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Good Enough is the New Perfect (Harlequin Non Fiction)

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30 review for Good Enough is the New Perfect (Harlequin Non Fiction)

  1. 4 out of 5

    Ashley Lauren

    I'm going to start this review with two important admissions: 1. I am not a mother. 2. I consciously decided not to finish the book. Allow me to explain why you may think these two things are very important, and why I think you are wrong. :) 1. I am not a mother, so any time I don't like a book (or anything, for that matter) about motherhood, I am told, "You just don't understand yet. When you have kids, you'll get it." But here's the thing: This book was about so much more than motherhood. It was a I'm going to start this review with two important admissions: 1. I am not a mother. 2. I consciously decided not to finish the book. Allow me to explain why you may think these two things are very important, and why I think you are wrong. :) 1. I am not a mother, so any time I don't like a book (or anything, for that matter) about motherhood, I am told, "You just don't understand yet. When you have kids, you'll get it." But here's the thing: This book was about so much more than motherhood. It was about being a perfectionist (which I am), being a wife (which I am), keeping up domestic duties (which I do), and being a part of a family (which I am). I'm actually not sure if I want to be a mother, ever, and I was excited to read this book because I am almost afraid of having children because I value my career so much and am SUCH a perfectionist and this book promised to explain to me how I could have a career, a child, and not be miserable. So, although I am not a mother, I do feel this book applies to me in some way. However, I found myself disappointed in the portrayal of these issues in the book. Which is why... 2. I decided not to finish the book. I found myself becoming angry and disappointed at the portrayal of societal issues, mothers in general, and husbands/fathers (believe it or not, and more on these in a minute) and I wanted to stop now and write a thoughtful, intelligent half-review rather than an angry full-review. Let me pause here before I go any further to say that I think the issues of motherhood that are brought up in this book are incredibly important. I have immense respect for Becky and Hollee for tackling the do-it-all mom phenomenon. There are so many mothers out there who feel the need to be perfect and do absolutely everything and who run themselves ragged trying only to end up feeling like failures. Heck, I'm so afraid of this that I don't even want children, period! So these issues are important, and it is important as women of this generation to consider these issues and find ways to be what we want to be and not lose our sense of self. That said, I took issue with the way these mom-issues were portrayed. First and foremost, this book absolutely reeked of privilege. To their credit, Becky and Hollee say this right away in the introduction: "We intentionally chose to examine only a slice of the maternal population - mothers who had the privilege of education and a certain amount of choice regarding work, including the ability to temporarily scale back hours, switch jobs, or take time off. Almost all the women we interviewed... were college-educated and relatively secure financially" (x). While I am glad that the authors admitted to the bias in their research, I'm still left knowing that this excludes SO MANY MOMS. I don't know many women who have these options, and those are the moms who stress themselves out trying to do it all. Because they have to. Even as a teacher, for example, I can take maternity leave and negotiate longer, unpaid leaves, but when my toddler throws a temper tantrum in the morning before school, I don't have the luxury of being a few minutes late because I had to deal with it. And I can't go part-time unless a part-time position opens. Also, it seemed that so many of the women interviewed for this book had such financial luxury that they were able to hire nannies who could cook dinner or cleaning services to take some of the stress off of the domestic responsibilities. Again, this is an absolute luxury that many women cannot afford. I felt that it was unfair to say that there are ways to avoid doing it all and then only discuss the options that worked for the upper-class. I also took issue with the language that was used to address these issues. There was quite a bit of ableist language going on. Do-it-all moms were described as being faced with crazy behavior or insane schedules. This, coupled with the overwhelming idea that contemporary moms are obsessed with the little things, gave the overwhelming vibe that women are hysterical and just need to calm down. It makes me wonder, then, just how far we've come from the 1950's housewife mentality. Or "The Yellow Wallpaper" for that matter. If we're just going to tell do-it-all moms that they are making themselves "crazy" and they need to calm down, how far away is that from the belief that women are, by nature, hysterical beings? It also sounds a bit like victim-blaming. You're making yourself feel this way, so you need to figure it out or ask for help - don't expect anyone to jump in and step up with the responsibilities. There was also a section of the chapter titled "The Inheritance" that discussed this modern phenomenon of women feeling like they HAVE to work AND have babies. The argument here is that contemporary moms are, literally, the daughters of the women's rights movement; their moms fought desperately for the right to work outside the home. Because of this, the argument is, women today feel they need to work outside the home or else they will let down their mothers. And not only that, according to Becky and Hollee, it's their mothers who make them feel this way. The section ends by saying, "Guilt and inspiration. The proud legacy of any mother" (33). To top it off, the language that surrounds any discussion of letting go of responsibilities or making decisions is problematic. The decisions the moms make in this book are almost always referred to as "sacrifices" rather than "choices." The language and arguments work together here to perpetuate the mom-as-martyr stereotype, which is troubling. Sure, moms have to make choices and prioritize, but so does everyone. Teaching your child the value of choice is certainly different than "sacrificing" something because you have too much to do. So, at the point that I saw women set up as hysterical martyrs, then we get a description of the helper-husbands, or Disney-dads. These are guys who absolutely cannot do anything right, and their wives need to take over for them or nag them incessantly. Think Everybody Loves Raymond Or Sarah Haskins' Target: Women episode. Now, don't get me wrong. I know plenty of women who just don't trust their husbands to do anything, and they make themselves run ragged trying to do the things their husband should be doing and the things they need to be doing. This is wrong. Women do need to let go and trust their husbands. However, there was a significant portion of this section devoted to the notion that men "don't do it right" and women need to then lower their standards. You know, sometimes the guy will leave dishes in the sink or clean the fridge but leave streaks on it. "Let it go, ladies!" was the overwhelming message. However, I ask you this: When hubby calls and says he's picking up his parents and bringing them over for dinner after work, who gets to run around doing dishes and re-cleaning the fridge? If you guessed the woman, you'd be correct. Here's the thing: There's no right or wrong way to clean, really, as long as the stuff is clean. But if you're leaving streaks on the fridge or dishes in the sink when you said you'd do the dishes, the job has not been done correctly or done at all. The implication of saying that women need to "let it go" may be correct in some ways or some instances, but truly says, "Honey, men will never learn. Don't even try to teach 'em." Which is untrue! Let me give this example: We don't have a full sized washer. Tim did the laundry the other day, having never done it before in our place because that is typically my chore, and added a full load worth of detergent. The clothes came out of the dryer all stiff because of the extra soap. Did I let it go? Did I sneak behind his back and redo the laundry? NEITHER OF THE ABOVE! I told him doing laundry in our place is like doing half of a load because of the size, and told him to use half the detergent. Why did I do that? Because I didn't marry an idiot. He's a smart man who knows lots of things and can learn how to do laundry in a half-washer. It wasn't a put-down; it wasn't something to just "let go." It was a learning experience. To assume that women need to "let go" when their husbands do something around the house that isn't "up to par" just perpetuates both ideas that women are crazy and men are idiots. You may be wondering at this point why I gave this book 3 stars. As I said before, these issues need to be tackled, and I absolutely applaud them for trying. However, I wish they hadn't spend so much time subconsciously perpetuating gender stereotypes in their breakdown of modern motherhood.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Alison Hess

    First I must admit one thing: I haven't read the entire book. It is so full of stories from mothers who describe their struggles to find balance, but it also includes helpful suggestions for moms who are struggling right now. And if we're honest, I'd have to say we're all struggling right now, today and everyday. Just like laundry, there is no end to the balancing act we must perform. Each morning will present new challenges to our best-laid plans, and it is our ability to find ways to weave tho First I must admit one thing: I haven't read the entire book. It is so full of stories from mothers who describe their struggles to find balance, but it also includes helpful suggestions for moms who are struggling right now. And if we're honest, I'd have to say we're all struggling right now, today and everyday. Just like laundry, there is no end to the balancing act we must perform. Each morning will present new challenges to our best-laid plans, and it is our ability to find ways to weave those challenges into our lives without giving in to the chaos that make us "Good Enough" moms. My second confession: I'm not rushing to finish the book anytime soon. Rather, I see it as a permanent fixture on my nightstand, something to read carefully and completely, not skim through to the end so that I can check it off my to do list. It is the book that I will pick up at night after a particularly hard day when I need encouragement, support or just a good laugh. It will be the one I use when my children or family or friends or co-workers come up with a completely new way to frustrate or confuse me. And it will be the one I will turn to when I am on the verge of tears, desperately trying to keep my life in balance and feeling like a complete failure. What I like the most about The New Perfect is how Hollee and Becky have woven personal stories of their own along with stories from a variety of women to provide us with the "how we got here" history of modern motherhood. Our mothers provided us with unprecedented opportunity, and we have felt the pressure to live up to their expectations ever since. What we forgot along the way is that these women didn't live up to anyone else's expectations; they created their own. That's how they made progress and changed the workplace. Instead of feeling like we're not doing enough from their point of view, we need to use our energy to make sure we're doing enough from ours. With Mother's Day coming this weekend, I know that The New Perfect will be a popular gift for moms of all ages, but I have another suggestion. I see this book as a wonderful graduation gift for those young women who are just starting their lives. College graduates, and even some from high school, may really benefit from reading our stories. Would they take from this book the same things I do as a mom who has been out of school for a number of years? I wouldn't expect that. But I would expect them to find inspiration in its pages, and I hope that they would see that we still don't have all of the answers. Maybe they'll see this as an opportunity to find new ways to balance their lives at an earlier age. And maybe they won't expect to have the answers, either. And that's good enough for me.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Annie

    This was a very well-written and insightful book. I think I might present this next August to be considered for book club.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Jennifer

    The cover on this book should have "NOT FOR MIDDLE CLASS WOMEN, AND JUST RUN IN THE OTHER DIRECTION IF YOU WORK BECAUSE YOU NEED TO" stamped on it. It does state clearly in the introduction that this book is not for the uneducated, those who are working and barely survivng, those who must work, and those who can't afford nanny care. (Ok, I may have ad-libbed a bit there, but you get the idea.) This is for high-earning, well-educated mothers who have options like in-home child care, flex hours, job The cover on this book should have "NOT FOR MIDDLE CLASS WOMEN, AND JUST RUN IN THE OTHER DIRECTION IF YOU WORK BECAUSE YOU NEED TO" stamped on it. It does state clearly in the introduction that this book is not for the uneducated, those who are working and barely survivng, those who must work, and those who can't afford nanny care. (Ok, I may have ad-libbed a bit there, but you get the idea.) This is for high-earning, well-educated mothers who have options like in-home child care, flex hours, job-sharing, and other options that most of the middle class don't have access to. And not that these women's problems aren't important, but the ideas that the authors suggest as solutions simply aren't viable for the majority of working moms I know. The only thing I left with from this book was that I have to find new ways of defining success - what do I really want to spend my time doing? - and I've already been down that road and am continuing to work on that. I think I can learn more from my other mommy friends than from this book . . .

  5. 4 out of 5

    Michele

    This book really annoyed me. I was hoping for a book for "real" working Moms like me who need to figure out what is important and what is not in trying to balance our careers and families. Instead, it was nothing but a bunch of doctors, lawyers and self employed entepreneurs whining about finding balance. Balance which generally involved hiring help. Most all of the women in the book were married to men in the same lucrative professions. I only recall one single mom, who was well off enough to r This book really annoyed me. I was hoping for a book for "real" working Moms like me who need to figure out what is important and what is not in trying to balance our careers and families. Instead, it was nothing but a bunch of doctors, lawyers and self employed entepreneurs whining about finding balance. Balance which generally involved hiring help. Most all of the women in the book were married to men in the same lucrative professions. I only recall one single mom, who was well off enough to rely extensively on hired help. The authors did make it clear that they were not dealing with the plight of those in working class positions, however there is a vast middle ground of educated women with good careers that make raising a family a juggling act who cannot realistically hire nannys or launch our own dream business while our husbands foot the bill. Very disappointing.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Kellie

    Checked this book out from the library after going back to work post-baby. The authors summed up the main point very early on that there are two types of working moms: Good Enoughs (who have a shot at being happy) and Never Enoughs (who don't). Liked the stories and tips but didn't read the whole book. And that's Good Enough for me! Checked this book out from the library after going back to work post-baby. The authors summed up the main point very early on that there are two types of working moms: Good Enoughs (who have a shot at being happy) and Never Enoughs (who don't). Liked the stories and tips but didn't read the whole book. And that's Good Enough for me!

  7. 4 out of 5

    Emsmith

    Interesting book on working mothers and juggling family and career. They have good insights. The two authors surveyed women who grew up always with the notion of having a career and family as a given.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Sarah

    Good read This book has a good basic premise: that you can't have it all but you can have what's most import if you know what that is. It's not as research-heavy as some other work-life books, but it was worth the time to read. Good read This book has a good basic premise: that you can't have it all but you can have what's most import if you know what that is. It's not as research-heavy as some other work-life books, but it was worth the time to read.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Lesley

    While this is slanted towards women who become moms with high powered careers vs. women who become moms in all working scenarios, (The surveys and research were only on moms in positions with a high level of education such as doctors, lawyers, etc.) I found the overall message of finding that place where you are happy with being good enough instead of perfect all the time to be positive. It's easier said than done, though, and I wonder how others, like me, who are not in 6-figure career situatio While this is slanted towards women who become moms with high powered careers vs. women who become moms in all working scenarios, (The surveys and research were only on moms in positions with a high level of education such as doctors, lawyers, etc.) I found the overall message of finding that place where you are happy with being good enough instead of perfect all the time to be positive. It's easier said than done, though, and I wonder how others, like me, who are not in 6-figure career situations relate to the book in that aspect. I have a degree and an important job as an educator, but I'm not sure what I am taking away from this book other than "You don't have to be perfect at every facet of your life all the time" and to be honest... I already knew that before reading. I will admit that I considered not finishing the book after the first few chapters. I guess even going in knowing that the focus was going to be on moms with privilege, I had a hard time with some of the stereotypes portrayed. For example, I have a MAJOR issue with the portrayal of the bumbling dad who never helped until asked or never did anything right. Still, I kept trying to relate even though I am not a doctor or lawyer nor do I make 6-figures, and I feel like I came up empty even though I fit the "perfectionist" description that was associated with people in these positions. I AM the kind of person who can be a little obsessive about doing it all perfectly all the time (or at least try) and thought I'd find some deep meaning amongst the pages since I am expecting my first child next month and am a little concerned that I won't be able to "let go" of those OCD tendencies easily. I don't feel any different about that after reading than I did going in. A read with some interesting statistics woven throughout and an overall positive message to let go of feeling the need to be perfect in every arena of your life all the time, (though really, this message can be said about happiness in general with or without kids being part of the equation) but not really one I'd see myself recommending to others.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Ciara

    are you tired of reading my book reviews about these work/life balance books yet? because i am tired of writing them. i really need to make a conscious effort to stop reading these kinds of books, because they're not relevant to me that impairs my enjoyment of them. this is another book that interviews a whole bunch of working moms (the lion's share of whom are successful, well-educated professionals, ie, not really your average mom off the street, which automatically limits the book's appeal & are you tired of reading my book reviews about these work/life balance books yet? because i am tired of writing them. i really need to make a conscious effort to stop reading these kinds of books, because they're not relevant to me that impairs my enjoyment of them. this is another book that interviews a whole bunch of working moms (the lion's share of whom are successful, well-educated professionals, ie, not really your average mom off the street, which automatically limits the book's appeal & relevance) & tries to figure out what makes work/life balance work for them. the conclusion: women who are willing to be "good enough" instead of "never enough" are less likely to get burnt out & express more satisfaction in the little things. they know how to delegate & how to take responsibility for what's truly important. i don't think you need to be a mom, let alone a working mom, for that message to have some resonance, especially in this era of the increasing professionalization of parenthood. which kind of made the book all the more a slog for me. i summed up its thesis in one sentence, but the book drags on for over 200 pages, & it's written in a voice that perpetually confused me. maybe because the authors kept referring to themselves in third person? & because it jumped around a lot between different women with different life situations & i couldn't always keep the details straight? & because ultimately, all the details never really amounted to much more than what i have already written? a fine sentiment for a book; not my cup of tea in execution.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Erin

    I have read the whole book, and it's does a very good job of describing the types of conflicts and situations that people run into when they are trying to balance work and family. It was wonderful to me because it does a very good job of describing the types of tensions, and conflicts that I encounter every day. I found their inclusion of intergenerational conflicts wonderful, and it helps me see where my mom's generation is coming from a little better. If you just read the first chapters, you'll I have read the whole book, and it's does a very good job of describing the types of conflicts and situations that people run into when they are trying to balance work and family. It was wonderful to me because it does a very good job of describing the types of tensions, and conflicts that I encounter every day. I found their inclusion of intergenerational conflicts wonderful, and it helps me see where my mom's generation is coming from a little better. If you just read the first chapters, you'll miss the fact that they include a lot of examples where men are helping with the family and home, and that there can be flexible situations created for caring for parents as well as children. It's not a major part of the book, but it's definitely there. And if you just read the bullet points, you'll miss that a lot of this book is description of the types of situations people face every day. It's not an advice book; even though a lot of helpful information is presented, the text makes it clear that it's not going to work well for all situations. I liked reading the examples. If a doctor, a lawyer and a journalist all have difficulties doing what I'm doing, than I can cut myself some slack for having problems juggling everything too. :-)

  12. 4 out of 5

    Carey

    This book has brought so much understanding and peace to my life! If you're a mom who was born in the 70s or 80s, I highly recommend you read it! I was truly encouraged and inspired by everything the authors shared. In a nutshell, it's a message to women raising children in the 21st century. Our opportunities are almost limitless, but that wasn't so true for our mothers' and grandmothers' generations-- many of them were forced to choose between a career and raising a family, or (in our grandmoth This book has brought so much understanding and peace to my life! If you're a mom who was born in the 70s or 80s, I highly recommend you read it! I was truly encouraged and inspired by everything the authors shared. In a nutshell, it's a message to women raising children in the 21st century. Our opportunities are almost limitless, but that wasn't so true for our mothers' and grandmothers' generations-- many of them were forced to choose between a career and raising a family, or (in our grandmothers' case), offered severely limited options when it came to careers. Now we actually CAN bring home the bacon, and a large majority of us are even out-earning our husbands! But, in spite of all these opportunities, we still want to be great Moms to our children. This book is all about striking a healthy and satisfying balance between the two, discovering your true passion, and not apologizing for the success you've achieved! I am strong, I am invincible, I am Mommy!

  13. 4 out of 5

    Betsy

    Enh--not my favorite, but interesting reading. I found myself agreeing frequently, but came away a little dissatisfied. It's all well and good to say that we need to reevaluate our expectations of ourselves, make sure we're not living up to outside expectation that don't mesh with our own family, etc. etc. But, sometimes, it's NOT about doing what feels right to ME--it's about sacrificing my own career aspirations for someone else's or buckling down and doing the hard work for a season even if I Enh--not my favorite, but interesting reading. I found myself agreeing frequently, but came away a little dissatisfied. It's all well and good to say that we need to reevaluate our expectations of ourselves, make sure we're not living up to outside expectation that don't mesh with our own family, etc. etc. But, sometimes, it's NOT about doing what feels right to ME--it's about sacrificing my own career aspirations for someone else's or buckling down and doing the hard work for a season even if I don't *want* to. Sometimes the Lord calls us to lay aside those things for the sake of the kingdom. Doesn't mean it's easy and that the pull of career isn't there, but it's still the right thing to do. I'd like to see this book's idea written from an overtly Christian perspective (maybe that kind of book already exists).

  14. 4 out of 5

    Dawn

    I read most of the parts I was gong to read when I first checked the book out then lost interest. It is not that I don't think it is a good book, but with so many stories taking my attention this summer, I was not as motivted to read a non fiction study of mothers. I might come back to it one day, but on to more lighthearted pieces at the moment. One quote stuck out at me - when they were trying to come up with a title and decided "Good enough in the new perfect", someone suggested "Suckie is th I read most of the parts I was gong to read when I first checked the book out then lost interest. It is not that I don't think it is a good book, but with so many stories taking my attention this summer, I was not as motivted to read a non fiction study of mothers. I might come back to it one day, but on to more lighthearted pieces at the moment. One quote stuck out at me - when they were trying to come up with a title and decided "Good enough in the new perfect", someone suggested "Suckie is the new awesome".. HA HA!! I fel like this could be MY current chapter of life! For any new moms when want to know how it is going for others - you would enjoy blipping through this book and reading the pieces that interest you most.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Julie Meintel

    I enjoyed this book quite a bit. The authors point out from the get-go, that this is a book written for a very specific audience, and therefore not everyone will understand or appreciate the general viewpoint. But I fell at least close enough to the target audience that I related to a lot of what they're saying about being a "good-enough" parent. There is so much societal pressure, if you allow yourself to fully feel it (and God bless you if you can say "who cares?"!) to be a "perfect" parent. I I enjoyed this book quite a bit. The authors point out from the get-go, that this is a book written for a very specific audience, and therefore not everyone will understand or appreciate the general viewpoint. But I fell at least close enough to the target audience that I related to a lot of what they're saying about being a "good-enough" parent. There is so much societal pressure, if you allow yourself to fully feel it (and God bless you if you can say "who cares?"!) to be a "perfect" parent. I enjoyed reading stories of other moms with whom I have some things in common, and realizing that I am not alone. I am not a perfect mother, and my kids are just fine.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Tracy

    Written by two moms who faced difficulties after having kids in terms of home-balance work, they set out to interview almost 1000 moms and then write about their findings. It seemed more suited to a long magazine piece, but the book is not without merit. The book contains long excerpts from interviews with some of the women. I might have enjoyed it more when I first had kids, but I don't have a ton of mommy guilt these days so while I found it interesting, I ended up skimming it towards the end. Written by two moms who faced difficulties after having kids in terms of home-balance work, they set out to interview almost 1000 moms and then write about their findings. It seemed more suited to a long magazine piece, but the book is not without merit. The book contains long excerpts from interviews with some of the women. I might have enjoyed it more when I first had kids, but I don't have a ton of mommy guilt these days so while I found it interesting, I ended up skimming it towards the end.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Jennifer

    This is a book written to make working mom's feel better about themselves. I did not see one example of a stay at home mom in the whole book. But I admit I skimmed at the end because the whole, 'get a nanny & a blackberry & it will be ok' solution was wearing thin after 150 pages. So I should have known by the sub title using the term, 'modern motherhood' that this book would not apply to a stay at home mom of 4 but I didn't. This book may be helpful or interesting to some but I was clearly NOT This is a book written to make working mom's feel better about themselves. I did not see one example of a stay at home mom in the whole book. But I admit I skimmed at the end because the whole, 'get a nanny & a blackberry & it will be ok' solution was wearing thin after 150 pages. So I should have known by the sub title using the term, 'modern motherhood' that this book would not apply to a stay at home mom of 4 but I didn't. This book may be helpful or interesting to some but I was clearly NOT the target audience.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Rachel Chase

    It was ok, it mostly had advice for being happier as a working mom. It didn't have very much information for stay-at-home moms like I was led to believe from reading about this book on a blog that I subscribe to. It is mostly written for working moms who are perfectionist type personalities and want to "do it all," it has a lot of personal stories of moms who have found ways to be more happy and laid back about life with kids, but since I am not a perfectionist nor a working mom I didn't find it It was ok, it mostly had advice for being happier as a working mom. It didn't have very much information for stay-at-home moms like I was led to believe from reading about this book on a blog that I subscribe to. It is mostly written for working moms who are perfectionist type personalities and want to "do it all," it has a lot of personal stories of moms who have found ways to be more happy and laid back about life with kids, but since I am not a perfectionist nor a working mom I didn't find it particularly useful in my own case.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Ada-Marie

    I really enjoyed this book and the narratives about women who are finding new solutions to age-old problems involving working and child-rearing. It was refreshing to read about other moms who juggle screaming kids and clients on conference calls at the same time. I think this book over-glorified "mompreneurs" without mentioning a lot of the risk, failure and economic burdens that most encounter. "Good enough" is my new mantra! I really enjoyed this book and the narratives about women who are finding new solutions to age-old problems involving working and child-rearing. It was refreshing to read about other moms who juggle screaming kids and clients on conference calls at the same time. I think this book over-glorified "mompreneurs" without mentioning a lot of the risk, failure and economic burdens that most encounter. "Good enough" is my new mantra!

  20. 5 out of 5

    Marjanne

    An interesting look into being a working mom. I appreciate all that the authors share in their ideas on how to 'have it all' (kind of), however there are few good solid answers. To me, it primarily broke down to how you cope with life and an managing your schedule to fit you best, as much as will allow. I also thought it was unfortunate that this really focused on upper middle-class families. Working and motherhood issues cover so many classes and incomes. An interesting look into being a working mom. I appreciate all that the authors share in their ideas on how to 'have it all' (kind of), however there are few good solid answers. To me, it primarily broke down to how you cope with life and an managing your schedule to fit you best, as much as will allow. I also thought it was unfortunate that this really focused on upper middle-class families. Working and motherhood issues cover so many classes and incomes.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Caroline

    I checked out multiple books on being a working mom after the birth of my second child, and this was the first one I read. While the general premise that the ability to do anything doesn't mean we should do everything is a good one, a lot of the anecdotes in this book are inaccessible to the typical working mom (CEOs who create flexible work schedules, moms who quit 9-5 work to start their own companies, etc.). I checked out multiple books on being a working mom after the birth of my second child, and this was the first one I read. While the general premise that the ability to do anything doesn't mean we should do everything is a good one, a lot of the anecdotes in this book are inaccessible to the typical working mom (CEOs who create flexible work schedules, moms who quit 9-5 work to start their own companies, etc.).

  22. 5 out of 5

    Christy Keating

    I loved this book! Wow, did it make me think, and ponder, and wonder....so nice to know that I'm not the only mom out there struggling with this new world of work and child-rearing, and being the best, etc. A great resource with not only reassurance, but also some ideas. My parenting book group really had a great discussion based on this one... I loved this book! Wow, did it make me think, and ponder, and wonder....so nice to know that I'm not the only mom out there struggling with this new world of work and child-rearing, and being the best, etc. A great resource with not only reassurance, but also some ideas. My parenting book group really had a great discussion based on this one...

  23. 4 out of 5

    Amanda

    meh - fine to check out of the library as an e-book and read on the airplane. And I liked that the authors gave support to the idea that there's more than one path to life. But I'm not sure it's life changing, and the (admittedly upfront) bias that the book has towards well-off, well-educated women who are lucky enough to have lots of choices and flexibility in their life if a little annoying. meh - fine to check out of the library as an e-book and read on the airplane. And I liked that the authors gave support to the idea that there's more than one path to life. But I'm not sure it's life changing, and the (admittedly upfront) bias that the book has towards well-off, well-educated women who are lucky enough to have lots of choices and flexibility in their life if a little annoying.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Karolinaantonia

    Should be called Perfect Is the New Good Enough. Reading about women who cut back to working 50 hours per week or decide to get home at 5:45 pm every evening does not make me feel that my career is "good enough". Overall, it is disappointingly superficial. And way too much self congratulation on the part of the authors about getting a book contract. Should be called Perfect Is the New Good Enough. Reading about women who cut back to working 50 hours per week or decide to get home at 5:45 pm every evening does not make me feel that my career is "good enough". Overall, it is disappointingly superficial. And way too much self congratulation on the part of the authors about getting a book contract.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Julie

    I thought this book had some good advice about how to balance work and family. The authors suggest that people need to figure out what is important to them and try to set their own standards for "good enough". I think the book is particularly helpful for overcoming societal standards of perfection and formulating your own standards based on values and choices. I thought this book had some good advice about how to balance work and family. The authors suggest that people need to figure out what is important to them and try to set their own standards for "good enough". I think the book is particularly helpful for overcoming societal standards of perfection and formulating your own standards based on values and choices.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Kimberly

    I really enjoyed this even though my struggles are less about the work/mother balance and more about just accepting myself as a good mom period. I liked the writing style, all the personal stories and, truthfully, the title. I remind myself all the time now that good enough really is enough. Thank you very much!

  27. 4 out of 5

    Kassel

    Lots of facts and stories in this book, but I was looking for more practical tips on how to be content with being "good enough" and overcoming perfectionism. Merged review: Lots of facts and stories in this book, but I was looking for more practical tips on how to be content with being "good enough" and overcoming perfectionism. Lots of facts and stories in this book, but I was looking for more practical tips on how to be content with being "good enough" and overcoming perfectionism. Merged review: Lots of facts and stories in this book, but I was looking for more practical tips on how to be content with being "good enough" and overcoming perfectionism.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Jaylyne

    Don't bother. Written by rich white women for other rich white women. I suppose if you have the advantage of time and resources, then you might find something useful here on discovering/embracing your inner happiness. Don't bother. Written by rich white women for other rich white women. I suppose if you have the advantage of time and resources, then you might find something useful here on discovering/embracing your inner happiness.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Amy

    Very anecdotal and didn't offer many concrete suggestions for actually making work/life balance changes. It was based on interviews and recounted highlights of those interviews. It would have been nice if it had more substance besides interview highlights. Very anecdotal and didn't offer many concrete suggestions for actually making work/life balance changes. It was based on interviews and recounted highlights of those interviews. It would have been nice if it had more substance besides interview highlights.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Mary Boyer

    On chapter 2 and loving this book so far. It's inspirational to see how other women are coming to terms with being good enough. It's a must-read book! On chapter 2 and loving this book so far. It's inspirational to see how other women are coming to terms with being good enough. It's a must-read book!

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