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Sin and Grace in Christian Counseling: An Integrative Paradigm

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Sin. Grace. Christian Counseling. How do these fit together? In Christian theology sin and grace are intrinsically interconnected. Teacher and counselor Mark McMinn believes that Christian counseling, then, must also take account of both human sin and God's grace. For both sin and grace are distorted whenever one is emphasized without the other. McMinn, noting his own tend Sin. Grace. Christian Counseling. How do these fit together? In Christian theology sin and grace are intrinsically interconnected. Teacher and counselor Mark McMinn believes that Christian counseling, then, must also take account of both human sin and God's grace. For both sin and grace are distorted whenever one is emphasized without the other. McMinn, noting his own tendencies and the temptation to stereotype different Christian approaches to counseling along this theological divide, aims to help all those preparing for or currently serving in the helping professions. Expounding the proper relationship of sin and grace, McMinn shows how the full truth of the Christian gospel works itself out in the functional, structural and relational domains of an integrative model of psychotherapy. Christian Association for Psychological Studies (CAPS) Books explore how Christianity relates to mental health and behavioral sciences including psychology, counseling, social work, and marriage and family therapy in order to equip Christian clinicians to support the well-being of their clients.


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Sin. Grace. Christian Counseling. How do these fit together? In Christian theology sin and grace are intrinsically interconnected. Teacher and counselor Mark McMinn believes that Christian counseling, then, must also take account of both human sin and God's grace. For both sin and grace are distorted whenever one is emphasized without the other. McMinn, noting his own tend Sin. Grace. Christian Counseling. How do these fit together? In Christian theology sin and grace are intrinsically interconnected. Teacher and counselor Mark McMinn believes that Christian counseling, then, must also take account of both human sin and God's grace. For both sin and grace are distorted whenever one is emphasized without the other. McMinn, noting his own tendencies and the temptation to stereotype different Christian approaches to counseling along this theological divide, aims to help all those preparing for or currently serving in the helping professions. Expounding the proper relationship of sin and grace, McMinn shows how the full truth of the Christian gospel works itself out in the functional, structural and relational domains of an integrative model of psychotherapy. Christian Association for Psychological Studies (CAPS) Books explore how Christianity relates to mental health and behavioral sciences including psychology, counseling, social work, and marriage and family therapy in order to equip Christian clinicians to support the well-being of their clients.

30 review for Sin and Grace in Christian Counseling: An Integrative Paradigm

  1. 4 out of 5

    Katy

    A must-read for any Christian counselor, or any Christian looking to understand the effects of sin and grace in their own lives.

  2. 4 out of 5

    David Cowpar

    This book is very insightful into the part a recognition of the reality of sin, and the need for grace, can play in a positive journey towards a healthy mental outlook. I think McMinn is really able and has thought deeply about how advances in the secular realm of psychotherapy and the understanding of the world passed down by theology interplay.

  3. 4 out of 5

    T.J. Telfer

    There were elements that I disagreed with and I found it to be repetitive at times; but my overall opinion of the text is that it is an essential corrective/restorative for the Sin and Grace dynamic in Christian ministry.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Chuck Kinsey

    This is an excellent book written by and for a professional counselor but easily understood by the lay person. In Dr. McMinn's experience the psychologist and the biblical counselor see their approaches mutually exclusive and often view the other with suspicion. Instead, he outlines the need to integrate the insights and strengths of both. McMinn builds on a Reformed theological perspective that sin is not merely an act but a condition and has resulting consequences. Yet to focus on sin without g This is an excellent book written by and for a professional counselor but easily understood by the lay person. In Dr. McMinn's experience the psychologist and the biblical counselor see their approaches mutually exclusive and often view the other with suspicion. Instead, he outlines the need to integrate the insights and strengths of both. McMinn builds on a Reformed theological perspective that sin is not merely an act but a condition and has resulting consequences. Yet to focus on sin without grace is to ignore the great reality of our human commonality and God's favor. Grace with an accompanying understanding of how our biology and relationships have been corrupted is central to the role of the counselor. Among the insights he shares is the noetic effects of sin. We all have a tendency to be overconfident of our own perspectives and conclusions assuming our own rightness as opposed to another's. We have a confirmation bias, always looking for proof and support for what we already believe. And we have belief perseverance whereby even when faced with contradictory evidence we tend to ignore it or explain it away. McMinn concludes by suggesting that three basic counseling perspectives should be integrated: the relational which looks at how past experiences have shaped or misshaped one's character, the skill-focused which deals with how cognitive or behavioral skills can help with life's complexities, and the moral which looks at mitigating consequences by living according to the natural principles of creation. Counsel focused on just one without the other two perspectives can be damaging and misleading. Underlying it all should be grace and recognition of the need for community.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Jeffrey

    McMinn's book is an excellent read and likely would be included in my very selective list of "desert island books." The book talks of two very familiar topics, the notion of sin and grace, yet does so in relational terms from a psychological perspective. We may think we know what these topics include, but after reading this book you might be happily pleased with the additional insights he has into grace and sin (not your old trite bible verse, quick explanation of missing the mark and moving on McMinn's book is an excellent read and likely would be included in my very selective list of "desert island books." The book talks of two very familiar topics, the notion of sin and grace, yet does so in relational terms from a psychological perspective. We may think we know what these topics include, but after reading this book you might be happily pleased with the additional insights he has into grace and sin (not your old trite bible verse, quick explanation of missing the mark and moving on but robust, developed and relational concepts with examples). The first section of the book deals with sin and grace and how this affects psychotherapy and counseling. McMinn is an integrationist but balances his book well. The second section of the book walks the reader through an integrated approach to therapy (i.e. theology and psychology): first tackle the functional complaints of the person and teach new behaviors and manage symptoms, second tackle the cognitive aspects of the person and their interpretive schemas (beliefs of various levels, assumptions, etc), lastly, tackle the relational divides that are almost always present. An excellent book, well worth the read.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Katie

    This book offers a balanced perspective on Christianity and mental health. McMinn provides clarity on the need for recognition of sin in one's life as well as an understanding of the biological and chemical components of mental health issues. This book offers a balanced perspective on Christianity and mental health. McMinn provides clarity on the need for recognition of sin in one's life as well as an understanding of the biological and chemical components of mental health issues.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Juliebo2

  8. 5 out of 5

    Laura E. DeHority

  9. 4 out of 5

    Tivoli

  10. 4 out of 5

    Chelsea

  11. 5 out of 5

    Tyler

  12. 4 out of 5

    Sarah

  13. 4 out of 5

    Amy Coxwell

  14. 5 out of 5

    Michael

  15. 5 out of 5

    Tim Watson

  16. 5 out of 5

    Gabriella Sabin

  17. 5 out of 5

    Bonni

  18. 4 out of 5

    Samantha Boone

  19. 4 out of 5

    Carter Doyle

  20. 5 out of 5

    Sam R. Franklin

  21. 4 out of 5

    Catherine

  22. 5 out of 5

    Lisa

  23. 4 out of 5

    Steve

  24. 5 out of 5

    J. Tomc

  25. 4 out of 5

    Regina Esliker

  26. 4 out of 5

    Cassidy

  27. 4 out of 5

    James Wesson

  28. 4 out of 5

    Madison Duran

  29. 5 out of 5

    Angie

  30. 4 out of 5

    John Sullivan

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