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Consequence: A Memoir

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"A man questions everything--his faith, his morality, his country--as he recounts his experience as an interrogator in Iraq; an unprecedented memoir and "an act of incredible bravery" (Phil Klay) "Remarkable... Both an agonized confession and a chilling expose of one of the darkest interludes of the War on Terror. Only this kind of courage and honesty can bring America back "A man questions everything--his faith, his morality, his country--as he recounts his experience as an interrogator in Iraq; an unprecedented memoir and "an act of incredible bravery" (Phil Klay) "Remarkable... Both an agonized confession and a chilling expose of one of the darkest interludes of the War on Terror. Only this kind of courage and honesty can bring America back to the democratic values that we are so rightfully proud of." --Sebastian Junger Consequence is the story of Eric Fair, a kid who grew up in the shadows of crumbling Bethlehem Steel plants nurturing a strong faith and a belief that he was called to serve his country. It is a story of a man who chases his own demons from Egypt, where he served as an Army translator, to a detention center in Iraq, to seminary at Princeton, and eventually, to a heart transplant ward at the University of Pennsylvania. In 2004, after several months as an interrogator with a private contractor in Iraq, Eric Fair's nightmares take new forms: first, there had been the shrinking dreams; now the liquid dreams begin. By the time he leaves Iraq after that first deployment (he will return), Fair will have participated in or witnessed a variety of aggressive interrogation techniques including sleep deprivation, stress positions, diet manipulation, exposure, and isolation. Years later, his health and marriage crumbling, haunted by the role he played in what we now know as "enhanced interrogation," it is Fair's desire to speak out that becomes a key to his survival. Spare and haunting, Eric Fair's memoir is both a brave, unrelenting confession and a book that questions the very depths of who he, and we as a country, have become.


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"A man questions everything--his faith, his morality, his country--as he recounts his experience as an interrogator in Iraq; an unprecedented memoir and "an act of incredible bravery" (Phil Klay) "Remarkable... Both an agonized confession and a chilling expose of one of the darkest interludes of the War on Terror. Only this kind of courage and honesty can bring America back "A man questions everything--his faith, his morality, his country--as he recounts his experience as an interrogator in Iraq; an unprecedented memoir and "an act of incredible bravery" (Phil Klay) "Remarkable... Both an agonized confession and a chilling expose of one of the darkest interludes of the War on Terror. Only this kind of courage and honesty can bring America back to the democratic values that we are so rightfully proud of." --Sebastian Junger Consequence is the story of Eric Fair, a kid who grew up in the shadows of crumbling Bethlehem Steel plants nurturing a strong faith and a belief that he was called to serve his country. It is a story of a man who chases his own demons from Egypt, where he served as an Army translator, to a detention center in Iraq, to seminary at Princeton, and eventually, to a heart transplant ward at the University of Pennsylvania. In 2004, after several months as an interrogator with a private contractor in Iraq, Eric Fair's nightmares take new forms: first, there had been the shrinking dreams; now the liquid dreams begin. By the time he leaves Iraq after that first deployment (he will return), Fair will have participated in or witnessed a variety of aggressive interrogation techniques including sleep deprivation, stress positions, diet manipulation, exposure, and isolation. Years later, his health and marriage crumbling, haunted by the role he played in what we now know as "enhanced interrogation," it is Fair's desire to speak out that becomes a key to his survival. Spare and haunting, Eric Fair's memoir is both a brave, unrelenting confession and a book that questions the very depths of who he, and we as a country, have become.

30 review for Consequence: A Memoir

  1. 4 out of 5

    Kelly (and the Book Boar)

    Find all of my reviews at: http://52bookminimum.blogspot.com/ The third stop on my “Passport to Everywhere” experience is Abu Ghraib and Fallujah – courtesy of a book I’d never heard of until one of my Goodreads friends posted a "review to come" sort of review that put it on my radar. Consequence is a memoir in what I’m going to call the James Frey sect of memoirs so I’m not going to waste any time reviewing it. This quote by a government psychologist appointed to analyze the author says everythi Find all of my reviews at: http://52bookminimum.blogspot.com/ The third stop on my “Passport to Everywhere” experience is Abu Ghraib and Fallujah – courtesy of a book I’d never heard of until one of my Goodreads friends posted a "review to come" sort of review that put it on my radar. Consequence is a memoir in what I’m going to call the James Frey sect of memoirs so I’m not going to waste any time reviewing it. This quote by a government psychologist appointed to analyze the author says everything that needs to be said . . . “There are signs of instability.” He also says my answers show a tendency to put myself in a better light. He says, “You seem a bit insecure. Is there someone you’re trying to impress?” Two more trips to somewhere and I get my mug!!!!

  2. 4 out of 5

    Claudia Putnam

    Maybe it's 3 stars, but it's important enough that I'll give it 4. Unfortunately the first part drags and drags. This is redeemed in the last part, though. The book starts to sing when he figures out what he wants to do with his story, by which I mean he figures out *in his life* what he wants to do with his story. As far his memoir goes, he knows by the time he starts writing it where he's going. It's just that you wonder all along what the hell he was doing with his life. How was it that a you Maybe it's 3 stars, but it's important enough that I'll give it 4. Unfortunately the first part drags and drags. This is redeemed in the last part, though. The book starts to sing when he figures out what he wants to do with his story, by which I mean he figures out *in his life* what he wants to do with his story. As far his memoir goes, he knows by the time he starts writing it where he's going. It's just that you wonder all along what the hell he was doing with his life. How was it that a young, Christian man with the best of intentions really did end up torturing people in Iraq? He wonders the same thing, but never really answers the question. Perhaps the question has no answer. Perhaps it has no answer for most people, but I wanted him to go a little deeper into his own soul. He said that his Presbyterian upbringing meant that at home with his family he sat around the dinner table and discussed books. That he shied away from conflict. That they were not the typical fundamentalist family that often sends people to the military, though in his family's case the men had gone to war and therefore he had thought it his duty to be a soldier (though his father and his grandmother, the wife of a WWII soldier, did NOT want him to go to Iraq). He grew up wanting to be a soldier or a police officer. But as a child he was bullied, and he also wanted very much to fit in. And to protect others. He also seems to have felt very strongly that his church should protect and welcome gays, and although he never takes a very strong stand, he feels alienated when it doesn't. This is his only moral compass, it seems, growing up. But I don't get it. He seems oriented to scripture, but we never hear which scriptures, or what they means to him exactly. We hear that he is attuned to a certain church leader, a youth leader, but we don't really hear what about Christianity means so much to him--church is a safe place, he likes the *structure* of it, the liturgy, but what of the sense of it? What does Jesus mean to him? What is religion to him? What is God? What is the inner life of Christianity to him? Because it all falls apart fairly quickly. As a soldier, in his first tour of Iraq. As a police officer, when he becomes as much a bully as a protector. So. You grow up wanting to be a soldier, but your ideal of a soldier is not what you thought. Surprise. You grow up wanting to a policement, but your childhood image of a policeman is not what you thought. Surprise. Do you then change course and want to be something else? No, you stubbornly fight this, even when you find you have a heart condition that disqualifies you for these careers, and even when you find that these roles morally compromise your Christianity, the other defining factor in your life. You keep trying to return to war, to the police force, to these things that destroy your soul. Part of that quest to go back—to the force, to war, even when other career choices, such as working for the NSA or the CIA might offer other ways to serve—stems from a somewhat understandable desire to do it right this time, to redeem himself. I can get that. But even before he got involved in torture, he seemed hellbent on combat, on being in the war zone, on finding any means possible of being in the thick of it, and I can’t see what was in his background that demanded this of a good Christian boy from a gentle Presbyterian background who hated bullying. He never says what about THIS war demanded his service, what about THIS war seemed moral to him. And that lack of examination remains throughout the book. Even when he accepts that torture is wrong, he remains convinced of the guilt of those he tortured. He never questions the right of Americans to be in Iraq, never questions that the insurgents were doing something wrong, that even the guy who suffered so terribly in the “Palestinian chair”—which he unequivocally sees as an evil means of obtaining what he also feels is unequivocally the truth—was an evildoer. But was he? Or was that man trying to defend his city from an illegal invasion? Fair seems unwilling to examine this, despite his grandmother presenting him with information about this. He never comments on the content of what his grandmother wants to discuss with him about the morality of the war itself. It also seemed strange to me that Fair never, ever considered doing a different form of service even within Iraq. He was a contractor for an organization, CACI, that from the get-go seemed not to have its shit together. From the get-go, he had offers from more together organizations, including Blackwater. But he didn’t take them, appears not to have considered them. (There was also a strange statement from a colleague who was very disturbed about also having participated in torture, including waterboarding, who later ended up at Gitmo, that Gitmo seemed to be nothing like Iraq—the implication being that it was a kinder, gentler place. Which isn’t what we have otherwise heard.) So these odd gaps bothered me a great deal as a listener. For someone who was trying to hold himself accountable, Fair had places he wasn’t willing to go, places I was interested in hearing about. But in the last third of the book, things got a lot better. For one thing, Fair had to face death, which meant he made some decisions about how he wanted to live. As he became more honest about himself and how he wanted to tell his story, his story became more clear to us as well. His own reckoning becomes a kind of reckoning for us as a country. And even in the parts where I kept banging my head against his walls, I still learned an awful, and I do mean awful, lot about the ways in which the military works and doesn’t work, as well as the ways in which contracts work and don’t work. Also the police. This was all very good to know. So I would recommend the book for all these reasons. The most haunting part is when he realizes that prison is mentioned in many places of the Bible and in not one of them is God on the side of the jailers.

  3. 4 out of 5

    David

    I was completely transfixed by what is probably the most brutally frank and honest memoir by a war veteran I've read. Despite Mr Fair's assertions to the contrary, writing this book was a courageous act which should be rewarded by the book becoming a major success. Readers will come away with an understanding of two truths: there are only casualties in war and all wars are crimes. I was completely transfixed by what is probably the most brutally frank and honest memoir by a war veteran I've read. Despite Mr Fair's assertions to the contrary, writing this book was a courageous act which should be rewarded by the book becoming a major success. Readers will come away with an understanding of two truths: there are only casualties in war and all wars are crimes.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Megalion

    Such a hot potato. One of the most scandalous things to come out of the Iraq war, the hard proof that our people viciously tortured prisoners. Eric was one of the "interrogators". He tells his story in what one might call a flat tone but it's simply the unembellished truth as he knows, saw, or experienced personally. He acknowledges the sin on his soul. That it'll never be erased. He doesn't tell his story in an attempt to win attention or find sympathy. Simply to give the reader the chance and Such a hot potato. One of the most scandalous things to come out of the Iraq war, the hard proof that our people viciously tortured prisoners. Eric was one of the "interrogators". He tells his story in what one might call a flat tone but it's simply the unembellished truth as he knows, saw, or experienced personally. He acknowledges the sin on his soul. That it'll never be erased. He doesn't tell his story in an attempt to win attention or find sympathy. Simply to give the reader the chance and experience the war and its dark side through the lens of his experience. He accepts that you may hate him. Want to put the hurt on him. He actually prefers that to sympathy. This is the story of one man who set out to serve his country as a civilian linguist. And found himself committing atrocities that he never dreamed himself possible of doing. His struggle to reverse course. His silent war with himself about turning a blind eye to torture happening in the next room and other things. Pretending that it wasn't happening. Brutally and starkly honest. I was reminded of Chris Kyle. I didn't read the book but I watched the movie. I saw critics and pundits vilifying it as trying to white wash the war. My thought was that they were all missing the point. The story is 100% about Chris Kyle, the man. What his upbringing was. His life philosophy and moral code. How he dealt with the fact that to do his duty and protect his soldiers, he had to shoot kids. But he did his job. He put the lives of his soldiers above the rest. I think that if the pundits had shut up for one second and really thought about what American Sniper was about, they'd been singing a different tune. Eric Fair was a guy who also wanted to do his part. His body kept him from being able to serve but his mind and language skills made him useful as a civilian translator. He was glad to go. Not even fathoming that one day he would find himself laying hands on a prisoner. Unlike Chris, he fell. This isn't his redemption. He's not looking for it. His story is there for those who want to know more. Violent and despicable acts are described in this book so if you are sensitive to those things, DO NOT READ THIS BOOK. If you can handle it, then DO READ THIS BOOK. It's grim and yet powerful. Thank you to the publisher for the free copy of this book in exchange for my honest review.

  5. 5 out of 5

    J. Kent Messum

    Quite a good read. However, my overall feelings about the book and author are considerably complicated for an array of reasons. 'Consequence' is the true story of Eric Fair's experiences in Iraq working as a private military contractor, or more specifically, an interrogator. The book spans his life, starting with being raised in small town America, moving on to his college days, and then focusing on several ways he served his country. All the while it explores his relationship with family, friend Quite a good read. However, my overall feelings about the book and author are considerably complicated for an array of reasons. 'Consequence' is the true story of Eric Fair's experiences in Iraq working as a private military contractor, or more specifically, an interrogator. The book spans his life, starting with being raised in small town America, moving on to his college days, and then focusing on several ways he served his country. All the while it explores his relationship with family, friends, church, the army, and the corporate side of war. Eric sees three paths open to him; the police force, the military, and the Presbyterian ministry. At different times in his life he tries to pursue all three and succeeds/fails on varying aspects to varying degrees. Every time he walks in a certain direction he covers considerable distance, but eventually returns with stories that are less than triumphant; poignant and sometimes insightful though they are. His police career is cut unexpectedly short, his army career fails to find traction, his contractor-interrogator job gradually turns into acts of torture (for both him and others), and his pursuit of priesthood is crippled by his constant grappling with the past. What we get from Mister Fair is a lot of commentary and introspection on what he felt he became and what America as a country is becoming. At times it gets preachy, and it toes the line of some fairly typical and predictable rhetoric. Understandable and forgivable, given the personal experience, but also stale to an extent; we've heard most of this before regardless of how emotionally charged it is. At times it fails to meet the needs of close examination, and instead we get commentary steeped in anger and sadness, unable to come to terms with the complexities of modern warfare and the fallibility/violence of the human species. At certain points it smacks of idealism colliding with cold reality. Should a man who has been involved in war have to inspect his actions logically and hold back his right to be upset? Not at all, but if you're letting your emotions get the best of you on the battlefield (literally or figuratively), maybe you're in the wrong business. And that's the one thing that bothered me throughout the whole book. To me, at least, it was obvious that Eric Fair was not cut out to be a police officer, or a soldier, or a minister. He was choosing paths in life that had little or nothing to do with his character, strength, mindset, and attitude. All three of those careers require that the participant be made of some pretty tough stuff, the right stuff, stuff that I felt Mister Fair did not possess. In many cases, people who take on challenging jobs they eventually can't deal with are fired, discharged, denied continuation, asked to resign, or pack it all in themselves. In Eric Fair's case, he stayed on. Then he wrote a book. As a result I felt I was being told a war story by a man who probably shouldn't been there in the first place. And as a consequence, it tended to taint what was being told.

  6. 5 out of 5

    precaffeinated

    I began this book last night and finished it this morning. Although the first person, present tense is grating for the length of an entire book, and Fair still is not fully open with himself or his readers, it was an engrossing read. My three stars reflects an average of four stars for interest yet only two for candor. What happens to a man who goes off to war? The book certainly answers this question: nightmares, guilt, alcoholism, sometimes death -- either by war or the man's own hand. How does I began this book last night and finished it this morning. Although the first person, present tense is grating for the length of an entire book, and Fair still is not fully open with himself or his readers, it was an engrossing read. My three stars reflects an average of four stars for interest yet only two for candor. What happens to a man who goes off to war? The book certainly answers this question: nightmares, guilt, alcoholism, sometimes death -- either by war or the man's own hand. How does a man like this reconcile his own religion with what he is ordered to do? I don't think we ever really get an answer. In his account, Fair's family expect him to become a pastor like his grandfather, but he is drawn to a darker, physical side, first becoming a policeman, where he learns to deploy violence against people who are always (well, at least in theory) criminals. For the longest time Fair thinks religion will save him, and the book contains a strange account of his interrogation of salafis who tell him how much like them he really is -- a thread that really leads nowhere. Aside from Fair's restlessness and his perpetual life crises, readers never really learn why he avoids the ministry, why he stubbornly clung to Presbyterianism despite it changing in front of his eyes, why he really dropped out of theological school. It wasn't that his writing was starting to take off; it was something else, unnamed, unexamined. And why does a man go off to war -- especially when many in his family have warned him against it? Fair again avoids fully answering the reader's questions, but we sense a tremendous restlessness in him that leads him to ignore his father's and grandmother's counsel. Fair is obviously a person of well above-average intelligence, and he is given to instrospection and guilt, but he shies away from truly probing the demons that still stir within him. The book begins with a quote from Maimonides' Laws of Repentance. Maimonides was the Arab-Jewish Talmudist who, besides being the Sultan's physician, wrote Guide for the Perplexed and had much to say on moral conduct. Maimonides counsels the guilty party to approach his victim "again and again until he his forgiven." Islam requires precisely the same of a wrong-doer, while in Christianity a hall pass signed by Jesus suffices. Unfortunately, all of Fair's -- and Bush and Cheney's, and Obama's -- victims are now either dead or lost to squalid prisons in places where Americans will fear to go for a long, long time. A dark truth never acknowledged in this book is that there never will be apologies -- and there never will be forgiveness for these personal and national sins. And so in the end Fair falls back on his Christianity -- or perhaps just wishful thinking. In his aunt's words, Eric Fair ends up forgiving himself: "I am just a human kid." Update 5/12/2016: As a former NSA employee, Eric Fair had to subject his book to the censors. Readers can see the extent of the excisions that were done in the blacked-out portions. In THE INTERCEPT Cora Currier reports (based on documents released by whistleblower Ed Snowden) on the existence of two articles Fair wrote in an NSA internal publication: https://theintercept.com/2016/05/11/t... These two documents were written by Fair ten years ago and paint a much rosier picture than in "Consequence" of his faith in the torture system: Part1: https://www.documentcloud.org/documen... Part2: https://www.documentcloud.org/documen...

  7. 5 out of 5

    Rachel

    I recommend reading this alongside Mohammedou Ould Slahi's Guatanamo Diary. I don't want to talk about how Fair's memoir is courageous (though it is). I don't think people should be congratulated for taking responsibility for violence and harm that they've perpetrated. I don't think that should be an exceptional act. I think, based on this memoir, that Fair would agree with that statement. But, unfortunately, it is. Unfortunately, this absence of responsibility and accountability doesn't only exis I recommend reading this alongside Mohammedou Ould Slahi's Guatanamo Diary. I don't want to talk about how Fair's memoir is courageous (though it is). I don't think people should be congratulated for taking responsibility for violence and harm that they've perpetrated. I don't think that should be an exceptional act. I think, based on this memoir, that Fair would agree with that statement. But, unfortunately, it is. Unfortunately, this absence of responsibility and accountability doesn't only exist on an individual, but on a systemic, institutional, governmental level as well. This is Eric Fair's memoir about his time in Iraq, both as an interrogator for a private contracting firm hired by the US government, and then later as an "intelligence" expert for the NSA. This is a memoir about perpetrating torture; about the disjointed and confused life path which led Fair to the time when he did so, and about the wreckage his guilt has created in the rest of his life. The implication of this memoir is that Fair's guilt is so immense, so life-shattering, in part because there are no avenues open to him for accountability, responsibility, or repentance. He tries to take responsibility; not only by writing this memoir, but also by cooperating with the justice department, by sharing what he knows along legal channels. But these efforts are stymied by the US government's inability to take responsibility, this country's unwillingness to admit that the acts Fair participated in are torture, and that torture is wrong. I think Americans should read this book. I think we need to take Fair's guilt, and all its echoes, into serious consideration. The acts Fair describes committing and participating in meet the criteria for torture described in the United States Torture Victims Relief Act. If someone came to the US and described experiencing those acts by a government other than ours, they would qualify for asylum on that basis.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Alli

    More painful next to Guantanamo Diary. Well written.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Nic

    I've gone with a middle of the road rating because I can't decide how I feel: The internal dialogue I expected to read about the author engaging in is absent - there are accounts of seeing / hearing other people do terrible things and doing nothing (which does, in my opinion, make one morally culpable) and some vaguely drawn episodes of his own actions. Then there is guilt, manifesting in drinking and outbursts of rage. We are told that the author was restricting his forward thinking to a period I've gone with a middle of the road rating because I can't decide how I feel: The internal dialogue I expected to read about the author engaging in is absent - there are accounts of seeing / hearing other people do terrible things and doing nothing (which does, in my opinion, make one morally culpable) and some vaguely drawn episodes of his own actions. Then there is guilt, manifesting in drinking and outbursts of rage. We are told that the author was restricting his forward thinking to a period of six days in order to carry on working. I can understand this as a strategy for dealing with a difficult period in life. However, what we are not given is a satisfactory explanation for why he wanted to carry on. 'Doing ones part', having something to say when the grandkids ask what you 'did in the war' or not wanting to be thought of as weak by other people with questionable ethics isn't an explanation. This was a job, not a sentence, he was free to call it a day and leave at any time. I cannot feel sympathy when told of his nightmares etc, not when they were, by and large, of his own making. The author in general comes across as an incredibly selfish human being who seems to operate with a 'because I want to' attitude, showing little regard for anyone besides himself. His disregard for others includes his wife, who the writing would suggest he either left behind, or caused to move home and job on what amounted to little more than a whim. I cannot recall a single instance in which he relays seeking and / or listening to this lady's opinion, although he makes a point of noting the extraordinarily strong stance he would take when it came to matters of equality within his church. As the book is so lacking in internal struggle or direct opinion about his choices (preferably opinions that change over the course of the narrative), it reads like a somewhat indulgent act of catharsis by someone who knows they've made bad decisions. All in all, I closed this book angry, for all sorts of reasons. But at times it did make me think, so 3/5.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Greg Williams

    This book is really a confession by a man who is haunted by guilt from things he did for the US government in Iraq. The author was a civilian contractor in Iraq where he served as an interrogator at the infamous Abu Ghraib prison (as well as other facilities). While working as an interrogator, he faced the contradiction between his Christian faith and what he was doing as an interrogator. He comes to realize that what he was doing is sin and that "if God is on anyone's side in Iraq, it's not min This book is really a confession by a man who is haunted by guilt from things he did for the US government in Iraq. The author was a civilian contractor in Iraq where he served as an interrogator at the infamous Abu Ghraib prison (as well as other facilities). While working as an interrogator, he faced the contradiction between his Christian faith and what he was doing as an interrogator. He comes to realize that what he was doing is sin and that "if God is on anyone's side in Iraq, it's not mine". I found the book to be both interesting and disturbing. I was simultaneously amazed and disgusted at the disorganization and incompetence of the civilian contracting firm that hired him. In the experiences of the author, it was clear that the contracting firms were simply trying to fill open positions with bodies, without much thought to whether the people they hired were qualified. This is also the first book I've read where parts of it have been censored by the government. All in all, I think this book is well-written. And I think the author is honest about what he did and experienced. The sad part of the book for me is the ongoing guilt the author carries. Although he is a Christian, he is unable to give the guilt and shame he feels to Jesus. At one point, he suggests that there's no atonement for witnessing a man being tortured and not seeking justice for that man. At another point, he says "I avoid [prayer] now because I have a debt to pay and I have no right to petition someone else to pay it. I am a torturer. I have not turned a corner or found my way back. I have not been redeemed. I do not believe that I ever will be. But I am still obligated to try." As a Christian, it makes me sad to see him try to carry this burden on his own. My prayer for him is that writing this confession will be the first step toward spiritual healing and a return to Christ as his redeemer.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Wes Metz

    Eric Fair was a man in search of himself; deeply religious, highly patriotic, and wanting to serve society, he wants to become a police officer but doesn't score highly enough on the test because candidates with veteran's preference points outscore him. He enlists in the army and becomes a linguist specializing in Arabic. He is never sent to the Middle East. He leaves the army and is recruited by the NSA as an analyst. Then an opportunity arises to work work for a private firm in Iraq. Iraq is wh Eric Fair was a man in search of himself; deeply religious, highly patriotic, and wanting to serve society, he wants to become a police officer but doesn't score highly enough on the test because candidates with veteran's preference points outscore him. He enlists in the army and becomes a linguist specializing in Arabic. He is never sent to the Middle East. He leaves the army and is recruited by the NSA as an analyst. Then an opportunity arises to work work for a private firm in Iraq. Iraq is where his language skills finally become useful. He becomes an interrogator, serving in Fallujah and Abu Ghraib. Here is where his beliefs are put to the test. There is little coordination between the military and the various private contractors. Money flows like water. No one seems to be in charge. Abuses occur. People die. He tortures prisoners. His relationship with his wife is severely strained. He ultimately returns to the U.S. He considers suicide. This is the story of a man who is unable to reconcile his beliefs and desires with the reality of his experiences. We see a small part of the Iraq war through his eyes, and what we see is not pretty. This is an honest and deep view of Fair's experiences.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Kim Miller-Davis

    Provocative, unsettling, and deeply disturbing, this is a memoir written by a former Abu Ghraib interrogator about the psychological aftermath of his time in Iraq. Although completely cleared of illegal activity, Fair continues to grapple with the overwhelming guilt and despair caused by his actions. He tells his story in present tense with sparse prose that is so simple that each sentence delivers a gut-wrenching punch to the reader. In his quest to make amends to the people he hurt, he provide Provocative, unsettling, and deeply disturbing, this is a memoir written by a former Abu Ghraib interrogator about the psychological aftermath of his time in Iraq. Although completely cleared of illegal activity, Fair continues to grapple with the overwhelming guilt and despair caused by his actions. He tells his story in present tense with sparse prose that is so simple that each sentence delivers a gut-wrenching punch to the reader. In his quest to make amends to the people he hurt, he provides a fascinating exploration of the competition between our responsibilities to our country, our responsibilities to humanity, and our responsibilities to ourselves. It really makes me wonder how Cheney and his acolytes live with themselves knowing that the torture methods they support as necessary for our defense against the enemy are so inherently evil that they are destroying those they are designed to protect. Heartbreaking.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Jamie Canaves

    Fair recounts the parts of his life that led him to the military and police force including his struggles with the Presbyterian religion. After being diagnosed with a severe heart condition and told he can't continue as a police officer his reaction is to enlist in the war in Iraq through private contractors since his condition would never pass the physical of the military. (It technically shouldn't have passed the private contractors either.) In Iraq he witnessed what would years later leak out Fair recounts the parts of his life that led him to the military and police force including his struggles with the Presbyterian religion. After being diagnosed with a severe heart condition and told he can't continue as a police officer his reaction is to enlist in the war in Iraq through private contractors since his condition would never pass the physical of the military. (It technically shouldn't have passed the private contractors either.) In Iraq he witnessed what would years later leak out about the conditions and abuse prisoners of war were subjected to. Between the heart condition and PTSD from the things he witnessed and participated in the book is about his downward spiral and attempts to find some way of dealing with it all.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Michele Hohlfeld

    I won an advance copy of this book as a Goodreads Giveway. Eric Fair writes his memoir in a matter of fact style; he never makes excuses or offers justification for what has been done by he or others, but rather, he simply and frankly relates his experiences. Highly political topics such as national security and interrogation techniques are central themes yet this is not a book about political ideology or partisan politics. It is a compelling, chilling, and tremendously unsettling confession tha I won an advance copy of this book as a Goodreads Giveway. Eric Fair writes his memoir in a matter of fact style; he never makes excuses or offers justification for what has been done by he or others, but rather, he simply and frankly relates his experiences. Highly political topics such as national security and interrogation techniques are central themes yet this is not a book about political ideology or partisan politics. It is a compelling, chilling, and tremendously unsettling confession that will haunt the reader. The consequences of war are made clear in this stark recounting of Mr. Fair's tale.

  15. 4 out of 5

    wade

    The heartfelt and thought provoking memoir of a man on the front lines of the war in Iraq. Mr. Fair was one of people charged with gaining information from prisoners at Abu Ghraib and other locations through various means. It was difficult for him then and he still struggles with it in his personal life now. Also, hanging over his head during the entire book is a major heart disorder that could have been terminal at any point. The book is honest, gritty and hard to read at times as a man tries The heartfelt and thought provoking memoir of a man on the front lines of the war in Iraq. Mr. Fair was one of people charged with gaining information from prisoners at Abu Ghraib and other locations through various means. It was difficult for him then and he still struggles with it in his personal life now. Also, hanging over his head during the entire book is a major heart disorder that could have been terminal at any point. The book is honest, gritty and hard to read at times as a man tries to make sense out of his life experiences.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Jennifer

    Eric Fair's memoir as an interrogator in Iraq is a difficult book to read at times, due to the subject matter, however it is one I would definitely recommend to those who enjoy non-fiction, memoirs, and to book discussion groups. Eric Fair's memoir as an interrogator in Iraq is a difficult book to read at times, due to the subject matter, however it is one I would definitely recommend to those who enjoy non-fiction, memoirs, and to book discussion groups.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Nicholas Finch

    Absolutely brilliant. I implore everyone to read this memoir. There's great literature and important literature. Consequence is both. Absolutely brilliant. I implore everyone to read this memoir. There's great literature and important literature. Consequence is both.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Whitney

    more of a 3.5 than a 4, but I rounded up. full review this week.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Susan

    This poor guy was a mess before going to Iraq. No surprise what happened after. And by the way his wife is a saint.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Romany Arrowsmith

    There's this thing Christians often do, which is mistake self-loathing for humility. Self-loathing is just another type of vanity. It serves no one to constantly flagellate yourself and declaim what a horrible evil insect you are ad nauseum. The point of a book about torture is that Eric Fair is NOT especially evil; we could all have been as cowardly and as cruel as he was, in his position. But his (putative) self-loathing blinds himself to this larger point. He is proud, in a way, of how clever There's this thing Christians often do, which is mistake self-loathing for humility. Self-loathing is just another type of vanity. It serves no one to constantly flagellate yourself and declaim what a horrible evil insect you are ad nauseum. The point of a book about torture is that Eric Fair is NOT especially evil; we could all have been as cowardly and as cruel as he was, in his position. But his (putative) self-loathing blinds himself to this larger point. He is proud, in a way, of how cleverly villainous he was. Self-loathing is pride in what you perceive to be your unique immorality. Fair writes explicitly that he will never forgive himself, that he lost his soul in Iraq. At the same time, he wrote chapters and chapters of his own "backstory" in Bethlehem, PA, the inclusion of which which have an implicit exculpatory function - "here's why I did what I did, here's where I came from, I was just a kid from the rust belt trying my best to be a patriot and a good husband". I never expect good writing from the troops involved in these wars (journalists still produce amazing pieces, but there's a distance from the immediacy of combat they can't bridge completely); it's been a long time since good literary minds regularly went to war, that era ended pre-Vietnam at least. But on top of the writing, Eric's story, I feel, misses the deep self-examination he purports to seek, and aims for absolution instead of justice for the Iraqis Eric tortured. Worth reading for what I learned about the "Palestinian chair" and the clusterfuck of contracting out our conflicts. If I could change any major aspect of American civil policy I'd introduce mandatory military service, if only to prevent mercenaries from fighting our wars. These contractors disgust me.

  21. 5 out of 5

    E.P.

    Eric Fair always wanted to protect and serve. He dreamed of being a police officer, or maybe a Presbyterian minister. Instead he ended up running an interrogation booth in Abu Ghraib. "Consequence" tells the story of how, through a series of life choices that often seemed sensible at the time, Fair found himself conducting "enhanced interrogations" at Abu Ghraib, Camp Fallujah, and Camp Victory. His goal after college was to join the police, but he was told he needed military experience first, so Eric Fair always wanted to protect and serve. He dreamed of being a police officer, or maybe a Presbyterian minister. Instead he ended up running an interrogation booth in Abu Ghraib. "Consequence" tells the story of how, through a series of life choices that often seemed sensible at the time, Fair found himself conducting "enhanced interrogations" at Abu Ghraib, Camp Fallujah, and Camp Victory. His goal after college was to join the police, but he was told he needed military experience first, so he joined the Army instead, where he was first sent to the DLI to learn Arabic, and then, leaving all his Arabic behind, to Fort Campbell to serve with the 101 Airborne. He spent most of his Army service cooling his heels in Kentucky or fighting slightly ludicrous mock-wars in training exercises in the bayous of Louisiana. It was only at the end, after he'd already forgotten most of his Arabic, that he was finally sent to Egypt to do what he was trained to. The main thing he got out of that was a viral infection that, he discovered several years later, had probably triggered the heart failure he started experiencing while still a young man and a rookie cop. Unable to work a beat any longer and unwilling to spend the rest of his life working a desk job, he uses his background to get a job in intelligence and goes over to Iraq first as a contractor with CACI, a private company that, according to its website, "provides information solutions and services in support of national security missions and government transformation for Intelligence, Defense, and Federal Civilian customers. CACI is a member of the Fortune 1000 Largest Companies, the Russell 2000 Index, and the S&P SmallCap600 Index. CACI’s sustained commitment to ethics and integrity defines its corporate culture and drives its success. With approximately 19,000 employees worldwide, CACI provides dynamic career opportunities for military veterans and industry professionals to support the nation’s most critical missions," and then, having gotten invaluable experience with CACI, as an interrogator with the NSA. Fair's depiction of CACI's activities are not nearly so positive as their website makes out. He describes total logistical chaos, with contractors dumped in Iraq without so much as body armor or a clear description of what they're supposed to do. Most of them have little Arabic and less training or experience conducting interrogations, but they're supposed to process hundreds of prisoners as rapidly as possible and "produce results." American soldiers are dying every day and at least some of the prisoners are responsible for that and for various atrocities committed against other Iraqis. Asking nicely isn't producing results, so the interrogators move on to other methods. The NSA is slightly more organized, but even more brutal: Fair spends his time there fighting off panic attacks and wanting "God to wait outside," since he's sure that God can't possibly be with him here. What is perhaps most alarming about Fair's story is that he and most of the other interrogators are aware that what they are doing is not okay right from the get-go, but they do it anyway. Most of them are motivated by a mixture of not wanting to look like quitters and failures, and genuine moral motives: one of the incidents that haunts Fair the most is when he sees someone who is in fact guilty of heinous crimes being held in a stress position for so long that he wets himself and mewls incoherently from pain. The man probably "deserves" this, but Fair knows it's a sin anyway. "Consequence" is a disturbing read, although for anyone used to reading about, say, KGB/FSB interrogation techniques, most of what Fair details is comparatively light stuff, and the things that are really bad are blacked out, as if the text is a classified document that's been released to the public. Even so, Fair is aware, as, I hope, were most Americans when the news of Abu Ghraib and other "enhanced interrogation" centers came out, that a line was crossed. Torture is, shall we say, not a binary but a spectrum, and just how far out onto the spectrum is it acceptable to go, when lives, including the lives of your fellow soldiers, are on the line? According to Fair, not actually very far at all. This is mainly Fair's own story, and extremely worth reading as such, but it also hints at a number of serious questions that the American government and the American public don't seem willing to consider. For instance, the prioritizing of the lives of American military personnel over that of foreign civilians. Most Americans do not want to see American casualties, and rightly so, but this low tolerance for casualties means tactics such as high-altitude bombing, drone strikes, and "enhanced interrogation" of suspected terrorists and enemy combatants, all of which leads to more civilian casualties and more anti-American sentiments. At the same time, having such a large, well-trained military means people will want to use it, involving American troops in unpopular, poorly defined operations in far-away countries that may not have much strategic value. But once you get involved in a mess like Iraq or Afghanistan, you can't just pull out without making the situation even worse than before. "Consequence" ends with Fair attempting to pull his life back together after spiraling into alcoholism, violent outbursts, and suicidal depression, not to mention advanced heart failure. We can only hope that he manages, and that he finds the redemption that he is seeking.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Steve

    While reading Eric Fair’s what-I-did-in-the-Iraqi-War memoir, I couldn’t help but be struck by a number of parallels between his life and mine. We both enlisted in the U.S. Army. Both in the month of September. Fair signed a five-year contract. I signed a four-year agreement. We both took basic training at Fort Leonard Wood, Missouri. Twenty-six years apart. We both left “Fort Lost-in-the-Woods” and went immediately to Monterey, California to study languages at the Defense Language Institute. Ag While reading Eric Fair’s what-I-did-in-the-Iraqi-War memoir, I couldn’t help but be struck by a number of parallels between his life and mine. We both enlisted in the U.S. Army. Both in the month of September. Fair signed a five-year contract. I signed a four-year agreement. We both took basic training at Fort Leonard Wood, Missouri. Twenty-six years apart. We both left “Fort Lost-in-the-Woods” and went immediately to Monterey, California to study languages at the Defense Language Institute. Again, twenty-six years apart. Fair studied Arabic, while I trained in Spanish. Fair’s course lasted about eighteen months, mine took about eight. While at DLI, we both probably earned the same or similar MOS, 98-Golf. Linguist. After training, we were both assigned to military intelligence units. Fair married a chemical engineer. My oldest nephew married a chemical engineer. Fair is a life-long Presbyterian. My brother-in-law recently retired after a life-time career as a Presbyterian minister. Fair has a rather unique writing style. Almost as if he’s asking questions from a list. For example, when Fair describes interviewing prisoners in the notorious Abu Ghraib prison: “I interrogate men who cry when asked about their families. I interrogate men who cry when asked about their parents. I interrogate men who cry when asked about their wives. I interrogate men who cry and ask about when they’ll be going home.” It reads like a shopping list. Fair’s account of his two Iraqi tours of duty, first as a private contractor, then with NSA, interrogating prisoners for the military, is a tell-all account. Fair is not shy about revealing his own personal demons, his near fatal health issues, not to mention his battle with the bottle. Fair also chronicles the incompetency of both governmental agencies and their civilian contractors when it comes to coping with wartime Iraq. On the next-to-the-last page of Fair’s journal, the author confesses “I have a debt to pay . . . I am a torturer. I have not turned a corner or found my way back. I have not been redeemed. I do not believe that I ever will be. But I am still obligated to try.” Therein lies a positive glimmer of hope regarding Fair’s apparent battle with post-traumatic stress. Fair never uses the word. But, his constant job and career changes, coupled with his insomnia and admitted alcoholism, leads you to assume that diagnosis. I came away from this Iraqi war diary with just two thoughts. This is a very sad, depressing book. And, Fair’s long-suffering wife, Karin, is a saint.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Edwina Callan

    Disclaimer: I won an advance copy of this book in a Goodreads Giveway. War is hell. War is kill or be killed. War is doing things you wouldn't normally even consider doing. Yes, really bad things happened in Abu Ghraib but the author didn't really do much besides shuffle paperwork, get drunk and whine. My Dad fought in WW2, hand-to-hand combat, died 20 years ago with shrapnel from the war still deeply embedded in his leg (which ached every day of his life). He had nightmares about the concentration c Disclaimer: I won an advance copy of this book in a Goodreads Giveway. War is hell. War is kill or be killed. War is doing things you wouldn't normally even consider doing. Yes, really bad things happened in Abu Ghraib but the author didn't really do much besides shuffle paperwork, get drunk and whine. My Dad fought in WW2, hand-to-hand combat, died 20 years ago with shrapnel from the war still deeply embedded in his leg (which ached every day of his life). He had nightmares about the concentration camps often, and on his death-bed he thought the Nazi's had captured him and were torturing him to death. But, NEVER, ever did my Dad whine or seek sympathy or blame his problems on the war. He always said it was his "duty" to serve his country ... and so he did. Real men, like him, are hard to find.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Karla

    It does not deserve a star. I think the author is not completely comfortable with his own truth though he makes not (multiple times) that this book is his way of confessing his sins. I believe there is far more to his story and I wish I had not read this, especially on the heels of "Black Flags". I think this is a desperate attempt for the author to feel that he is not culpable for the events he witnessed/took part in. I was angry that once I start a book and must finish because this book was no It does not deserve a star. I think the author is not completely comfortable with his own truth though he makes not (multiple times) that this book is his way of confessing his sins. I believe there is far more to his story and I wish I had not read this, especially on the heels of "Black Flags". I think this is a desperate attempt for the author to feel that he is not culpable for the events he witnessed/took part in. I was angry that once I start a book and must finish because this book was not worth my time.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Zulfiya

    Honest and grating, the story of the human child. We can easily do things he did - we are all human kids as he describes himself. I do not need to forgive the author - we all way too easily do horrid things even though we all believe that at the crunch time we will act virtuously ... It is only human. The thing that I can not understand is his religion. Why is he still clinging to it ? Is there any any any justification whatsoever for it? On the other hand, we are all human children, and this is Honest and grating, the story of the human child. We can easily do things he did - we are all human kids as he describes himself. I do not need to forgive the author - we all way too easily do horrid things even though we all believe that at the crunch time we will act virtuously ... It is only human. The thing that I can not understand is his religion. Why is he still clinging to it ? Is there any any any justification whatsoever for it? On the other hand, we are all human children, and this is his weakness as a human child ... He is looking for a pattern to make sense of his life ...

  26. 5 out of 5

    Marc

    Writing style was just OK. One graphic scene involving a body bag that I happened to read while eating lunch... it had interesting moments but, overall, repetitive.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Jonathan Tennis

    Wanted to like this and while Fair is a fairly decent storyteller, this just was not something I could get into. Finished the book but would not recommend it.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Will Chin

    Eric Fair's memoir on his work as an interrogator in Iraq is a raw, uncompromising five-star read — yet, I feel a little hesitant to rank it as one of the year's best. Here's why: I found this book after doing some research on Abu Ghraib. I wanted to read more about interrogations and torture methods — don't ask — and the atrocities at Abu Ghraib rank right up there as some of the worst. So I went into this book expecting to learn what makes a normal human being commit such acts and how they jus Eric Fair's memoir on his work as an interrogator in Iraq is a raw, uncompromising five-star read — yet, I feel a little hesitant to rank it as one of the year's best. Here's why: I found this book after doing some research on Abu Ghraib. I wanted to read more about interrogations and torture methods — don't ask — and the atrocities at Abu Ghraib rank right up there as some of the worst. So I went into this book expecting to learn what makes a normal human being commit such acts and how they justify it when questioned. I wanted to learn the variety of ways that humans have invented to torture another human — but I don't get a lot of that. Consequence: A Memoir is, instead, the story of an interrogator who had a first-hand experience at interrogation, or advanced interrogation, but Eric Fair was never one of "the bunch" at Abu Ghraib. If you can imagine the atrocities committed at that prison camp as a circle, Eric Fair's involvement was at the periphery. His circle overlapped for a few months before charting a course of its own. This means that if you want to read in detail about what went on in the prison camp, you would be sorely disappointed. You will not gain new insights into the torturers at Abu Ghraib. Instead, you read the account of someone who was sort of there for a while. Still, Eric Fair was an interrogator, and he shoved people around. Even though he never laid his hands on a prisoner, for example, and he was even known among them as "the nice one", Fair still felt responsible and guilty for his involvement — even though, as I have said, his involvement in Abu Ghraib specifically was fairly peripheral. He returns home with PTSD, and this is likely the best account of PTSD out there you will get to read. Another element that holds back an enthusiastic recommendation despite the five-star review is the fact that portions of this book are, strangely enough, redacted. Paragraphs are literally blacked out, and I am assuming that this is due to the sensitive nature of the content. While I understand that there may be classified information in the book, I do wonder why Fair and his editor felt a need to leave the censored portions in the book. I say this because there is a clear transition from Fair's numbness to becoming really traumatised by the war experience, and a lot of that happens in the blacked-out paragraphs. You can tell because the first lines after blacked-out portions almost always point to Fair sinking deeper into depression and trauma. The situation escalates but, because the descriptions are censored, the reader never quite knows what happened. So you end up guessing and piecing sections together without knowing WHY it happened. But I still want to give this book five stars because it is an important book about the cost of war. It is important to know that, while politicians continue to wave the flag of justice and sell the righteousness of war to the general public, other people have to bear the cost at the end of the day. I love the paragraph where Fair writes about how the military would set up all sorts of rules, encourage personnel to break said rules and, when shit hits the fun, will not hesitate to cut losses later on. This is indicative of how military, not just the US military, works. Having been through the military myself, I can relate to the paradoxical way they operate.

  29. 5 out of 5

    wally

    five forty-six pee em the 11th of march 2018, early sunday evening...still light out...not sure when sunset is, finished, good read three stars i liked it kindle library loaner. at times i thought he was skirting the issue. touches albeit briefly on his personal experiences with the fabled torture. ...some interesting blacked out portions of the narrative. time spent with the nsa...i believe, or, that's where the sections occur....during that time period. includes bits and pieces of emails the en five forty-six pee em the 11th of march 2018, early sunday evening...still light out...not sure when sunset is, finished, good read three stars i liked it kindle library loaner. at times i thought he was skirting the issue. touches albeit briefly on his personal experiences with the fabled torture. ...some interesting blacked out portions of the narrative. time spent with the nsa...i believe, or, that's where the sections occur....during that time period. includes bits and pieces of emails the enlightened sent to him after his pieces appeared in the newspaper. equivalent of eat shit and die. some of them, most of them...not a lot included maybe a half dozen. one commiserates. i dunno. i have nothing but contempt for assholes like that, the "hang cheney" crowd. so enlightened. touches...again, briefly...and he does use the word "success" when it comes to interrogation enhanced. years ago, time in service, i'd read P.O.W.: A Definitive History of the American Prisoner-Of-War Experience in Vietnam, 1964-1973 and that chronicle includes the torture endured by u.s. servicemen, pilots, for the most...although one enlisted man blown overboard during shore bombardment is one who managed to escape...anyway...torture. i don't recall much hand-wringing when that torture came to light and now what? an aircraft carrier is in one of the vietnamese ports? heh! but the hand-wringers would have us believe their hate makes the world go round. "eat shit and die" their motto. so...contempt for them. doom on them. and...like i said. i think he was skirting the issue...for the most. i don't think he was being completely honest. touches...briefly...on interrogation that went well. recounts the time of the world war...someone from that time. what is not included is....what? the nuts and bolts. say, this was fiction...the reader would be...boring because the issue is skirted, couched...with words like fuck and shit and tits. all hail the new mantra. have fun with it. briefly, as said...brings up the example of...i think it was a german who interrogated allied p.o.w.s? brought them on walks? something. but...you'd think...that with war being our business and business being incredibly good, that there would be no need for learning by the numbers. you would think there'd be a manual on it. this works...this doesn't. and me, nothing but contempt for the assholes..."torture doesn't work" well, when i read hubbell's work about out p.o.w.'s in vietnam, torture damn sure worked. they got answers. and then i return to waco. the waco church. a building housing children, subjected to non-stop sleep deprivation (torture)...loud noises (torture)...music played continually (torture)...on national television...this before the tank busted down the focking door and they gassed them. torture? so, yeah, nothing but contempt from me. i need to go see a man about a dog.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Emily

    "On my way to the ICE, I stop and rest near the HESCO barriers near Camp Ganci. I pray. I've not pursued prayer in some time. But as I sit in a prison in Iraq and prepare to interrogate prisoners of war, it seems appropriate to pray to God. Presbyterians are tuaght to pray with the Lord's Prayer in mind. We begin with praise, then move on to requests and confessions before closing with words of thanks. My prayer outside Camp Ganci ends quickly. As I move toward requests, I feel a terrible sense "On my way to the ICE, I stop and rest near the HESCO barriers near Camp Ganci. I pray. I've not pursued prayer in some time. But as I sit in a prison in Iraq and prepare to interrogate prisoners of war, it seems appropriate to pray to God. Presbyterians are tuaght to pray with the Lord's Prayer in mind. We begin with praise, then move on to requests and confessions before closing with words of thanks. My prayer outside Camp Ganci ends quickly. As I move toward requests, I feel a terrible sense of shame. I cannot ask God to accompany me into the interrogation booth. "In Scripture, God often works in prisons, but he is never on the side of the jailer. He is always on the side of the prisoner. The realization brings on a physical reaction. My hands shake. My face warms. I feel nauseated. The sensation is terrifying. Prayer in Iraq is dangerous. I am beginning to realize I'm not on God's path. I'm on my own." (87-88) ********** "I interrogate men who cry when asked about their families. I interrogate men who cry when asked about their parents. I interrogate men who cry when asked about their wives. I interrogate men who cry and ask about when they'll be going home. "I do not lay hands on any of these detainees, as I did to the men who taunted me about the mortar attacks. My questioning is direct and conversational. Some of the men provide information, other do not, but no matter how gentle the interrogation might be, I leave the booth feeling guilty and condemned. None of these men are being protected. They are detained in one of Saddam Hussein's most infamous prisons, they are given no information about their status, and they have no way of knowing when or if they will see their families again. Some of them are guilty; some of them are not. All of them are jailed under intolerable circumstances. I am their jailer. If God is on anyone's side in Iraq, it's not mine." (101) *********** I am disheartened and infuriated by this firsthand account of the disorganization; lack of training, equipment, clear direction, and accountability; and complete disregard for just and humane treatment of fellow human beings demonstrated by both American military personnel and private contractors hired to work with them during the Iraq war. We did far more damage to our cause by these actions than our enemies did. As someone who grew up in a military family and has friends and family members currently serving, I am angry at those who sullied the reputation of the good men and women who serve, putting them at greater risk. I appreciate Mr. Fair coming clean about his experiences and actions, and I hope those who approved and encouraged this heinous behavior (including Bruce Jessen and David Mitchell) are held accountable.

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