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Capitão América: Uma Nova Era

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Na sequência dos ataques do 11 de Setembro, a América tem de combater a ameaça do terrorismo. O país necessita de uma figura que dê o exemplo. Esse homem é o Capitão América. Mas, poderá o Capitão América manter afastada a sombra do terrorismo?


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Na sequência dos ataques do 11 de Setembro, a América tem de combater a ameaça do terrorismo. O país necessita de uma figura que dê o exemplo. Esse homem é o Capitão América. Mas, poderá o Capitão América manter afastada a sombra do terrorismo?

30 review for Capitão América: Uma Nova Era

  1. 5 out of 5

    Terence

    In the wake of 9/11, Captain America is forced into action as terrorists strike at an American town. Cap is once more reminded of the tragedy of war. The New Deal is quite the introspective piece looking at the cause of 9/11 and whether America is as innocent as Americans believe. The world has monsters and killers, but is the US the cause of them? A few of the quotes in this volume are the type that keep me up at night when I think about them too long. "Are we only hated because we're free -- Fr In the wake of 9/11, Captain America is forced into action as terrorists strike at an American town. Cap is once more reminded of the tragedy of war. The New Deal is quite the introspective piece looking at the cause of 9/11 and whether America is as innocent as Americans believe. The world has monsters and killers, but is the US the cause of them? A few of the quotes in this volume are the type that keep me up at night when I think about them too long. "Are we only hated because we're free -- Free and prosperous and good? Or does the light we see cast shadows we don't -- Where monsters...can plant the seeds of hate?" "History repeats itself. Like a machine gun. A madman lights the spark -- And the people pay the price." To me The New Deal is what Captain America is all about. He's the heart, the fight, the idealism, and the aspiration of America and Americans. It's funny when I was younger I didn't appreciate Captain America, but ever since his films in the Marvel Cinematic Universe I have a totally different perspective on him. Cap is simply an incredible character and this volume is a good reminder as well as a palate cleanser from the horrible Hydra Cap crap Marvel recently put out. The New Deal is a strong beginning to a powerfully thoughtful Captain America series.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Nicolo

    For me, this was the book that brought artist John Cassaday that Astonishing X-Men gig with Joss Whedon that turned him into a superstar. This is not my favorite portrayal of post-9/11 Cap; that honor belongs to Mark Millar and Bryan Hitch on Ultimates; but this is a close second. If I'm not mistaken, this is the first appearance of John Cassday's subtle redesign of Cap's chain-mail tunic. The fabric or material of suit is less cloth and more of a composite material arranged in a chain-mail desig For me, this was the book that brought artist John Cassaday that Astonishing X-Men gig with Joss Whedon that turned him into a superstar. This is not my favorite portrayal of post-9/11 Cap; that honor belongs to Mark Millar and Bryan Hitch on Ultimates; but this is a close second. If I'm not mistaken, this is the first appearance of John Cassday's subtle redesign of Cap's chain-mail tunic. The fabric or material of suit is less cloth and more of a composite material arranged in a chain-mail design. That is significant in itself since the look became the main Captain America visual for more than a decade. Cassaday carried this story with his shoulders and showed that his art could carry a book or at least a story. It was good that he did because the story failed me as a reader. The story isn't bad but it failed me because I'm not an American. The patriotic tone of the book made me as a reader excluded. Still, I can get behind the art and that's why it gets four stars.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Himanshu Karmacharya

    A decent Captain America story that takes place post-911, mixed bag of freshness and clichés, but with incredible artwork.

  4. 4 out of 5

    James DeSantis

    This was pretty damn good. After the events of 9/11 we have a broken cap. Trying to piece against the world again. The first issue of him digging through the pile of the buildings where he's trying to save a few people is just perfect captain America. Then have Captain America stop a hate crime from happening in true Captain America fashion. Then we get into the real meat of the story of terrorism and it's probably one of the most patriotic yet capturing who Cap is. Surprisingly the story does j This was pretty damn good. After the events of 9/11 we have a broken cap. Trying to piece against the world again. The first issue of him digging through the pile of the buildings where he's trying to save a few people is just perfect captain America. Then have Captain America stop a hate crime from happening in true Captain America fashion. Then we get into the real meat of the story of terrorism and it's probably one of the most patriotic yet capturing who Cap is. Surprisingly the story does justice to current events at the time. I think a lot of it still rings true, on how hate breeds fear, which cause people to do horrible things. So wonderful. The art is pretty solid too as is the pacing. The ending ends as I expected so that was a bit let down since I thought they could have pushed it a little more. Saying that, this was a really entertaining captain america story. A 4 out of 5.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Mizuki

    It's a nice, fast paced story, the artwork is nice too. This post-911 short story has a sensible political message, although I honestly don't know how realistic this message is, or how useful it's when applying to the real world. It's a nice, fast paced story, the artwork is nice too. This post-911 short story has a sensible political message, although I honestly don't know how realistic this message is, or how useful it's when applying to the real world.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Anthony

    Little torn about how I feel on this one. On the one hand, I do get why Marvel would want a character like Captain America handling 'real-world' events, especially 9-11. But on the other, I want my super hero comics to be escapism from the real world. Sure, Captain America was a big propaganda figure during WWII, and it's heavily infused in his history and origin. But that was the 1940's. Seeing Captain America fight terrorists doesn't have the same effect as seeing Captain America punching Hitl Little torn about how I feel on this one. On the one hand, I do get why Marvel would want a character like Captain America handling 'real-world' events, especially 9-11. But on the other, I want my super hero comics to be escapism from the real world. Sure, Captain America was a big propaganda figure during WWII, and it's heavily infused in his history and origin. But that was the 1940's. Seeing Captain America fight terrorists doesn't have the same effect as seeing Captain America punching Hitler. Like, there's a scene were Captain America is literally falling to his death while he's wrapped in the American flag which is also on fire. I mean come on, really? But at least the antagonist wasn't your typical run-of-the-mill middle eastern looking stereotype. Instead, we're never quite sure where he's from (I think it's heavily implied that he's Russian?). And his look is also that of a burnt man, so the scaring has made him completely white. I just think it's interesting (in a positive way) that in a book which is basically Captain America against terrorists, the lead terrorist doesn't look like your generic Hollywood stereotype of what a terrorist is. But with all that said, this is a pretty good read. This is mostly down to John Cassaday's art looking amazing (and much better than his recent work in Uncanny Avengers). I like how Rieber doesn't overfill the pages with caption boxes and word balloons, so he's not covering up Cassaday's art. Instead the story is almost driven by the art and all the words are secondary. I'd recommend this to readers that enjoyed Matt Fractions Invincible Iron Man: The Five Nightmares. While I don't think it's quite as good, it's covering similar themes and grounds.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Chelsea 🏳️‍🌈

    This was just fine. The artwork wasn’t my favorite. There are a few marvel comics around this time that have similar art. It just feels very static and doesn’t have the same excitement I get from other artwork. The storyline was surprisingly progressive for the time. This is a year after 9/11 and we have stories where Cap is protecting Muslim Americans from hate crimes. The message is “do not punish an entire people for the actions of terrorists”. It’s a great message and one I’m surprised marve This was just fine. The artwork wasn’t my favorite. There are a few marvel comics around this time that have similar art. It just feels very static and doesn’t have the same excitement I get from other artwork. The storyline was surprisingly progressive for the time. This is a year after 9/11 and we have stories where Cap is protecting Muslim Americans from hate crimes. The message is “do not punish an entire people for the actions of terrorists”. It’s a great message and one I’m surprised marvel allowed but, it’s only recently that marvel has been completely chicken when it comes to their writers saying anything political (you know, unless you want to turn captain America into a fucking Nazi). So, it was surprisingly refreshing. An interesting note: if I read this right, this comic actually takes responsibility for the civilians harmed during WWII? That’s interesting. But ultimately, this didn’t do nearly as much for me as some other Cap comics have. I do give credit for taking what was probably a controversial stance at the time.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Phillip Berrie

    Not being a citizen of the US and being somewhat removed from the times of the event I found this a suitably balanced comic book reply to the horror that was 9/11. It posed some interesting questions, which presumedly would have brought some interesting reactions at the time from people in the States. This political connection and commentary gives it an extra half star from me. Story-wise, I thought that there wasn't enough foreshadowing of the climactic showdown with the villain of the piece. Ar Not being a citizen of the US and being somewhat removed from the times of the event I found this a suitably balanced comic book reply to the horror that was 9/11. It posed some interesting questions, which presumedly would have brought some interesting reactions at the time from people in the States. This political connection and commentary gives it an extra half star from me. Story-wise, I thought that there wasn't enough foreshadowing of the climactic showdown with the villain of the piece. Artistically, I thought the rendition of my favourite star-spangled avengers was adequate, though I thought it was a little lacking with between panel continuity. Recommendation: one for the Cap fans and those interested in one response to the events of 9/11.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Sem

    I should be grateful that it was a quick read. I winced so hard at the ideologically driven plot that I came close to spraining something. Elegant art though.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Ivan Lex

    I don't know why the hell I hadn't read this before! If at any point someone asks me about the perfect Captain America comic to begin with I will definitely recommend this one, I think it perfectly frames what this superhero means, beyond the action and bullets, this comic is Steve Rogers in pure essence! After the tragic events of 9/11 Steve feels a responsibility as an American to help at the disaster, collect debris and save lives; It doesn't matter if he's assigned a mission his place is I don't know why the hell I hadn't read this before! If at any point someone asks me about the perfect Captain America comic to begin with I will definitely recommend this one, I think it perfectly frames what this superhero means, beyond the action and bullets, this comic is Steve Rogers in pure essence! After the tragic events of 9/11 Steve feels a responsibility as an American to help at the disaster, collect debris and save lives; It doesn't matter if he's assigned a mission his place is with the Americans! I love that here is very clear that the problem is not immigrants, the problem is terrorism, not people. If you are a muslim os whatever does not make you a terrorist. Steve Rogers himself is the son of Irish immigrants to the United States and that is what makes America great, the mixture of the best of all cultures, it is a great message that is perfectly linked to the symbol of the super soldier. On the other hand, this book represents a social criticism of the government that always hides the garbage of its illicit acts or that covers the tracks of its mistakes with which it has harmed many people. I didn't had the honor of reading something written by John Ney Rieber before and I can only say one thing: what a balls have this man to write this, it is a great comic about morality and social criticism. To finish I want to applaud the art of John Cassaday, the importance he gives to the small details is appreciated, few times I have seen artists give so much importance to drawing the details of the boots, the helmet and the Captain's suit well. This man knows how to do his job!

  11. 4 out of 5

    Frank Jarome

    An attempt to “modern” Cap post 9/11, it mostly works. The narration is slightly overdone, but well-written. And the artwork is amazing. A quick, solid read

  12. 4 out of 5

    Ana Rita Durão

    Following the September 11th attacks, America faces a new threat – terrorism. After a climate of terror, the country needs someone who represents justice and shows the best it has. It needs Captain America, a hero who faces real world events, a hero who is a metaphor for the challenges of the American people. Taking a realistic and sincere approach, John Ney Rieber conveys the thoughts of an American who witnessed, live, the fall of the towers. The whole book is simple, with many pages being the Following the September 11th attacks, America faces a new threat – terrorism. After a climate of terror, the country needs someone who represents justice and shows the best it has. It needs Captain America, a hero who faces real world events, a hero who is a metaphor for the challenges of the American people. Taking a realistic and sincere approach, John Ney Rieber conveys the thoughts of an American who witnessed, live, the fall of the towers. The whole book is simple, with many pages being the qualities of the Americans and the questions that Steve Rogers asks himself. As important as this story has been, it is the subject of some controversy, many say that it takes courage to speak of such a striking theme and others find it too political. The difference of this comic book and the others can soon be seen in each of the covers. "We have to be strong, stronger than we ever were. If we lose hope now, if we lose faith during these dark times, then nothing else will matter. And they will have won."

  13. 5 out of 5

    Chris Browning

    A hugely frustrating but noble failure - you can't accuse Rieber of not trying to tackle some big stuff in his Captain America/ 9/11 story but because he spends so long trying to weave ambiguity into the narrative, the story becomes kind of muddled and awkward. It's almost as if Rieber has some kind of tally system going on: conventional wisdom about the war against terror used once? Then apply something about how America is partly to blame in response. Moment of American patriotism? Then here's A hugely frustrating but noble failure - you can't accuse Rieber of not trying to tackle some big stuff in his Captain America/ 9/11 story but because he spends so long trying to weave ambiguity into the narrative, the story becomes kind of muddled and awkward. It's almost as if Rieber has some kind of tally system going on: conventional wisdom about the war against terror used once? Then apply something about how America is partly to blame in response. Moment of American patriotism? Then here's a dangling subplot about fundamentalism in all its forms. In it's admittedly noble attempt to cast the blame on no one, it feels kind of vague and lacking in focus. Maybe it's because it was written quickly after the New York attacks, but it kind of feels evasive and lost at times and for every genuinely impressive bit of plotting, there's almost inevitably a platitude coming to try and undercut it. The art is lovely though and has some impressively moving sequences that almost feel like a warmer, more melancholy Frank Quitely

  14. 5 out of 5

    John

    Captain America is a tricky character to pull-off. When he's in perfect boy scout mode, he's pretty boring. It's only when he's against some sort of existential force, do I find him more compelling. So, Engleheart's run is fun and so is Ta-Nehisi Coates. I never really cared for Brubaker's take, even though it felt a bit relevant at the time (of the symbol of the American Dream in chain and later dead). Same goes with Nick Spencer's. There's also good but kind of forgettable run's like Stern, Wa Captain America is a tricky character to pull-off. When he's in perfect boy scout mode, he's pretty boring. It's only when he's against some sort of existential force, do I find him more compelling. So, Engleheart's run is fun and so is Ta-Nehisi Coates. I never really cared for Brubaker's take, even though it felt a bit relevant at the time (of the symbol of the American Dream in chain and later dead). Same goes with Nick Spencer's. There's also good but kind of forgettable run's like Stern, Waid and Remender that come to mind. This arc, was post-9/11 and as such it's a bit jingoist "ra-ra". It's not near as blatant as say Frank Miller's woefully misguided misfire of "Holy Terror" but it is a nice more updated version of Captain America punching Hitler. Yet, this arc and the following started to question the government--so much so that he quit and Chuck Austen had to finish it up. I'm not someone huge into nationalism (so I watch Cap with a suspicious eye) but this was a good take.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Doctor Alpha

    First half is interesting, gripping and well written, but all the questions concerning the legitimacy of US foreign policies and arms dealings are completely thrown away the moment Cap. insists, in what seems a reiteration of the "with us, against us" typical of the Bush Docrine, on the perception of terrorists as mad, demented people . So demented and mad that they were able to bypass all U.S. military might to achieve the destruction of the Twin Towers as well as to force the USA in an endless First half is interesting, gripping and well written, but all the questions concerning the legitimacy of US foreign policies and arms dealings are completely thrown away the moment Cap. insists, in what seems a reiteration of the "with us, against us" typical of the Bush Docrine, on the perception of terrorists as mad, demented people . So demented and mad that they were able to bypass all U.S. military might to achieve the destruction of the Twin Towers as well as to force the USA in an endless war in Afghanistan. Two and an half stars.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Francisco Becerra

    Overall a very good take of the Cap, and the beggining of his amazing current portrait. However, the story in itself is very uneven, having some very profound takes mixed with the usual campiness of previous Cap stories. The "villain" is as faceless as it could be, a very unsatisfying way of resolving the story. Overall a very good take of the Cap, and the beggining of his amazing current portrait. However, the story in itself is very uneven, having some very profound takes mixed with the usual campiness of previous Cap stories. The "villain" is as faceless as it could be, a very unsatisfying way of resolving the story.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Sinchan Bhatt

    A story of a jaded Steve Rogers in the aftermath of 9/11. The Marvel Knights line intended to bring classic characters into the new century by making them more "mature", which in a lot of cases just meant making them more needlessly grim and violent. This soft-relaunch, however, did have some titles that actually accomplish the goal of maturity, and this is one of them. Some very relevant messaging about terror and it's causes and consequences. This was a quick read, with striking captions and b A story of a jaded Steve Rogers in the aftermath of 9/11. The Marvel Knights line intended to bring classic characters into the new century by making them more "mature", which in a lot of cases just meant making them more needlessly grim and violent. This soft-relaunch, however, did have some titles that actually accomplish the goal of maturity, and this is one of them. Some very relevant messaging about terror and it's causes and consequences. This was a quick read, with striking captions and brisk dialogue. Overall I was quite surprised with how well the writer handled an extremely heavy topic, especially for a superhero comic.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Ronan The Librarian

    Featuring a very solemn, stolid Cap, this is a 9/11-inspired story that ages much better than I was worried it might. Cap takes on terrorists and never loses sight of what makes him, him. Cassaday’s art is great, intense and clean. This is a classic-feeling Cap story, as he works to counter plots against the country, while unpacking the fact that his home and namesake are far from perfect. Another great Cap story that I’d recommend to any fan.

  19. 4 out of 5

    David Turko

    I'm surprised at how much I enjoy this. This story focuses on Cap right after 9/11. Reiber goes into the tragedies of war and Cap's personal beliefs and it's amazing. As usual Cassaday's art is stunning. He truly is one of the greatest illustrators in comics. Definitely recommend this one. "History repeats itself. Like a machine gun. A madman lights the spark -- And the people pay the price." I'm surprised at how much I enjoy this. This story focuses on Cap right after 9/11. Reiber goes into the tragedies of war and Cap's personal beliefs and it's amazing. As usual Cassaday's art is stunning. He truly is one of the greatest illustrators in comics. Definitely recommend this one. "History repeats itself. Like a machine gun. A madman lights the spark -- And the people pay the price."

  20. 4 out of 5

    Matthew Sullivan

    Fun read The way this story is written out, it makes you feel like you are a part if it, because, well, you were. 9/11 comes to life for those of us who remember the horror of that day. And we root with even more vigor than ever before for Cap to uphold justice.

  21. 4 out of 5

    C Moore

    Rieber and Cassaday artfully blend their meditations on complex, real-life national grief with the layers of myth and personal conflict that fill the pages of Captain America’s history. This is thoughtful work that holds up very well.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Andrew

    This may be the best Cassaday art I have come across. Right in between Planetary and Astonishing for a perfect mix. Story is a direct response to 911 as the book began in 2002. While not nuanced, it felt balanced.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Christopher Tower

    This book is perfect. Rieber is a very excellent and under-rated comic book writer. He should do more work. But without Cassady's art, this book would not be nearly as good. WOW. This was a re-read for me but worth it. This book is perfect. Rieber is a very excellent and under-rated comic book writer. He should do more work. But without Cassady's art, this book would not be nearly as good. WOW. This was a re-read for me but worth it.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Guardian

    Great

  25. 5 out of 5

    Eden

    this was just a bunch of American propaganda tbh

  26. 4 out of 5

    Mike

    Great art, but jingoistic post-9/11 Cap story.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Kurt Lorenz

    Read as single issues. Art: ☆☆☆☆☆ Story: ☆☆☆

  28. 5 out of 5

    Caiden osei

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. this book is amaizing

  29. 4 out of 5

    Matthew Smith

    Nine eleven

  30. 4 out of 5

    T. Brady

    unforgettable

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