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Nightmare Magazine 25: October 2014. Women Destroy Horror! Special Issue

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NIGHTMARE is an online horror and dark fantasy magazine. In NIGHTMARE's pages, you will find all kinds of horror fiction, from zombie stories and haunted house tales, to visceral psychological horror. Funded as a stretch goal of our sister-magazine LIGHTSPEED’s Women Destroy Science Fiction! Kickstarter campaign, this month we're presenting a special issue of NIGHTMARE call NIGHTMARE is an online horror and dark fantasy magazine. In NIGHTMARE's pages, you will find all kinds of horror fiction, from zombie stories and haunted house tales, to visceral psychological horror. Funded as a stretch goal of our sister-magazine LIGHTSPEED’s Women Destroy Science Fiction! Kickstarter campaign, this month we're presenting a special issue of NIGHTMARE called Women Destroy Horror!: an all-horror extravaganza entirely written—and edited!—by women. Here’s what we’ve got lined up for you in this special issue: Original horror—edited by legendary editor Ellen Datlow—by Gemma Files, Pat Cadigan, Catherine MacLeod, Katherine Crighton, and Livia Llewellyn. Reprints—also selected by Datlow—by Joyce Carol Oates, Tanith Lee, and A.R. Morlan. And nonfiction articles—edited by Stoker Award-winning author Lisa Morton—by Galen Dara, Lucy A. Snyder, Maria Alexander, Chesya Burke, Lisa Morton, and Jessica Amanda Salmonson. Plus an original cover illustration by Carly Janine Mazur.


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NIGHTMARE is an online horror and dark fantasy magazine. In NIGHTMARE's pages, you will find all kinds of horror fiction, from zombie stories and haunted house tales, to visceral psychological horror. Funded as a stretch goal of our sister-magazine LIGHTSPEED’s Women Destroy Science Fiction! Kickstarter campaign, this month we're presenting a special issue of NIGHTMARE call NIGHTMARE is an online horror and dark fantasy magazine. In NIGHTMARE's pages, you will find all kinds of horror fiction, from zombie stories and haunted house tales, to visceral psychological horror. Funded as a stretch goal of our sister-magazine LIGHTSPEED’s Women Destroy Science Fiction! Kickstarter campaign, this month we're presenting a special issue of NIGHTMARE called Women Destroy Horror!: an all-horror extravaganza entirely written—and edited!—by women. Here’s what we’ve got lined up for you in this special issue: Original horror—edited by legendary editor Ellen Datlow—by Gemma Files, Pat Cadigan, Catherine MacLeod, Katherine Crighton, and Livia Llewellyn. Reprints—also selected by Datlow—by Joyce Carol Oates, Tanith Lee, and A.R. Morlan. And nonfiction articles—edited by Stoker Award-winning author Lisa Morton—by Galen Dara, Lucy A. Snyder, Maria Alexander, Chesya Burke, Lisa Morton, and Jessica Amanda Salmonson. Plus an original cover illustration by Carly Janine Mazur.

30 review for Nightmare Magazine 25: October 2014. Women Destroy Horror! Special Issue

  1. 4 out of 5

    Ben Nash

    The Destroy Project excited me from the first time I heard about it, but Nightmare magazine is the first of the three issues I've read. I'm not nearly as much of a Horror reader as I am a science fiction and fantasy reader, so go figure. Of the original pieces, It Feels Better Biting Down worked the best. The more narrow focus and creative take on body horror connected with me and creeped me out. The best story, though, was the reprint from Tanith Lee, Black and White Sky. Magpies start inexpl The Destroy Project excited me from the first time I heard about it, but Nightmare magazine is the first of the three issues I've read. I'm not nearly as much of a Horror reader as I am a science fiction and fantasy reader, so go figure. Of the original pieces, It Feels Better Biting Down worked the best. The more narrow focus and creative take on body horror connected with me and creeped me out. The best story, though, was the reprint from Tanith Lee, Black and White Sky. Magpies start inexplicably rising into the sky in a vividly apocalyptic Britain. Questions of human nature and existence are explored by the citizens of a small rural town. Death and resurrection also came to mind, though in a sort of gruesome reversal of the Christian familiarity--life rises to the heavens leaving the people to make sense of the mystery until death finally falls down on them. Pat Cadigan's Unfair Exchange , Katherine Crighton's The Inside and the Outside, and Joyce Carol Oates's Martyrdom all worked for me on some levels. Stories with mythic elements usually stand out to me, but the last three stories of this issue, which all have these elements, were the ones which worked least. The writing is good, but they didn't connect. It's probably partly my lack of familiarity with the genre, but I think horror works best when there's a personal connection, and I didn't have one here. I was also initially disappointed by the essays in the second part. Then I realized I was expecting them to be something they never promised. An Historical Overview of Classic Horror Novels and Women's Short Horror Fiction: An Historical Overview both are good jumping-off points for some good reading. With all the historic works out there, I wonder if anyone has done a website collecting the public domain works. The H Word: The H is for Ha­rass­ment (a/k/a Hor­ror’s Misog­yny Prob­lem) added another layer to the already monumental pile of evidence out there of misogyny in our genres--Burke ends with a good reminder. This was altogether a good read, one which I'll certainly recommend along with the other Destroy efforts. It was a fitting October read.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Mir

    Maybe I'll read some of these for Halloween. Maybe I'll read some of these for Halloween.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Richard Houchin

    Several of these stories made me uncomfortable and I'd rather not read them again, so mission accomplished for horror! The editor says that it was an entirely unexpected coincidence that twins feature prominently in many unrelated stories in this edition, but I read it and now I'm having twins. Spoooky. Several of these stories made me uncomfortable and I'd rather not read them again, so mission accomplished for horror! The editor says that it was an entirely unexpected coincidence that twins feature prominently in many unrelated stories in this edition, but I read it and now I'm having twins. Spoooky.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Dystopian

    I wanted to love love love this but it was just okay. I didn't find the horror horrifying or scary or even that unsettling (bar a few exceptions). I wanted to love love love this but it was just okay. I didn't find the horror horrifying or scary or even that unsettling (bar a few exceptions).

  5. 4 out of 5

    bee

    Fiction This is Not For You by Gemma Files: 3/5 Sideshow by Catherine MacLeod: 2.5/5 Unfair Exchange by Pat Cadigan: 2.75/5 The Inside and the Outside by Katherine Crighton: 3/5 It Feels Better Biting Down by Livia Llewellyn: 2/5 Martyrdom by Joyce Carol Oates: 1/5 Black and White Sky by Tanith Lee: 3.5/5 ...Warmer by A. R. Morlan: 3/5 Non-fiction An Historical Overview of Classic Horror Novels by Lucy A. Snyder: 4/5 Baby Got Backbone: What Makes Strong Women Kick in Horror Films and TV Shows by Ma Fiction This is Not For You by Gemma Files: 3/5 Sideshow by Catherine MacLeod: 2.5/5 Unfair Exchange by Pat Cadigan: 2.75/5 The Inside and the Outside by Katherine Crighton: 3/5 It Feels Better Biting Down by Livia Llewellyn: 2/5 Martyrdom by Joyce Carol Oates: 1/5 Black and White Sky by Tanith Lee: 3.5/5 ...Warmer by A. R. Morlan: 3/5 Non-fiction An Historical Overview of Classic Horror Novels by Lucy A. Snyder: 4/5 Baby Got Backbone: What Makes Strong Women Kick in Horror Films and TV Shows by Maria Alexander: 4.25/5 The H Word: The H is for Harassment (a/k/a Horror's Misogyny Problem) by Chesya Burke: 4/5 Women's Short Horror Fiction: An Historical Overview by Jessica Amanda Salmonson: 4/5 Average rating: 3.08/5 stars, pushed down to a 2/5 because that more accurately encompasses my feelings about this issue as a whole. Nothing here majorly stood out to me or screamed "amazing!" or even "great!" to be honest, and I felt like I didn't really gain anything overall from reading it other than a slight education on horror short story history in the non-fiction section.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Corinne

    So far only read: It Feels Better Biting Down by Livia Llewellyn (pub 2014) - 1.5* wtf I have no idea what that was about. With an illustration like this I was intrigued but the story's meaning went way above my head. illustrator credit to: Reiko Murakami https://www.reikomurakami.com/ Twins that are a bit unusual with their "extra finger" curled like a scorpion stinger and their toothsome smile are drawn outside and what they see over their fence becomes absolutely confusing and far out there. So far only read: It Feels Better Biting Down by Livia Llewellyn (pub 2014) - 1.5* wtf I have no idea what that was about. With an illustration like this I was intrigued but the story's meaning went way above my head. illustrator credit to: Reiko Murakami https://www.reikomurakami.com/ Twins that are a bit unusual with their "extra finger" curled like a scorpion stinger and their toothsome smile are drawn outside and what they see over their fence becomes absolutely confusing and far out there. stupid.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Eggp

    Magpies and ladies both sinister in large groups mind your own business.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Claudia Piña

    4-4.5 Precioso.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Fantasy Literature

    I wouldn’t normally review a magazine from last month, but the October issue of Nightmare Magazine is something special, and it’s still available. In this issue, Women Destroy Horror! Issue 25 is devoted to horror written by women, the result of a Kickstarter originally intended to help women destroy science fiction (in the June 2014 issue of Lightspeed Magazine) that met its stretch goals. (Full disclosure: I contributed to the Kickstarter.) The guest fiction editor of this issue is Ellen Datlow I wouldn’t normally review a magazine from last month, but the October issue of Nightmare Magazine is something special, and it’s still available. In this issue, Women Destroy Horror! Issue 25 is devoted to horror written by women, the result of a Kickstarter originally intended to help women destroy science fiction (in the June 2014 issue of Lightspeed Magazine) that met its stretch goals. (Full disclosure: I contributed to the Kickstarter.) The guest fiction editor of this issue is Ellen Datlow, who is the foremost horror editor working today, of any gender. She picked a lot of great stories for this special issue. Her editorial reminds us that women not only once dominated horror, but actually invented it. Ghost stories and gothic tales were written by women for decades before... Read More: http://www.fantasyliterature.com/maga...

  10. 4 out of 5

    Schweighsr

    The first story in this issue is "This Is Not For You" by Gemma Files gave me nightmares. It is an amazing, creepy, perfect slice of life worthy of Shirley Jackson. I have to seek out more stories by this author! The first story in this issue is "This Is Not For You" by Gemma Files gave me nightmares. It is an amazing, creepy, perfect slice of life worthy of Shirley Jackson. I have to seek out more stories by this author!

  11. 5 out of 5

    Sian Jones

    As another reviewer said, I wanted to love this issue (as much as I loved its sister issue, Women Destroy Science Fiction), but I couldn't. The fiction was oddly unaffecting -- even the iconic reprints. The roundtable discussion is the main reason to pick this issue up. As another reviewer said, I wanted to love this issue (as much as I loved its sister issue, Women Destroy Science Fiction), but I couldn't. The fiction was oddly unaffecting -- even the iconic reprints. The roundtable discussion is the main reason to pick this issue up.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Jennifer

    Some of these were good but holy shit that JCO story. I have never read anything more fucked up in my life and now I can't get it out of my head. Wish I hadn't read it. Some of these were good but holy shit that JCO story. I have never read anything more fucked up in my life and now I can't get it out of my head. Wish I hadn't read it.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Stephanie

    LOVED the Tanith Lee reprint in this.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Rob Port

    Meh.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Christopher Shultz

  16. 5 out of 5

    Liz Neering

  17. 5 out of 5

    Michael Van Vleet

  18. 5 out of 5

    T

  19. 5 out of 5

    Steve Sick

  20. 4 out of 5

    Diane Hagen

  21. 4 out of 5

    jennet wheatstonelllsl

  22. 5 out of 5

    Laurie

  23. 4 out of 5

    Vern

  24. 5 out of 5

    Mathew

  25. 4 out of 5

    Sarah Carter

  26. 4 out of 5

    Amelia

  27. 5 out of 5

    Melbourne Bitter

  28. 5 out of 5

    Jen

  29. 5 out of 5

    Rosemarie Brizak

  30. 5 out of 5

    Chris Estes

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