Hot Best Seller

In the Mind's Eye: Visual Thinkers, Gifted People with Dyslexia and Other Learning Difficulties, Computer Images and the Ironies of Creativity

Availability: Ready to download

This inspiring book profiles gifted individuals who used nontraditional methods in their work as it explodes many myths about conventional intelligence and charts new vistas for today's computer visualization technologies. Some of our most original intellects--Albert Einstein, Thomas Edison, Lewis Carroll, and Winston Churchill--relied heavily on visual modes of thought, p This inspiring book profiles gifted individuals who used nontraditional methods in their work as it explodes many myths about conventional intelligence and charts new vistas for today's computer visualization technologies. Some of our most original intellects--Albert Einstein, Thomas Edison, Lewis Carroll, and Winston Churchill--relied heavily on visual modes of thought, processing information in terms of images instead of words or numbers.Thomas G. West examines the learning difficulties experienced by both famous and everyday people, and he explores how recent neurological research shows an association between visual talents and verbal difficulties. In the Mind's Eye probes new data on dyslexics to see how computers enhance the creative potential of visual thinkers, as well as interactive computer applications at all levels of education and work. Updated with a new preface, epilogue, and expanded notes, this volume could be the clarion call for educators and corporations to mine this untapped resource of highly creative talent in our midst.


Compare

This inspiring book profiles gifted individuals who used nontraditional methods in their work as it explodes many myths about conventional intelligence and charts new vistas for today's computer visualization technologies. Some of our most original intellects--Albert Einstein, Thomas Edison, Lewis Carroll, and Winston Churchill--relied heavily on visual modes of thought, p This inspiring book profiles gifted individuals who used nontraditional methods in their work as it explodes many myths about conventional intelligence and charts new vistas for today's computer visualization technologies. Some of our most original intellects--Albert Einstein, Thomas Edison, Lewis Carroll, and Winston Churchill--relied heavily on visual modes of thought, processing information in terms of images instead of words or numbers.Thomas G. West examines the learning difficulties experienced by both famous and everyday people, and he explores how recent neurological research shows an association between visual talents and verbal difficulties. In the Mind's Eye probes new data on dyslexics to see how computers enhance the creative potential of visual thinkers, as well as interactive computer applications at all levels of education and work. Updated with a new preface, epilogue, and expanded notes, this volume could be the clarion call for educators and corporations to mine this untapped resource of highly creative talent in our midst.

30 review for In the Mind's Eye: Visual Thinkers, Gifted People with Dyslexia and Other Learning Difficulties, Computer Images and the Ironies of Creativity

  1. 5 out of 5

    Elizabeth

    12/5/20 While this book had a lot of interesting things to say about dyslexia and how it can enhance certain aspects of thought, it was a little heavy on predictions that did not come true about a revolution in education and computers helping us quirky brained people. Still, this is one of the only books I have found that highlights the benefits of dyslexia. Most books on the topic are the equivalent of a sad head shake and a "poor child, what a hard life is ahead of you." Yes, my life has not a 12/5/20 While this book had a lot of interesting things to say about dyslexia and how it can enhance certain aspects of thought, it was a little heavy on predictions that did not come true about a revolution in education and computers helping us quirky brained people. Still, this is one of the only books I have found that highlights the benefits of dyslexia. Most books on the topic are the equivalent of a sad head shake and a "poor child, what a hard life is ahead of you." Yes, my life has not always been easy, but I feel like many of my talents and accomplishments are because of, not in spite of my dyslexia. It's nice to see the science backs me up.

  2. 5 out of 5

    4th-8th

    This is not my review, but it is from Thomas West's blog http://inthemindseyedyslexicrenaissan... Learning to See The theme of the late-bloomer reappears again and again with Churchill. He was not an early reader, but greatly loved reading once he became proficient. He had difficulty with speech as a youth, but developed, in time, an extraordinary sensitivity and skill with language. He seemed to be poor in nearly every aspect of school, until his late teens when, at Sandhurst, he developed with g This is not my review, but it is from Thomas West's blog http://inthemindseyedyslexicrenaissan... Learning to See The theme of the late-bloomer reappears again and again with Churchill. He was not an early reader, but greatly loved reading once he became proficient. He had difficulty with speech as a youth, but developed, in time, an extraordinary sensitivity and skill with language. He seemed to be poor in nearly every aspect of school, until his late teens when, at Sandhurst, he developed with great rapidity--feeling himself "growing up almost every week"--then finishing well ahead of most of his peers. Even his great love of painting was developed quite late, when he was middle-aged. And, of course, his greatest achievements during World War II were reserved for the years in which most would have already gone into retirement (and some time after he and others regarded his political career as essentially "finished"). What, then, can be said of his education as a writer and historian? His education during his years at Harrow (where, after all, he did not do very well) would not seem sufficient to explain his great skill or depth of knowledge and understanding in later years. Nor would even his oft-repeated study of elementary English composition and grammar. His years at Sandhurst were designed for the active and practical military professional, not to provide a background in the literature of the military historian. Where and when had he read the great authors, to provide a base for his native writing skills? Once again, late-blooming seems the answer and seems the dominant pattern. Like Faraday, Churchill started late but he never stopped. And he followed his own program, in his own time, for his own purposes. After Sandhurst, and after brief exciting exploits in Cuba, he was posted with his British Army unit to India. During this time, he entered upon a program of reading to correct the deficiencies of Harrow and Sandhurst. If we are correct in asserting that Churchill developed capabilities greater than others, but later than others (as some of those we have been considering), then it is not hard to imagine that his program of self study had the right timing and conditions for the greatest benefit (perhaps much greater than one would usually obtain as part of a conventional university program of study). In India, Churchill had apparently taken well to the easy routine of military duties and regimental competitions. But when his need for deeper and broader knowledge came it was abrupt and strong: “It was not until this winter of 1896, when I had almost completed my twenty-second year, that the desire for learning came upon me. I began to feel myself wanting in even the vaguest knowledge about many large spheres of thought.” By this time, he had developed a feeling for language and an appreciation for words "fitting and falling into their places like pennies in the slot." He had developed a extensive vocabulary, yet he was aware that he was not always sure of the meaning of certain words and was hesitant to use them "for fear of being absurd." He was aware that he knew something about a variety of topics, such as tactics or politics or honorable behaviour. But what of a topic such as ethics? “. . . In Bangalore there was no one to tell me about Ethics for love or money. . . . This was only typical of a dozen similar mental needs that now began to press insistently upon me. I knew of course that the youths at the universities were stuffed with all this patter at nineteen and twenty, and could pose you entrapping questions or give baffling answers. We never set much store by them or their affected superiority, remembering that they were only at their books, while we were commanding men and guarding the Empire. Nevertheless I had sometimes resented the apt and copious information which some of them seemed to possess, and I now wished I could find a competent teacher whom I could listen to and cross-examine for an hour or so every day.” So without an instructor, he taught himself. He wrote to ask his mother to send him books. He started with Gibbon's Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire: “I was immediately dominated both by the story and the style. All through the long glistening middle hours of the Indian day, from when we quited stables till the evening shadows proclaimed the hour of polo, I devoured Gibbon. I rode triumphantly through it from end to end and enjoyed it all. I scribbled all my opinions on the margins of the pages. . . It was a curious education . . . because I approached it with an empty, hungry mind, and with fairly strong jaws; and what I got I bit. . . .” For a time during this period he read history and philosophy four or five hours each day. In addition to Gibbon, he read Plato, Aristotle, Schopenhauer, Malthus, Darwin and many other books of "lesser standing." The education was "curious" but effective. As one biographer commented: “In fact, it was a very wide and remarkable one; Churchill's selection of books was eclectic and random, but the purpose was serious: what he read he remembered, and he challenged and questioned what he read. This self-education was the first real indication of his ability, his determination, and his independence. It may also be seen as the first clear sign of a personal ambition to succeed in life.”

  3. 4 out of 5

    Andy

    This book is very interesting, though I'm not sure that Faraday, Maxwell and Einstein had Dyslexia- maybe learning difficulties though. Finding other ways to communicate at a different plane, like the visual-spatial, isn't new though. I enjoyed the profiles very much. This book is very interesting, though I'm not sure that Faraday, Maxwell and Einstein had Dyslexia- maybe learning difficulties though. Finding other ways to communicate at a different plane, like the visual-spatial, isn't new though. I enjoyed the profiles very much.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Jim Crocker

    If you imagine that you are a visual thinker, then this book is for you. If you think your friend or partner is a little strange, then this book is for you. In the Mind's Eye is a real eye opener. If you imagine that you are a visual thinker, then this book is for you. If you think your friend or partner is a little strange, then this book is for you. In the Mind's Eye is a real eye opener.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Nikki McDorman

    Very good, very thorough; reads like a textbook, though.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Trevor

    I found this book at a thrift shop while on vacation, I don't think I would have ever run into it otherwise. I was pleasantly surprised. In the Mind's Eye reads into the strengths of visual thinking, and how those with verbal weakness like dyslexics often have unrecognized advantages to make up for it. Personally I am a rather verbal thinker, but the book was thought provoking nonetheless. I got a peek into the mind of figures like Da Vinci, Einstein and Tesla, and gained some understanding of my I found this book at a thrift shop while on vacation, I don't think I would have ever run into it otherwise. I was pleasantly surprised. In the Mind's Eye reads into the strengths of visual thinking, and how those with verbal weakness like dyslexics often have unrecognized advantages to make up for it. Personally I am a rather verbal thinker, but the book was thought provoking nonetheless. I got a peek into the mind of figures like Da Vinci, Einstein and Tesla, and gained some understanding of my peers who are intelligent but think differently (and are often put down by those who are more verbal and argumentative). The book does sometimes feel it lacks structure, where points are often repeated and scattered. But it wasn't annoying as each tangent offered some insight. Worth the read.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Sarah Murphy

    A difficult book to read. High brow and at times academic, hard to maintain my interest, but worth reading merely for the subject matter. However the last half of the book appeared to drone on and on. Though the author does state not all of the book needs to be read. I found the case studies of those with dyslexic traits the most interesting. Really I was a little disappointed that there isn't an audio version of the book, as reading felt like a coursework university requirement. Overall a refer A difficult book to read. High brow and at times academic, hard to maintain my interest, but worth reading merely for the subject matter. However the last half of the book appeared to drone on and on. Though the author does state not all of the book needs to be read. I found the case studies of those with dyslexic traits the most interesting. Really I was a little disappointed that there isn't an audio version of the book, as reading felt like a coursework university requirement. Overall a reference book.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Sashburn

    Dense stuff. Have to read it. Have. To. Read. It. Supposedly, it will give me clues into myself and Eli.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Peter

    Interesting book, very academic. Not what I was looking for but that doesn't mean it is not a good book. Interesting book, very academic. Not what I was looking for but that doesn't mean it is not a good book.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Julia

    A fascinating read that challenged my understanding of how to teach children to read and write.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Teri

  12. 5 out of 5

    Rob Williams

  13. 4 out of 5

    Eugene Miya

  14. 4 out of 5

    Carla Rayacich

  15. 5 out of 5

    Patricia Wafer

  16. 4 out of 5

    Tova

  17. 5 out of 5

    Peter

  18. 4 out of 5

    Elise

  19. 5 out of 5

    Ivan

  20. 4 out of 5

    James

  21. 4 out of 5

    Julie Bennett

  22. 5 out of 5

    Bruce Emmerling

  23. 5 out of 5

    Amy

  24. 4 out of 5

    LauraW

  25. 4 out of 5

    Carolina Liechtenstein

  26. 5 out of 5

    Susan

  27. 4 out of 5

    Susan

  28. 4 out of 5

    Jeff Turner

  29. 4 out of 5

    Jude Brigley

  30. 4 out of 5

    Jon

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...