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Winning On Purpose: How To Organize Congregations to Succeed in Their Mission (Convergence Ebook Series)

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Using an innovative sports analogy, John Kaiser provides proven biblical principles of leadership to help board members, pastors, lay leaders, denominational executives, consultants, and dedicated church members succeed in their respective missions. He also discusses how these strategies can be tailored to fit the requirements of specific denominations.


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Using an innovative sports analogy, John Kaiser provides proven biblical principles of leadership to help board members, pastors, lay leaders, denominational executives, consultants, and dedicated church members succeed in their respective missions. He also discusses how these strategies can be tailored to fit the requirements of specific denominations.

30 review for Winning On Purpose: How To Organize Congregations to Succeed in Their Mission (Convergence Ebook Series)

  1. 5 out of 5

    Jeff

    Good book for providing a framework to running a congregation. Our Church Council read this and used parts to help provide clarity and accountability.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Deanna Giles

    Great book! Winning on Purpose is a great book. Its main contributionmis that it delineates the relationships very well of pastor, staff, board, and congregation. Of course, I am biased. I think that people generally like a book when they agree with it. I do. But my bias is philosophical, not personal. I.e. I am not related to the author not do I have a financial stake in the success of the book. It just makes really good sense to me.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Chris Everson

    I enjoyed reading this book and look forward to using some of the principles in my congregation. However the editing in this book is horrendous. Multiple errors per chapter instead of I the number 1 is used and multiple misspellings of God (cod) and one of Jesus (fesus). The read would be much better without those errors.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Kathleenalford

    I am a new member of our church's council. This book informed me of the format that many nonprofit organizations are following. For a church, the parts are congregation, staff, council, and lead pastor. The author set up the boundaries of each part and designated the different duties. The book is very well-written and organized. I will refer to it many times during my tenure on the council. I am a new member of our church's council. This book informed me of the format that many nonprofit organizations are following. For a church, the parts are congregation, staff, council, and lead pastor. The author set up the boundaries of each part and designated the different duties. The book is very well-written and organized. I will refer to it many times during my tenure on the council.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Bryan Sagmoe

    Great clarity on leading the organization of the church. Knowing the game you're playing, the players, the rules, and most importantly what makes up a point on the scoreboard. Life is more than just running around and getting sweaty every day as it applies to your leadership in the church. Great clarity on leading the organization of the church. Knowing the game you're playing, the players, the rules, and most importantly what makes up a point on the scoreboard. Life is more than just running around and getting sweaty every day as it applies to your leadership in the church.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Mike Jorgensen

    *Required reading for work.* Some of the principles are helpful and generally wise. The rest is particularly Baptist but pretending to be as universal (and biblical) as the other aspects.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Karen

    Good information about how our church council operates, but way too many sports analogies.

  8. 4 out of 5

    JaNet Rogge

    Excellent book for our Board of Directors at my church. Well planned and clearly easy to read. Now I want to go back and re-read sections to put things into action.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Erin

    Written for senior pastors and "boards" so not terribly useful for other church staff and leaders. I don't find the game metaphor compelling. The advice given is applicable mostly to large non-denoms. Mainline denom church readers are FAR better served with one of these (in order of how good they are): Church Unique: How Missional Leaders Cast Vision, Capture Culture, and Create Movement, Deepening Your Effectiveness: Restructuring the Local Church for Life Transformation, Ultimately Responsible: Written for senior pastors and "boards" so not terribly useful for other church staff and leaders. I don't find the game metaphor compelling. The advice given is applicable mostly to large non-denoms. Mainline denom church readers are FAR better served with one of these (in order of how good they are): Church Unique: How Missional Leaders Cast Vision, Capture Culture, and Create Movement, Deepening Your Effectiveness: Restructuring the Local Church for Life Transformation, Ultimately Responsible: When You're in Charge of Igniting a Ministry With Dvdrom , or Equipping Church, The

  10. 4 out of 5

    Tom Bazan

    Winning on Purpose is a book about how to organize a congregation so that it can "succeed" in its mission. Kaiser has a strategy--he calls it "Accountable Leadership"--for empowering different people (or groups) to do different things. His strategy is set up to avoid having too many cooks in the kitchen and allowing people to lead, organize, and grow a congregation, while at the same time providing a structure of oversight to prevent abuse of power, including prolonged stagnation. Kaiser's strate Winning on Purpose is a book about how to organize a congregation so that it can "succeed" in its mission. Kaiser has a strategy--he calls it "Accountable Leadership"--for empowering different people (or groups) to do different things. His strategy is set up to avoid having too many cooks in the kitchen and allowing people to lead, organize, and grow a congregation, while at the same time providing a structure of oversight to prevent abuse of power, including prolonged stagnation. Kaiser's strategy is formed by having four groups (the congregation, a board, the pastor, and the staff) playing their appropriate roles and knowing the "object" of the game, "rules" of the game, and method of keeping "score." It is designed to prevent each player from usurping the duties of other players. In other words, the board should govern, the pastor should lead, the staff should manage, and the congregation should minister. He goes into details of why each of these is appropriate, and why he thinks that this setup is more appropriate than others. Additionally, he talks a bit about how a congregation could transition from its current setup to an Accountable Leadership model.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Dale Critchley

    Since we implemented Kaiser's model at our church, we are so much more productive! Having had a taste, I will never go back to the old Board & Council system. This model is the Ferrari to replace the horse & buggy. My only complaint is the need for more details on implementation. Having a FAQ or a website with a forum or Q&A section would be very helpful. I had a coach to help me, so I was fine, but a solo pastor trying to implement things on his own will need to make up some of the details on th Since we implemented Kaiser's model at our church, we are so much more productive! Having had a taste, I will never go back to the old Board & Council system. This model is the Ferrari to replace the horse & buggy. My only complaint is the need for more details on implementation. Having a FAQ or a website with a forum or Q&A section would be very helpful. I had a coach to help me, so I was fine, but a solo pastor trying to implement things on his own will need to make up some of the details on the fly.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Timothy

    Great perspective on church leadership, but somewhat specific to American Baptist Churches of the West. This book provides some great big picture ideas for church structure using sports analogies (the object of the game, the rules or boundaries, etc.). As a United Methodist, much of what was discussed and proposed will have to be adapted to my specific setting and polity, but it was certainly a worthwhile read!

  13. 4 out of 5

    Josh

    This is a very helpful book regarding systems and leadership structures within a local church. Though it would be very hard to completely adopt everything in this book to a Wesleyan setting... it does provide so much material and ideas to help focus the energies of the entire church. Identifying the four 'players' of the church and what their primary responsibilities should cover would be extremely helpful for any church to know and understand. This is a very helpful book regarding systems and leadership structures within a local church. Though it would be very hard to completely adopt everything in this book to a Wesleyan setting... it does provide so much material and ideas to help focus the energies of the entire church. Identifying the four 'players' of the church and what their primary responsibilities should cover would be extremely helpful for any church to know and understand.

  14. 5 out of 5

    David

    Will probably write more later, but for now I will just say that there is definitely some helpful stuff in here (making it worth a read), but there was lots I found irritating and frustrating that left me debating whether to give it 2 or 3 stars (gave it 3 for charity's sake). Will probably write more later, but for now I will just say that there is definitely some helpful stuff in here (making it worth a read), but there was lots I found irritating and frustrating that left me debating whether to give it 2 or 3 stars (gave it 3 for charity's sake).

  15. 4 out of 5

    Drew

    This gave a lot of practical information on church governance that can also be applied to any governance board - business or home owners.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Jennifer

    A very non-churchy way to do church, but it makes so much sense it's ridiculous more aren't using the Kaiser model. A very non-churchy way to do church, but it makes so much sense it's ridiculous more aren't using the Kaiser model.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Tom Buratovich

    This is a must read for any pastor frustrated by stubborn churches. What a helpful book.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Steve S.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Stephanie Massey

  20. 5 out of 5

    Michael

  21. 5 out of 5

    Jason Stanley

  22. 4 out of 5

    Steve

  23. 5 out of 5

    Steven Jones

  24. 5 out of 5

    Betsy Vanderpool

  25. 4 out of 5

    John Freedman

  26. 5 out of 5

    Steve

  27. 4 out of 5

    Bruce

  28. 4 out of 5

    Jen

  29. 4 out of 5

    Seth Baruffi

  30. 4 out of 5

    Jeff Denlinger

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