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The Boy Who Catches Wasps: Selected Poetry of Duo Duo

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Duo Duo began to write poetry in the early 1970s when the Cultural Revolution was still in full swing. He was obliged to write clandestinely, never imagining he would have readers. He continued to write throughout the 1980s, publishing in samizdat publications, and then more openly as the authorities relaxed their grip. Duo Duo left China for a reading tour of England June Duo Duo began to write poetry in the early 1970s when the Cultural Revolution was still in full swing. He was obliged to write clandestinely, never imagining he would have readers. He continued to write throughout the 1980s, publishing in samizdat publications, and then more openly as the authorities relaxed their grip. Duo Duo left China for a reading tour of England June 4th 1989, the morning after the Tiananmen massacre that he had witnessed. Duo Duo’s poetic vision embraces a historical and political vision that is much more diverse, more global than that circumscribed by the confines of the last third of China’s twentieth century. The context of China, Duo Duo’s lived experience, is necessarily present in the poet’s imaginary, but it is diffused in a world-view that embraces all of modern humanity’s dilemmas, our increasing separation from nature, and our alienation from one another. The exile, like the hybrid and other "in between" subjects, writes of China with the benefit of critical distance, but also writes with an exceptional perspective of wherever he finds himself. Before leaving China, Duo Duo worked as a journalist. His writing has been widely translated and published throughout the world, including two small selections of his work—in English—published in the UK and Canada. Generally associated with the other menglong (ambiguist) poets, such as Bei Dao and Yang Lian. Duo Duo currently lives and teaches in the Netherlands. Gregory Lee currently lives in France and teaches at l’Université Jean Moulin Lyon III. He has also taught at the Universities of Cambridge, London, Chicago and Hong Kong. His translations of Duo Duo and other Chinese poets have appeared in numerous publications, including Fissures: Chinese Writing Today (Zephyr Press), and Abandoned Wine (Wellsweep Press). Also available Fissures: Chinese Writing Today TP $14.95, 0-939010-59-3 • CUSA


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Duo Duo began to write poetry in the early 1970s when the Cultural Revolution was still in full swing. He was obliged to write clandestinely, never imagining he would have readers. He continued to write throughout the 1980s, publishing in samizdat publications, and then more openly as the authorities relaxed their grip. Duo Duo left China for a reading tour of England June Duo Duo began to write poetry in the early 1970s when the Cultural Revolution was still in full swing. He was obliged to write clandestinely, never imagining he would have readers. He continued to write throughout the 1980s, publishing in samizdat publications, and then more openly as the authorities relaxed their grip. Duo Duo left China for a reading tour of England June 4th 1989, the morning after the Tiananmen massacre that he had witnessed. Duo Duo’s poetic vision embraces a historical and political vision that is much more diverse, more global than that circumscribed by the confines of the last third of China’s twentieth century. The context of China, Duo Duo’s lived experience, is necessarily present in the poet’s imaginary, but it is diffused in a world-view that embraces all of modern humanity’s dilemmas, our increasing separation from nature, and our alienation from one another. The exile, like the hybrid and other "in between" subjects, writes of China with the benefit of critical distance, but also writes with an exceptional perspective of wherever he finds himself. Before leaving China, Duo Duo worked as a journalist. His writing has been widely translated and published throughout the world, including two small selections of his work—in English—published in the UK and Canada. Generally associated with the other menglong (ambiguist) poets, such as Bei Dao and Yang Lian. Duo Duo currently lives and teaches in the Netherlands. Gregory Lee currently lives in France and teaches at l’Université Jean Moulin Lyon III. He has also taught at the Universities of Cambridge, London, Chicago and Hong Kong. His translations of Duo Duo and other Chinese poets have appeared in numerous publications, including Fissures: Chinese Writing Today (Zephyr Press), and Abandoned Wine (Wellsweep Press). Also available Fissures: Chinese Writing Today TP $14.95, 0-939010-59-3 • CUSA

38 review for The Boy Who Catches Wasps: Selected Poetry of Duo Duo

  1. 5 out of 5

    Paul

    是 我爱你 我永不收回 shi wo ai ni wo yong bu shou hui Best of the "Misty" poets of the 80's. Symbolism and beautiful, bizarre imagery. Hope my Chinese is good enough one day to really be able to read and understand the original. 是 我爱你 我永不收回 shi wo ai ni wo yong bu shou hui Best of the "Misty" poets of the 80's. Symbolism and beautiful, bizarre imagery. Hope my Chinese is good enough one day to really be able to read and understand the original.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Frank

  3. 4 out of 5

    Dr Soheyla

  4. 4 out of 5

    Michaela

  5. 4 out of 5

    Conrado

  6. 4 out of 5

    Jonathan

  7. 4 out of 5

    Ying

  8. 4 out of 5

    Yi Yu

  9. 4 out of 5

    Amy Lantrip

  10. 4 out of 5

    Karolina

  11. 5 out of 5

    Y. Ryan

  12. 4 out of 5

    Phillip Ischy

  13. 5 out of 5

    James

  14. 4 out of 5

    Lucas

  15. 4 out of 5

    Sharlene

  16. 5 out of 5

    Flora

  17. 5 out of 5

    LA

  18. 4 out of 5

    Mason Parker

  19. 5 out of 5

    F. Rzicznek

  20. 4 out of 5

    Teresa Chuc

  21. 4 out of 5

    Saryuna

  22. 5 out of 5

    Brock

  23. 4 out of 5

    Raven

  24. 4 out of 5

    Jonas Dornelles

  25. 5 out of 5

    Arturo

  26. 5 out of 5

    Tapani

  27. 4 out of 5

    Vitt

  28. 5 out of 5

    Jur

  29. 4 out of 5

    Härjapealane

  30. 4 out of 5

    S

  31. 4 out of 5

    Steven Chang

  32. 5 out of 5

    Sean

  33. 4 out of 5

    Sippy

  34. 4 out of 5

    Kyle

  35. 5 out of 5

    Blake Waters

  36. 5 out of 5

    Fiona

  37. 4 out of 5

    thomas

  38. 5 out of 5

    Simon

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