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Amazing Fantasy #15: Spider-Man!

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Includes Amazing Fantasy #15 and Amazing Spider-Man (1963) #1 Relive the adventures that started it all! A radioactive spider may have granted bookish young Peter Parker incredible abilities, but it was his uncle's death that truly transformed him. Thrill to Spidey's debut issues, completely re-mastered! Includes Amazing Fantasy #15 and Amazing Spider-Man (1963) #1 Relive the adventures that started it all! A radioactive spider may have granted bookish young Peter Parker incredible abilities, but it was his uncle's death that truly transformed him. Thrill to Spidey's debut issues, completely re-mastered!


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Includes Amazing Fantasy #15 and Amazing Spider-Man (1963) #1 Relive the adventures that started it all! A radioactive spider may have granted bookish young Peter Parker incredible abilities, but it was his uncle's death that truly transformed him. Thrill to Spidey's debut issues, completely re-mastered! Includes Amazing Fantasy #15 and Amazing Spider-Man (1963) #1 Relive the adventures that started it all! A radioactive spider may have granted bookish young Peter Parker incredible abilities, but it was his uncle's death that truly transformed him. Thrill to Spidey's debut issues, completely re-mastered!

30 review for Amazing Fantasy #15: Spider-Man!

  1. 4 out of 5

    The Lion's Share

    So I finally got to read the first Spider-Man issue. It was very ahead of its time in my opinion. Stan Lee writes a forward, saying how this issue almost never got published because the publishers thought the character was not what readers wanted. Spider-Man was a teenager, he wasn't good looking, he still lived at home with his aunt and uncle and so on. Amazing Fantasy was coming to an end, so Lee and Ditko thought they would try and get it out in the last issue, because what was there to lose? T So I finally got to read the first Spider-Man issue. It was very ahead of its time in my opinion. Stan Lee writes a forward, saying how this issue almost never got published because the publishers thought the character was not what readers wanted. Spider-Man was a teenager, he wasn't good looking, he still lived at home with his aunt and uncle and so on. Amazing Fantasy was coming to an end, so Lee and Ditko thought they would try and get it out in the last issue, because what was there to lose? Turns out it was the bestselling issue out of all the Amazing Fantasy comics. From there onwards, fans were lapping it up and Lee's format of writing to fans in the comics asking for feedback was working wonders. Though the character is very basic in this first issue, you can see how ahead of its time it was. The imagination and the character hit a chord with a lot of fans and people could relate to him. He wasn't your typical comic book hero that was invulnerable. I also discovered that Ditko left later on because of his relationship with Stan Lee. It seems Ditko created Jonah Jameson as his vision of how he saw Stan Lee and Ditko was Peter Parker. Lots of mythos and I can't wait to read more.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Sophia

    These stories were so exciting and good! I loved reading Peter Parker's origin story (side note: they called him Peter Palmer in the Amazing Spider-Man #1) plus his evolution in becoming Spider-Man. In issue #1 of Amazing Spider-Man, everyone in the city knows who Spidey is...but they think he's a criminal! All because of J. Jonah Jameson and his horrible articles about the web-slinger! We see an appearance of the Fantastic Four and how Spider-Man whopped their butts (basically). In the end, you These stories were so exciting and good! I loved reading Peter Parker's origin story (side note: they called him Peter Palmer in the Amazing Spider-Man #1) plus his evolution in becoming Spider-Man. In issue #1 of Amazing Spider-Man, everyone in the city knows who Spidey is...but they think he's a criminal! All because of J. Jonah Jameson and his horrible articles about the web-slinger! We see an appearance of the Fantastic Four and how Spider-Man whopped their butts (basically). In the end, you just feel sorry for poor Peter because he can't catch a break or help his Aunt May. I can't wait to read the next comic and see what happens next!

  3. 5 out of 5

    Eduard Gafton

    Read as part of Amazing Spider-Man Epic Collection: Great Power Full of tropes and yet brimming of original ideas, Amazing Fiction #15 is a turning point in comic book history. Its faults such as cramming an origin story in mere a 20 pages (albeit, admittedly, with good reason) are overshadowed by the creation of arguably the most popular super-hero. The cover is also something to be aware of, as it spurred countless admirers and imitators. It's not a perfect issue by any means, but Amazing Fantas Read as part of Amazing Spider-Man Epic Collection: Great Power Full of tropes and yet brimming of original ideas, Amazing Fiction #15 is a turning point in comic book history. Its faults such as cramming an origin story in mere a 20 pages (albeit, admittedly, with good reason) are overshadowed by the creation of arguably the most popular super-hero. The cover is also something to be aware of, as it spurred countless admirers and imitators. It's not a perfect issue by any means, but Amazing Fantasy #15 is a classic which set the stage for the webhead we all know and love. And that's nothing short of amazing .

  4. 5 out of 5

    Bookishrealm

    This was such an interesting read. I’m on this journey to read as many marvel comics as I can. I know this will take me years but right now I’m reading the original Stan Lee Spiderman comics. It was intriguing to even see how comics have changed over time. I was amazed by the art style and the storytelling. It was so different from what I’m used to but I definitely can understand why Spider-Man was such an important character to the Marvel universe. He was a teen and I know during that time is w This was such an interesting read. I’m on this journey to read as many marvel comics as I can. I know this will take me years but right now I’m reading the original Stan Lee Spiderman comics. It was intriguing to even see how comics have changed over time. I was amazed by the art style and the storytelling. It was so different from what I’m used to but I definitely can understand why Spider-Man was such an important character to the Marvel universe. He was a teen and I know during that time is was weird to introduce a teenager as a superhero. I definitely will be doing a month in-depth review and study but I’m glad I’ve started this journey.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Dawie

    If you look at the first Toby Spiderman film in relation to Parker’s origins, the film feels like it tried to keep close to the source material at least. Pretty amazing for a comic that came out 1963.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Lorryn

    J Jonah Jameson has been anti-spidey since day 1 gotcha.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Therese

    Spidermans first appearance. Fun to see where he first was introduced. I have been quite obsessed with spiderman since NWH so I guess I'm diving into the comics now? Spidermans first appearance. Fun to see where he first was introduced. I have been quite obsessed with spiderman since NWH so I guess I'm diving into the comics now?

  8. 4 out of 5

    Mika

    finally read the first spidey appearance

  9. 4 out of 5

    jaynie (taylor's version)

    he's a dick, uncle ben died bcs of him. i expected a lot from this spider man but meh he's a dick, uncle ben died bcs of him. i expected a lot from this spider man but meh

  10. 4 out of 5

    Mica (Taylor's Version)

    Spider-Man will always remain as the best superhero of all time. I don't make the rules Spider-Man will always remain as the best superhero of all time. I don't make the rules

  11. 5 out of 5

    Dina

    As a fan of the cinematic Spider-Man(s) and a first-time comic reader, this was a great start!

  12. 5 out of 5

    Robert

    So, after reading Amazing Spider-Man #4, I decided to go back to issue one to read them consecutively. When I pulled up #1, there was a blurb that Spiderman was introduced in #15 of Amazing Fantasy. So off I went to get this one. My understanding is this was supposed to be a one-off. Yeah, right. But it did help bring about the end of this title in favor of one dedicated to the new character. We learn that Peter Parker is a bookworm interested in science. He attended a science expo/lecture on atom So, after reading Amazing Spider-Man #4, I decided to go back to issue one to read them consecutively. When I pulled up #1, there was a blurb that Spiderman was introduced in #15 of Amazing Fantasy. So off I went to get this one. My understanding is this was supposed to be a one-off. Yeah, right. But it did help bring about the end of this title in favor of one dedicated to the new character. We learn that Peter Parker is a bookworm interested in science. He attended a science expo/lecture on atomic energy. There, a tiny spider was filled with radiation and bit Peter thus giving him strength and agility like a spider. Peter sews a costume (a mighty fine one, I must say). Peter lives with Uncle Ben and Aunt May. Peter enters a wrestling match where he earns money by wrestling the largest goon. Peter uses Spiderman for entertainment purposes. So, when a policeman is chasing a bad guy, Spiderman is reluctant to get involved. Poor decision. It turns out that bad guy later committed a burglary. In the course of it, a man was murdered. That was Uncle Ben. Peter is distraught. If only he had helped earlier. Of course, Spiderman goes out and captures the bad guy. Thus is the beginning of his superhero career. The Bell Ringer was an interesting little story about a Greek island that a volcano was about to erupt. Everyone abandoned the island save the bell ringer since his family was always around to ring the bell. Perhaps he was awarded for his deed. :) The Mummy Case story had hints of the Myth of Sisyphus, which totally excited me. A suitable consequence for the crime. I liked this one a lot. The volume ends with "There Are Martians Among Us". This is a cute little tale. Telegraphed, I do believe, but interesting too. I love the art from this time period.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Dan Gvozden

    The best 11 pages in all of comics. Reread this for what is probably the several hundredth time, in prep for the relaunch of the ALL-NEW AMAZING SPIDER-TALK!

  14. 5 out of 5

    J.M. Giovine

    When it comes to classic “golden age” of comic books, particularly origin stories, Spider-man, from Amazing Fantasy #15, its the one I appreciate and value the most. While most of the popular superheroes did have their own respective origins, penciled and narrated with their own particular talents behind, its gotta be Stan Lee and Steve Dikto’s team-up the one that created, arguably, Marvel comics icon face, considering how much of a failure the author thought this will be. There’s a certain val When it comes to classic “golden age” of comic books, particularly origin stories, Spider-man, from Amazing Fantasy #15, its the one I appreciate and value the most. While most of the popular superheroes did have their own respective origins, penciled and narrated with their own particular talents behind, its gotta be Stan Lee and Steve Dikto’s team-up the one that created, arguably, Marvel comics icon face, considering how much of a failure the author thought this will be. There’s a certain value and oddity around Spidey’s immediate success, thinking that Lee thought people wouldn’t like it cause of the image (he’s a Spider, after all), so the character becoming overly popular in such a rush comes as a huge surprise, been an impact for pop-culture and comic books in general, and also coming along other characters such as Iron man or The Fantastic Four, Spidey was one of the original creations during the "New Marvel Era" in the early sixties, when Marvel was now the comic book editorial we all know and love. For this single issue in particular, the basics are covered; this isn't an official single title, so this doesn't belong to a regular series for the character, but the complexity around Spider-man's origin is here and it hasn't grow old, even for nowadays standards in regards of writing and art; Lee's style is super dated and so old-fashioned, just as other important names from the decade, but there's also a humble and almost romantic tone to his letters every time he describes each panels, but you also can tell how relatable and ordinary his protagonists are, and Peter Parker is, perhaps, the most appealing of them all; the ordinary, overly-smart and shy teenager who only wants a place in the world around him, but constantly feels rejected, and then the miracle happens, so now he must make a decision on what to do with his new amazing gifts. It's simple, its effective, and entertaining as hell. Dikto's pencils, just like Stan's narrative, are old-fashioned and vintage, worthy of the typical "newspaper comic strips" designs, so there's also plenty of value on his art, and yeah, Spidey wouldn't be as memorable and iconic in regards of his appearance if it weren't for his aesthetic-vision. Nowadays it might seem as cliche, but the displaying of characters towards the issue are incredibly familiar, but also, lets not forget, as a piece of its time, the circumstances on which Peter gets to become the hero he'll eventually be are unique and essentially groundbreaking for the time being, and even in modern day comic books, this origin keeps being exploited and revisited without changing the essence and events from this very issue. Even without exploring much of Uncle Ben before his passing in the last panels, we understand the relationship Pete had with him and how influential his character is, and Aunt May, as well, has the potential for her development set up for the upcoming Amazing Spider-man series. If I have to pick a single problem I have with this issue, it'll be the dated feel within each page; yes, that's part of the importance towards its value, but comic books have come so far in regards of story and art-style, that seeing something like this might back off several peoples interest, but this is worthy of a study and, yes, as usual, if you're a fan, chances are you already might've read it, but as a origin story and as a game-changer, its always useful to understand where the success and popularity of a beloved character came from, in this case, I have no problem whatsoever on granting this a place inside history, for this issue is not just a piece of high-value among collectors, for me personally, is a textbook in order to understand how comic-books were made back in the day, and where my favorite super hero came from and the source of his magic and success, in other words, an essential reading.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Kier Scrivener

    "Aware at last, that in this world, with great power there must also come great responsibility. Peter Parker makes his debut appearance and we meet this high school reject and bookworm who is obsessed with science and is only well liked by his aunt and uncle and faculty until a radioactive spider bites him and the last of his life source ebbs into Peter. The Peter we meet is missing his universal charm and charisma and instead is selfish and coddled until he is faced with his actions head on and "Aware at last, that in this world, with great power there must also come great responsibility. Peter Parker makes his debut appearance and we meet this high school reject and bookworm who is obsessed with science and is only well liked by his aunt and uncle and faculty until a radioactive spider bites him and the last of his life source ebbs into Peter. The Peter we meet is missing his universal charm and charisma and instead is selfish and coddled until he is faced with his actions head on and walks away to ponder the result of his actions and walks into legendhood. "A spider whom fate has given a starring, if brief, role to play in the drama we call life." I found it very interesting the way Stan Lee wrote in this comic as he combines very 60s slang that made me laugh but also has these dramatic renderings co-exist in the same panel and I really like it. "Only a science major could have created." I do love that since the dawn of his creation, Peter Parker is a dedicated science nerd who is the reason why he can be a superhero and actually utilize his superhuman abilities well. I think that he is a combination of an outcast that can relate with else being severely flawed and privileged when also encouraging kids to be proud of who they are as nerds and also challenge the way people perceive bookworms. The Bell Ringer "You may believe or you may not, but one thing we are certain . . . you will never forget it." I knew this was an anthology but I expected them to be of a similar fashion. But The Bell Ringer takes a more historical small quaint fishing town with an old man who rings the church bells to alert the fisherman of shore even in fog. It is ordinary and beautifully written. "They are as much a part of the little village as the very soul upon which men trod." I think that it can illuminate the mid century of the 20th century as a convergence of old and new. It was a time of still rural towns and fishing as well as skyscrapers and radiation and science. Just like Pedros that is clinging on to the generational ties as the others embark on a new life and lifestyle, he is taken up in an Elijah like summoning to heaven. Man In The Human Case: A criminal is evading the police and gets teleported to Ancient Egypt. Stan Lee is creative if nothing less. I also love the advertising and dedicated page being candid about continuity, hope people will request Spiderman, and removing adult as not to embarrass teenage readers. "There Are Martians Among Us" Though this story has some very traditional views on marriage and gender roles it is a beautiful flip on aliens. Where we have the husband and wife discuss how worried they are about having to go out (Seemingly afraid of the manhunt for the martians). Instead it is revealed they both are martians even though they are indecipherable from the general populace. Take that othering philosophy it says.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Noah White

    AMAZING FANTASY 15, AMAZING SPIDER-MAN 1-10 (Spider-Man's First Arc) Peter Parker is easily one of the greatest creations in the history of comic books. Even if you threw out every other plot element besides the character himself, you'd still have a character story that deals with so much poignant emotional and psychological conflict. The dialogue is what really makes this. Stan Lee divides Peter Parker's dialogue into 3 distinct styles: Peter Parker's thoughts, Peter Parker's words, and Spider-Ma AMAZING FANTASY 15, AMAZING SPIDER-MAN 1-10 (Spider-Man's First Arc) Peter Parker is easily one of the greatest creations in the history of comic books. Even if you threw out every other plot element besides the character himself, you'd still have a character story that deals with so much poignant emotional and psychological conflict. The dialogue is what really makes this. Stan Lee divides Peter Parker's dialogue into 3 distinct styles: Peter Parker's thoughts, Peter Parker's words, and Spider-Man's words. This structure says a lot about our protagonist; Peter Parker's words are presented in a very introverted and articulate manner. Spider-Man's words, conversely, are presented in a very extroverted and sarcastic manner. This presents the central conflict of the character, in that Spider-Man is a cathartic part of Peter's psychology; he is everything Peter is afraid to be, but can be behind the security blanket of a mask. The only truth to the character is his thoughts, as he tightly controls the presentation of Peter Parker to hide suspicion he could be Spider-Man. This plays even further into the notion of Spider-Man being a cathartic release for him, in that his thoughts are designed as this fusion of Peter's intellect and Spider-Man's wit. Peter Parker's spoken words lack much of the wit which is present in his own thoughts. Spider-Man presents all of that wit, because he has more freedom to do so; behind the security blanket of a mask, there's less consequence. And this plays into the deeper theme, of "Great Responsibility" coming with "Great Power." Because there is no physical consequence to himself. But his choice of how he uses this newfound freedom and newfound power has consequences for others... which, as iconic as they are, I won't dare spoil here. These consequences affect his romantic equal Betty Brant, his loyal to a fault Aunt May, the think-tank editor J. Jonah Jameson, or the city of New York as a whole and its perception of him; even if these consequences don't necessarily affect him directly, they still create a whole plate of intimate character conflicts that have nothing to do with spandex villains. The villains simply create a plot of his actions, where these ongoing conflicts resulting from his actions are his character evolution.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Kitsune

    I finally discovered what the "IMPORTANT MESSAGE TO YOU, FROM THE EDITOR" is (they're scrapping the contest page and removing "Adult" from the masthead, if you were wondering). "With great power there must also come -- great responsibility!" Interesting how that's kind of a "Beam me up, Scotty" phrase - just a hair off from how everyone remembers it. Actually, the whole origin story is a bit different from how I remember it (Spider-Man went on a promotional tour for a few months before the robber I finally discovered what the "IMPORTANT MESSAGE TO YOU, FROM THE EDITOR" is (they're scrapping the contest page and removing "Adult" from the masthead, if you were wondering). "With great power there must also come -- great responsibility!" Interesting how that's kind of a "Beam me up, Scotty" phrase - just a hair off from how everyone remembers it. Actually, the whole origin story is a bit different from how I remember it (Spider-Man went on a promotional tour for a few months before the robber kills Uncle Ben, huh). Really, though, I hope they continue Rocko Rank's story. Ads from the 60s are also bizarre.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Steven

    It's a silver-age comic, so it's hard to really be too hard on it given that this was the general-style most comics at this time would have taken. It is hardly fair to judge a comic from 1963 by the standards of 2018. While it is a little silly and goofy (that includes the other stories in the book), it is a fun read and very well-written. Does it hold up today? Not completely. Is it worth at least one read? Yes, without a doubt. It's a silver-age comic, so it's hard to really be too hard on it given that this was the general-style most comics at this time would have taken. It is hardly fair to judge a comic from 1963 by the standards of 2018. While it is a little silly and goofy (that includes the other stories in the book), it is a fun read and very well-written. Does it hold up today? Not completely. Is it worth at least one read? Yes, without a doubt.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Iman Qadri

    it's funny cuz this kinda reads like a villain origin story at first especially when peter says he'll "show them" and "they'll be sorry". it's interesting seeing how in the movies and other comics his character is further developed and far more sympathetic. i knew the earth-616 version spider-man was a bit of a dick but seeing it myself.. i have to admit he was serving cunt but he's my little meow meow regardless! it's funny cuz this kinda reads like a villain origin story at first especially when peter says he'll "show them" and "they'll be sorry". it's interesting seeing how in the movies and other comics his character is further developed and far more sympathetic. i knew the earth-616 version spider-man was a bit of a dick but seeing it myself.. i have to admit he was serving cunt but he's my little meow meow regardless!

  20. 4 out of 5

    Marloges

    This is the first appearance of Peter Parker, the one that started it all and invented the character... so obviously I have to give this five stars. And for good reason! I was surprised how well written this comic book is considering the time it came out and it's astounding how many elements of it were already included in this very first issue. Stuff that hasn't been changed 40-50 years later. This is the first appearance of Peter Parker, the one that started it all and invented the character... so obviously I have to give this five stars. And for good reason! I was surprised how well written this comic book is considering the time it came out and it's astounding how many elements of it were already included in this very first issue. Stuff that hasn't been changed 40-50 years later.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Rees Malwin

    SIGNIFICANCE: Amazing Fantasy #15 introduces us to the Amazing Spider-Man, Peter Parker. A photojournalist for the Daily Bugle, he’s bitten by a radioactive spider on a field-trip, and gains super-spidey powers. He makes a costume to hide his identity, and takes on crime jobs after his Uncle Ben is shot to help pay for his Aunt May’s medical bills.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Larissa Granato

    I'm not super fond of the lack of subtlety in comic books but the cheesiness can make me smile and this was one of those cases. Also it's nice to read something that is so clearly a starting point when 99% of comic book plot lines are too confusing to tackle, and I enjoyed getting to know the original Peter Parker. I'm not super fond of the lack of subtlety in comic books but the cheesiness can make me smile and this was one of those cases. Also it's nice to read something that is so clearly a starting point when 99% of comic book plot lines are too confusing to tackle, and I enjoyed getting to know the original Peter Parker.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Noora

    Of course it would have been amazing to read the comic at the time, but to say the least, no wonder why this is such a comic book classic! It was amazing to read because I have seen the movies and it gave me a sense of how accurate the first spider man movie is. In general, I love the art style of old comics and this did not disappoint! I love that I am able to read these!

  24. 5 out of 5

    Kebz

    First Spidey comic. Very cool to see Spider-Man in his first appearance. I did not understand why he didn't stop the robber. He didn't have any reason not to unlike the movie. He just did it to be a dick. He says he only cares about himself. Well, it's a lesson learned for him because he got his Uncle Ben killed. He'll become a better person after that. First Spidey comic. Very cool to see Spider-Man in his first appearance. I did not understand why he didn't stop the robber. He didn't have any reason not to unlike the movie. He just did it to be a dick. He says he only cares about himself. Well, it's a lesson learned for him because he got his Uncle Ben killed. He'll become a better person after that.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Beyond Words

    A bit obviously written, but that it was written a long time ago and I've seen all the movies so I'll let it slide. ;) It is short and sweet, funny and has the iconic phrase "with great power there must also come --great responsibility!" A bit obviously written, but that it was written a long time ago and I've seen all the movies so I'll let it slide. ;) It is short and sweet, funny and has the iconic phrase "with great power there must also come --great responsibility!"

  26. 4 out of 5

    Rob

    This was a gas of an origin story, but is anyone really going to take a nerdy teenager with glasses for real as a superhero? I hope we get to see more of this Spider-Man fellow. He looks like a cool boss in those weird long johns. Beats Westerns and Archie!

  27. 4 out of 5

    Anthony Buffum

    Ive heard about this story but Ive never fully read the story. All everyone talks about is when peter gets bitter. But now I know the original story. Of course, Ive seen it in the movies and they take a different approach on it sometimes too. I am now glad I have read the story that started it all.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Jan Gimme books

    Amazing Fantasy #15 is the first historie of Spider Man, the first historie of a great superhero, this book deserves 5 stars

  29. 4 out of 5

    Yeary Orion Maple

    Decent beginning to a great hero Spider man definitely seems kind of bratty at first and less heroic. Very interesting to read though. I recommend reading.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Gregory McKnight

    It's perfect. It's perfect.

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