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X-Men: Kitty Pryde & Wolverine

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Kitty travels to Japan to help her father and ends up face-to-face with the granddaddy of all ninjas - Ogun! But Ogun's plans for Kitty's future pale before the role he played in Wolverine's past, and the clawed Canadian vows to bring down his former teacher even if it means his death - or Kitty's! Kitty travels to Japan to help her father and ends up face-to-face with the granddaddy of all ninjas - Ogun! But Ogun's plans for Kitty's future pale before the role he played in Wolverine's past, and the clawed Canadian vows to bring down his former teacher even if it means his death - or Kitty's!


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Kitty travels to Japan to help her father and ends up face-to-face with the granddaddy of all ninjas - Ogun! But Ogun's plans for Kitty's future pale before the role he played in Wolverine's past, and the clawed Canadian vows to bring down his former teacher even if it means his death - or Kitty's! Kitty travels to Japan to help her father and ends up face-to-face with the granddaddy of all ninjas - Ogun! But Ogun's plans for Kitty's future pale before the role he played in Wolverine's past, and the clawed Canadian vows to bring down his former teacher even if it means his death - or Kitty's!

30 review for X-Men: Kitty Pryde & Wolverine

  1. 5 out of 5

    Bookwraiths

    Claremont for all his faults is a damn good writer. Al Milgrom’s drawings aren’t always gorgeous, but they are very action oriented and help tell a multilayered story very well. Together, these two created a damn fine tale with this Kitty Pryde and Wolverine teamup. The plot itself sees Kitty dealing with several traumatic experiences by returning home to be with her dad, leaving the X-men behind. Naturally, things aren’t all rosy though; some shady dealing going on at her father’s bank, causing Claremont for all his faults is a damn good writer. Al Milgrom’s drawings aren’t always gorgeous, but they are very action oriented and help tell a multilayered story very well. Together, these two created a damn fine tale with this Kitty Pryde and Wolverine teamup. The plot itself sees Kitty dealing with several traumatic experiences by returning home to be with her dad, leaving the X-men behind. Naturally, things aren’t all rosy though; some shady dealing going on at her father’s bank, causing Kitty to travel to Japan solo to try to save him. But our young mutant soon finds herself in over her head and at the mercy of a very old, very powerful warrior. Hot off the heels of his first solo miniseries, Wolverine shows up in Japan to try to save his young protege Kitty. This return to the land of the Rising Sun reuniting him with old loves, confronting him with his old master, and forcing him to face his inner demons as he discovers that Kitty might be beyond his ability to help. Overall, this was a solid, entertaining read. Sure there are elements of this story I could complain about. Claremont’s endless dialogue. Milgrom’s bulky figures. A plot which recycled several generic themes about growing up, facing your inner demons, and having to fight off the negative influence of others. But while all these things irritated me, all I could think about as I read this book was how much better this story was than 90% of the new comics out there. The good old days might not always be good, but when it comes to Marvel comics I really think it was better back in the day.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Artemy

    My first Claremont book, and I really enjoyed it! A story about Kitty Pryde going to Japan to help her crook father who got into trouble with some Yakuza, that features Kitty becoming a ninja assassin and Wolverine coming to help her and confront one of his greatest foes, another ninja in a demon mask who possessed Kitty's soul. The story is absolutely bonkers and demonstrates all of the 80's comics sensibility, but damn, it was really entertaining! Claremont doesn't shy away from showing Kitty My first Claremont book, and I really enjoyed it! A story about Kitty Pryde going to Japan to help her crook father who got into trouble with some Yakuza, that features Kitty becoming a ninja assassin and Wolverine coming to help her and confront one of his greatest foes, another ninja in a demon mask who possessed Kitty's soul. The story is absolutely bonkers and demonstrates all of the 80's comics sensibility, but damn, it was really entertaining! Claremont doesn't shy away from showing Kitty failing and screwing up hard, but he also doesn't look down upon her and makes her into a strong and independent hero who deals with her own problems, despite Wolverine being there to mentor her. Allen Milgrom's art looks great even today, with dynamic paneling and excellent sense of movement and action. Claremont's writing is also not as bad as I expected, it does get occasionally too wordy and the plotting can feel contrived in places, but overall I'd say this mini-series holds up really well and is a lot of silly fun.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Malum

    Kitty Pryde goes to Japan, becomes a ninja, takes the name "Shadowcat", and does some growing up. The art wasn't great but the story was fun enough. Kitty Pryde goes to Japan, becomes a ninja, takes the name "Shadowcat", and does some growing up. The art wasn't great but the story was fun enough.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Sam Quixote

    Kitty Pryde’s dad, a bank manager, is being forced to launder money for the Yakuza, the Japanese mafia, and is taken to Japan for the flimsiest of reasons - to meet the head of the organisation. Kitty follows her dad, suspecting rightly that he might be in danger, in an effort to help him somehow. But she’s taken hostage by an immortal ninja master called Ogun who chooses Kitty to be his next mortal vessel, conditioning her to become a ninja assassin and sending her against one of her dearest fr Kitty Pryde’s dad, a bank manager, is being forced to launder money for the Yakuza, the Japanese mafia, and is taken to Japan for the flimsiest of reasons - to meet the head of the organisation. Kitty follows her dad, suspecting rightly that he might be in danger, in an effort to help him somehow. But she’s taken hostage by an immortal ninja master called Ogun who chooses Kitty to be his next mortal vessel, conditioning her to become a ninja assassin and sending her against one of her dearest friends who’s come to rescue her - Wolverine! This was the first superhero comic I ever saw, stumbling across it in a pile of TV guide magazines, as an infant but couldn’t read it because it was written in Italian or German (weird because no one in my family speaks either language). But I could look at the artwork and was mesmerised by Allen Milgrom’s drawings. When I first saw this I wondered how the young woman could fall through solid objects like building’s floors or how the masked guy with the knives in his hands could keep living after being stabbed with swords so many times. The ninja’s demon mask, the sequence where Kitty is brainwashed by Ogun, the panel where Kitty runs Logan through with a katana - it all came back to me when I picked this up recently. So 25+ years after first encountering it, I sat down to read this mini-series from 1984. And it’s not bad! I’m not the biggest fan of 80s comics, they tend to have the kind of tropes that annoy me like too much exposition, the panels are crowded with too many thought bubbles, the storylines are a little tame - and this book is no different. But it’s a lot better than Chris Claremont’s other, more famous Wolverine book he did with Frank Miller, also set in Japan. For one thing, the focus is more on Kitty than Wolverine and Claremont writes her really well. The first issue, while exposition/thought bubble heavy, is really interesting as we see Kitty go from ice skating to hitching a ride to Japan to figuring out how to survive in a foreign land with no money, all of which, despite her powers, prove more difficult than she first thought. Then the second chapter builds on Kitty’s character further as we see the nightmarish demon masked ninja brainwash Kitty to become a mindless killer. Milgrom draws this sequence by putting Kitty in a spotlight surrounded by darkness then having her hair cut by a katana. Kitty is drawn as an infant slowly growing through the panels to the young woman she is in an ingenious depiction of breaking someone down and rebuilding them. The ‘80s was full of stories where there was a wise master teaching a young pupil the ways of some kind of discipline - think Yoda/Luke, Miyagi/Daniel-san, Rocky/Apollo - and Claremont obliges by providing a sequence here with Wolverine acting as brutal sensei to young Kitty. The only thing missing was synth music. It’s not all perfect, the ‘80s tics I mentioned are a bit annoying and the ending has a lengthy wrapping-up speech from Kitty which reads very tritely, but I still felt this was a very good book. Solid artwork from Milgrom, decent writing by Claremont, “Kitty Pryde & Wolverine” is one of the better Marvel books from the ‘80s that still holds up today.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Becky

    I want this. I am SO impressed with this run. I was worried it was just going to be Kitty getting into trouble and Logan coming to get her, but it was so much better than that. He saw in her the demons that haunted him and the same scars he bore, and instead of protecting her or rescuing her he gave her the strength to rescue herself. And then, just to make sure she was still Kitty Pryde he offered her the final stroke. And when she couldn't take it, it was not out of weakness. This is why I hav I want this. I am SO impressed with this run. I was worried it was just going to be Kitty getting into trouble and Logan coming to get her, but it was so much better than that. He saw in her the demons that haunted him and the same scars he bore, and instead of protecting her or rescuing her he gave her the strength to rescue herself. And then, just to make sure she was still Kitty Pryde he offered her the final stroke. And when she couldn't take it, it was not out of weakness. This is why I have such a huge problem with things like the Astonish X-Men What If run where Kitty pulls out Emma's heart. It's a fundamental misunderstanding of how the character of Kitty Pryde has been constructed in the past. Also, Yukio was fantastic. This little run just had some amazing women, and for a comic that came out in the mid-80's, that's pretty damn impressive. And guess what! Logan's character arc didn't suffer for Kitty and Yukio having their own growth and development! In the end it wasn't just Wolverine who helped Kitty face her demons, she got to return the favour and impart some wisdom on him. This was SUCH a good run.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Andrew

    Turns out not to be as bad as it originally sounds and looks. The purpose of the story is to get Kitty Pryde over her funk from a couple events that she had been bemoaning for a while in Uncanny, give her a bit of a darker edge, and finally give her a codename that would actually get used. And Claremont succeeds. My guess is Wolverine gets brought in for two reasons: one, they didn't think Kitty Pryde could sell a comic alone, and two, they wanted to mine the success of the Wolverine mini-series Turns out not to be as bad as it originally sounds and looks. The purpose of the story is to get Kitty Pryde over her funk from a couple events that she had been bemoaning for a while in Uncanny, give her a bit of a darker edge, and finally give her a codename that would actually get used. And Claremont succeeds. My guess is Wolverine gets brought in for two reasons: one, they didn't think Kitty Pryde could sell a comic alone, and two, they wanted to mine the success of the Wolverine mini-series (the Frank Miller one) some more. So they take the story to Japan, get Kitty in trouble with the Yakuza and an immortal ninja, and call Wolverine for help. The art starts out bad and gets better, but not a cause in itself to pick up the book

  7. 4 out of 5

    Jennifer

    Okay, first of all, it was not my intention to check out any books for myself, let alone three comic books. I was actually looking for comic books for Jefferson, but everything was either too babyish or too adult. Then there was Kitty Pryde & Wolverine, and as Kitty is currently my favorite X-Man, I had to get it. I didn't realize when I chose it that this was a "retro" issue. But even had there not been a big deal made in the introduction that this was a reprint of a series over twenty years old Okay, first of all, it was not my intention to check out any books for myself, let alone three comic books. I was actually looking for comic books for Jefferson, but everything was either too babyish or too adult. Then there was Kitty Pryde & Wolverine, and as Kitty is currently my favorite X-Man, I had to get it. I didn't realize when I chose it that this was a "retro" issue. But even had there not been a big deal made in the introduction that this was a reprint of a series over twenty years old, it would have been immediately obvious on the very first page, even to a superhero comics n00b like me. Both the art style and the storyline felt so very 80s. (As they were.) Kitty Pryde runs home to her family after having her heart broken by Peter Rasputin, only to find her father enmeshed in some sort of scandal with Japanese bankers/Yazuka/renegade sumo wrestlers. (Seriously, if they missed a Japanese trope or stereotype in this story, I would be shocked.) Kitty tries to come to the rescue, but is kidnapped. Wolverine tries to come to her rescue, but Kitty has been brainwashed (by a magical samurai, of course) and attempts to kill him. Mayhem ensues. It's a good story despite? because of? the old-fashioned feel. The characters of course don't mesh perfectly with the Whedon-led Astonishing reboot, but they mostly feel true to their cores, except for maybe some teen drama hand-wringing from Kitty in the beginning. Also, it's nice to see Wolverine in love with someone in a way that deviates from the loyal dog following Jean Gray around. Fun, especially for those who enjoy the Japanese-flavoured violence. Not essential.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Artemis

    Starting off 2020 - a new decade - with a few 'X-Men' comics, and I have to say, I'm pleasantly surprised by most of what I've read. Specifically, I'm very impressed with Kitty Pryde. I read 'X-Men: Kitty Pryde & Wolverine' a couple of years ago, but now that I've received my own copy instead of a library one, and have read more about Kitty in the original comics by Chris Claremont, I've come to appreciate her enough that not only is she my favourite X-Man, but she is one of my new favourite super Starting off 2020 - a new decade - with a few 'X-Men' comics, and I have to say, I'm pleasantly surprised by most of what I've read. Specifically, I'm very impressed with Kitty Pryde. I read 'X-Men: Kitty Pryde & Wolverine' a couple of years ago, but now that I've received my own copy instead of a library one, and have read more about Kitty in the original comics by Chris Claremont, I've come to appreciate her enough that not only is she my favourite X-Man, but she is one of my new favourite superheroines ever. I bountifully admire her. She is an inspiration, and I wish that she had been given the love, respect, and popularity she deserves in recent comics, and in other mediums. Any 'X-Men' screen adaptations do NOT do this girl justice - that is, when they bother to include her at all. Katherine "Kitty" Pryde is not some whiny teenager and low ranking X-Man whose mutant power of phasing through solid objects is the only thing that marks her out as special. No, Kitty is brave, practical, tenacious, determined, and is a child prodigy with a genius IQ; while still believably a young teenage girl, with adorable and relatable perks. She's not repulsed by her abilities and who she is, she's excited! She is a dancer, an ice skater, and later a great martial artist - for powers alone do not make a hero, hard work does. She is Jewish and the granddaughter of a Holocaust survivor. Storm is one of her best girl-friends. Ordinary and X-traordinary (sorry not sorry) at the same time, this kitten is learning and growing all the time. Oh, and she can "air walk" - practically fly! (She has thick brown hair, like me, too!) Hard to believe that Kitty was only thirteen when she was first introduced. She started out at the beginning of 'The Dark Phoenix Saga'. Read the comics to get a sense of the real Kitty Pryde! She's a sweetheart who's not to be underestimated and messed with! I've read little of Kitty's more recent comics - there doesn't seem to be a lot about her, at least as her own independent hero, which is a shame - but from the days of the classic eighties 'The Uncanny X-Men' run - mass overuse of dialogue and thought balloons and all - Kitty Pryde was a young feminist icon that that decade sorely needed. She empowers teenage girls and does them justice; in the old comics, anyway. In 'X-Men: Kitty Pryde & Wolverine', Kitty gets into the most dangerous situations and suffers egregiously - physically, emotionally, and mentally - as no teenager should. For her troubles and wanting to help her family, she is used and abused on a horrific, monstrous scale; you could say demonic, if not psychically. But she is stronger than she thinks she is, and in time she may rise above her trauma, without letting it completely take over her life. She has friends and allies; people who care for her. An eighties Marvel comic that takes a female character's trauma seriously and gives it the weight it warrants - what a shock! While not empowering Kitty exactly (as trauma shouldn't; too often it's used as a cheap, lazy, insensitive ploy in writing in order to "build character" - it doesn't and it shouldn't), it doesn't make her weak, helpless and dependent. Neither is she ever a typical "strong female character" who hides her emotions and true thoughts (she's very thoughtful and an open book). She's still Kitty, but undoubtedly changed by her experiences. Always does she aspire to do better, and be better. This comic is as much Kitty's story, and about her development, as it is Wolverine/Logan's, if not more so. It is highly dramatic storytelling, and it is here where Kitty first adopts the codename Shadowcat (I never liked Sprite - it makes her seem small, flighty, delicate, and disposable, which is far from the truth). As much as I enjoyed it, however, it being an eighties-nineties superhero comic, I have a few issues with it. I don't like the artwork - it's a bit flat, simplistic, ugly, and it doesn't incorporate enough detail, yet has overly detailed faces - those close-ups and mouths hanging open are off-putting. It being set mainly in Japan, it does contain stereotypes - of course the villains are ninjas, sumo wrestlers, and Yakuza-styled mobsters. At least there are about three Japanese female characters on the side of good who are complex and badass. Though sometimes the women are dressed inappropriately, are half naked, and/or are bathing with the artist giving us a fuller show of their cleavage than before. Ahh, the eighties! I hope this sexist work ethic is dying out at last. But nothing is perfect, and regardless, 'X-Men: Kitty Pryde & Wolverine' is fun, gritty, and a fine highlight and turning point for Kitty (did I just rhyme?). It equally spotlights two of (arguably) the most famous X-Men in comics. Indeed I've quickly grown to appreciate Wolverine as well; far more than anything I've seen on television, especially those hugely sexist Hugh Jackman vehicles that call themselves 'X-Men' movies. These characters have stood the test of time - from an imperfect time period, towards further imperfect times and misuses. Back to their roots, and as their own absolute selves, they are awesome. Final Score: 4/5

  9. 4 out of 5

    Bonnie G.

    This is a SUPER weird series whose main goal is to just get Kitty Pryde to become ShadowCat and give her ninja skills quickly- but oddly enough I liked it.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Joe Jungers

    I recall this being some A-1 comics. Background for Logan, plot for Kitty. Good stuff.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Rick

    This is one of those mini-series that Marvel published because Wolverine was so popular, but they still weren't sure if he'd make it in his own title. Hard to believe that there was a time that Wolverine was not perceived as a cash cow, but there was. While is is nit anywhere near as compelling as the Wolverine by Claremont & Miller was, it nice to see Kitty having a chance to share the spotlight. But this brings to one of the problems with this series: it really illustrates how Claremont and Ma This is one of those mini-series that Marvel published because Wolverine was so popular, but they still weren't sure if he'd make it in his own title. Hard to believe that there was a time that Wolverine was not perceived as a cash cow, but there was. While is is nit anywhere near as compelling as the Wolverine by Claremont & Miller was, it nice to see Kitty having a chance to share the spotlight. But this brings to one of the problems with this series: it really illustrates how Claremont and Marvel feared powerful female characters. Kitty is now given a treatment that clarifies that she has been infected with the seed of corruption, like Jean Grey/Phoenix and Rogue (the multiple personality disorder after she siphoned off Ms. Marvel's memories & personality), Magik was forced to matured at an accelerated rate in a demonic hell and now Kitty is forced to mature at an accelerated rate at the hands of psychopathic ninja (even the newly arrived Rachel Summers carried the seeds of an apocalypse within her). Claremont really has an issue with impregnating women with evil that appears to consume the. Conversely, men in the Marvel Universe don't seem to have this infection in anywhere near the same numbers. It wouldn't bother me so much except Claremont just has to keep using and then reusing the formula again and again (he did the same thing when he took over the Fantastic Four and brought a daughter of Reed & Sue from a future who hadn't been born yet in the current storyline, exactly like Rachel Summers as a daughter of Cyclops & Phoenix came from an alternate future). Claremont has clearly shown he's a talented writer, but he does seem to get lazy and recycle his successful story arcs. The other problem I have with this book is the art. Al Milgrom is a very talented artist and his technique for laying out fast-paced adventure stories is excellent. But there is a stiffness in the figures and chunkiness of line work that just doesn't appeal to me. When another artist inks his pencils it helps tremendously, but here he's taken on full art chores and it sadly distracts me from the story. A good effort for a rather forced story to shoehorn another Wolverine mini-series into the X-Men series, whether it fit or not.

  12. 5 out of 5

    James

    This solo series starring Wolverine and Kitty Pryde of the X-men has a very 80s premise: Kitty's dad, a banker, makes some bad loans that get him in debt with the yakuza, and she's forced to jet off to Japan to rescue him. But she doesn't want to bother the rest of the X-men with family business, so instead she steals some money from an ATM, catches a nasty cold and, oh yeah, becomes the deadly thrall of a legendary ninja who teaches her his deadly skills so he can eventually take over her body This solo series starring Wolverine and Kitty Pryde of the X-men has a very 80s premise: Kitty's dad, a banker, makes some bad loans that get him in debt with the yakuza, and she's forced to jet off to Japan to rescue him. But she doesn't want to bother the rest of the X-men with family business, so instead she steals some money from an ATM, catches a nasty cold and, oh yeah, becomes the deadly thrall of a legendary ninja who teaches her his deadly skills so he can eventually take over her body with his own spirit, perpetuating his immortality. And the ninja, Ogun, is an old buddy of Wolverine's, which is never a healthy thing to be. So on the surface, the plot here has Kitty doing deadly ninja things and then struggling to save her own soul after Wolverine rescues her. In the larger X-men universe, this interlude in Japan offered a good way to transform the X-men's youngest member from the kid of the group to something more mature. It also offers some nice emotional drama, particularly in the fifth issue of the six-issue series. Here Kitty fights back, despite knowing she's in over her head, and the end result is a combo of nice action, solid growth, and a killer final panel, as Wolverine enters the proceedings. As with the original Wolverine series, the exoticization of Japan and the cumbersome ninja mythos is a bit silly and likely a little offensive to modern eyes. The narration and moral crisis can be heavy handed, as writer Chris Claremont is wont to do. But this miniseries is more effective than its predecessor, offering a sympathetic central character with Kitty Pryde. Plus there's also the regular joy of everyone in the cast telling her blowhard dad to shut his mouth... Read digital issues.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Kelly Sedinger

    This is good, but not as good as I remember from way back when (1984, I think, or 1985). Shortly after her breakup with Colossus, Kitty Pryde goes home and discovers that her banker father is involved in possibly illegal activity. She follows him to Japan, where she gets in one bit of trouble after another and finally finds herself the captive of an evil ninja-type warrior who may or may not be immortal, and who shares a shadowy past with Wolverine, who comes to Kitty's aid. The book is kind-of a This is good, but not as good as I remember from way back when (1984, I think, or 1985). Shortly after her breakup with Colossus, Kitty Pryde goes home and discovers that her banker father is involved in possibly illegal activity. She follows him to Japan, where she gets in one bit of trouble after another and finally finds herself the captive of an evil ninja-type warrior who may or may not be immortal, and who shares a shadowy past with Wolverine, who comes to Kitty's aid. The book is kind-of a sequel to the earlier WOLVERINE tale, by Chris Claremont and Frank Miller. This time the art is in Al Milgrom's hands, and it's mostly good, except for some panels that are, well, jarringly ugly. Chris Claremont's fascination with Japanese culture shows here, but I always wonder how much of this is real and how much is just the typical kind of 80s pop-culture view of Japanese culture. The story doesn't have very many outright surprises, although Kitty's decision to recast herself as "Shadowcat" is interesting, and Wolverine is always a fun character to read. One does tire of constant reminders of various powers ("I use my adamantium claws which can cut through anything", "Getting inside is easy for me because my mutant power is to walk through walls!"), which I suppose are necessary but somewhat distracting. Still, I like this limited series a good deal, and my real rating would be higher if GR allowed partial stars. (Do they, and I just don't know how to do it?) KITTY PRYDE AND WOLVERINE is an entertaining side-tale in the long saga of the late 80s mutant stories. If nothing else, it's nice to see a story from that period that has a start AND an ending!

  14. 5 out of 5

    Matt

    NOTE: I would actually give this 3 1/2 stars. For about 20 years I've heard of this 1984 limited series, the second to feature Wolverine after 1982's classic must-read series with Chris Claremont and Frank Miller (yep, the guy who wrote and co-directed Sin City and has directed this Christmas' The Spirit). The first issue of this collection reads like a lame YA novel. Kitty Pryde, who can walk through solid objects like a ghost, is experiencing some major teen angst. The story doesn't pick up un NOTE: I would actually give this 3 1/2 stars. For about 20 years I've heard of this 1984 limited series, the second to feature Wolverine after 1982's classic must-read series with Chris Claremont and Frank Miller (yep, the guy who wrote and co-directed Sin City and has directed this Christmas' The Spirit). The first issue of this collection reads like a lame YA novel. Kitty Pryde, who can walk through solid objects like a ghost, is experiencing some major teen angst. The story doesn't pick up until a supposed immortal ninja who is connected to an embezzlement scheme that Kitty's father (who runs a bank) is on. The story turns dark and examines identity and rebirth. I got a little tired of Claremont's "Stephen King" syndrome of repeating himself ("I'm Wolverine and I'm the best there is at what I do." Yeah, yeah, we know!!). Yet, you have to remember that this was originally a series published monthly. The art is okay and some of the dialogue feels a little dated (especially in the first two issues - too many thought balloons!). Yet, in all for a 24 year old story, it still holds up well if you are a fan of the X-Men.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Nuno

    Roughly 20 years ago I was reading this mini-series for the first time, then in its Brazilian edition. Sometime in between, those books were lost. But I never forgot the stories. What we have here is a coming-of-age story, where Kitty (still 15 years old) has to face some family issues which will bring her into a myriad of problems, far away from home. Enter Wolverine, who tries to find Kitty but instead meets only a deadly opponent. Well, in fact a few friendly faces also. After all, he's no ne Roughly 20 years ago I was reading this mini-series for the first time, then in its Brazilian edition. Sometime in between, those books were lost. But I never forgot the stories. What we have here is a coming-of-age story, where Kitty (still 15 years old) has to face some family issues which will bring her into a myriad of problems, far away from home. Enter Wolverine, who tries to find Kitty but instead meets only a deadly opponent. Well, in fact a few friendly faces also. After all, he's no newcomer in Japan. So, all this time past, did it live up to my memories? I would say yes and no. On the one hand, although Claremont does a great job with the script, dealing with some deep topics actually, there are some areas of the story which I felt were a bit too predictable. I guess I had retained only the best parts... But, on the other hand, the good side of it is that I was able to better appreciate the graphic aspect. I didn't remember the dynamic and vibrant art, which actually surprised me a bit. Milgrom was able to imprint this book with a very particular style, which in my opinion works very well. In the end, this is a classic. And there are valid reasons for that.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Luke

    One of the best X-Men stories ever written! Kitty Pryde and Wolverine is an absolutely brilliant book. Not only in and of itself but also because it is the culmination of the development of Kitty's and Wolverine's relationship over the course of Uncanny X-Men. This book marks one of Kitty Pryde's most definitive moments, so reading it as a Kitty Pryde fan was a great experience. While she was always one of the most interesting X-Men, this story takes her character and rebuilds it from the ground One of the best X-Men stories ever written! Kitty Pryde and Wolverine is an absolutely brilliant book. Not only in and of itself but also because it is the culmination of the development of Kitty's and Wolverine's relationship over the course of Uncanny X-Men. This book marks one of Kitty Pryde's most definitive moments, so reading it as a Kitty Pryde fan was a great experience. While she was always one of the most interesting X-Men, this story takes her character and rebuilds it from the ground up, literally! The paneling, covers and art are all also great, along with the fight scenes, which this book has many of. A lot of fight scenes can sometimes be frustrating in older comics due to their simplistic and pointless nature, however that doesn't apply to this story at all. The over use of text boxes that older comics also suffer from is also not present here, since instead of a third person narrator, the only text boxes used are for insights into to what the characters are thinking, giving them an actual purpose. Definitely read it if you love Kitty or Wolverine, or if you want to dip your toe into some classic X-Men stories.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Jace

    I bought this book because Shadowcat/Kitty Pryde is one of my favorite characters. I could care less about Wolverine. Sure, he was interesting back in the 80s and 90s, but that was before Marvel made him their workhorse and decided to cram him into 30 books a month just to milk his popularity. Anyway, this book explores Kitty's transformation into her new Shadowcat identity. Samurai and ninjas aren't really my thing, but this book was still a decent read, especially considering the character exp I bought this book because Shadowcat/Kitty Pryde is one of my favorite characters. I could care less about Wolverine. Sure, he was interesting back in the 80s and 90s, but that was before Marvel made him their workhorse and decided to cram him into 30 books a month just to milk his popularity. Anyway, this book explores Kitty's transformation into her new Shadowcat identity. Samurai and ninjas aren't really my thing, but this book was still a decent read, especially considering the character exploration. This is one of the best examples of the Wolvie/Kitty Father/Daughter dynamic. Although it feels a little hokey and somewhat dated, it's still far superior (and a better bang for your buck) than a lot of the crap being written today in mainstream Marvel comics.

  18. 4 out of 5

    ▫️Ron S

    I didn’t bother with this ‘back in the day’, and I’m sure I had a lot of opportunities to pass it up. X-men was the drug of choice that saw me holding jobs since I was 12 (paper route). This wasn’t a bunch of mutants, it was a drama about Kitty following her dad b/c he got into financial trouble. Then it becomes a whole lot more - and I am grateful to have had the chance to read it for the first time right now, in the deadly chaotic mess of a nation gone mad. She calls home, and someone who cares I didn’t bother with this ‘back in the day’, and I’m sure I had a lot of opportunities to pass it up. X-men was the drug of choice that saw me holding jobs since I was 12 (paper route). This wasn’t a bunch of mutants, it was a drama about Kitty following her dad b/c he got into financial trouble. Then it becomes a whole lot more - and I am grateful to have had the chance to read it for the first time right now, in the deadly chaotic mess of a nation gone mad. She calls home, and someone who cares is there. Someone who is an advocate for her own growth more than a rescuer. These times have had me wishing for a rescuer - and the message that we rescue ourselves with our own hard work, devotion, and perseverance - these are timeless messages well-told by the most under appreciated genius in comics history (aside from Kirby). Thanks for the story Chris. And thank you, Shadowcat and Wolverine. They don’t make ‘em like they used to - so it’s pretty handy that I collected a lot in the best time span comics ever saw.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Reggie Esteban

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. Kitty Pryde, a young member of the super heroes group known as “The X-Men,” senses trouble involving her father and ventures off overseas on her own to protect him from an organized crime syndicate. Chris Claremont, the author of the series, starts off slowly in the first issue acquainting the readers with Kitty and setting the scene. By the second issue, Claremont moves the story into high gear and eventually gets Wolverine involved. The reader is led down a mysterious path which keeps you guessi Kitty Pryde, a young member of the super heroes group known as “The X-Men,” senses trouble involving her father and ventures off overseas on her own to protect him from an organized crime syndicate. Chris Claremont, the author of the series, starts off slowly in the first issue acquainting the readers with Kitty and setting the scene. By the second issue, Claremont moves the story into high gear and eventually gets Wolverine involved. The reader is led down a mysterious path which keeps you guessing. Who is harassing Kitty’s father? Can Kitty fight off criminals on her own? What happens when Wolverine confronts the deadliest samurai in Japan? The story has a surprise ending and is hard to put down. I’d read it again if I had time.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Lance Grabmiller

    Collects the entire six issues of Kitty Pryde and Wolverine (November 1984 - April 1985). Not as good as the Wolverine solo series from a year or two earlier, but a good backstory on how Kitty Pryde becomes Shadowcat (after flirting with various other code names and costumes for the previous four years). Not essential except for completionists.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Eddie

    The emergence of... Shadowcat! This is a character defining adventure, and even with the at times slightly excessive amounts of dialogue (I think Claremont was always like that) it is still an 80s classic. Or at least it is to me because it focuses on my two all time favourite superheroes! Kitty is still Wolverine’s best protege.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Tori

    3.5 stars - fits snugly into claremont's ongoing x-men epic while remaining satisfying on its own, but held back by average art and mired in orientalist stereotypes - why you'd try to integrate b-movie ninjas into the world of characters who already have so much going for them is completely beyond me! 3.5 stars - fits snugly into claremont's ongoing x-men epic while remaining satisfying on its own, but held back by average art and mired in orientalist stereotypes - why you'd try to integrate b-movie ninjas into the world of characters who already have so much going for them is completely beyond me!

  23. 5 out of 5

    Nicholas Siebers

    Kitty Pryde was my favorite X-man for a long time, but I have mixed feelings about this story arc. The magical transformation into a ninja feels a little forced, and ultimately it is still Wolverine who does most of the day-saving. Still, Shadowcat has some great moments in this, and Wolverine too. Good but not great.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Jon Shanks

    One I've been meaning to read for years and was well worth. Wolverine, ninjas & general bad-assery! Plus Kitty Pryde grows from being the teenage mascot of the X-Men into much more of a strong, independent character and firm fan favourite (myself included). A great story and an essential one for X-Men fans. One I've been meaning to read for years and was well worth. Wolverine, ninjas & general bad-assery! Plus Kitty Pryde grows from being the teenage mascot of the X-Men into much more of a strong, independent character and firm fan favourite (myself included). A great story and an essential one for X-Men fans.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Ivan Lex

    To be honest I don't love so much these old stories, sometimes are really interesting but with a lot of text, and in this comic that fits perfectly. I think that this is a must read story for every Wolvie and Kitty fans To be honest I don't love so much these old stories, sometimes are really interesting but with a lot of text, and in this comic that fits perfectly. I think that this is a must read story for every Wolvie and Kitty fans

  26. 4 out of 5

    Crazed8J8

    Surprisingly well done. A great coming of age story for Shadowcat (who gets her name in this run). This story really solidifies a Kitty as a hero and is important in so many later stories. A great read!

  27. 4 out of 5

    Alex

    I loved these. I was invested from beginning to end.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Garner

    Classic Claremont, great art.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Pawan Rai

    If you enjoyed Claremont's X-men run and missed this I highly recommend you check it out. If you enjoyed Claremont's X-men run and missed this I highly recommend you check it out.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Labyrinth Rossiter

    In this story, Kitty Pryde is captured and her soul is tainted by the ninja Ogun, and the trials she goes through force her to grow up. She leaves the child-like Ariel/Sprite persona behind and takes "Shadowcat" for the first time. She learns about inner and outer strength, making difficult choices, personal sacrifice...entering the adult realm. The demon-like Ogun is Wolverine's old master, and Wolverine is forced to confront the mirror of his "beast," but he also learns in this story that he i In this story, Kitty Pryde is captured and her soul is tainted by the ninja Ogun, and the trials she goes through force her to grow up. She leaves the child-like Ariel/Sprite persona behind and takes "Shadowcat" for the first time. She learns about inner and outer strength, making difficult choices, personal sacrifice...entering the adult realm. The demon-like Ogun is Wolverine's old master, and Wolverine is forced to confront the mirror of his "beast," but he also learns in this story that he is a man who has learned to harness that energy and control it. There was plenty of "ninja" excitement, but the "tests of character" aspect of the story makes it particularly a good series to recommend to my daughter.

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