 children spoke about growing up with a father who expected a lot and wasn't too forgiving if one of his children strayed fr I won this book from a Goodreads first-reads giveaway. What grabbed me when I entered this giveaway is that the book is likened to The Tender Bar which I really enjoyed, so I had to enter this giveaway. I liked this memoir, didn't love it. It revolved around the author's father, "Puffer" and his rise and fall in the oil business in Louisiana. The author who was the 2nd of 4 children spoke about growing up with a father who expected a lot and wasn't too forgiving if one of his children strayed from the path that he had chosen for them. I liked reading some of the stories about growing up in the south and probably could have done without some of the others. All in all, it was a decent read.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Wendy

    When I first started reading this book I really didn't think I was going to be able to finish it. I just kept wanting to put it down but I'm so happy that I stuck with it because this turned out to be a wonderful memoir and I was sad to see it end. It definitely wasn't the book that I thought it was going to be but I'm so happy that it is the book it turned out to be. This is the best memoir I've read in a long time. So happy to finally read a book about a boy that grew up on the Louisiana bayou When I first started reading this book I really didn't think I was going to be able to finish it. I just kept wanting to put it down but I'm so happy that I stuck with it because this turned out to be a wonderful memoir and I was sad to see it end. It definitely wasn't the book that I thought it was going to be but I'm so happy that it is the book it turned out to be. This is the best memoir I've read in a long time. So happy to finally read a book about a boy that grew up on the Louisiana bayou.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Amy

    Easy to read and interesting review of one's life. Would have rating this 3-stars but author indicated book was not totally factual and I get it, stories being modified.... but book lost meaning when unable to determine fictional characters, etc. Easy to read and interesting review of one's life. Would have rating this 3-stars but author indicated book was not totally factual and I get it, stories being modified.... but book lost meaning when unable to determine fictional characters, etc.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Beach026

    I don't know how I missed this one so many years ago but I'm so glad I found it now because thoroughly enjoyed it. it was sort of like reading a true life memoir of JR hewing or some other Southern family that has to adjust to the times and find their own way in life. In my idea of a perfect world everyone would stay together, stay in Louisiana and stay prosperous and happy. It may not play out that way but it sure was an enjoyable ride. I don't know how I missed this one so many years ago but I'm so glad I found it now because thoroughly enjoyed it. it was sort of like reading a true life memoir of JR hewing or some other Southern family that has to adjust to the times and find their own way in life. In my idea of a perfect world everyone would stay together, stay in Louisiana and stay prosperous and happy. It may not play out that way but it sure was an enjoyable ride.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Katherine Phillips

    I love biographies and found this was endearing and beautifully spun. I had no idea who Blaine Lourd was…but it didn’t matter. A boy growing up in bayou country resounded with me because of the DuPont side of my family. Candid and charming, Blaine Lourd wrote this in the tradition of Willie Morris.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Michelle

    A memoir mostly about growing up with a charismatic, risk taking father during the oil boom in southern Louisiana. Rich setting and immersive period details and told in a witty voice with very quotable observations on human nature. A fun read!

  11. 5 out of 5

    Kate

    Memoir, love letter to a father and a male coming of age book. A homage to a particular kind of Southern (Louisiana) masculinity. Important. Goes along with other contemporary US social examinations like Nomadland and Hillbilly Elegy. We need to know ourselves. urgently..

  12. 5 out of 5

    Alison

    I saw this audiobook featured on a shelf near the checkout desk at my local library so I decided to take it home and give it a listen for the following reasons: my husband's family is from Louisiana and many family members still live there; he has been in the oil industry since the late 70's; and finally, we spent a lot of time in the Lafayette area, for both business and pleasure. I have to admit, there was a lot I could relate to, particularly the parts about working in the oil business and th I saw this audiobook featured on a shelf near the checkout desk at my local library so I decided to take it home and give it a listen for the following reasons: my husband's family is from Louisiana and many family members still live there; he has been in the oil industry since the late 70's; and finally, we spent a lot of time in the Lafayette area, for both business and pleasure. I have to admit, there was a lot I could relate to, particularly the parts about working in the oil business and the networking that takes place, the meteoric rise in finances that were made by many in that business and the devastation that came about with the oil bust in the early - mid 80's. Also, living in the Houston area, we are familiar with the trips across the border and I've been to many of the places he mentioned, however, we must have kept to the more 'family friendly' sections of these areas. When the author described a trip he and his father took to Reynosa, I thought I might end up stopping the audiobook and simply return it to the library unfinished but I ended up skipping past the donkey portion and continued on. Despite the donkey scene, I thought the first half of the book was fairly good. I would have liked a bit more description of the local area (it seems the author's best descriptions were reserved for the hunting and fishing scenes) and I didn't feel like I really got to know or understand anyone other than the author and his father and even in those cases, it was still sketchy. I know the book was really more about their relationship but the younger two siblings were barely mentioned so we never got to understand why they turned out the way they did. There were also too many gaps of time in the book and a few times I had to stop the audio and go back because I couldn't follow the thread of the story. This was especially true of the second half of the book. It felt as though the author had simply rushed forward in order to tell the rest of the story and he lost interest in his own book. Very often I thought perhaps I must have missed something but after replaying it 2 or 3 times, I realized the author skipped ahead in his story without connecting the dots. The result was that I never quite knew how much time had passed between the anecdotes or how or why the relationships changed the way they did. For instance, what was it precisely that led both Bryan and later, Blaine, to move away from La. and to seemingly reject their family? What was it about Deb's husband that caused the family to not accept him? As a result, I had no empathy toward any of the persons in the book and I was left disappointed. The characters (and I keep thinking of these people as 'characters', like in a novel because I never got a real sense of any kind of emotion) all seemed to be flat and unemotional which gave me the sense the author is very much divorced from his own emotions. I would think, getting a call from your mother who tells you your best friend, a young man of 27, has died might be described as knocking your breath out of your chest and having your knees buckling out from under you as you struggle to comprehend the words you were hearing. Instead, it is all told matter of factly and you never hear about it again after the funeral, so you don't get the sense of the impact of what the author actually felt at that time. Since I was listening to the audiobook, which was read by the author, I also hoped to hear the flavor of Southern Louisiana in his voice but I only managed to catch the barest hint of his Cajun accent a few brief times. At the very least, we should have been treated to that wonderful accent when he describes someone as speaking with a thick Louisiana accent but nope. Disappointed again. It's hard to get the true flavor of Cajun Country when the reader sounds like the story could have taken place almost anywhere. Perhaps I should have gotten the print version of this book. At least then I could have imagined the accents in my head.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Jess

    Thank you to Simon and Schuster, by way of NetGalley, for providing an advance reading copy. Born on the Bayou recounts Blaine Lourd’s childhood and adolescence among the sub-tropical wetlands of New Iberia, Louisiana, and documents Lourd’s observations of his father’s meteoric rise and slow decline in the oil business (or ‘awl bidness’, as the locals refer to it). Blaine Lourd and his father, Puffer, were extremely close. Sharing hunting trips and hours together in duck blinds, they developed a d Thank you to Simon and Schuster, by way of NetGalley, for providing an advance reading copy. Born on the Bayou recounts Blaine Lourd’s childhood and adolescence among the sub-tropical wetlands of New Iberia, Louisiana, and documents Lourd’s observations of his father’s meteoric rise and slow decline in the oil business (or ‘awl bidness’, as the locals refer to it). Blaine Lourd and his father, Puffer, were extremely close. Sharing hunting trips and hours together in duck blinds, they developed a deep bond that Lourd would carry through his childhood. But there comes a moment in most men’s lives when they discover that their dad is not a superhero. My friend said for him it was when he was old enough to realise that his dad couldn’t change the traffic lights by snapping his fingers–in Lourd’s case this realisation came under more somber circumstances. Puffer was always a drinker. Whether it was a neighbourhood barbeque, a day playing the ponies, or just quitting time, it seemed Puffer always had a drink in his hand. It was an innocuous habit and his sons made a game out of it: Blaine and his brother Tutu would fight over who got to bring Puffer his next beer while mowing the lawn–the front yard alone ‘was about a four-beer job’–and the winner carried that pride for the rest of the day. Southern men have great respect for their fathers and Puffer’s children were no different. Professionally, Puffer was doing better and better. He climbed the ranks in the booming oil industry that was Louisiana in the 1970s; but born with the charisma of a salesman and an entrepreneurial spirit, Puffer decided to go into business for himself. Work was fun, sociable, profitable and he celebrated by drinking at work as well–he would often visit his clients ‘with a business card in one hand and a bottle of Crown Royal in the other’. As his business excelled, the money came rolling in and the Lourds loved the high-life: new cars for Puffer, new dresses for the women, country clubs, private hunting camps and golf tournaments. When the bottom inevitably fell out of the oil industry several years later, Puffer was too proud to alter the lifestyle to which his family had become accustomed. When asked if everything was going well at work he would typically counter with ‘I never had a bad day’, his trademark response to most questions. Wanting his family to have the best, he encouraged his wife and children to keep spending and the money went out faster than it came in. Having once turned to booze in moments of celebration, he now found it a welcome distraction from the pressures of daily life and slowly withdrew from his family as his intake increased. Now a shadow of his former self, Blaine comes to realise that his daddy can’t do everything after all and sets out to forge his own career to support himself. The collected anecdotes create a sympathetic portrait of Lourd’s father: Puffer was a victim of circumstance as much as pride. Lourd does well to parallel the story of his professional success as directly inverse to Puffer’s decline, which allows the story to come full-circle and reinforces the familial themes in the book. Finally, as Lourd reflects on a memorable day with Puffer in a duck blind, it’s as if he realises that his father will always be a superhero in his memory. And no matter what curveballs might come their way they are just two men who will always have Louisiana.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Deb Lester

    Blaine Lourd is a Los Angeles businessman. But his poignant new memoir, Born on the Bayou tells the story of a young boy growing up in "Cajun" country. This is a father-son tale that will make you smile, make you nostalgic and make you contemplate the relationships in your own life. Lourd is a born storyteller and his book is both raw and sentimental. Readers who love non-fiction and memoirs should not miss this one. It was amazingly detailed and full of sharp intellect and a true sense of famil Blaine Lourd is a Los Angeles businessman. But his poignant new memoir, Born on the Bayou tells the story of a young boy growing up in "Cajun" country. This is a father-son tale that will make you smile, make you nostalgic and make you contemplate the relationships in your own life. Lourd is a born storyteller and his book is both raw and sentimental. Readers who love non-fiction and memoirs should not miss this one. It was amazingly detailed and full of sharp intellect and a true sense of family. Lourd proves that you might take the boy out of the Bayou but you never take the Bayou out of the boy! I read non-fiction on occasion and truly enjoy it. I have often found that true life experiences are sometimes more interesting than most fiction. Memoirs are a favorite of mine for a lot of reasons. I like the intimacy that the reader gets from the story. It's like being a part of that person's life for a little while. I like the realistic portrayals of hard times and good times. I like the honesty in it. And wow, did Blaine Lourd deliver with his new memoir, Born on the Bayou. This is such a good memoir. I found myself wondering things about when I wasn't reading it. Lourd has a wonderful voice for writing. His storytelling ability is memorable. I think this is one that will stick with readers for awhile. It is basically, a father-son story. Lourd tells about his life in Southern Louisiana and how it shaped him into the man he became. It has everything from hunting to chasing women and will draw the reader like bees to honey. Lourd grew up in the 70's during the oil boom and subsequent collapse in the early 80's. His father, known to many as "Puffer", was a trucker who taught his boys about becoming a man. It is a candid story that doesn't hesitate to show the good and the bad of this man's life and how his influence changed his sons for the better and the worse. I loved the admiration Lourd felt for his older brother and his acceptance of his fathers flaws. I found myself wanting to know more than even the memoir provided, a rare thing in non-fiction for me. This is also a rags to riches kind of story. Blaine Lourd didn't stay in the Bayou, but the Bayou never left him, even when he became a big shot in the big city. For one thing is shows the American Dream is still real and is still happening. There are those who still come up hard, but come up strong. Lourd's book exemplifies what hard work will get you and how you must never forget where you came from. The sense of family is strong in this book, the sense of tradition and a dying way of life. We may be becoming a more urban society as opposed to the rural society of the past, but is that good or bad? Bottom Line: This was an amazing story. I can't recommend it enough if you like this kind of reading. And if you don't and you're looking to broaden your horizons a bit, this is the memoir to do it with. Excellent, storytelling. A strong intellect and sheer raw honesty. It's a great read and I hope this isn't the only story we get from this author. He certainly knows a thing or two about telling a good story!

  15. 5 out of 5

    PabloHabla

    Inside look at the true culture of south Louisiana. Rich in traditions, great food and fun. Almost every young boy loves to go fishing and hunting with their dad, and in coonass country it's can be how you feed your family. It's hard to break the chains that bind us to our past when they are so closely intertwined with our roots. Inside look at the true culture of south Louisiana. Rich in traditions, great food and fun. Almost every young boy loves to go fishing and hunting with their dad, and in coonass country it's can be how you feed your family. It's hard to break the chains that bind us to our past when they are so closely intertwined with our roots.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Roxanne

    I won this book from Goodreads. I enjoyed the book but I did not really catch the flavor of the South as much as the book jacket describes. It is a personal memoir of the author Blaine Lourd and his experiences growing up the Louisiana Bayou. He grew up in the 1970's in New Iberia, Louisiana with his father at his side. The author says that President Jefferson only wanted New Orleans in the Louisiana Purchase and did not really care about the rest of the state. I am from Calif so the South is pr I won this book from Goodreads. I enjoyed the book but I did not really catch the flavor of the South as much as the book jacket describes. It is a personal memoir of the author Blaine Lourd and his experiences growing up the Louisiana Bayou. He grew up in the 1970's in New Iberia, Louisiana with his father at his side. The author says that President Jefferson only wanted New Orleans in the Louisiana Purchase and did not really care about the rest of the state. I am from Calif so the South is pretty different for me. New Orleans has the glamour, the art and the music and is sort of the soul of the state. But New Iberia is way out in the country. It is made up of bottomland-pine trees, oak trees,Spanish moss, marshes and bayous. It is in the heart of the Cajun Country. His father nicknamed "Puffer" was a saleman in the oil business. Puffer taught Blaine how to hunt for mallard ducks in a duckblind. Duck hunting became a religion. His father was strict with rules and taught his son honor. Every August they a fishing trip. Puffer thought any child of his that wanted to leave the romantic South was a traitor. His first son Bryan left for college in Calif and became an agent at The William Morris Agency. Blaine went to LSU in the early 80's. in 1981 Congress and President Reagan made changes to the oil regulations and the South was devastated. Puffer's life began to unravel and he started to get distance from his family. Even his wife divorced him. Blaine could get a job in the oil business so he went to Calif also. He went into the banking industry and he stayed in Los Angeles. When Puffer got sick his boys took him in. This was a good book but it sounds like the childhood my husband had in the Midwest growing up. I really would have liked more of a Southern feel.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Susan Csoke

    Henry Puffer Lourd Jr. met and married a blonde church going woman from Texas named Sherion in the summer of 1959. Together they raised three sons and a daughter. Bryan, Blaine, Harvey and Deb. Henry ran an oil embargo in New Iberia, Louisiana. He provided his family with a life of luxury, prestige, privelage and Discipline. Bryan moved to L. A. and Blaine followed. Henrys oil business had drastically declined. Bryan was a banker, Blaine got a position with E>F> Hutton in Santa Monica as a finan Henry Puffer Lourd Jr. met and married a blonde church going woman from Texas named Sherion in the summer of 1959. Together they raised three sons and a daughter. Bryan, Blaine, Harvey and Deb. Henry ran an oil embargo in New Iberia, Louisiana. He provided his family with a life of luxury, prestige, privelage and Discipline. Bryan moved to L. A. and Blaine followed. Henrys oil business had drastically declined. Bryan was a banker, Blaine got a position with E>F> Hutton in Santa Monica as a financial consultant. Harvey/tutu married and later divorced. Deb married, had two kids, later divorced. She met someone new and had another child. Henry and Sherion eventually divorced. And after Henry had his legs amputated below the knees he went to live in Bryans house until he died. A HEARTWARMING STORY. THANK YOU GOODREADS FIRSTREADS FOR THIS FREE BOOK.!!!!

  18. 4 out of 5

    James

    Advice from a wealth management consultant and author: We all hold what we have to. I've learned much about what to be and do, and what not to be and do, from a man who rode the crest and learned the difference between luck and grace the hard way. I've learned that the brand-new car or mower will always become the damned old car or mower, in the same way people sometimes become old friends not from a deepening of closeness over time but instead, by default, through the simple passing of time. An Advice from a wealth management consultant and author: We all hold what we have to. I've learned much about what to be and do, and what not to be and do, from a man who rode the crest and learned the difference between luck and grace the hard way. I've learned that the brand-new car or mower will always become the damned old car or mower, in the same way people sometimes become old friends not from a deepening of closeness over time but instead, by default, through the simple passing of time. And hardest of all, I've learned that we have nothing so important as the silence we keep with ourselves, and that the money we waste on what we love may, in the end, be the only wealth we do not squander, and that generosity is never wasted because nothing else endures, and it may be all we carry with us out the window. What more can be said?

  19. 4 out of 5

    Scottsdale Public Library

    Born a spirited young buck in rural Cajun country to a proud Louisiana father fondly known as, “Puffer”, due to an early smoking habit, Blaine Lourde, charms us with his Southern coming of age tale during the oil boom of the 1970s. His father had almost overnight success and it seemed the money, like oil, would never stop flowing. Leaving no gritty or seedy detail out, the reader gets a glimpse of living high on the hog in Cajun country in the 70s. When the economy changed, his larger than life Born a spirited young buck in rural Cajun country to a proud Louisiana father fondly known as, “Puffer”, due to an early smoking habit, Blaine Lourde, charms us with his Southern coming of age tale during the oil boom of the 1970s. His father had almost overnight success and it seemed the money, like oil, would never stop flowing. Leaving no gritty or seedy detail out, the reader gets a glimpse of living high on the hog in Cajun country in the 70s. When the economy changed, his larger than life father never recovered. Blaine is very candid in matter-of-fact good ol' boy style about father and son relationships, when expectations disappoint, and the shift of father and son roles later in life. - Lisanne E.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Louise

    A charming, well written account of southern family's evolving internal dynamics and reversals of fortune through three generations. There's are some shadows of Mark Twain in the early, descriptive, Louisiana outdoorsy-boyhood part of the story and later on a light dusting of the 80's "Bright Lights Big City" vibe when events take the brothers to Los Angeles, but it doesn't go off the cliff into the Hollywood excess side of things. It stays focussed on the events within the family and ends in th A charming, well written account of southern family's evolving internal dynamics and reversals of fortune through three generations. There's are some shadows of Mark Twain in the early, descriptive, Louisiana outdoorsy-boyhood part of the story and later on a light dusting of the 80's "Bright Lights Big City" vibe when events take the brothers to Los Angeles, but it doesn't go off the cliff into the Hollywood excess side of things. It stays focussed on the events within the family and ends in the logical place. The only thing that could add to my enjoyment of this work would be an audiobook read by the author or (a qualified performer with an authentic Louisiana lilt).

  21. 4 out of 5

    Laurie

    Mixed emotions. "Back in 1973, when my family first moved into it, Bluehaven was in an area of Iberia Parish that the townspeople called 'the country." I grew up on Bluehaven Drive, down the street from Blaine's family. His warm, rich accounts of life on Bayou Teche brought me right back to New Iberia, right back to the joys and sadness of family, culture, and growing up in coonass county. The rating was knocked down from 5 stars to 3 because Blaine admitted not all of his memoir was true. That o Mixed emotions. "Back in 1973, when my family first moved into it, Bluehaven was in an area of Iberia Parish that the townspeople called 'the country." I grew up on Bluehaven Drive, down the street from Blaine's family. His warm, rich accounts of life on Bayou Teche brought me right back to New Iberia, right back to the joys and sadness of family, culture, and growing up in coonass county. The rating was knocked down from 5 stars to 3 because Blaine admitted not all of his memoir was true. That one crazy Cajun trait, exaggeration for the sake of a good story, doesn't work in a memoir.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Ron S

    A memoir about growing up in Louisiana with a father in the "awl bidness" (oil business) through the boom years of the 70s until the crash of the 80s. This is a bit of an odd book; it's really the memoir of an upper middle class kid whose alcoholic father likes to hunt and fish, and not some sort of tale of coonass/redneck misadventures, as the cover might lead one to think. However, the author's writing style, which is simple, heart-felt and easily readable, elevates the tale. A memoir about growing up in Louisiana with a father in the "awl bidness" (oil business) through the boom years of the 70s until the crash of the 80s. This is a bit of an odd book; it's really the memoir of an upper middle class kid whose alcoholic father likes to hunt and fish, and not some sort of tale of coonass/redneck misadventures, as the cover might lead one to think. However, the author's writing style, which is simple, heart-felt and easily readable, elevates the tale.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Paul

    Excellent story about growing up in the shadow of a father who seems larger than life and realizing that to move on you need to move away, and follow your own footsteps. The book at times seems to be a stereotype of life in southern Louisiana but you are so perfectly immersed in the life and culture by the authors vivid descriptions that you have to believe it was like it is described. I think you need to be a man to truly enjoy this book.

  24. 5 out of 5

    CURTIS NUGENT

    I thought this would be a memoir (that is how it is presented) of a young man growing up in south Louisiana. It is so much more. It is more about a relationship of a boy and his father who he idolizes. Later, upon becoming a man, he begins to see his father's faults and behind the facade. This does not make him think less of his father, but rather accept him with all his faults. My father grew up in Louisiana so that sort of made this a story I could relate to. I thought this would be a memoir (that is how it is presented) of a young man growing up in south Louisiana. It is so much more. It is more about a relationship of a boy and his father who he idolizes. Later, upon becoming a man, he begins to see his father's faults and behind the facade. This does not make him think less of his father, but rather accept him with all his faults. My father grew up in Louisiana so that sort of made this a story I could relate to.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Katrina K

    Goodreads win. Will read and review once received. I was so surprised that I ended up liking this book. It really is a guy's guy sort of book, but even with that feeling I got from it I still ended up liking it. The book was easy going and well written. I am really happy that I was able to read this book. I would recommend it to anyone looking for a good read with a few laughing moments. Goodreads win. Will read and review once received. I was so surprised that I ended up liking this book. It really is a guy's guy sort of book, but even with that feeling I got from it I still ended up liking it. The book was easy going and well written. I am really happy that I was able to read this book. I would recommend it to anyone looking for a good read with a few laughing moments.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Melissa

    This was just an ok read for me. I think men will find this more enjoyable than women. The writer has a unique style of writing and holds the readers attention, it just wasn't for me. I was given this book in exchange for an honest review via Netgalley. This was just an ok read for me. I think men will find this more enjoyable than women. The writer has a unique style of writing and holds the readers attention, it just wasn't for me. I was given this book in exchange for an honest review via Netgalley.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Cheri Marshall

    Excellent! Excellent read. Captivating, funny, sad and true to life. His description of bayou country is spot on. You won't want to put it down. Thank you Blaine. Yes, excellent indeed. Excellent! Excellent read. Captivating, funny, sad and true to life. His description of bayou country is spot on. You won't want to put it down. Thank you Blaine. Yes, excellent indeed.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Nancy

    I won this in a Goodeads giveaway. I did enjoy this memoir but like others mentioned, the scene with the donkey in Mexico was too much.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Judith Lott

    Very interesting story of life in our southern states - enjoyed it. Thanks to GoodReads for the book and the opportunity to read it!

  30. 4 out of 5

    Stephanie

    Working on my review. This is an an provided by the publisher and netgally. Reviewing for Night and Day book blog http://ndbbr2014.com Stephanie Powell Working on my review. This is an an provided by the publisher and netgally. Reviewing for Night and Day book blog http://ndbbr2014.com Stephanie Powell

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