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The Complete Beck Diet for Life: The 5-Stage Program for Permanent Weight Loss (eBook Original)

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Bestselling author and weight-loss expert Judith S. Beck, Ph.D., has inspired thousands of dieters to lose weight and keep it off using the power of Cognitive Therapy. Her techniques emphasize preparing the mind and changing eating habits before making changes to the food you eat. Now, for the first time, Dr. Beck outlines the next step on the road to success: a specifi Bestselling author and weight-loss expert Judith S. Beck, Ph.D., has inspired thousands of dieters to lose weight and keep it off using the power of Cognitive Therapy. Her techniques emphasize preparing the mind and changing eating habits before making changes to the food you eat. Now, for the first time, Dr. Beck outlines the next step on the road to success: a specific, balanced diet plan that teaches how to eat thin to ensure that weight loss lasts a lifetime. Based on the eating choices of her most successful dieters and maintainers, The Complete Beck Diet for Life provides a step-by-step approach to weight loss by helping readers successfully navigate the 5 stages of learning to eat thin. Each stage teaches a different skill necessary for losing weight and keeping it off. It starts by first helping dieters change their thinking so they can make permanent changes in their eating. When dieters are ready to change what they eat, they determine the right food plan, including comprehensive suggestions for breakfast, lunch, dinner, snacks, and bonus foods, as well as a Think Thin menu formula with 37 recipes for Phase 2 of the plan and 15 bonus recipes for Phase 4. In addition, a sample strength-training plan is provided to help shape up while slimming down; interactive elements include filling out Response Cards, completing daily eating logs, and charting progress on weight-loss graphs.


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Bestselling author and weight-loss expert Judith S. Beck, Ph.D., has inspired thousands of dieters to lose weight and keep it off using the power of Cognitive Therapy. Her techniques emphasize preparing the mind and changing eating habits before making changes to the food you eat. Now, for the first time, Dr. Beck outlines the next step on the road to success: a specifi Bestselling author and weight-loss expert Judith S. Beck, Ph.D., has inspired thousands of dieters to lose weight and keep it off using the power of Cognitive Therapy. Her techniques emphasize preparing the mind and changing eating habits before making changes to the food you eat. Now, for the first time, Dr. Beck outlines the next step on the road to success: a specific, balanced diet plan that teaches how to eat thin to ensure that weight loss lasts a lifetime. Based on the eating choices of her most successful dieters and maintainers, The Complete Beck Diet for Life provides a step-by-step approach to weight loss by helping readers successfully navigate the 5 stages of learning to eat thin. Each stage teaches a different skill necessary for losing weight and keeping it off. It starts by first helping dieters change their thinking so they can make permanent changes in their eating. When dieters are ready to change what they eat, they determine the right food plan, including comprehensive suggestions for breakfast, lunch, dinner, snacks, and bonus foods, as well as a Think Thin menu formula with 37 recipes for Phase 2 of the plan and 15 bonus recipes for Phase 4. In addition, a sample strength-training plan is provided to help shape up while slimming down; interactive elements include filling out Response Cards, completing daily eating logs, and charting progress on weight-loss graphs.

30 review for The Complete Beck Diet for Life: The 5-Stage Program for Permanent Weight Loss (eBook Original)

  1. 4 out of 5

    Trena

    Can I just start by saying how depressing it is to read a book about not eating? The author writes that she used her methods to lose 30 pounds. Judging by her author photo she is quite thin. I really wonder if she is staying below her set point by sheer force of will, because the book reflects more than a touch of disordered eating, or at least disordered thinking about food. First of all, it is not an exaggeration to say that the word "guilt(y)" shows up on every.single.page of the book. I star Can I just start by saying how depressing it is to read a book about not eating? The author writes that she used her methods to lose 30 pounds. Judging by her author photo she is quite thin. I really wonder if she is staying below her set point by sheer force of will, because the book reflects more than a touch of disordered eating, or at least disordered thinking about food. First of all, it is not an exaggeration to say that the word "guilt(y)" shows up on every.single.page of the book. I started paying attention and in a random 12 page sample it appeared at least once on every page. The words "weak," "(out of) control" and "bad about myself" appear on probably every 4th page. There is just a whole lot of moral and eating-disordered language about the very practical task of feeding yourself. Many of her "patient anecdotes," or more properly her interpretations of her alleged patients' experience, are utterly f*ing depressing. Here is Michael, from page 87. He "completed a 10 mile bike ride for a charity. He had never done anything like that before. He felt elated and proud and, without quite realizing it, raced through the lunch that was provided, hardly noticing what he ate. He then didn't feel satisfied and took seconds--which showed up on the scale the next day." I mean, seriously, you can't cut the guy who did a 10 mile ride some slack? She recounts the agony of another dieter who "popped a baby carrot into her mouth" while making her son's lunch. Again, seriously? Beck says that her method is based on Cognitive Behavioral Therapy, which she states her father invented (I did not fact check), and she is a PhD and professor of Psychiatry. However, the book ignores recent psychological findings. She talks a lot about whether one is going to strengthen one's "resistance muscle" or one's "giving-in muscle." (Again with the moralizing bad/weak/guilty person language.) However, it's pretty firmly accepted in psychology at this point that there is a limit to self-control, termed "ego depletion" (interesting interview with the originator of the concept and term in the Atlantic here). Meaning, you can work your resistance muscle...until you just can't anymore. She simply does not recognize this, even though one of her "patient anecdotes" about a woman who went to dinner with friends, stuck to her diet, and then came home and had a healthy snack of bananas and nuts exactly illustrates the principle. Beck told the story as one of shame and guilt. All of this is leaving aside the "Advantages Deck," the things you want to come true by not eating, almost all of which are about being more socially acceptable and looks, with only glancing references to health The insane thing about Beck's insanity is that the actual diet she proposes is totally sensible. It has you cut only 200 calories per day below what's needed to maintain your current weight and the lowest caloric level it provides for is 1600 (if you want to go below that, she recommends talking to a dietitian)--and it goes all the way up 2400. No foods are off limits; you are allowed one treat of 150-200 calories, depending on your calorie level, per day. I'm not crazy about her 3 meals and 3 snacks model, as I would rather have larger meals, but that's just personal preference. She also has more grains/starches in her plan than I like, as I'd rather have more olive oil with my sauteed veggies than a slice of bread; but again, personal preference and her plan follows reasonable guidelines in terms of percentages of protein, fat, and carbs. The recipes are mostly made with whole foods rather than sciency "diet" ingredients. So there is really no reason that it should be an entire book about not eating--you're eating plenty! But you would really never know that from the text. The text is so parsimoniously miserly that you would think the accompanying diet is a 400 calorie liquid shake once a day. She also has some good techniques, such as eating mindfully while enjoying every bite of food, planning your meals and snacks, and waiting a while after you eat to let your satiety hormones kick in and noticing that you really do feel full even if you didn't after finishing. She emphasizes losing weight slowly, and says it doesn't matter how long it takes to come off because you're taking it off for life. But even things that should be useful, such as distinguishing between hunger and non-hunger (page 75) are about not eating. If you identify yourself as not-hungry but having some other reason for wanting to eat, you are to tell yourself, "This isn't hunger. I'm definitely not going to eat." But if you identify yourself as actually stomach hungry...yeah, you still don't eat. I mean, maybe you shouldn't necessarily eat every time you feel hungry, but why bother to distinguish between the two states if the outcome is the same? She wants you to be batsh!t and high maintenance in restaurants, and asserts that "all successful dieters and maintainers" are the same about ordering crazy things off-menu (her late 90s touch of assuming that consomme is still on restaurant menus everywhere was amusing), sending back food if a drop of butter has touched it, and bringing your own spray salad dressing (remember that?). But if you go to a restaurant, that is objectively untrue. People of normal and thin weight in general eat restaurant food as it is presented on the menu and served from the kitchen. She doesn't allow for transfer of calories between days of the week. I don't know enough about the science here, but I suspect (given the evidence regarding intermittent fasting, for example) that a big restaurant meal one day and a smaller meal the next is just fine. Perhaps my review is unfair because I am not the target audience. I do not have disordered overeating thoughts and behaviors for the most part, and maybe she is trying to reach that audience. But I really can't recommend this book to anyone to whom a healthy, non-moralizing relationship with food is important.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Jaime Sallis

    I really like this book because it teaches you to eat like a thin person. Since June have lost 16lbs, I did not follow her diet but did just the first phase, which is a behavioral change in losing weight.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Deborah

    The book has some good ideas about reinforcing positive life habits and thinking around better nutrition and health.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Lesley Looper

    It took me a while to finish this book, and even so, I skimmed it. Still, there were some good ideas. I'm working on finding a diet buddy. It took me a while to finish this book, and even so, I skimmed it. Still, there were some good ideas. I'm working on finding a diet buddy.

  5. 4 out of 5

    candis

    Based on the principles of CBT(cognitive behavior therapy), this book offers insight on sabotaging thoughts that prevent dieters from sticking to a modified eating plan in order to meet their weight loss goals. More of a self-help book aimed at teaching one to change erroneous, unrealistic thoughts, the book has useful information for anyone looking to learn how to reach a goal. There is a no-nonsense eating plan designed for dieters at differing levels of caloric needs. The diet offers food cho Based on the principles of CBT(cognitive behavior therapy), this book offers insight on sabotaging thoughts that prevent dieters from sticking to a modified eating plan in order to meet their weight loss goals. More of a self-help book aimed at teaching one to change erroneous, unrealistic thoughts, the book has useful information for anyone looking to learn how to reach a goal. There is a no-nonsense eating plan designed for dieters at differing levels of caloric needs. The diet offers food choices from easy to get, reasonably-priced foods. I recommend to those looking for a motivational boost in their weight loss efforts.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Melissa

    This was a really good book. She is interested in behavioral psychology and has you do lots of experiments to prove to yourself that you can, for example, resist a food you crave (by setting it in front of you and then throwing it away) and you can be hungry and not freak out (by not eating between breakfast and dinner for a day). It sounds a little weirder than it is -- I thought it provided lots of good food for thought (no pun intended) about how and why we eat thoughtlessly and get into poor This was a really good book. She is interested in behavioral psychology and has you do lots of experiments to prove to yourself that you can, for example, resist a food you crave (by setting it in front of you and then throwing it away) and you can be hungry and not freak out (by not eating between breakfast and dinner for a day). It sounds a little weirder than it is -- I thought it provided lots of good food for thought (no pun intended) about how and why we eat thoughtlessly and get into poor habits.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Kristine

    this book started out strong and then I just wasn't feeling like it was resonating for me. So my bookmark is about half way through, and I'm bringing it back to the library. I think that the concept of the flash cards, starving yourself to identify hunger signals, and dealing with your rebellious streak just rubbed me the wrong way. I'm sure it's super helpful for some people, just wasn't for me. this book started out strong and then I just wasn't feeling like it was resonating for me. So my bookmark is about half way through, and I'm bringing it back to the library. I think that the concept of the flash cards, starving yourself to identify hunger signals, and dealing with your rebellious streak just rubbed me the wrong way. I'm sure it's super helpful for some people, just wasn't for me.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Christine Ray

    Another good book by Judith Beck. Provides an actual food plan for someone who wants it as well as helpful checklists and tracking sheets. I still feel that her basic concepts are more thoroughly covered in The Beck Diet Solution and the Diet Trap Solution, but this is an easy, structured way to start integrating the Beck Diet skills into your life.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Dawn

    Interesting approach to weight loss - fix the reasons why you eat too much, and you will lose weight. Didn't work for me - I wasn't willing to put in the time and effort. It involves daily checklists and I have enough going on without checking another 20 item list every day Interesting approach to weight loss - fix the reasons why you eat too much, and you will lose weight. Didn't work for me - I wasn't willing to put in the time and effort. It involves daily checklists and I have enough going on without checking another 20 item list every day

  10. 5 out of 5

    Kristina

    Excellent.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Elizabeth Watson

    If you pick the right foods from this book, you will definitely always be full! It's a great diet to follow for making a life long change to eating healthier. If you pick the right foods from this book, you will definitely always be full! It's a great diet to follow for making a life long change to eating healthier.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Geneva

    Skimmed it. There were a few good tips to think about and adapt to your eating habits.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Julia

    This is an excellent guide for how to be prepared to talk to yourself when you are tempted to overeat or to eat foods you have already decided you want to avoid.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Jennifer James

    This very helpful book addresses the self-sabotaging thoughts that keep diets from working. I've lost almost 15 pounds so far using the skills in this book. This very helpful book addresses the self-sabotaging thoughts that keep diets from working. I've lost almost 15 pounds so far using the skills in this book.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Debbie

  16. 4 out of 5

    Sarah A

  17. 4 out of 5

    Bernadette

  18. 4 out of 5

    Morgen Salas

  19. 4 out of 5

    Diego Rabelo

  20. 5 out of 5

    Dawn

  21. 5 out of 5

    Shirley

  22. 4 out of 5

    Carol Todd

  23. 5 out of 5

    Wye

  24. 5 out of 5

    Kristine

  25. 4 out of 5

    Kat

  26. 5 out of 5

    Stacy

  27. 4 out of 5

    Elise

  28. 5 out of 5

    Jessika

  29. 4 out of 5

    Anjali Agarwal

  30. 4 out of 5

    Kelly

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