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Neptune's Children

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A day at the fabled amusement park Isles of Wonder turns deadly when a world-wide biological attack kills every adult, leaving behind only the kids to fend for themselves. Isolated from the world, unsure of what lies ahead, the young survivors assemble under the statue of King Neptune, the mythical ruler of the Isles, to form a new society. Led by the children of the park A day at the fabled amusement park Isles of Wonder turns deadly when a world-wide biological attack kills every adult, leaving behind only the kids to fend for themselves. Isolated from the world, unsure of what lies ahead, the young survivors assemble under the statue of King Neptune, the mythical ruler of the Isles, to form a new society. Led by the children of the park workers, they choose to remain closed off from the outside world living relatively comfortably inside the self-contained park. But when violence from the infested outside world appears to infiltrate their safe zone, one small group discovers a secret society and a hidden system of underground tunnels, and the stage is set for a war that will determine the future of everyone on the Isles. As alliances are formed and broken, readers will find themselves taking sides in this suspenseful adventure story that addresses the duality of human nature.


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A day at the fabled amusement park Isles of Wonder turns deadly when a world-wide biological attack kills every adult, leaving behind only the kids to fend for themselves. Isolated from the world, unsure of what lies ahead, the young survivors assemble under the statue of King Neptune, the mythical ruler of the Isles, to form a new society. Led by the children of the park A day at the fabled amusement park Isles of Wonder turns deadly when a world-wide biological attack kills every adult, leaving behind only the kids to fend for themselves. Isolated from the world, unsure of what lies ahead, the young survivors assemble under the statue of King Neptune, the mythical ruler of the Isles, to form a new society. Led by the children of the park workers, they choose to remain closed off from the outside world living relatively comfortably inside the self-contained park. But when violence from the infested outside world appears to infiltrate their safe zone, one small group discovers a secret society and a hidden system of underground tunnels, and the stage is set for a war that will determine the future of everyone on the Isles. As alliances are formed and broken, readers will find themselves taking sides in this suspenseful adventure story that addresses the duality of human nature.

30 review for Neptune's Children

  1. 5 out of 5

    Colleen Venable

    Ahh YA dystopia novels, how I can't keep away from thee! While the premise needed a little work (how exactly does a biological virus kill off all of the adults in the world and just leave the kids?) this book was so fantastic! Huge numbers of characters were juggled and rounded-out with Sachar-eske ease and the plot itself wore away the tip of the seat I was balancing on. On the "it made me exclaim outloud in joy/shock/holy-poop-this-is-awesome" scale this book gets a 9 out of 10 for making me l Ahh YA dystopia novels, how I can't keep away from thee! While the premise needed a little work (how exactly does a biological virus kill off all of the adults in the world and just leave the kids?) this book was so fantastic! Huge numbers of characters were juggled and rounded-out with Sachar-eske ease and the plot itself wore away the tip of the seat I was balancing on. On the "it made me exclaim outloud in joy/shock/holy-poop-this-is-awesome" scale this book gets a 9 out of 10 for making me look crazy on the train. It seriously surprised me how much I was enjoying it and every time I thought some characters were turning cliche Dobkin kicked me in the shin with a "ha foooled you". It was so gripping right to the end that I turned each page with trepidation that the next page was going to be the start of the plot turning into a mildly-concealed advertisement for a sequel, as many YA dystopia novels do, but again Dobkin went a' kicking and I finished the book with a big satisfied grin. (Won't tell if the grin was because of it ending well, or it ending well-written but terribly for the characters involved. No spoilers here!) Such a great read, by the end I barely cared about that first page! Screw you scientists, I loved this book!

  2. 5 out of 5

    Michael Taylor

    Neptunes Children... Ok, let me start with the negative... Some parts are a little drawn out. There, that's it, nothing horrible. And even though they are drawn out, it didn't stop me from reading. The story begins with one of the most shocking things that could happen to any child. And it's that very first scene that will hook you throughout the book. You'll keep reading not just because you "want" more, you "NEED" more. I fell in love with this book and the moment I told my students about it, i Neptunes Children... Ok, let me start with the negative... Some parts are a little drawn out. There, that's it, nothing horrible. And even though they are drawn out, it didn't stop me from reading. The story begins with one of the most shocking things that could happen to any child. And it's that very first scene that will hook you throughout the book. You'll keep reading not just because you "want" more, you "NEED" more. I fell in love with this book and the moment I told my students about it, it was impossible to find on the shelves of our Media Center. Bonnie Dobkin is the pro of "reader fishing" - she has the best hook and bait. Readers won't put this book down until the last page.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Pandora

    Just finished this book. The book has a slow start as it sets up the plot. Then you reach a point where you just have to finish the book. It just impossible to do anything else. It has been describe as part Lord of the Files, part Animal Farm, with a touch of Mickey Mouse. It is also has that great thing an A+++ ending. One in which the last sentence is so perfect that you couldn't do better. One other thing about the book after reading some reviews. The book does suppose that you will buy into Just finished this book. The book has a slow start as it sets up the plot. Then you reach a point where you just have to finish the book. It just impossible to do anything else. It has been describe as part Lord of the Files, part Animal Farm, with a touch of Mickey Mouse. It is also has that great thing an A+++ ending. One in which the last sentence is so perfect that you couldn't do better. One other thing about the book after reading some reviews. The book does suppose that you will buy into the plot. A diease that kills off the adults. I had read The Girl Who Owned a City and found this book to be much more believeable with this plot then The Girl Who Owned a City. At least in this one they took care of the santiation problem ie the dead adults. I also think that although some adults might be uneasy about the book I think from a kid's point of view this book is a sure fire winner. PS March 2012 - Looking this review over. Just wanted to add I can still remember the greatness of the characters especially the lead girl. I read a lot so any book that can still stand out after this much time has a lot going for it. Reading it again

  4. 5 out of 5

    Petronėlė

    Read this a very long time ago. Still can remember scenes from this. Reminiscent of Gone series by Michael Grant. Kind of dark for a middle grade/teen book.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Idalia Francisco

    Read this a long time ago, when I was in elementary school (6 or 7 years ago) and I remeber enjoying this book. One of the first dystopian-ish I 've read. Read this a long time ago, when I was in elementary school (6 or 7 years ago) and I remeber enjoying this book. One of the first dystopian-ish I 've read.

  6. 5 out of 5

    FATIMA

    This book is excellent. This book is excellent.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Razi

    One of the few novels from my childhood that I still go back and read.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Gem

    So the Neptune island are just Disney knock offs. Disneyland would be a good place to be for the apocalypse for many reasons that are pointed out in the book

  9. 5 out of 5

    Karin

    Someone created a deadly virus. Someone let it loose on their enemy. Someone didn’t realize how powerful it was. The creators didn’t know that the virus would spread and kill everyone in its path. Including themselves. The virus killed everyone except for the children. On a day like any other, families made their way to the Isles of Wonder. The Isles of Wonder is a gigantic theme park consisting of five islands, each specializing in a certain type of entertainment. The kids that showed up on this pa Someone created a deadly virus. Someone let it loose on their enemy. Someone didn’t realize how powerful it was. The creators didn’t know that the virus would spread and kill everyone in its path. Including themselves. The virus killed everyone except for the children. On a day like any other, families made their way to the Isles of Wonder. The Isles of Wonder is a gigantic theme park consisting of five islands, each specializing in a certain type of entertainment. The kids that showed up on this particular day didn’t realize they would have to call it home after their parents and older siblings dropped dead in the middle of the park without warning. Josh, along with his sister Maddie, are just two of the thousands of children left wandering the islands alone after the catastrophe. It takes a couple of days for them to snap out of the shock of losing their parents and older sister, but when a voice booms from the top of the Palace calling everyone to listen, Josh and Maddie go to listen to what the speaker has to say. Milo, whose father used to be in charge of the sound system at the Isle of Wonder decides it’s time to get people organized. Taking on the persona of King Neptune, he attempts to enlist vounteers to serve as a committee to make decisions for the larger group. Soon, children are pulling together to dispose of the dead bodies, take care of the children that are too young to care for themselves, and make sure there is enough food and supplies to last them a long time. Everything seems to be working. People are getting along, no one is going hungry, and kids are working themselves into a comfortable rhythm of day to day tasks. But, the question that many people have is, “What is outside the park?” When Josh and his friend Zoe witness lights in the distance, they decide to tell Milo, hoping he’ll put together a scouting party to see if there is anyone else alive. Can everything stay perfect in their fairy tale world? Will King Neptune allow people to leave the Isle of Wonder? How far will people go to remain in power? NEPTUNE’S CHILDREN is a fascinating page-turner. The author creates a relatively safe world for the setting. The children never face hunger, lack supplies, or have to deal with harsh weather. The story relys on the interactions between the characters. Josh, the main character, isn’t always in the core group of decision makers, so the reader has to suffer right along with him when he doesn’t know what is going on around the park. NEPTUNE’S CHILDREN would be a good suggestion for someone who enjoyed GONE by Michael Grant. There are many similarities. GONE is just categorized as a fantasy and involves supernatural elements whereas NEPTUNE’S CHILDREN does not. This is a great choice for anyone that enjoys the post-apocalyptic/survival genre.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Samantha

    The reason I gave this book a four star rating instead of three is because it takes place in an interesting setting. I mean, a Utopian amusement park; that is awesome. Plus it's a page turner. Of course it has problems but still, great concept. Basic idea: Crazy people create a virus that kills everyone, (including them) but not the children. The children in the wonderland amusement park are stuck, but have food, water, and power. The main characters are Josh and his 'family'. A bunch of kids ta The reason I gave this book a four star rating instead of three is because it takes place in an interesting setting. I mean, a Utopian amusement park; that is awesome. Plus it's a page turner. Of course it has problems but still, great concept. Basic idea: Crazy people create a virus that kills everyone, (including them) but not the children. The children in the wonderland amusement park are stuck, but have food, water, and power. The main characters are Josh and his 'family'. A bunch of kids take charge but it seems that their leaders shouldn't be trusted. So basically a corrupt government novel, but with children in a theme park. Now, a few basic pet peeves I had was that a)A rebellious goth girl with a soft side is named Zoe. (Sounds stupid but it's cliche and it's gotten annoying) b)The grief element was pathetic (Woah, every adult in the world may be dead and we're stuck on this island.... Let's go party!) and c)The 'villains' were not fleshed out well. So the characters are decently developed. You can get a vibe for most of them. A lot of people are thrown at you in the beginning and brought back in the end, so keep a list or try to remember well. I don't want to give away too much, but the bad guys' reasons aren't fully explained. It's mentioned once but only once. Sometimes it's okay to leave the reader without the exact reason for the antagonist's behavior but this time it wasn't, because they were kids. Kids don't go around being evil without a great reason. And the main character really should be bothered by the reason, at least. As the book said; "How could they be so stupid?" The climax scene especially. (view spoiler)[The heroes/heroines and followers don't demand answers from the guy they were betrayed by. They just defeat him and move on. Once again, the characters just accept things too fast. (hide spoiler)] None of this villain development stuff was helped by the fact that there was a one year gap in the society building. It was pretty well filled in for the most part, but it still stuttered the growth. The narration was good and so were the characters. I'm not a fan of third person but the subtle voice of it was great. I liked the idea of this. The execution could've taken some tweaks but can be overlooked. The setting and plot are definitely the book's strong points. The characters are interesting people, even though they occasionally act very out of character. I wouldn't call it a strong point just because there are a lot of characters. Overall I still thought this was a pretty great book. Most post-apocalyptic books involve gangs and destruction so innocent children trying to cope was a nice change. A great read for rainy days.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Becky

    Dobkin, Bonnie. 2008. Neptune's Children. From the jacket flap: "A dream vacation at the Isles of Wonder theme park becomes a nightmare when biological terrorism causes the death of every adult on the Islands. Younger teens and children survive, only to face the resulting horror and the chaos of a world without authority. The figure of King Neptune, symbol of the Islands, unites them as they begin to build a society within the park, safe from outside dangers. Led by a group called the Core, made Dobkin, Bonnie. 2008. Neptune's Children. From the jacket flap: "A dream vacation at the Isles of Wonder theme park becomes a nightmare when biological terrorism causes the death of every adult on the Islands. Younger teens and children survive, only to face the resulting horror and the chaos of a world without authority. The figure of King Neptune, symbol of the Islands, unites them as they begin to build a society within the park, safe from outside dangers. Led by a group called the Core, made up mostly of former park workers' children, the survivors slowly organize their world. But when mysterious events bring danger, some of the Islanders begin to wonder if their home is as safe as they think and if their leaders can really be trusted. As suspicions grow and rivalries intensify, the stage is set for a war that will determine the future of everyone on the islands." Intrigued? I know I was. The plot centers around Josh and his "family." (He's an older younger teen--13 or 14--and he's caring for his younger sister, Maggie. From the very beginning, he pairs up with another set of siblings--Zoe and Sam. Together they form a family unit.) In the first few days after IT happens, there is confusion. But within 48 hours, order and structure and authority are introduced into the theme park. Josh is one of the contributors to the sanity. The "king," the boy behind King Neptune's oddly soothing voice, is Milo. He calls all the kids together and asks the older ones--minus the babysitters--to help him. Josh is one of his volunteers, and for a while he is one of the Core, but his "family" responsibilities soon prove more important than his social ones. Through the course of a year--a little over a year--these kids survive on their own without too many glitches, but soon that changes. Little questions, little doubts, a few things that rub our characters the wrong way. Why? Why is Milo so insistent that no one ever leave the theme park? Why can't they have the freedom to leave if they want? To explore the outside world for themselves? While some adults (and a few teens) might find this one predictable, there is much to enjoy in Neptune's Children. I found that even if I was fairly certain where everything was going, I wanted to be along for the ride, for each step in the journey. It was definitely a page-turner for me. Reminiscent of both a Star Trek episode and a Twilight Zone episode, this one was a darkly fun read. © Becky Laney of Becky's Book Reviews

  12. 5 out of 5

    Jennifer Wardrip

    Reviewed by Jaglvr for TeensReadToo.com Nothing is more perfect than a family trip to an amusement park. Josh and his family find themselves at Isles of Wonder. They are celebrating the remission of his younger sister Maddie's cancer. When asked how she wants to celebrate, she answers how most kids would respond: "I want to go to Isles of Wonder!" Off they go. Unbeknownst to Josh's family and the rest of the world, a plague has been created by an unknown group. The virus was released from thousan Reviewed by Jaglvr for TeensReadToo.com Nothing is more perfect than a family trip to an amusement park. Josh and his family find themselves at Isles of Wonder. They are celebrating the remission of his younger sister Maddie's cancer. When asked how she wants to celebrate, she answers how most kids would respond: "I want to go to Isles of Wonder!" Off they go. Unbeknownst to Josh's family and the rest of the world, a plague has been created by an unknown group. The virus was released from thousands of locations simultaneously around the globe. Though the creators had inoculated themselves from the virus, the virus spontaneously mutates and annihilates all the adults in the world. The virus seems to have spared anyone under about the age of fourteen. As the adults around the world start dropping, the children at Isles of Wonder are alone and unprepared. The single voice of King Neptune bellows through the PA system in the park. "Everyone on the islands. If you can hear me, come to the palace." Slowly, all the children band together at the center of the amusement park. Milo, the voice behind King Neptune, appears, and starts creating a new society based on survival. Many of the children in the park had parents that worked for Isles of Wonder. All the knowledge that each has is shared and a community is formed with jobs and responsibilities. In time, some members of the community are unsatisfied. Lights have been spotted outside in the distance and it is time to venture beyond their safe haven. But Milo has other plans, and those with doubts are soon considered rebels and forced to hide. Eventually a confrontation must occur, with one side being victorious. Unexpected alliances develop and strategies are formed. Who will be supreme in the end? Ms. Dobkin's NEPTUNE'S CHILDREN brings to mind the classic ANIMAL FARM by George Orwell. A new society forms with all the best intentions of things being perfect. But, as we all know, there is no perfect society and humanity will take over. NEPTUNE'S CHILDREN is a fascinating look at how the best intentions soon turn bad, and those fighting for good must prevail.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Melissa

    It happened when they were at the Isles of Wonder, designed to be the “ultimate theme park.” For them it would soon be their home. When a mysterious, genetically engineered virus kill all the adults and older teens, the younger teens, children, and infants, have to find a way to live in a world with no parents or any other adult. They have to recreate their own world and new lives. For Josh and his little sister Maddie this means creating their new life where the old one had abruptly ended in th It happened when they were at the Isles of Wonder, designed to be the “ultimate theme park.” For them it would soon be their home. When a mysterious, genetically engineered virus kill all the adults and older teens, the younger teens, children, and infants, have to find a way to live in a world with no parents or any other adult. They have to recreate their own world and new lives. For Josh and his little sister Maddie this means creating their new life where the old one had abruptly ended in the Isles of Wonder Amusement Park. As the older kids come to terms with the tragedy, they begin to organize and follow the charismatic Milo who steps up as the leader of the Isles along with a core group of kids who volunteer to help him. They create borders and try to protect the Isles from those from the outside who would try to steal what the surviving islanders have. As time progresses, Josh, his new friend Zoe and some of the other islanders begin to wonder if there are other reasons the core insists that they shouldn’t venture out of the Isles. This novel was terrifying. In a sense it was a modern Lord of the Flies. The thought of infants and small children suddenly left to be raised by older brothers and in some cases complete strangers was a difficult concept. At the same time it was a book that was very hard for me to put down. I had to know what would happen next. I recommend this to anyone who likes books about survival, dystopian futures, or is looking for a quick read. Cautions for sensitive readers: In the very beginning of this book all the adults die and the kids have to organize the burials for all of the dead while this is not explicitly described it is referred to. There is also violence in this novel. As the teens get older they do form families, and some sex is referred to although there are no explicit details.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Kokomo-Howard County Public Libary

    It happened when they were at the Isles of Wonder, designed to be the “ultimate theme park.” For them it would soon be their home. When a mysterious, genetically engineered virus kill all the adults and older teens, the younger teens, children, and infants, have to find a way to live in a world with no parents or any other adult. They have to recreate their own world and new lives. For Josh and his little sister Maddie this means creating their new life where the old one had abruptly ended in th It happened when they were at the Isles of Wonder, designed to be the “ultimate theme park.” For them it would soon be their home. When a mysterious, genetically engineered virus kill all the adults and older teens, the younger teens, children, and infants, have to find a way to live in a world with no parents or any other adult. They have to recreate their own world and new lives. For Josh and his little sister Maddie this means creating their new life where the old one had abruptly ended in the Isles of Wonder Amusement Park. As the older kids come to terms with the tragedy, they begin to organize and follow the charismatic Milo who steps up as the leader of the Isles along with a core group of kids who volunteer to help him. They create borders and try to protect the Isles from those from the outside who would try to steal what the surviving islanders have. As time progresses, Josh, his new friend Zoe and some of the other islanders begin to wonder if there are other reasons the core insists that they shouldn’t venture out of the Isles. This novel was terrifying. In a sense it was a modern Lord of the Flies. The thought of infants and small children suddenly left to be raised by older brothers and in some cases complete strangers was a difficult concept. At the same time it was a book that was very hard for me to put down. I had to know what would happen next. I recommend this to anyone who likes books about survival, dystopian futures, or is looking for a quick read. Cautions for sensitive readers: In the very beginning of this book all the adults die and the kids have to organize the burials for all of the dead while this is not explicitly described it is referred to. There is also violence in this novel. As the teens get older they do form families, and some sex is referred to although there are no explicit details.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Ealaindraoi

    Biological terrorists release a virus that kills everyone over the age of 14. This story focuses on the children who are at Isles of Wonder, a Disney-like theme park. In many ways, these kids may be better off than those outside the park. The park is completely automated and self-contained, with recycling of water and creation of their own electrity. They are gated off from the outside world, and they have several children who are the offspring of employees at the park. They have some specialize Biological terrorists release a virus that kills everyone over the age of 14. This story focuses on the children who are at Isles of Wonder, a Disney-like theme park. In many ways, these kids may be better off than those outside the park. The park is completely automated and self-contained, with recycling of water and creation of their own electrity. They are gated off from the outside world, and they have several children who are the offspring of employees at the park. They have some specialized knowledge of the park systems, just by listening to their parents talk about their work. Some children step up to become leaders and organize all the things that need to be done. A world without adults, it could be paradise for kids....or could it? This was an engrosing and interesting book. It's very much like Animal Farm in that it examines the governing system that the kids work out and how it comes about. It looks at the personal relationships between the kids and looks at how people decide how to do the "right" thing. It was a really good book, but the idea of watching your parents die right in front of you, might be disturbing for younger readers. It's not graphically mentioned but as time goes by, some of the older girls do become pregnant. It is fascinating how many of the kids form their own unrelated "families" with older children playing the role of parents. If you think you can handle the more graphic scenes, you should read this book; it really gives you a lot to think about.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Carre Gardner

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. Sometimes you wonder how certain books ever get published.... This one is rife with writing no-nos, not the least of which is a case of Extreme Over-Description: the reader is not trusted to imagine any deatail for herself, but is painstakingly instructed on every visual nuance the author imagined as she wrote each scene. As well, the story's just not all that orignal: the whole way through it, my kids and I (we listened to the audiobook version) kept calling out, "That's from Animal Farm!" That Sometimes you wonder how certain books ever get published.... This one is rife with writing no-nos, not the least of which is a case of Extreme Over-Description: the reader is not trusted to imagine any deatail for herself, but is painstakingly instructed on every visual nuance the author imagined as she wrote each scene. As well, the story's just not all that orignal: the whole way through it, my kids and I (we listened to the audiobook version) kept calling out, "That's from Animal Farm!" That's from The Giver!" "That's from "Jericho"! etc. I know that technically, there are no new stories in the world, but one expects an author to be able to take old ideas and make them somehow fresh. As well, one gets the feeling that this author has never truly experienced grief...or at least, she writes like she hasn't. In the story, thousands of children, who have all just lost their parents, and in some cases, their entire families to a biological weapon released at an amusement park, grieve very "conveniently." That is, they spend a day or so being stunned by it all, they cry at the funeral, and then, with all that bothersome emotion taken care of, they dust themselves off, put it all behind them and go have some fun. After all, their families may be dead, but they can ride the roller coasters whenever they want to, so maybe it's not such a bad deal. Or that's how it's all conveyed anyway. On the good side: one star because the amusement park setting is unusual.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Cayleigh

    This was one I listened to on my work commute. I enjoyed it, though it did take me about an entire disc to really get into the story which is probably around 6-8 chapters. Though I have to say, most of the time so far while listening to stories it is me trying to figure out if I'm going to like the narrator more so than the story at first, it took me a while to warm up the reader on this one. This is YA, disease kills all the adults and only kids under about 13 years old or so are left behind. Th This was one I listened to on my work commute. I enjoyed it, though it did take me about an entire disc to really get into the story which is probably around 6-8 chapters. Though I have to say, most of the time so far while listening to stories it is me trying to figure out if I'm going to like the narrator more so than the story at first, it took me a while to warm up the reader on this one. This is YA, disease kills all the adults and only kids under about 13 years old or so are left behind. This book follows the lives of kids who were at a Disney Land type place. I did enjoy it, the kids and the clean-up they have to do were pretty believable though at some points you have to wonder, could kids in the 7-13 age range really take care of infants and toddlers? I very much enjoyed being with Zoe and Josh and their "kid-lits" (the younger kids that the older children either "adopted" or their younger siblings. I liked how they started on their own to form "families" throughout the islands. Josh and Zoe think something is going on with the "Core" the group that gradually and imperceptibly take over power of the whole Islands, especially once some of the kids start wanting to find out what happened on the mainland, and if those kids have joined up and organized as well. Having Neptune's islands set apart by the monorail/ferry from the mainland by a lagoon was a nice way to follow the events after the disaster from only a limited scope. Though it opens up bigger at the very end, but I think if there were to be a second book I would probably pass on it.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Jen

    An unknown terrorist group unleashes a plague on the world that is able to kill all the adults but doesn't harm the children. A group of kids is at an island amusement park when the event occurs and what follows is the story of how they band together and survive. It's been compared to "Lord of the Flies" and "Animal Farm" and I guess it's got features of both, but it doesn't really compare to either. This book isn't bad, but it's got some flaws. First off - who are the terrorists and what kind of An unknown terrorist group unleashes a plague on the world that is able to kill all the adults but doesn't harm the children. A group of kids is at an island amusement park when the event occurs and what follows is the story of how they band together and survive. It's been compared to "Lord of the Flies" and "Animal Farm" and I guess it's got features of both, but it doesn't really compare to either. This book isn't bad, but it's got some flaws. First off - who are the terrorists and what kind of plague only kills the older generation? We needed an explanation here to make this believable since there isn't anything different between an adult and a child's DNA. We don't get one. Second, there are a lot of characters in this book. It's hard to keep track of who's who. We also didn't get enough history or character development to really care about any of these kids. It makes it hard to get into the story when you don't really care what happens to the characters. The power corruption in this book was a good direction to take the story and I thought it worked well here, although I had a slight issue with the ping pong emotions of Miles (he almost seems to have a split personality - I don't know if that was intentional). The ending worked well and I liked that we were given a solid resolution to the character's stories. Overall, not a bad book, but not the best dystopian I've read either.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Chandra

    I've heard a lot of people comparing this book to the Lord of the Flies, which I must say is somewhat odd. True, when I read the first chapter, I was wondering if the book was just a clear and blatant rip-off of Lord of the Flies (Kids. Living on an island. With no adults. And chaos begins. Sound familiar?), but the problem of "chaos" is fixed fairly quickly into the book, to be replaced with a government that slowly turns corrupt. (Now this is sounding like another book we had to read in school I've heard a lot of people comparing this book to the Lord of the Flies, which I must say is somewhat odd. True, when I read the first chapter, I was wondering if the book was just a clear and blatant rip-off of Lord of the Flies (Kids. Living on an island. With no adults. And chaos begins. Sound familiar?), but the problem of "chaos" is fixed fairly quickly into the book, to be replaced with a government that slowly turns corrupt. (Now this is sounding like another book we had to read in school...Animal Farm! Which I actually find kind of funny, because I always figured that if you were to combine Animal Farm and Lord of the Flies, you'd get a bunch of evil little choir boys obsessively trying to kill an evil, charismatic talking pig, but I guess that just goes to show how much I care about the symbolism and allegory of both books.) Anyway, while the concept was rather Lord-of-the-Flies-esque, the moral appeared to be far more along the lines of "absolute power corrupts" rather than "kids + anarchy = bad" such as in said book. As far as the book goes, ripping off of other books aside, it was okay. Some of the characters were interesting and some cool stuff happened, but it was nothing particularly wonderful or new.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Toshita

    Josh and his sister are visiting the Isles of Wonder when a terrorist group biologically attacks the world, killing all of the adults. Josh and his sister are stranded on the island of the Isles of Wonder with other children who were visiting or live there. They come together to help each other but when accusations are aspersed small groups form. The islanders are on the brink of a war that will determine the future of the islanders. Will Josh and his sister come out safe and sound or will they Josh and his sister are visiting the Isles of Wonder when a terrorist group biologically attacks the world, killing all of the adults. Josh and his sister are stranded on the island of the Isles of Wonder with other children who were visiting or live there. They come together to help each other but when accusations are aspersed small groups form. The islanders are on the brink of a war that will determine the future of the islanders. Will Josh and his sister come out safe and sound or will they lose their lives in this war? When I read the blurb for Neptune's Children, my first thought was: Gone by Michael Grant. The basic idea of both novels is the same, all the adults disappear, the children are left to fend for themselves, cliques form etc. I thought that I would like it considering it was like Gone. But I didn't like it. I didn't like it very much because it was very predictable. You always knew who was going to cause problems. Another reason I didn't like it was because I had already read Gone. I had a picture in my head that was similar to what happens in Gone. I believe I would have liked Neptune's Children if I hadn't read Gone before. You can find more reviews here: http://colloquyonbooks.blogspot.com/

  21. 5 out of 5

    Eric Rivas

    Neptune’s Children Bonnie Dobkin; Walker children’s, 272 pages A normal day at Isles of Wonder turns tragic when a biological attack kills every adult, leaving the kids alone in an isolated theme park, filled with “wonder”. At the beginning the kids were sad, and confused because all of a sudden the people that took care of them were suddenly gone and no one knew why. So a few of the older children began to organize when a voice comes on the intercom of the island claiming to be “Neptune” which wa Neptune’s Children Bonnie Dobkin; Walker children’s, 272 pages A normal day at Isles of Wonder turns tragic when a biological attack kills every adult, leaving the kids alone in an isolated theme park, filled with “wonder”. At the beginning the kids were sad, and confused because all of a sudden the people that took care of them were suddenly gone and no one knew why. So a few of the older children began to organize when a voice comes on the intercom of the island claiming to be “Neptune” which was the king of isles of wonder and told the kids to meet up at one place, soon enough the king became obsessed with power and began to incorporate secret societies within their “government” which led the protagonist to make some important decisions whether to stay with this girl he met and a friend and take care of their siblings or join and become more involved with their government, or possibly escape from the isles of wonder. The reader will find their selves wanting to finish the book in one day, it does take a while to start up, but once it does, it is worth the wait, that is the only negative part, the rest of the novel is extremely interesting and will keep you wondering what will happen and there are many conflicts that develop and all have unique solutions.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Kristi

    The premise of this book was that a virus kills anyone past the age of puberty. Thousands of children are left to fend for themselves on an island theme park. They are luckier than most, as there is food on the island to feed tens of thousands of visitors, self-contained power and medical stations and other things that make the island more livable in some ways than what you'd see on the mainland. A power structure arises and it causes problems. As an adult, I found several things freaking me out The premise of this book was that a virus kills anyone past the age of puberty. Thousands of children are left to fend for themselves on an island theme park. They are luckier than most, as there is food on the island to feed tens of thousands of visitors, self-contained power and medical stations and other things that make the island more livable in some ways than what you'd see on the mainland. A power structure arises and it causes problems. As an adult, I found several things freaking me out, like when the kids have been on the island for a year and the oldest kids hitting puberty and getting pregnant. With no doctors around! Also, the general lack of attention that there definitely would have been deaths on the island due to injury and illness with no advanced medical personnel to handle such issues. There were other issues with the book, but it wasn't bad overall. I know there's other books written with a somewhat similar premise, all adults dead and only children remain, and I may check them out and see if they're any better than this particular one.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Rachel

    I listened to this audiobook on a roadtrip with some friends. It's not a book I would have chosen to read on my own- I'm not so into post-apocalyptic stories. But I liked it a lot more than I thought I would when I read the back cover. The narrator's voice was really obnoxious, so I might have liked it more if I had just read it, but, again, I probably wouldn't have read it if it had been just my decision. Basically, all the adults and children over age 13 in the whole world die in biological war I listened to this audiobook on a roadtrip with some friends. It's not a book I would have chosen to read on my own- I'm not so into post-apocalyptic stories. But I liked it a lot more than I thought I would when I read the back cover. The narrator's voice was really obnoxious, so I might have liked it more if I had just read it, but, again, I probably wouldn't have read it if it had been just my decision. Basically, all the adults and children over age 13 in the whole world die in biological warfare gone wrong, and the story follows a group of kids who are at an amusement park when the disease wipes everybody out. At first, everybody works together to help each other survive, but then the leaders get power-hungry and start manipulating all the other kids so they can stay in control. It was an entertaining and engaging book; our trip actually ended before the story did and I went a little crazy not knowing how it ended until my friend who I went on the trip with summarized it for me the next week.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Paul

    This book began with an interesting concept and venue, but did not live up to its potential. The concept is that a (terrorist?) organization unleashes a virus upon the world, and the virus kills ALL the adults in the world but leaves children physically unscathed. This book chronicles the succeeding events for a group of the surviving children who happened to have been on an island amusement park at the time of the cataclysmic event. The author makes a go of describing how the children survive the This book began with an interesting concept and venue, but did not live up to its potential. The concept is that a (terrorist?) organization unleashes a virus upon the world, and the virus kills ALL the adults in the world but leaves children physically unscathed. This book chronicles the succeeding events for a group of the surviving children who happened to have been on an island amusement park at the time of the cataclysmic event. The author makes a go of describing how the children survive the first year and attempt to re-establish some sort of society and government. She glosses over some major points, but I'll concede there's only so much ground she could cover. I suspect the book was intended for a younger audience. Interesting side note: The castle on the cover of my edition bears an UNCANNY resemblance to the Harry Potter exhibit at Universal Studios in Orlando Florida. (Trust me, I was personally there while reading this book). I cannot think that is a coincidence.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Alyssa

    Even with considerations for its genre (dystopian) and audience (YA), this book is bad. Sure, it comments on how power corrupts, but so do many other YA dystopias which are much, much better. The cast is full of lots of underdeveloped and static characters. The dialogue is awful. The writing is inconsistent (at one point the main character is holding a prop weapon which he describes as being unable to hurt a gumdrop, but then later it is treated as if it is a serious weapon)and predictable, and Even with considerations for its genre (dystopian) and audience (YA), this book is bad. Sure, it comments on how power corrupts, but so do many other YA dystopias which are much, much better. The cast is full of lots of underdeveloped and static characters. The dialogue is awful. The writing is inconsistent (at one point the main character is holding a prop weapon which he describes as being unable to hurt a gumdrop, but then later it is treated as if it is a serious weapon)and predictable, and the over all feeling at the end is unsatisfactory because the author hinted at a number of things which never came added up to anything. While it doesn't affect the text itself, the narrator for the audiobook is awful. I don't get why they got a female narrator for a book whose protagonist is male, but the narrator's male voice sounded like someone doing a bad stoner impression. Her female voices tended to be very whiny and annoying too. While I did not like the text, the narrator made it worse.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Heather

    I tried to listen to this as an audio book, but the narrator's voices for the boys were HORRIBLY ANNOYING. So I checked out the book, and read the rest. The concept made me uneasy: all of the adults in the world are killed by a bio-terrorist attack gone wrong, and no one older than 14 is left alive. A bunch of kids that had been at a huge amusement park with their families try to set up their own community, but when a few individuals get power, they get out of control. It was fairly realistic, b I tried to listen to this as an audio book, but the narrator's voices for the boys were HORRIBLY ANNOYING. So I checked out the book, and read the rest. The concept made me uneasy: all of the adults in the world are killed by a bio-terrorist attack gone wrong, and no one older than 14 is left alive. A bunch of kids that had been at a huge amusement park with their families try to set up their own community, but when a few individuals get power, they get out of control. It was fairly realistic, but I think the thing that bothered me was the idea of all these kids on their own, making stupid decisions. The worst (to me) was a bunch of 12- and 13-year-old couples deciding to have babies. That seemed like a frightening idea when there are no more doctors or medicine, but what the hey? Anyway, at least the solutions weren't oversimplified and there weren't any "happily ever afters," but the kids had to figure EVERYTHING out for themselves.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Z

    This should probably have been closer to a 3.5. The language was of a lower level than what I was going for, especially for a Lord of the Flies-esque book. This dealt with violence and chaos and power struggles, which is hard to do when you're writing for a younger audience. But Animorphs managed to pull that off, and I think Neptune's Children does, too. I would have liked to see a longer book with more character development - as it is, it's more about the events that occur once all the adults This should probably have been closer to a 3.5. The language was of a lower level than what I was going for, especially for a Lord of the Flies-esque book. This dealt with violence and chaos and power struggles, which is hard to do when you're writing for a younger audience. But Animorphs managed to pull that off, and I think Neptune's Children does, too. I would have liked to see a longer book with more character development - as it is, it's more about the events that occur once all the adults in the world are killed by a disease, leaving only children to re-create civilization. Luckily, the book doesn't try to focus on the whole world, but keeps the story contained to a theme park, which also solves the problems of electricity and running water, so that leadership and civilization questions can be answered, instead of focusing merely on survival. A good, quick read.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Shawnasea

    I have been reading a ton of post-apocalyptic books lately. I picked up this one because it was being compared to Lord of The Flies and I thought revisiting that theme might be a nice change from the zombies and vampires of late. I felt that the story was lacking. The set up was so quick and you never get any answers regarding the plague or the fact that it only hits adults. And then you're bombarded with entirely too many characters and with every additional name, I felt like I was neglected ti I have been reading a ton of post-apocalyptic books lately. I picked up this one because it was being compared to Lord of The Flies and I thought revisiting that theme might be a nice change from the zombies and vampires of late. I felt that the story was lacking. The set up was so quick and you never get any answers regarding the plague or the fact that it only hits adults. And then you're bombarded with entirely too many characters and with every additional name, I felt like I was neglected time with the main characters and so I never grew to care for them. I struggled to keep reading on. My attention was finally held about 100 pages in and then I was able to breeze through it the same way I digest most YA books. This book does get better, there is some excitement and a little twist. It's just painful getting there.. and even when you do, you still never find out what happened with the plague. In short, this is one of those few that would actually make a better movie than a book.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Raina

    Josh is on vacation with his family at a theme park which rivals Disneyworld when it strikes. Biological terrorism takes out all of the adults in the park older than thirteen or fourteen. Soon, a group of kids begin to lead the crowd of kids in creating a new society. The concept of children reinventing society is not new, exemplified by the classic “Lord of the Flies” by William Golding and notably followed by Michael Grant’s “Gone” series. Here, Dobkin stages the scenario in an amusement park, Josh is on vacation with his family at a theme park which rivals Disneyworld when it strikes. Biological terrorism takes out all of the adults in the park older than thirteen or fourteen. Soon, a group of kids begin to lead the crowd of kids in creating a new society. The concept of children reinventing society is not new, exemplified by the classic “Lord of the Flies” by William Golding and notably followed by Michael Grant’s “Gone” series. Here, Dobkin stages the scenario in an amusement park, and this pushes the concept into a sort of idealized dream world. It adds some fun to the occasionally grisly realities of finding food, water, and shelter without adults. The kids institute a regular “fun day,” create family units, and farm their own food. The plot is somewhat predictable to a reader of the genre, but there is a charm to the naiveté of this vision. This is a very optimistic view of society as invented by children.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Airaology

    A virus was created to wipe out enemies (it did not go into detail as to who or why) and killed every adult. It spread and there were only children. The book focuses on Isles of Wonder (think Disney theme park) children get stuck on a theme park. No adults, no supervision. Reminded me a bit of Gone without the super powers. (to those who are loyal to that series should check this one out but take note: it's not as gory as the Gone series) For the duration of the time to read this book, I was alwa A virus was created to wipe out enemies (it did not go into detail as to who or why) and killed every adult. It spread and there were only children. The book focuses on Isles of Wonder (think Disney theme park) children get stuck on a theme park. No adults, no supervision. Reminded me a bit of Gone without the super powers. (to those who are loyal to that series should check this one out but take note: it's not as gory as the Gone series) For the duration of the time to read this book, I was always wondering: Why Neptune's Children? Why name it that specific way? It'll confuse readers to think this was actually going to be a Neptune book And then when I finish the book, I was at awe. SO THAT'S WHY!!!! It's a brave new world without parents. Knowledge have to be built from scratch and food must be rationed but the ending was interesting.

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