Hot Best Seller

Failed Moments (Historical Fiction)

Availability: Ready to download

Read what people are saying: “Immersive, Amazingly Original---Epic Story Across Two Centuries---A Tale of Redemption for the Ages” What if the only way to survive your life is to go back in history and right the wrongs of two other men’s lives? Patrick Walsh finds himself in this precarious position as he goes back in time from modern day New York City to: ˃˃˃ The F Read what people are saying: “Immersive, Amazingly Original---Epic Story Across Two Centuries---A Tale of Redemption for the Ages” What if the only way to survive your life is to go back in history and right the wrongs of two other men’s lives? Patrick Walsh finds himself in this precarious position as he goes back in time from modern day New York City to: ˃˃˃ The French Caribbean in 1790 Biracial plantation owner Patrice Beaumont is known as a “kinder” slave master and claims to be committed to ending slavery, but his actions don’t back-up his words. Is being the “best of the worst” all he’s capable of? ˃˃˃ 1863 New York City Irish street fighter Patrick Allen is days away from the biggest fight of his career, when the Draft Riots ignite dangerous racial conflicts around the city. Never one to take sides outside the ring, he steers clear of the angry mobs. So when he stumbles on a lynching in progress, who can expect him to do anything more than look away?Tackling race relations from a unique perspective, Failed Moments is a thought-provoking adventure that questions the measure of a man not by his decision to do no harm, but his willingness to act on what is right. Scroll up and grab a copy today!


Compare

Read what people are saying: “Immersive, Amazingly Original---Epic Story Across Two Centuries---A Tale of Redemption for the Ages” What if the only way to survive your life is to go back in history and right the wrongs of two other men’s lives? Patrick Walsh finds himself in this precarious position as he goes back in time from modern day New York City to: ˃˃˃ The F Read what people are saying: “Immersive, Amazingly Original---Epic Story Across Two Centuries---A Tale of Redemption for the Ages” What if the only way to survive your life is to go back in history and right the wrongs of two other men’s lives? Patrick Walsh finds himself in this precarious position as he goes back in time from modern day New York City to: ˃˃˃ The French Caribbean in 1790 Biracial plantation owner Patrice Beaumont is known as a “kinder” slave master and claims to be committed to ending slavery, but his actions don’t back-up his words. Is being the “best of the worst” all he’s capable of? ˃˃˃ 1863 New York City Irish street fighter Patrick Allen is days away from the biggest fight of his career, when the Draft Riots ignite dangerous racial conflicts around the city. Never one to take sides outside the ring, he steers clear of the angry mobs. So when he stumbles on a lynching in progress, who can expect him to do anything more than look away?Tackling race relations from a unique perspective, Failed Moments is a thought-provoking adventure that questions the measure of a man not by his decision to do no harm, but his willingness to act on what is right. Scroll up and grab a copy today!

30 review for Failed Moments (Historical Fiction)

  1. 4 out of 5

    Linda

    When I think about what review to give a book, my first consideration is how much I wanted to read the book. There was never a point where I didn’t want to keep reading. I had a book club obligation to read another book, but instead of reading the other, I kept going back to Failed Moments. I, eventually, accepted that I wasn’t going to even pick up the other book until I finished. The carefully constructed plot was very interesting and kept me going back for more. The major shortcoming of this b When I think about what review to give a book, my first consideration is how much I wanted to read the book. There was never a point where I didn’t want to keep reading. I had a book club obligation to read another book, but instead of reading the other, I kept going back to Failed Moments. I, eventually, accepted that I wasn’t going to even pick up the other book until I finished. The carefully constructed plot was very interesting and kept me going back for more. The major shortcoming of this book is its lack of sophistication. The author’s explanation of reincarnation was so simplistic that it wasn’t convincing. The philosophical underpinnings of the entire book weren't very strong. I was interested, but I was never able to completely suspend my disbelief. The writing itself was easy to read which is a good thing, but it lacked descriptions, so much so that I found myself occasionally forgetting that Patrick’s Irish-American life was in a different time period. As far as my own personal tastes, I like historical fiction that teaches me something that I didn’t know and piques my interest. This book did that, but I didn’t think that the historical details were seamlessly weaved into the plot. I got the impression that there were brief interludes where I was being schooled. I didn’t particularly dislike that aspect, but I did think that the research could have been more subtly integrated. Intellectually, I thought that there were things that could have been done better. However, I am still giving this book four stars, because I looked forward to reading it every day. I wanted to know what was going to happen, and I wanted to know how the plot would resolve. I am looking forward to more from A. Robert Allen.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Nanci **Warning**IWasASailor⚓️MyMouthisDirty

    I received an ARC via A. Robert Allen for an honest review. I rate this book from 4.3-4.5. The synopsis of Failed Moments: Failed Moments takes Patrick Walsh, a day trader by occupation and a daydreamer by disposition, from modern day New York City back to… 1790, French Caribbean: biracial plantation owner Patrice Beaumont is known as a “kinder” slave master, but his trusted friend reminds him that is no cause for pride. He claims to be committed to ending slavery, but his actions don’t back-up his I received an ARC via A. Robert Allen for an honest review. I rate this book from 4.3-4.5. The synopsis of Failed Moments: Failed Moments takes Patrick Walsh, a day trader by occupation and a daydreamer by disposition, from modern day New York City back to… 1790, French Caribbean: biracial plantation owner Patrice Beaumont is known as a “kinder” slave master, but his trusted friend reminds him that is no cause for pride. He claims to be committed to ending slavery, but his actions don’t back-up his words. Is being the “best of the worst” all he’s capable of? 1863, New York City: Giant Irish street fighter Patrick Allen is days away from battling it out with a similarly oversized Black fighter, when the Draft Riots ignite dangerous racial conflicts around the city. Never one to take sides outside the ring or join a fight he can’t win, he steers clear of the angry mobs. So when he stumbles on a lynching in progress, who can expect him to do anything more than look away? Besides having a similar name and a proclivity to make tragic mistakes, what mystery ties these men together? Tackling race relations from a unique perspective, Failed Moments is a thought-provoking adventure through four centuries that questions the measure of a man not by his decision to do no harm, but his willingness to act on what is right. *********************************************************************** REVIEW I read this book twice and after the second read I was convinced that I truly did love this book! It has the ability to have you reflect about your own life and how we have lived it thus far. Patrick is a successful and very wealthy man, however, besides wealth he has very little else. He lives his life in solitude, no love, no adventures, family he never sees. He goes through the motions of living, just not LIVING. Tragedy unfortunately strikes, and Patrick is put on life support. No one comes to visit him nor does he have anyone to care if he lives or dies. While he is in a comma, he has an out of body experience and is visited by his favorite Aunt Grace (who is deceased). She informs Patrick that she is there to play a role in helping Patrick to fix the wrongs in his past lives in order to fix and keep his current one. Grace becomes Patrick's guide as he travels back in time, and helps with the back story of each character. If Patrick does not succeed in righting the wrongs he made, he will not be saved in his current life, and will be reincarnated into a new person, with the hope that his next life will be better. I didn't know what to expect when I first received this book, but once I started it, I was hooked. I was taken on a journey from the start of the book until finish. I felt the characters, their pain, the betrayal they felt; as well as the hope. The story flowed perfectly. The book tells both sides of the stories, what he was meant to change and if he changed it. I loved his past stories, Mr. Allen did an incredible job of detail, ensuring the era his goes back in time to fit properly with history. Once completed I sat and reflected on my own life, the mistakes I made on the way and what changes I would make. I know I can't go back in time, but it did allow me to think about how I will act in the future. I definitely recommend this book!

  3. 5 out of 5

    April Campbell-Bowe

    I received an Advanced Copy of this book and asked to write an honest review: My love is historical fiction so I was very excited to be asked to read this book. At first I have to admit, the way the book is laid out confused me. I had to read through the first chapter a couple times to understand the main idea. The book is based on what if we are reincarnated and we are given chances to live another life and try not to repeat the mistakes we made the first time. What if we may even take three ch I received an Advanced Copy of this book and asked to write an honest review: My love is historical fiction so I was very excited to be asked to read this book. At first I have to admit, the way the book is laid out confused me. I had to read through the first chapter a couple times to understand the main idea. The book is based on what if we are reincarnated and we are given chances to live another life and try not to repeat the mistakes we made the first time. What if we may even take three chances to really get the point or our mission here on earth, to leave it a better place and touch other people's lives in a way that should be positive and help them along their journey. This is the author's literary debut and is based on the exactly this `what if' concept - having the possibility to correct wrongs or change life by going back in time and doing things differently. The story is solid, the writing excellent and the novel is labeled `historical fiction'. ous The reason I was so confused is there was no synopsis for my copy and it is put best by another reviewer by this: What if the only way to survive your life is to go back in history and right the wrongs of two other men's lives? If I had understood this right away it would have made it much easier to begin reading. Once you understand this concept the book flows right on along. Patrick Walsh, a day trader by occupation and a daydreamer by disposition, time travels from modern day New York City back to 1790, French Caribbean: biracial plantation owner Patrice Beaumont is known as a "kinder" slave master, but his trusted friend reminds him that is no cause for pride. He claims to be committed to ending slavery, but his actions don't back-up his words. Is being the "best of the worst" all he's capable of? And to 1863, New York City: Giant Irish street fighter Patrick Allen is days away from battling it out with a similarly oversized Black fighter, when the Draft Riots ignite dangerous racial conflicts around the city. Never one to take sides outside the ring or join a fight he can't win, he steers clear of the angry mobs. So when he stumbles on a lynching in progress, who can expect him to do anything more than look away?' I truly thought the writing was solid and the story very unique and thoughtful. Great attention was given to the details that make the story come alive. The hero of the story is also accompanied by a very colorful, interesting character in her own right, his aunt. She serves different roles to help him learn his lesson and make the right choices to he can move on to the afterlife. I loved how the story wasn't about anyone incredibly important, but just someone that was there in situations where they could choose to help others or help themselves and it puts a magnifying glass on your own life when you think you are going along making meaningless decisions. Our lives all intersect and we should try to think about others we meet each day and if we may help them in some way or how our choices will affect others. Truly inspiring. The only reason I didn't give it five stars is that the layout is confusing and people may give up to early and miss this great story.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Shari Larsen

    Patrick Walsh is lying in a coma after a near fatal gunshot wound, when he gets a visit from a mysterious woman from his past. He is led back in time to two different lives he has lived before; a wealthy plantation owner in 1700's Haiti, and an Irish street fighter in Civil War era New York City. He finds he is led on these journeys to get a second chance at correcting mistakes made the first time around. This isn't the type of story I would normally read; I don't believe in past lives or reincar Patrick Walsh is lying in a coma after a near fatal gunshot wound, when he gets a visit from a mysterious woman from his past. He is led back in time to two different lives he has lived before; a wealthy plantation owner in 1700's Haiti, and an Irish street fighter in Civil War era New York City. He finds he is led on these journeys to get a second chance at correcting mistakes made the first time around. This isn't the type of story I would normally read; I don't believe in past lives or reincarnation, but the author offered to send me a free copy after reading my review on Goodreads for Yellow Crocus by Laila Ibraham, so I thought I would give it a try. And even though, like I said, I don't believe in past lives, it made for a very imaginative story, and makes the reader think about how one's heritage and place in history help to make us how we are today, and how our actions in life can affect future generations for better or worse.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Christina

    I was sent an advance copy of this book and was asked to provide an honest review. Nothing makes me happier than reading historical fiction, particularly that which takes place during the colonial and post-colonial periods of the Americas, so I was excited when I was contacted by the author about reading this book and reviewing it for him. I had high hopes for the book, but I have to disagree with other readers on how captivating this book was. Usually, I practically inhale books whole, but Fail I was sent an advance copy of this book and was asked to provide an honest review. Nothing makes me happier than reading historical fiction, particularly that which takes place during the colonial and post-colonial periods of the Americas, so I was excited when I was contacted by the author about reading this book and reviewing it for him. I had high hopes for the book, but I have to disagree with other readers on how captivating this book was. Usually, I practically inhale books whole, but Failed Moments was one that I choked on from beginning to end, which resulted in true disappointment. I believe the stumbling blocks I encountered while reading this book all point to one root cause, and that is the author's lack of experience with fictional composition and self-editing. Overall, Failed Moments is a well-researched book, and I'm sure that performing such research took more than a bit of patience. This is particularly true in the section concerning Patrick's 18th-century alter ego, Patrice Beaumont. But at the same time, all of the wonderful facts are much too much. The unnecessarily long passages of dialogue, the lack of vivid descriptions, and the factual information made the book extremely didactic. Nothing is left for the reader to figure out on his or her own. I felt like I was almost being talked down to. It isn't necessary to translate dialogue into Creole, and thereby make the reader read the same passage twice. A certain bit of dialogue can simply be written out in English and understood by the reader to have been spoken in the character's native language, whatever that may be. Contextual clues can be used to figure out what "Patrice" or "gens de couleurs" are when translated to in English. I understand the need to write so that the average person can understand the text, but I also know that readers want to be treated like they are reasonably knowledgeable people. My biggest problem with the book, though, was my inability to believe it. I loved the spiritual twist to book, but not only do I think that the author throws that part of the story at the reader too fast without proper exposition, I also found that the whole story line was just too neat and perfect. It was too simplistic and neat that when we meet Patrick, he just happens to be dreaming while in a coma. It's a little heavy-handed on the author's part to start a book out that way. I felt like I should have been about a quarter of the way done with the book when I was on the first page. But despite the research that was poured into this book, the most unbelievable parts of the book were the historical bits with Patrice. As I said before, the statistics and figures concerning this period in colonial history were all spot on. As a person who makes her living as a copy editor, I appreciated the extra detail and care given there. However, I found the research regarding etiquette, customs, and interactions between both the sexes and the social classes to be lacking. In the 18th century, a man such as Abraham Julian would never go out of his way to attempt to make his host's wife feel comfortable in her "own" house and ease her frustrations. This is especially true because not only is Gabrielle not Patrice's wife, she's a slave. A man of Patrice's stature wouldn't allow his slave to sit at table and dine with him, no matter how "kind" he was or whether or not he had guests for dinner. A wealthy man's female friend would not be sought out for business advice or included in his private business matters, no matter how close she was. Nor would a slave be called by his African name once he had been purchased. Baako would not have been given the courtesy of being called by his given name; he would have been given a French name by Henri Baptiste. (Remember Kunta Kinte in Roots? He was called Toby.) These are things that would happen in the 20th and 21st centuries, not in 1790, and these are all things that could have been fixed with a great deal of self-editing on author's part, even if it meant completely rewriting characters and events, as well as on the part of an accomplished copy editor.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Brian Borgford

    This novel takes an in depth look at a couple of little know periods of history. Because I didn’t know anything about these times, I did a bit of spot checking and found that they appear to be historically accurate and very informative. The stories themselves are very interesting, informative and excellent reading, especially for history buffs. For non-history aficionados the stories are compelling enough to stand on their own and entertain. The book itself is well written, making you want to cont This novel takes an in depth look at a couple of little know periods of history. Because I didn’t know anything about these times, I did a bit of spot checking and found that they appear to be historically accurate and very informative. The stories themselves are very interesting, informative and excellent reading, especially for history buffs. For non-history aficionados the stories are compelling enough to stand on their own and entertain. The book itself is well written, making you want to continue reading. The tool the author uses to guide us from the present to the past is a unique approach to travelling in time. There is even a hint of philosophy and morals for those who require purpose in their reading.

  7. 5 out of 5

    KarenK2

    This is what I figure, if after reading 12 chapters and I still don't care, DNF pile it goes. I just couldn't connect with this book, the conversation is stilted and awkward. It was not believable. It starts with Patrick, circa 2013. He finds himself having lunch with his aunt who has been dead over 5 years. He time travels back to the 1700's and is reincarnated as his ancestors, to right the wrongs made by them. Blah. 1 star. This is what I figure, if after reading 12 chapters and I still don't care, DNF pile it goes. I just couldn't connect with this book, the conversation is stilted and awkward. It was not believable. It starts with Patrick, circa 2013. He finds himself having lunch with his aunt who has been dead over 5 years. He time travels back to the 1700's and is reincarnated as his ancestors, to right the wrongs made by them. Blah. 1 star.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Linda Gutierrez

    Imaginative premise An interesting account of the amalgam that is most of our genealogy. There's a lot more narrative than dialog, but an impressive first novel. Imaginative premise An interesting account of the amalgam that is most of our genealogy. There's a lot more narrative than dialog, but an impressive first novel.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Grady

    `My God, Frank knows everyone. So his name is Peter- the name suits him,' Patrick thought. New York City author Anthony Robert Allen makes his literary debut with an exceptionally fine novel that is based on the `what if' concept - having the possibility to correct wrongs or change life by going back in time and doing things differently. The story is solid, the writing excellent (Allen is a college administrator!) and the novel is labeled `historical fiction'. Having read and enjoyed his book, th `My God, Frank knows everyone. So his name is Peter- the name suits him,' Patrick thought. New York City author Anthony Robert Allen makes his literary debut with an exceptionally fine novel that is based on the `what if' concept - having the possibility to correct wrongs or change life by going back in time and doing things differently. The story is solid, the writing excellent (Allen is a college administrator!) and the novel is labeled `historical fiction'. Having read and enjoyed his book, this reviewer looked for more information about the genesis of the novel: `My goal was to present a family history book to my immediate family as a present for Christmas in 2013. I hired genealogists in the U.S., Ireland, and the Caribbean. As the story started to come together, I uncovered some interesting things in terms of ethnicity and religion. My Irish ancestry can be traced back to the late 1700s in Ireland. Each of my Irish family lines stayed throughout the Great Famine in the 1840s, but then left for the United States over the next 20-30 years. Some of my ancestors went to Chicago, which had a tremendous Irish population, and they were in the city during the Great Chicago fire of 1871. Others went to New York around the time of the Draft Riots in 1863, which pitted the Irish against the blacks. My Irish line has been consistently Catholic over the years. While the Irish side didn't offer so many surprises, my "other side" did. I have one line of Sephardic Jews that I can trace back to Portugal in the 1500s. This branch of the family owned slaves in St. Domingue (modern-day Haiti) just before the slave revolution, eventually intermarried with a mulatto line of former slaves, and became Anglican from that point forward. I have another branch of my family tree that I can trace back to the marriage of a white planter to a free woman of color on the island of Nevis in the Caribbean in the early 1800s. This line was also Protestant. Life, of course, is so much more than ethnicity and religion, and the stories I uncovered--which are very well-documented --are much more sensational than ordinary. My family has been both poor and wealthy and no stranger to scandal. Some of the more colorful characters include disbarred lawyers, promiscuous husbands, bootleggers, numbers runners, scammers, politicians, and athletes.' Given that exhaustive research and discovery of the complexities of time and change and mutations of thought and lines to which we all are inherent, Allen has created a condensation of all this in this brief but involving and poignant novel. His synopsis serves the book well: `What if the only way to survive your life is to go back in history and right the wrongs of two other men's lives? Patrick Walsh, a day trader by occupation and a daydreamer by disposition, time travels from modern day New York City back to 1790, French Caribbean: biracial plantation owner Patrice Beaumont is known as a "kinder" slave master, but his trusted friend reminds him that is no cause for pride. He claims to be committed to ending slavery, but his actions don't back-up his words. Is being the "best of the worst" all he's capable of? And to 1863, New York City: Giant Irish street fighter Patrick Allen is days away from battling it out with a similarly oversized Black fighter, when the Draft Riots ignite dangerous racial conflicts around the city. Never one to take sides outside the ring or join a fight he can't win, he steers clear of the angry mobs. So when he stumbles on a lynching in progress, who can expect him to do anything more than look away?' Reading FAILED MOMENTS is the privilege to reminisce about our own ancestry and despite all the current banter about immigration reform; we in America are all immigrants. Allen takes us through that discovery and in doing so has provided a very fine novel. Highly Recommended.

  10. 5 out of 5

    TolkienFan

    As one of the members who belong to "Kindle Unlimited" I found this book to be engrossing and at a remarkably reasonable cost (it was free...). Actually, the author, A.R. Allen, asked me to take a look at the book and review it. I agreed to do so as long as he understood that my review would not be a "done deal". He agreed to take the bad with the good, so here I am. Initially, I thought the premise was a bit on the maudlin side for a full-length novel. I was quite certain that the book would fal As one of the members who belong to "Kindle Unlimited" I found this book to be engrossing and at a remarkably reasonable cost (it was free...). Actually, the author, A.R. Allen, asked me to take a look at the book and review it. I agreed to do so as long as he understood that my review would not be a "done deal". He agreed to take the bad with the good, so here I am. Initially, I thought the premise was a bit on the maudlin side for a full-length novel. I was quite certain that the book would fall short of my typical desire in a novel, if not my expectation. What I discovered was intriguing and thought provoking. The idea of having a "second chance" to right previous wrongs or failures was strangely captivating. What I discovered left me wondering a little about my preconceptions with respect to fiction and particularly "historical fiction". I started reading this book one evening and immediately got lost. A rather ignominious start for me. I stopped, and thought for a few moments and then went back to the book and reviewed the premise and the first couple of chapters. Strange indeed... I found that I needed to take this story in small bites. Chew thoughtfully for awhile and then go back to it and read some more. Assimilated in that manner, I thoroughly enjoyed the book. It took me several days to complete, which is totally NOT like my normal reading pattern. Every time I thought about starting a different book, I went back to this one instead. Like I said, strangely captivating... I think one of the most intriguing and important characteristics of the book was the reliance on historical provenance. I found the history to be rich and fulfilling, the descriptions to be concise yet complete, and the settings to be thought provoking. The prose was generally well-written and never detracted from the characters, rather it supported them and helped draw a well-defined image that was never far removed from the forefront of the story line. I still find the story to be a little strange for some reason. I have no particular preconceptions on which to attribute this feeling, but nevertheless there it is. After making peace with my inner muse and settling in to read, I found the story to move along with grace and fluidity. If you can overcome the intense feeling of "strange" and the rather disparate fracturing of the "lifelines" of the main characters, you will come away with a feeling of being pleasantly sated. It is a "feel-good" story that occupies history and ties it all together with a sense of enlightenment. Four stars --- Recommended

  11. 5 out of 5

    Vivian

    Patrick runs into his Aunt Grace while waiting for his date. He's very fond of his Aunt. He just hasn't seen her in years. Since April 11th 2008, to be exact. The day she died. Was this an apparition or an opportunity? Patrick soon realizes that Aunt Grace has been sent to give him a glimpse at his past. A chance to right wrongs. For herself, as well as him. "We're in this together. Remember, if you fail, I fail, and if you succeed, I succeed." It is then the 1700's in the town of Jacmel on the Patrick runs into his Aunt Grace while waiting for his date. He's very fond of his Aunt. He just hasn't seen her in years. Since April 11th 2008, to be exact. The day she died. Was this an apparition or an opportunity? Patrick soon realizes that Aunt Grace has been sent to give him a glimpse at his past. A chance to right wrongs. For herself, as well as him. "We're in this together. Remember, if you fail, I fail, and if you succeed, I succeed." It is then the 1700's in the town of Jacmel on the Caribbean island of St. Domingue. Mixed race slave owner, Patrice Beaumont, followed his father's advice to "go along to get along". He learns that this approach was tearing him up inside. Betraying his half brother, treating him as a common slave, with only limited liberties. During a time of upheaval, Patrice is presented a moral dilemma. Or is it a gift from beyond? Later, in 1863 -20-year old Irish born, Patrick Allen, lives in New York with his mother, Grace. After her husband's death and their move to the United States, Grace's sole purpose was to ensure her big bulk of a son a healthy upbringing. Patrick would soon prove that he'd not only develop his brawn but his brain; as smart as he was strong. Living in Brooklyn, during a period where the Irish were hated, Patrick became known as Pretty Paddy, a nickname first used by his father in their homeland. Grace couldn't be prouder but after taking I'll, during the draft period, she wanted to make sure her son would do the right thing by their people. Back to the present, where Patrick learns that with a certain set of values and opportunities, lives are altered. ~ I especially enjoyed time spent with Aunt Grace at the Reflektions Café, and their witty banter. The story is smart and clearly put together; tying all ends nicely although at times lengthy.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Penny

    I really enjoyed this book with its intriguing concept that if we could change one small thing in our lives the outcome would be so completely different! It is spiritual and fantasy rolled into one. The author did a lot of research into periods in history that were so important, then and now, how decisions and conscience are so critical, he discovered that some of his ancestors contributed to these events in time, and was able to introduce them to us as characters in the story. Firstly we see the I really enjoyed this book with its intriguing concept that if we could change one small thing in our lives the outcome would be so completely different! It is spiritual and fantasy rolled into one. The author did a lot of research into periods in history that were so important, then and now, how decisions and conscience are so critical, he discovered that some of his ancestors contributed to these events in time, and was able to introduce them to us as characters in the story. Firstly we see the disgusting period in history where slaves were used as a commodity to improve the white mans lives and finances, then we see how the Irish famine and the difficulties between the Catholics and Protestants overflow into hatred and conflict, which we still see today unfortunately! Patrick Walsh lies fighting for his life after a tragic accident, in a coma that he may never come out of unless he chooses to! He is flawed in many ways and now is his chance to improve his happiness and his future, Will He?? We get to see man's inhumanity towards man, its sickening cruelty towards others who are different, who is right? Who has the right to inflict such hardships on others? And if we only did the right things, our whole world could be so different. I really enjoyed this book, clever story and interesting concepts, it is so unusual and quite complex. It actually causes you to think a bit!

  13. 5 out of 5

    Patsy

    What if we could travel back in time as Patrick Walsh did to right the wrongs in our life. Patrick Walsh was in the hospital in a coma on life support when a dead Aunt Grace came to visit him and to guide him through previous years to make things right. A wonderful story of reincarnation about the author's ancestors hundreds of years ago. Beginning in 1790 in the French Caribbean as a black plantation owner which was kind to his slaves. Then he was in Ireland during the Irish famine, later moved What if we could travel back in time as Patrick Walsh did to right the wrongs in our life. Patrick Walsh was in the hospital in a coma on life support when a dead Aunt Grace came to visit him and to guide him through previous years to make things right. A wonderful story of reincarnation about the author's ancestors hundreds of years ago. Beginning in 1790 in the French Caribbean as a black plantation owner which was kind to his slaves. Then he was in Ireland during the Irish famine, later moved to New York City with his family in 1877. He saw the Civil War era in 1863 and much more. The author has written an excellent story about time travel and reincarnation with great research on his ancestor's history. A very rich plot, smoothly written, fast pace and easy to read. The characters were well defined also the time period and the locations were easy to follow. A very complex story with an excellent plot of supernatural, adventure, spiritual and a small amount of mystery. I enjoyed the book and I want to read it again. I also liked the cover on the novel. The author asked me to read the book for an honest review.I

  14. 5 out of 5

    Davina Bell

    I truly enjoyed Failed Moments . At first, I thought this was a time-travel novel. However, the concept in which Mr. Allen uses to explore the different time periods was very creative and enjoyable. As a fan of historical fiction, I felt Mr. Allen had a really nice blend of the historical facts and the fictional story line. I actually learned some things about history that I was previously unaware. In addition, the theme of being warned of the dangers of "always going along to get along". This I truly enjoyed Failed Moments . At first, I thought this was a time-travel novel. However, the concept in which Mr. Allen uses to explore the different time periods was very creative and enjoyable. As a fan of historical fiction, I felt Mr. Allen had a really nice blend of the historical facts and the fictional story line. I actually learned some things about history that I was previously unaware. In addition, the theme of being warned of the dangers of "always going along to get along". This novel also made me think about even more than the historical aspect. It made me think about the purpose of life itself. Life is hard. And in life, we make difficult and hard decisions. What if all the choices we make and the people we interact with are all interconnected? Remaining a fence sitter may be the absolute worst thing in life. It is far worst than making a wrong choice and sticking with it. Fortunately in this novel the characters were able to "get it right". What if this is the only act we get? The only chance to get it right? These are the questions that I pondered as I read. Great read!

  15. 5 out of 5

    Karenann Carty

    Robert Allen weaves together a deeply personal narrative with societal and historical threads to create a novel that tackles timeless and complex issues of race, class, and status -- accentuating their impact on people’s individual journeys. When a near-fatal incident leaves the main character on life support, his spirit joins his beloved, deceased Aunt Grace on a passage back in time. What ensues is a cautionary tale of self-discovery filled with well-defined characters, richly crafted settings Robert Allen weaves together a deeply personal narrative with societal and historical threads to create a novel that tackles timeless and complex issues of race, class, and status -- accentuating their impact on people’s individual journeys. When a near-fatal incident leaves the main character on life support, his spirit joins his beloved, deceased Aunt Grace on a passage back in time. What ensues is a cautionary tale of self-discovery filled with well-defined characters, richly crafted settings, and engaging plots. This imaginative story leaves the reader to reflect on how one’s ancestral heritage, place in history, and conception of the afterlife connect to present-day relationships and realities; reminding us that our daily decisions have the capacity to drive the course of our own lives and the potential to change the lives of others. Failed Moments is a beautiful, satisfying, and thoroughly enjoyable read!

  16. 4 out of 5

    Raine Raine

    A MUST READ, CANT PUT IT DOWN What an amazing story! I was not really sure what to expect from the authors description of hi story. However it was not long into the book and I realized this was a different take on past lives! What a clever way to introduce such a topic without even realizing it and it is just the most brilliant way to introduce such theory by telling a story. The participants in the story have the opportunity to go back into history and correct some of the mistakes they made. I A MUST READ, CANT PUT IT DOWN What an amazing story! I was not really sure what to expect from the authors description of hi story. However it was not long into the book and I realized this was a different take on past lives! What a clever way to introduce such a topic without even realizing it and it is just the most brilliant way to introduce such theory by telling a story. The participants in the story have the opportunity to go back into history and correct some of the mistakes they made. It was really a very moving story and one that touches the soul. Failed Moments is a must read book, cleverly written with all the emotion needed to make it real. Well done to the author I look forward to more of his work. Thank you A. Robert Allen for giving me this opportunity to read your book!

  17. 4 out of 5

    Michele Wesley

    Failed Moments was an excellent read. This book took me on an unexpected journey that I thoroughly enjoyed, and I received a history lesson that I appreciated. I have a small collection of books that I’ll re-read when time permits and this is one of them. The Author, Mr. A. Robert Allen, provided me a free copy of this book, but Failed Moments is more than worth the small amount for a download. This is definitely a Goodread worth the time.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Lib

    I was given this book to review. It started slow and at first I did not enjoy the way it started but with a bit of perseverance I continued and was rewarded. It covers three points in time and made me think of what would I do in these situations. It had me wanting more and each of these times could be separated into three novels but instead made into one interesting and thought provoking novel that I could not put down. I would recommend this book to my friends.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Aly

    This book was a little "heavy" for me. I liked it but I was not sure for the first half of the book. This book has historical fiction with spirituality and a bit of mystery in it. I am not big on historical fiction but this book was not bad. I enjoyed the mystery part! * I received this book from the author in exchange for an honest review* This book was a little "heavy" for me. I liked it but I was not sure for the first half of the book. This book has historical fiction with spirituality and a bit of mystery in it. I am not big on historical fiction but this book was not bad. I enjoyed the mystery part! * I received this book from the author in exchange for an honest review*

  20. 4 out of 5

    Bonnye Reed

    Kindle Unlimited GAB An exceptional book by a special author. A. Robert Allen is an author I watch for - everything of his that I have read made a lasting impression on me. Failed Moments is one of those books you will want to read again. We follow Peter and his Aunt through three separate layers of their souls journeys through time. An exceptional tale, told very well.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Frances Scott

    Unlike many other reviewers, I did NOT receive a copy of this book for free from the author in exchange for an honest review; I received a message through Goodreads from the author asking me to review it. There was no offer of a free copy. I bought mine through Amazon or half.com, I can't remember which. Substantively, I found this book to be original, thought-provoking, and enriching. It is a highly imaginative portrayal of what happens to humans after death. There is an important message embed Unlike many other reviewers, I did NOT receive a copy of this book for free from the author in exchange for an honest review; I received a message through Goodreads from the author asking me to review it. There was no offer of a free copy. I bought mine through Amazon or half.com, I can't remember which. Substantively, I found this book to be original, thought-provoking, and enriching. It is a highly imaginative portrayal of what happens to humans after death. There is an important message embedded in this story - that race, religion, and other demographic-type facts about a person are insignificant. It is the spirit within the person's soul that matters. It is a beautiful message and the story illustrates this well. In terms of form, however, I had issues with the writing style. Somehow, it just did not "flow" for me. Many of the sentences were structured awkwardly and there were way too many uses of the word "which." There was a lot more narrative than dialogue. I was always aware that I was reading and seldom felt that I had been drawn into the story. It did not transport me as many fiction works do. I wanted it to do so because I was fascinated by the book's premise. I would strongly encourage the author to hire an attentive, nitpicking editor. The book (and reading experience) was marred by a multitude of errors that any good editor would have caught. He has no idea as to when to use a comma - several were missing, even more were present that should have been omitted. I provided the author with six pages of suggested corrections (and I've included them at the end of this review). As another reviewer mentioned, some of these errors were anachronisms - the use of the salutation Ms., for example, during the Civil War era. "Ms." was coined during the 1970s; he should have dubbed this character "Miss Molly" instead of "Ms. Molly." Another example is iced tea being served during this time period. Iced tea was not popularized until the 1904 Worlds Fair. It is extremely unlikely that this group would have been pouring tea over ice in the 1800s. I also found it alarming that the author didn't check on the spelling of Horace Greeley's last name - he spells it Greely throughout the book. I believe that all of these glaring errors interfered with my usual ability to immerse myself in a book, forget my own surroundings, and be momentarily disoriented when the phone rings or someone speaks to me. In the final analysis, I was disappointed that such an excellent idea for a book was not executed with a higher level of quality. The edits I submitted: Page 27, Line 8 – “discrete” should read “discreet” ” (discrete means separate and distinct; discreet means subtle, unobtrusive) Page 33, Line 18 – “thirteen year-old Patrice” should read “thirteen-year-old Patrice” Page 40, Line 32 – “second-class” should read “second class” unless the noun (citizen) is actually placed right after it. Example: in the next line, “first-class citizen” is correctly hyphenated Page 67, Line 8 – “faired” should read “fared” Page 73, Lines 19-20: “wait and see approach” should read “wait-and-see approach” Page 75, Line 17 – “heavily armed men” should read “heavily-armed men” Page 77, Line 1 – should be a comma after Christophe Page 77, Line 22 – should be a comma after hunting Page 85, Line 9 – “senior level discussion” should read “senior-level discussion” Page 86, Line 17 – should be a comma both before and after Patrice, not just after: “This separation has got to end, Patrice, Camille is right . . .” Page 88, Line 20 – should be a comma after detail Page 88, Line 25 – “heavily armed men” should read “heavily-armed men” Page 88, Line 29 – “heavily armed men” should read “heavily-armed men” Page 96, Line 1 – “who” should be “whom” Page 96, Line 16 – “go along to get along philosophy” should read “go-along-to-get-along philosophy” Page 96, Line 27 – there should be no comma after Claude Page 98, Line 14 – should be a comma after mother and before Camille, and then after Camille Page 104, Line 11 – should be no comma after coffee Page 109, Line 15 – “good night talk” should read “good-night talk” Page 115, Line 11 – “modern day Irish” should read “modern-day Irish” Page 115, Line 15 – “St. Lukes” should read “St. Luke’s” Page 116, Line 31 – should be no comma between O’Connell and provided Page 117, Line 19 – should be a comma between wife and on Page 119, Line 8 – “succumb from exposure” should read “succumb to exposure” Page 119 Line 13 – “piece rate system” should read “piece-rate system” Page 119, Line 16 – “four-year old son” should read “four-year-old son” Page 119, Line 17 – same as Line 13, above Page 120, Line 6 – should be a comma after night Page 121, Line 8 – should be a comma after is Page 122, Line 6 – “rough and tumble sheriff” should read “rough-and-tumble sheriff” Page 122, Line 10 – “though” should read “through” Page 122, Line 15 – “curled up position” should read “curled-up position” Page 123, Line 26 – should be a question mark, not a period, after week Page 123, Line 27 – should be a comma between to and Patrick Page 124, Line 4 – “200 pound mother” should read “200-pound mother” Page 124, Line 15 – should be no comma between table and while Page124, Line 16 – “otherwise rough son” should read “otherwise-rough son” Page 127, Line 25 – should be a comma between brother and substantially Page 129, Line 28 – should be a comma between fact and caused Page 131, Line 3 – should be a comma between session and along Page 132, Line 3 – “long time staffer” should read “long-time staffer” Page 132, Line 10 – “off the boat Irish” should read “off-the-boat Irish” Page 133, Line 19 – “last ditch attempt” should read “last-ditch attempt” Page 133, Line 33 – should be a comma between sick and with Page 140, Line 11 – “Ms.” Is an anachronism – the salutation Ms. came into being in the 1970s! (many other instances of the use of Ms. Molly not specifically pointed out here) Page 145, Line 20 – should be a comma between this? and asked Page 151, Line 7 – “Greely” is spelled “Greeley” - many more instances of this incorrect spelling in subsequent pages Page 151, Line 23 – “long held political beliefs” should read “long-held political beliefs” Page 152, Line 17 – “who” should read “whom” Page 152, Line 25 – “career capping exercise” should read “career-capping exercise” Page 153, Line 4 – should be a question mark after jobs Page 154, Line 7 – “lower class groups” should read “lower-class groups” Page 154, Line 21 – “who” should read “whom” Page 155, Line 1 – “lady’s man” should read “ladies’ man” Page 155, Line 6 – should be a comma after professor Page 155, Line 17 – since the word “act” refers to a specific piece of legislation, it should read “Act” Page 158, Line 1 – “Anxious” should read “Eager” (anxious connotes anxiety; eager connotes enthusiasm) Page 158, Line 16 – “pouring over” should read “poring over” Page 159, Line 5 – “first class education” should read “first-class education” Page 161, Line 8 – “down side” should read “downside” Page 162, Line 2 – “much needed” security should read “much-needed security” Page 166, Lines 12-13 – “Black on Black” should read “Black-on-Black” Page 171, Line 15 – should be no comma after Redden Page 175, Line 18 – “good natured ” should read “good-natured” Page 175, Line 20 – should be a question mark after resurface and before Grace Page 177, Line 10 – should be no comma after it Page 177, Line 18 – “35 year-old German” should read “35-year-old German” Page 177, Line 22 – “mostly white crowd” should read “mostly-white crowd” Page 178, Line 4 – “understand when” should read “understand that when” Page 178, Line 30 – should be no comma between room and surrounded Page 179, Line 4 – “who” should read “whom” Page 182, Line 3 – should be no comma between apartment and with Page 183, Line 20 – “sixty year-old” should read “sixty-year-old” Page 185, Line 25 – “action filled night” should read “action-filled night” Page 192, Line 8 – “seven hour walking tour” should read “seven-hour walking tour” Page 192, Line 17 – “in his plate” should read “on his plate” Page 192, Line 20 – “much deserved rest” should read “much-deserved rest” Page 194, Line 9 – “high level conversations” should read “high-level conversations” Page 195 Line 22 – “much needed rest” should read “much-needed rest” Page 196, Line 13 – iced tea is another anachronism – Iced tea was very, very rarely seen until it was popularized at the 1904 World’s Fair in St. Louis – unlikely that this groups would have been pouring tea over ice during the Civil War era. Page 197, Line 3 – should be no comma after morning Page 198, Line 22 – should be no comma after Hall Page 199, Line 7 – should be a comma after Park and before approached Page 201, Line 5 – should be no comma after Men Page 201, Line 27 – “but as out of control the Irish” should read “but as out of control as the Irish” Page 204, Line 19 – “all out sprint” should read “all-out sprint” Page 205, Line 3 – should be no comma after place Page 206, Line 7 – should be a quotation mark before Mrs. Kilpatrick – someone is talking Page 207, Line 22 – should be a comma after in Page 208, Line 2 – should be a comma after Irish Page 208, Line 23 – should be a comma after this Page 209, Line 4 – “slicked back hair” should read “slicked-back hair” Page 210, Line 1 – “how to best have” should read “how best to have” Page 210, Line 14 – should be no comma after thought Page 213, Line 8 – should be no comma after married Page 213, Line 23 – should be no comma after bobbed Page 214, last line – “only took” should read “took only” Page 215, Line 3 – “good night kiss” should read “good-night kiss” Page 219, Line 8 – should be no comma after before Page 219, Line 18 – the word “same” should be deleted Page 219, Line 19 – “already perfect tie” should read “already-perfect tie” Page 221, Line 28 – “35-years-old” should read “35 years old” Page 223, Line 16 – “such a magnitude it is worth” should read “such a magnitude that it is worth” Page 223, Line 25 – should be no comma between souls and with Page 224, Line 3 – should be no comma between friends and and Page 227, Line 3 – “even you mother” should read “even you, Mother” Page 227, Line 7 – “back and forth banter” should read “back-and-forth banter” Page 227, Line 8 – should be no comma between banter and which Page 228, Line 9 – should be no comma between go and and Page 229, Line 3 – should be no comma between walls and and Page 229, Line 4 – “westward facing chair” should read “westward-facing chair” Page 230, Line 2 – should be no comma after doorman and before and Page 231, Line 15 – should be no comma after woman Page 232, Line 1 – “pompous looking man” should read “pompous-looking man” Page 232, Line 21 – “half an hour” should read “half hour” Page 232, Line 27 – should be no comma after close and “her” should read “him” (she was saying goodbye to Patrick; therefore, she was bidding HIM farewell) Page 233, Line 3 – should be no comma after side Page 235, Line 9 – “discrete” should read “discreet” (discrete means separate and distinct; discreet means subtle, unobtrusive) Page 235, Line 11 – “highly trained dog” should read “highly-trained dog” Page 235, Line 18 – should be no comma after element Page 235, Line 25 – same as 229, Line 4 – “westward facing chair” should read “westward-facing chair” Page 236, Line 19 – The wink meant, good job and congratulations should read: The wink meant ‘good job and congratulations.’ Page 237, Line 7 – should be no comma after Archambeau Page 237, Line 11 – should be no comma after Boigen Page 237, Line 14 – “who” should read “whom” Page 237, Line 27 – should be no comma after petals

  22. 5 out of 5

    Tyra Sherese

    Title: Failed Moments Author: A. Robert Allen is a longtime resident of New York City and works as a college administrator at New York City College. He has a lifelong passion for writing and has traced his family tree back hundreds of years. His roots are White, Black, Catholic, Protestant and Jewish. Place: Online Publisher: CreateSpace Independent Publishing Platform Publication Date: February 5, 2015 Edition: First Number of Pages: 237 Price: $16.41 (Amazon) ISBN: 10: 150581467 and 13: 978-15058146 P Title: Failed Moments Author: A. Robert Allen is a longtime resident of New York City and works as a college administrator at New York City College. He has a lifelong passion for writing and has traced his family tree back hundreds of years. His roots are White, Black, Catholic, Protestant and Jewish. Place: Online Publisher: CreateSpace Independent Publishing Platform Publication Date: February 5, 2015 Edition: First Number of Pages: 237 Price: $16.41 (Amazon) ISBN: 10: 150581467 and 13: 978-15058146 Preface or Introduction: None Table of Contents: None Number of Chapters: 53 General Field or Genre: Historical Fiction Author’s Thesis: To live the life you are destined to live, you have to return to your past lives to right the wrongs you have committed against others. Common Thread: Race, History Author’s Style: Formal Areas Covered: History: (1) French Caribbean 1790, Declaration of the Rights of Man and of the Citizen; and (2) New York City 1863, Conscription Act Footnotes: None Book’s Format Layout: 2 pages per sheet of paper Binding: e-book (no binding; Maps, illustrations: No Index: None Author’s Sources: None Summary Failed Moments is a fictional account of two stories which focus on various ancestors from the author’s family. Both stories address historical and racial aspects during a particular period of history. The book begins with Walsh, a wealthy man who has profited from the fall of dot.coms. A former professor of finance, he now spends each day working out, reading business trends for hours, and trading portfolios on his computers. Sometimes he has a date at a bar or restaurant or just spends time alone wandering the streets. He lives in isolation, away from family and others. Walsh appears at an elegant hotel where he is expected to meet his date whose name, physical appearance and background are unknown to him. As he looks at his watch and realizes that his date is running late, he feels a tap on his shoulder and experiences brief pain just below his right ear. The pain forces him to hunch over and press his hands against the sides of his head before he straightens up in an attempt to regain his composure. When he turns around, he meets his date, who happens to be his Aunt Grace, whom he thought had died about five years prior. During his meeting with his Aunt Grace, Walsh learns that he has died and is on life support at a local hospital. He learns that his life had not been going in the right direction and that while he had traveled too far down the wrong path, he still had a chance to get his life back on track. Aunt Grace tells Walsh that he has two prior lives that he will need to revisit and he will be given an opportunity to correct moments in these two lives where he exercised the wrong choice or took an inappropriate action. If he is successful in his revisit of these two prior lives, then he will regain consciousness and he will have the opportunity to live the life he was destined to live. However, if he is unsuccessful, he will not regain consciousness. Story #1 – St. Dominque (October 1790) In this life, Walsh is known as Patrice Beaumont, a 36 year slave owner of mixed race. He owns the Beaumont Plantation, a 1,000 acre plantation with 350 slaves, and 20 rooms in the main house, located on the outskirts of the city of Jacmel (in the southern region of St. Dominque). He inherited the plantation from his father, Patrice Beaumont, Sr. The Beaumont Plantation has a long reputation as one of the biggest coffee producers. Beaumont prides himself in treating his slaves better than any other slave plantation owner. His is the most influential plantation owner in Southern St. Domingue, and has the ability to make change. The class system on the island of St. Dominque consists of the ruling grands blancs (wealthy whites who owned most of the largest plantations and who resisted the rule of France and envisioned the island breaking off from the mother country); petits blancs (lower class whites who worked as artisans, shopkeepers/oversees who were more loyal to France); and gens de couleur (mixed race group who had full economic rights, but limited basic civil liberties). The Declaration of the Rights of Man and of the Citizen was passed by the National Assembly, which gave promise to the gens de couleur that “free men of color would be able to vote and fully participate in society”. Beaumont grow up on the plantation with Andre, a slave, whose mother was the lifelong house slave to the Beaumont family. This afforded Andre special privileges on the plantation. He and Andre, who shared the same physical similarities, grew up together like brothers. Quotes: “Being the best of the worst is nothing to celebrate.” “Would Patrice seize this opportunity and realize the potential he had to be a great leader?” Story #2 – Ireland to New York (1863) During his second life, Walsh is known as Patrick Allen, Jr., a 20 year old Irish Catholic, 6’7”, who grew up poor in Ireland with his father, Patrick Allen, Sr. (a/k/a as “Pretty Paddy”), and his mother, Grace. His father, who is very intelligent, has dreams of a political career in free Ireland but works as a laborer in workhouses, along with Allen’s mother. The family is poor as most Irish are during that time; during one period of time they receive their entire source of income from the Public Works programs set up by the government. Although the family is poor, they quietly donate a portion of their income to a different neighbor each day. Allen’s father later die in Ireland after being infected by lice. In 1863, Allen and his mother leave Ireland after the Great famine and move to New York. There are a lot of tension between the Irish and Blacks about jobs, which contribute to the riots that erupt in the city during the summer of 1863. In terms of social class, the Irish are looked down on by almost everyone else in the city, while Blacks are not considered citizens. During this time, Allen live by “Daddy’s Rules” which help him to become a man: (1) Never let them know you have a brain; (2) Don’t’ accept everything you hear as truth; (3) Don’t reject a truth only because it is personally hard to accept; and (4) Have total respect for a gun, substantial respect for a knife, some respect for a club, and little respect for anything else. Allen also live by “Mommy’s Rule”: to use his God given intelligence and physical difference to make a difference, just like his father did.” The Conscription Act, is passed by Congress to allow for a wartime draft of U.S. citizens. The draft is scheduled to take place on Saturday, July 11, 1863. All male citizens at least 20 years of age are subject to the Draft, however, there are three basic exemptions to the draft: (1) two for wealth whites (they could either pay the government $300 to be excused or offer some poor soul a lesser amount to be their subordinate); and (2) one for blacks (they were not considered citizens). The exemptions to the Conscription Act guarantee an all Irish war. Quote: "When you can make a difference,it is your fight." Conclusion. I have such a large “Books to Read List” that it is often very difficult to choose which book to read next. I am VERY glad that the author reached out to me via Goodreads.com and inquired about my interest in reading and reviewing his new book Failed Moments. I am an avid reader and have always wanted to write a book review, and I welcomed the opportunity to do so. I enjoy reading memoirs, biographies and autobiographies. I also enjoy reading about history. The author took creative liberties in writing the story which I found to be very interesting. While the author’s book is a fictional account of his ancestors, I was able to see what I believe to part of the author himself in the book. I was never bored while reading this book as it was very hard to put down. I found it to be suspenseful from beginning to end. I would LOVE to see a film based on this book. I really enjoyed reading the book Failed Moments and have added the author to my list of preferred authors. I look forward to reading future books by A. Robert Allen.

  23. 5 out of 5

    V Rabassa

    Different and very interesting What I liked about Allen's debut novel are: the premise, the historical background and the characters. The premise: Patrick Allen is in a coma and gets the opportunity to go back to two of his previous life's to do "the right thing" and get closer to "purity". But he is not alone: his beloved (and deceased) Aunt Grace is side by side correcting her mistakes, too. I find myself wondering what if the author had taken a different, less direct way to make this premise kn Different and very interesting What I liked about Allen's debut novel are: the premise, the historical background and the characters. The premise: Patrick Allen is in a coma and gets the opportunity to go back to two of his previous life's to do "the right thing" and get closer to "purity". But he is not alone: his beloved (and deceased) Aunt Grace is side by side correcting her mistakes, too. I find myself wondering what if the author had taken a different, less direct way to make this premise known to the reader, or maybe, later in the book. I believe in reincarnation, but it is not essential to enjoy the story. I want historical fiction to teach me something new: Failed Moments did. Nonetheless, sometimes it felt more like a history lesson, instead of the background being woven into the story. I enjoyed the characters, most of them very easy to like (or despise, in Henri's and Jean Claude's case), but thought they were not deeply developed. Some of them seem more like shadows, not characters. I guess having three stories to tell does not provide for that, unless you take the risk of a very long book. I was mostly intrigued by Abraham Julian: what an opportunity for a great story!!!

  24. 5 out of 5

    Pam

    Failed Moments is by A. Robert Allen. This book is part of his Slavery and Beyond series. This book is good; but by the end it seems to drop off in suspense and gets a little boring and repetitive. However, on a whole, the book is really great. It gives the reader a unique and different view of the spell cast to take you back to Old New York City. ‘ Roger is a reclusive man who lives in New York City. He works alone, eats alone, and lives alone. He has a few intimate friends; but mostly he is alo Failed Moments is by A. Robert Allen. This book is part of his Slavery and Beyond series. This book is good; but by the end it seems to drop off in suspense and gets a little boring and repetitive. However, on a whole, the book is really great. It gives the reader a unique and different view of the spell cast to take you back to Old New York City. ‘ Roger is a reclusive man who lives in New York City. He works alone, eats alone, and lives alone. He has a few intimate friends; but mostly he is alone. He finds himself in a hotel he hasn’t noticed on the East side where he is living now. He is waiting on a date to meet him here. Meanwhile, he notices the beautiful interior and the unusual groups of people. One group is animated and as they leave to catch a bus, they tear off a leaf from a vase of flowers sitting in the middle of the room. The other group is subdued and quiet as they go out the other door. He feels a sharp jolt to his head then hears and sees his Aunt Grace, who had died. He wonders what is going on. What he learns takes him back into the past to rectify mistakes made. If he corrects them properly, he will live; if not, he will die. It is an interesting approach to look at the history of New York City and it really works.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Amy:)

    A very interesting read This is one of the best books I have read in awhile. While in a coma, Patrick is guided through 3 of his past lives. Each life is set in different time periods, but there are cleverly woven details, events, and characters that tie them all together. Issues of race, class, social inequity and moral dilemmas abound. I have read the other books in the Slavery and beyond series. This is my favorite. I would recommend it to anyone interested in history especially periods of sla A very interesting read This is one of the best books I have read in awhile. While in a coma, Patrick is guided through 3 of his past lives. Each life is set in different time periods, but there are cleverly woven details, events, and characters that tie them all together. Issues of race, class, social inequity and moral dilemmas abound. I have read the other books in the Slavery and beyond series. This is my favorite. I would recommend it to anyone interested in history especially periods of slavery and Irish immigration.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Bridget Glover

    Entertaining read...relatable characters Great read for those who enjoy historical fiction books. It was entertaining, characters were relatable and the situations they faced definitely made you stop and think about what you would do if you were in their shoes. This book makes you wonder how many failed moments you've had of your own and if you would do things differently if given a second chance. Entertaining read...relatable characters Great read for those who enjoy historical fiction books. It was entertaining, characters were relatable and the situations they faced definitely made you stop and think about what you would do if you were in their shoes. This book makes you wonder how many failed moments you've had of your own and if you would do things differently if given a second chance.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Julie Potter

    Just Wow I was totally taken in by this book. I didn't want it to end. The story was interesting right from the front page. I was a little confused with the characters but then I realized that they were the same people just at different times. I can't wait to read the next two in the series. Just Wow I was totally taken in by this book. I didn't want it to end. The story was interesting right from the front page. I was a little confused with the characters but then I realized that they were the same people just at different times. I can't wait to read the next two in the series.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Lisa

    I'm not usually one for self-published books but I wanted to read this give its storylines and their contexts as well as the bok's seeming similarity to Octavia Butler's Kindred. I might have liked this one better as two novels that each fully developed the stories of the Irish fighter and the mixed race plantation owner, but this was still a satsifying, well-written novel. I'm not usually one for self-published books but I wanted to read this give its storylines and their contexts as well as the bok's seeming similarity to Octavia Butler's Kindred. I might have liked this one better as two novels that each fully developed the stories of the Irish fighter and the mixed race plantation owner, but this was still a satsifying, well-written novel.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Jonna

    What a wonderful book! I have loved each and every one of A. Robert Allen's "Slavery and Beyond" series but this one is my favorite. There's a mystical twist to the story that makes it enchanting. It's a tough story - a hard subject - but Allen weaves the narrative in such a way that you follow along, hungry for the next event to unfold. This is a definite must read! You'll be glad you did. What a wonderful book! I have loved each and every one of A. Robert Allen's "Slavery and Beyond" series but this one is my favorite. There's a mystical twist to the story that makes it enchanting. It's a tough story - a hard subject - but Allen weaves the narrative in such a way that you follow along, hungry for the next event to unfold. This is a definite must read! You'll be glad you did.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Angie Cory

    Patrick's Life Lessons Each of Patrick's opportunities became increasingly reflective to my own. Questioning purpose, faith, parenting, politics. Daily nuances in any life. Patrick's soul, every soul, is tangible. Lives touched. Lives changed. Joy. Sorrow. Promise. Tomorrow. Patrick's Life Lessons Each of Patrick's opportunities became increasingly reflective to my own. Questioning purpose, faith, parenting, politics. Daily nuances in any life. Patrick's soul, every soul, is tangible. Lives touched. Lives changed. Joy. Sorrow. Promise. Tomorrow.

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...