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Falconland: The Story of Frederick II: A Novel of Medieval Historical Fiction

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Frederick II was a child of privilege. Born into two royal families, he is in line to inherit the thrones of Italy, Sicily, Germany and the Holy Roman Empire until tragedy strikes, his birthright is lost, and his world is shattered. Frederick is taken to the Vatican to live with Pope Innocent III. Frederick learns about the politics and power of the medieval church and how Frederick II was a child of privilege. Born into two royal families, he is in line to inherit the thrones of Italy, Sicily, Germany and the Holy Roman Empire until tragedy strikes, his birthright is lost, and his world is shattered. Frederick is taken to the Vatican to live with Pope Innocent III. Frederick learns about the politics and power of the medieval church and how his family name has turned him into a target of his guardian, the pope. He is treated like a prisoner of The Church and nearly disavows his religion until a friendship with Francis of Assisi shows him another side of Christianity. After being sent to live with foster parents, Frederick escapes to the docks of Sicily… a melting pot of medieval culture. Here he gains valuable life lessons not taught by royal tutors. This unique mix of education and real world understanding is what shapes Frederick throughout his life. His final tutor is a former crusader named Hector MacBrae who takes Frederick under his wing and prepares him for his future as a leader. A leader who would change the world! In chronicling Frederick’s journey from a "street rat" on the docks of Palermo, too the title of Holy Roman emperor, Falconland tells the compelling story of a privileged child who loses everything, but overcomes the tragedy and abuse of his childhood to establish himself as one of the most powerful and enlightened leaders of the Middle Ages. This is the first of two historical novels about Frederick II. It takes you inside the intriguing world of medieval Europe, with its fierce rivalries among royal kingdoms, high born families and a rising and dark power within the church. You will never view the middle ages the same after reading Falconland.


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Frederick II was a child of privilege. Born into two royal families, he is in line to inherit the thrones of Italy, Sicily, Germany and the Holy Roman Empire until tragedy strikes, his birthright is lost, and his world is shattered. Frederick is taken to the Vatican to live with Pope Innocent III. Frederick learns about the politics and power of the medieval church and how Frederick II was a child of privilege. Born into two royal families, he is in line to inherit the thrones of Italy, Sicily, Germany and the Holy Roman Empire until tragedy strikes, his birthright is lost, and his world is shattered. Frederick is taken to the Vatican to live with Pope Innocent III. Frederick learns about the politics and power of the medieval church and how his family name has turned him into a target of his guardian, the pope. He is treated like a prisoner of The Church and nearly disavows his religion until a friendship with Francis of Assisi shows him another side of Christianity. After being sent to live with foster parents, Frederick escapes to the docks of Sicily… a melting pot of medieval culture. Here he gains valuable life lessons not taught by royal tutors. This unique mix of education and real world understanding is what shapes Frederick throughout his life. His final tutor is a former crusader named Hector MacBrae who takes Frederick under his wing and prepares him for his future as a leader. A leader who would change the world! In chronicling Frederick’s journey from a "street rat" on the docks of Palermo, too the title of Holy Roman emperor, Falconland tells the compelling story of a privileged child who loses everything, but overcomes the tragedy and abuse of his childhood to establish himself as one of the most powerful and enlightened leaders of the Middle Ages. This is the first of two historical novels about Frederick II. It takes you inside the intriguing world of medieval Europe, with its fierce rivalries among royal kingdoms, high born families and a rising and dark power within the church. You will never view the middle ages the same after reading Falconland.

38 review for Falconland: The Story of Frederick II: A Novel of Medieval Historical Fiction

  1. 5 out of 5

    Joel Hinrichs

    This might be acceptable as YA but not more - the content is a decent riff on actual history but the execution is chock-full of anachronisms, timing errors, map errors, and so forth. Example: the idea of a General Officer arose late in the Renaissance. We get a good rendition of a battle scene with infantry (commoners) knights (aspiring to higher standing) and barons / princes which supply them, all assist a king. Each noble's contingent answers to the noble. King Frederick assigns tasks to the p This might be acceptable as YA but not more - the content is a decent riff on actual history but the execution is chock-full of anachronisms, timing errors, map errors, and so forth. Example: the idea of a General Officer arose late in the Renaissance. We get a good rendition of a battle scene with infantry (commoners) knights (aspiring to higher standing) and barons / princes which supply them, all assist a king. Each noble's contingent answers to the noble. King Frederick assigns tasks to the princes etc. and the battle takes place. However, off the battlefield a coterie of generals appears during a war council: their one contribution is to nod happy agreement like marionettes. We have people going from the north coast of Italy to Rome and back in at most a few days. On horseback, where it's a killing thing (to the horse) to travel more than fifty miles in a day, and with liberal rest days sprinkled in between. We have All Kinds of 20th/21st Century figures of speech, exercise left to the reader, but trust me in the 491 pp on my Kindle I stopped counting halfway through the book at a couple of dozen groaners. Some understanding of storytelling, to be sure. But not much understanding of authorship, which includes subtle and complex characters (I kept looking) and show-not-tell. Way too much tell, and often as not the details get inverted, such as leaving Rome in a northward direction to reach Assisi, which is to the south from there. I'll stop here. Very very little SPAG if any - but I'd love the chance to edit the poor wretched thing, because it can be made so very much better.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Abigail Lai

    this is great

  3. 4 out of 5

    Wendy S Utley

  4. 4 out of 5

    Robyn

  5. 5 out of 5

    Audrey A.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Terry Deloach

  7. 5 out of 5

    Maria

  8. 4 out of 5

    Ruth Butler

  9. 5 out of 5

    Tacowsh1t

  10. 5 out of 5

    william girvan

  11. 4 out of 5

    Merete Marx

  12. 4 out of 5

    p wyn

  13. 4 out of 5

    Andy

  14. 5 out of 5

    J. Alexander

  15. 4 out of 5

    Melinda Simmons

  16. 4 out of 5

    John H Barrie III

  17. 4 out of 5

    Leonora P. Engle

  18. 5 out of 5

    Tatia

  19. 4 out of 5

    Linda Kramer

  20. 4 out of 5

    Betty Macy

  21. 5 out of 5

    Cheryl

  22. 4 out of 5

    Vicki

  23. 4 out of 5

    Wesley Bragg

  24. 5 out of 5

    Susan C.

  25. 5 out of 5

    heavenbound

  26. 4 out of 5

    Christine

  27. 5 out of 5

    Janine

  28. 4 out of 5

    A

  29. 4 out of 5

    Rita

  30. 5 out of 5

    Hannah

  31. 4 out of 5

    Swifticus

  32. 4 out of 5

    VANESSA GRIER

  33. 4 out of 5

    Fernando Dias

  34. 4 out of 5

    Kim Pflum

  35. 5 out of 5

    Kathy Bojanek

  36. 5 out of 5

    Frederick Tucker

  37. 5 out of 5

    Amanda

  38. 4 out of 5

    Darlene Sall

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