Hot Best Seller

Afro-Future Females: Black Writers Chart Science Fiction's Newest New-Wave Trajectory

Availability: Ready to download

Afro-Future Females: Black Writers Chart Science Fiction’s Newest New-Wave Trajectory,edited by Marleen S. Barr, is the first combined science fiction critical anthology and short story collection to focus upon black women via written and visual texts. The volume creates a dialogue with existing theories of Afro-Futurism in order to generate fresh ideas about how to apply Afro-Future Females: Black Writers Chart Science Fiction’s Newest New-Wave Trajectory,edited by Marleen S. Barr, is the first combined science fiction critical anthology and short story collection to focus upon black women via written and visual texts. The volume creates a dialogue with existing theories of Afro-Futurism in order to generate fresh ideas about how to apply race to science fiction studies in terms of gender. The contributors, including Hortense Spillers, Samuel R. Delany, Octavia E. Butler, and Steven Barnes, formulate a woman-centered Afro-Futurism by repositioning previously excluded fiction to redefine science fiction as a broader fantastic endeavor. They articulate a platform for scholars to mount a vigorous argument in favor of redefining science fiction to encompass varieties of fantastic writing and, therefore, to include a range of black women’s writing that would otherwise be excluded. Afro-Future Females builds upon Barr’s previous work in black science fiction and fills a gap in the literature. It is the first critical anthology to address the "blackness" of outer space fiction in terms of feminism, emphasizing that it is necessary to revise the very nature of a genre that has been constructed in such a way as to exclude its new black participants. Black science fiction writers alter genre conventions to change how we read and define science fiction itself. The work’s main point: black science fiction is the most exciting literature of the nascent twenty-first century.


Compare

Afro-Future Females: Black Writers Chart Science Fiction’s Newest New-Wave Trajectory,edited by Marleen S. Barr, is the first combined science fiction critical anthology and short story collection to focus upon black women via written and visual texts. The volume creates a dialogue with existing theories of Afro-Futurism in order to generate fresh ideas about how to apply Afro-Future Females: Black Writers Chart Science Fiction’s Newest New-Wave Trajectory,edited by Marleen S. Barr, is the first combined science fiction critical anthology and short story collection to focus upon black women via written and visual texts. The volume creates a dialogue with existing theories of Afro-Futurism in order to generate fresh ideas about how to apply race to science fiction studies in terms of gender. The contributors, including Hortense Spillers, Samuel R. Delany, Octavia E. Butler, and Steven Barnes, formulate a woman-centered Afro-Futurism by repositioning previously excluded fiction to redefine science fiction as a broader fantastic endeavor. They articulate a platform for scholars to mount a vigorous argument in favor of redefining science fiction to encompass varieties of fantastic writing and, therefore, to include a range of black women’s writing that would otherwise be excluded. Afro-Future Females builds upon Barr’s previous work in black science fiction and fills a gap in the literature. It is the first critical anthology to address the "blackness" of outer space fiction in terms of feminism, emphasizing that it is necessary to revise the very nature of a genre that has been constructed in such a way as to exclude its new black participants. Black science fiction writers alter genre conventions to change how we read and define science fiction itself. The work’s main point: black science fiction is the most exciting literature of the nascent twenty-first century.

40 review for Afro-Future Females: Black Writers Chart Science Fiction's Newest New-Wave Trajectory

  1. 5 out of 5

    Zach

    An odd hodgepodge of a book that is perhaps more successful as a manifesto or call to arms than an academic collection. There are some important contributions here, but it seems like the book can never decide if it's: 1. a study of science fiction by African-American women who are commonly understood to be writers of such (Butler, Hopkinson, Shawl, etc) 2. a call for the inclusion of fiction by African-American women written outside of the realist mode (so the above plus Morrison, Bambara, etc) in An odd hodgepodge of a book that is perhaps more successful as a manifesto or call to arms than an academic collection. There are some important contributions here, but it seems like the book can never decide if it's: 1. a study of science fiction by African-American women who are commonly understood to be writers of such (Butler, Hopkinson, Shawl, etc) 2. a call for the inclusion of fiction by African-American women written outside of the realist mode (so the above plus Morrison, Bambara, etc) in some sort of larger inclusive genre project 3. a study of Afro-futurism in general (ie including art outside of the realm of literature) 4. a collection commemorating Octavia Butler 5. a work regarding the overall relationship between race and science fiction Now, any and all of these would be worthwhile projects, but I think some focus would have helped a lot here. The introduction by Marleen Barr would lead you to believe that #2 is the primary goal of this work, and a few of the essays follow that lead. Barr's own major contribution, though ("On the Other Side of the Glass": The Television Roots of Black Science Fiction) falls more into #5 (and #3?), examining the role of TV characters in normalizing images of black Americans. I am honestly kind of mystified as to why the interviews with two men were included, especially given that the Samuel Delany interview is (I think) the single longest piece in the book. Similarly Steven Barnes's piece on black male sexuality in the movies, which was interesting (if rather essentialist), but had pretty much nothing to do with literature written by black women (or Afro-futurism). The collection also includes a few short stories by African-American women: Octavia Butler - The Book of Martha: in which God enlists the help of a Seattle-based female African-American science fiction author named Octavia Butler Martha to reform humanity. A fun insight into escapism. Andrea Hairston - Double Consciousness: An excellent example of the ability of SF to literalize important concepts, in this case Du Bois's idea of double consciousness as the African American individual's experience of both self-consciousness/American identity and constant critical scrutiny from white society. In this, a scientist and a... mystic? end up imprisoned in the same body together after falling in love when one invades the other's world (or nation?). I wasn't really clear on what was going on in this story, but a little bit of research has led me to believe that it is a side- or back-story to Hairston's Mindscape, which I now plan on reading sooner or later. Nisi Shawl - Dynamo Hum: Again, science-fictional literalization, this time of the reclamation of sexual agency by an African American woman. Sheree R. Thomas - The Ferryman: this one had kind of a Beloved-ish feel to it, given its horror-tinged gothic atmosphere and story revolving around slavery and the family, and while I can't claim to have followed much of it at all, I will be rereading it. Nalo Hopkinson - Herbal: This is a story about the elephant in the room. All of these were above-average stories that exemplify the use of the novum-as-literalization that is probably the most important social use of this genre, and I think that might actually be the biggest contribution of this volume to the literature.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Jess

    I read this book to supplement a paper I did on Octavia E. Butler's Wild Seed, mostly because of the essay "Becoming Animal in Black Women's Science Fiction" by Madhu Dubey. This book is a great source for academics but it's all just an interesting collection of criticism, essays, and short stories about black women in science-fiction, speculative fiction, and fantasy. I came away with a lot of to-read books (short stories, authors, graphic novels, anything you could want). I recommend this both I read this book to supplement a paper I did on Octavia E. Butler's Wild Seed, mostly because of the essay "Becoming Animal in Black Women's Science Fiction" by Madhu Dubey. This book is a great source for academics but it's all just an interesting collection of criticism, essays, and short stories about black women in science-fiction, speculative fiction, and fantasy. I came away with a lot of to-read books (short stories, authors, graphic novels, anything you could want). I recommend this both as an aid and an enjoyable read!

  3. 5 out of 5

    Jetamors

    I enjoyed most of the fiction and essays in this book, though I was somewhat perplexed by Steven Barnes' contribution, which focused primarily on men. I enjoyed most of the fiction and essays in this book, though I was somewhat perplexed by Steven Barnes' contribution, which focused primarily on men.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Mills College Library

    813.08762 A2587 2008

  5. 4 out of 5

    kate

  6. 5 out of 5

    Mark A.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Michael

  8. 5 out of 5

    N

  9. 5 out of 5

    Alyson

  10. 5 out of 5

    Naori

  11. 5 out of 5

    Gemma Field

  12. 4 out of 5

    D.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Sumayyah

  14. 5 out of 5

    Nathan Full

  15. 5 out of 5

    Lorraine

  16. 5 out of 5

    Stephani

  17. 5 out of 5

    Colin

  18. 4 out of 5

    Christy

  19. 4 out of 5

    glasses like clark kent

  20. 4 out of 5

    Blackbook

  21. 4 out of 5

    Linda

  22. 4 out of 5

    Ayo

  23. 4 out of 5

    Ibi Zoboi

  24. 5 out of 5

    Laura Quilter

  25. 5 out of 5

    lynnee denise

  26. 5 out of 5

    Janel

  27. 4 out of 5

    Pamster

  28. 5 out of 5

    tish

  29. 5 out of 5

    Laya

  30. 4 out of 5

    Ching-In

  31. 4 out of 5

    Jocelyn

  32. 4 out of 5

    Asha

  33. 5 out of 5

    Dojiang

  34. 4 out of 5

    Liz

  35. 5 out of 5

    Brenda

  36. 5 out of 5

    bruin

  37. 5 out of 5

    Juliana

  38. 5 out of 5

    Marie

  39. 4 out of 5

    Katrina

  40. 4 out of 5

    Tanis

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...