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Murder in the Bayou: Who Killed the Women Known as the Jeff Davis 8?

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Murder in the Bayou chronicles the twists and turns of a high-stakes investigation into the murders of eight women in a troubled Louisiana parish. Between 2005 and 2009, the bodies of eight women were discovered around the murky canals and crawfish ponds of Jennings, Louisiana, a bayou town of 10,000 in the heart of the Jefferson Davis parish. The women came to be known as Murder in the Bayou chronicles the twists and turns of a high-stakes investigation into the murders of eight women in a troubled Louisiana parish. Between 2005 and 2009, the bodies of eight women were discovered around the murky canals and crawfish ponds of Jennings, Louisiana, a bayou town of 10,000 in the heart of the Jefferson Davis parish. The women came to be known as the Jeff Davis 8, and local law enforcement officials were quick to pursue a serial killer theory, opening a floodgate of media coverage and stirring a wave of panic across Jennings’ class-divided neighborhoods. The Jeff Davis 8 had been among society’s most vulnerable—impoverished, abused, and mired with mental illness. They engaged in sex work as a means of survival. And their underworld activity frequently occurred at a decrepit no-tell motel called the Boudreaux Inn. As the cases went unsolved, the community began to look inward. Rumors of police corruption and evidence tampering, of collusion between street and shield, cast the serial killer theory into doubt. But what was really going on in the humid rooms of the Boudreaux Inn? Why were crimes going unsolved and police officers being indicted? What had the eight women known? And could anything be done do stop the bloodshed? Mixing muckraking research and immersive journalism over the course of a five-year investigation, Ethan Brown reviewed thousands of pages of previously unseen homicide files to posit what happened during each victim’s final hours.


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Murder in the Bayou chronicles the twists and turns of a high-stakes investigation into the murders of eight women in a troubled Louisiana parish. Between 2005 and 2009, the bodies of eight women were discovered around the murky canals and crawfish ponds of Jennings, Louisiana, a bayou town of 10,000 in the heart of the Jefferson Davis parish. The women came to be known as Murder in the Bayou chronicles the twists and turns of a high-stakes investigation into the murders of eight women in a troubled Louisiana parish. Between 2005 and 2009, the bodies of eight women were discovered around the murky canals and crawfish ponds of Jennings, Louisiana, a bayou town of 10,000 in the heart of the Jefferson Davis parish. The women came to be known as the Jeff Davis 8, and local law enforcement officials were quick to pursue a serial killer theory, opening a floodgate of media coverage and stirring a wave of panic across Jennings’ class-divided neighborhoods. The Jeff Davis 8 had been among society’s most vulnerable—impoverished, abused, and mired with mental illness. They engaged in sex work as a means of survival. And their underworld activity frequently occurred at a decrepit no-tell motel called the Boudreaux Inn. As the cases went unsolved, the community began to look inward. Rumors of police corruption and evidence tampering, of collusion between street and shield, cast the serial killer theory into doubt. But what was really going on in the humid rooms of the Boudreaux Inn? Why were crimes going unsolved and police officers being indicted? What had the eight women known? And could anything be done do stop the bloodshed? Mixing muckraking research and immersive journalism over the course of a five-year investigation, Ethan Brown reviewed thousands of pages of previously unseen homicide files to posit what happened during each victim’s final hours.

30 review for Murder in the Bayou: Who Killed the Women Known as the Jeff Davis 8?

  1. 4 out of 5

    Julie

    Murder in the Bayou by Ethan Brown is a 2016 Scribner publication. Although this case may have made headlines at some point between 2005-2009, I was not familiar with it. I stumbled across this book while browsing through the Axis360 library and decided to check it out, but I never imagined it would give me a real case of the shivers. The ‘Jeff Davis 8’ case was so named because the murders took place in Jefferson Davis Parish in Louisiana. The location does indeed create that Gothic tone the bl Murder in the Bayou by Ethan Brown is a 2016 Scribner publication. Although this case may have made headlines at some point between 2005-2009, I was not familiar with it. I stumbled across this book while browsing through the Axis360 library and decided to check it out, but I never imagined it would give me a real case of the shivers. The ‘Jeff Davis 8’ case was so named because the murders took place in Jefferson Davis Parish in Louisiana. The location does indeed create that Gothic tone the blurb hints at. That tone, coupled with the cold- blooded murders of eight women and the astounding corruption in law enforcement, was enough to make me feel squeamish and a little jumpy. The author’s stark and rather jarring style of journalism, which may not be polished enough for some, but works in this case, in my opinion, because it really opens up the reality of these murders, and throws a harsh light on a southern version of the syndicate in the midst of the lurid sex and drug trade. It’s such a convoluted and murky case complicated by corruptions so deep and prevalent, it’s hard to fathom. Don’t expect the usual focus on the victims' lives, or a precise law enforcement investigation, or a courtroom drama with a definitive verdict, which is often featured in true crime, but instead you should brace yourself for a hard and gritty investigative report that will leave you chilled right down to the bone. If you read True Crime, this book is not to be missed! 4 stars

  2. 4 out of 5

    coolguy2k

    Well shit that's terrifying Well shit that's terrifying

  3. 5 out of 5

    Ronnie Cramer

    It was tough getting through this one. The book is ostensibly about a series of unsolved murders in Louisiana, but it's mostly about the author and his self-styled "investigation." Written in a vainglorious style that is generally dull, murky, repetitive, and unfocused. My "to-read" list had included SHAKE THE DEVIL OFF, but I notice it's by this same guy so I will likely avoid it. It was tough getting through this one. The book is ostensibly about a series of unsolved murders in Louisiana, but it's mostly about the author and his self-styled "investigation." Written in a vainglorious style that is generally dull, murky, repetitive, and unfocused. My "to-read" list had included SHAKE THE DEVIL OFF, but I notice it's by this same guy so I will likely avoid it.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Jeanette

    This is not worth the read, IMHO. Too much hear say and they say. And too much author's opinion interpreted. I do cut him some slack as this Jennings, Louisiana and the Jeff Davis 8 in particular, is no straight path cause/ effect story of any particular of 1000's of details to tell. It's so entwined within lewd, addicted, horrific lifestyles of violence and assault that I doubt that any particular accused perp might hold every fact of knowing what, where, when with any true accuracy. (They mostl This is not worth the read, IMHO. Too much hear say and they say. And too much author's opinion interpreted. I do cut him some slack as this Jennings, Louisiana and the Jeff Davis 8 in particular, is no straight path cause/ effect story of any particular of 1000's of details to tell. It's so entwined within lewd, addicted, horrific lifestyles of violence and assault that I doubt that any particular accused perp might hold every fact of knowing what, where, when with any true accuracy. (They mostly roam and can't remember the day before yesterday. That's not sarcasm, it's honesty.) It's also improbable they are able to voice it at all in a way that would be understandable to authority "outside" the dependency exchanges of this convoluted "system". Terrible civil and governmental corruptions twin the perversity of the dozens of primes running these games in this town. Some being police cabals, some being gang ploys/ distributions. It's too low in every sense of human nature to portray equations of all this in any straight line for one particular crime, IMHO. That's also how many a day are committed. These women's lives were worth less than a stockyard animal. And they lived in styles of choices and non-choices (both) on such dangerous edges, that I doubt any convictions would equate to any "justice" regardless. Most of the worst perps themselves dying in violence after witnessing or committing homicides. There is a decent charting and chronological order graphic section at the end of the book listing crimes and other criteria. It's absolutely essential because many of these people have "hood" names or same surnames or inter-marriage relationships etc. etc. etc. Most are NOT related by blood despite all the same last names. Nearly everyone in this town has one of 3 or 4 "common" Cajun surnames.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Toni FGMAMTC

    Interesting. If you like true crime stories or mysteries like Making a Murderer, you should check it out. There are so many questions. Things were definitely not handled right.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Trisha

    "It's Jennings, man." He gave me a friendly, almost collegial clap on the shoulder. "Welcome to the dirty south." This was an interesting and deeply sad story. A small town, population about 10,000, has had a horrible habit of losing some of its most vulnerable members - women who are struggling on the fringes of their town - but losing them to murder. All of these women left family behind - mothers, siblings and sometimes even children. And the mystery around all their deaths, the author's reason "It's Jennings, man." He gave me a friendly, almost collegial clap on the shoulder. "Welcome to the dirty south." This was an interesting and deeply sad story. A small town, population about 10,000, has had a horrible habit of losing some of its most vulnerable members - women who are struggling on the fringes of their town - but losing them to murder. All of these women left family behind - mothers, siblings and sometimes even children. And the mystery around all their deaths, the author's reasons to tie them together but also to tie them to certain people who maybe probably did it. It was an interesting read full of heartache but also anger. How have these not been solved?! I'm anxious to see the show they made out the book.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Whitney

    A quick read and dismal yet fascinating to know this is not only a true story but also very much so alive. The show was incredible to watch as well but as any true book nerd will tell you, the book was better. At times hard to keep up with due to the number of people involved and on more than one occasion, a chapter will begin concerning one subject and end with another. Lots of twists and turns. Keep up the research Mr. Brown. These women, and all those who suffered along with them, deserve jus A quick read and dismal yet fascinating to know this is not only a true story but also very much so alive. The show was incredible to watch as well but as any true book nerd will tell you, the book was better. At times hard to keep up with due to the number of people involved and on more than one occasion, a chapter will begin concerning one subject and end with another. Lots of twists and turns. Keep up the research Mr. Brown. These women, and all those who suffered along with them, deserve justice, and the governmental forces who played a deadly role deserve to wear that shoe on the other foot. We see you.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Angus McKeogh

    Pretty good. I somehow heard about this book through a quirky connection between the LISK documentary that recently came out and figured this was something similar. Actually it revolves more around the corruption of Southern law enforcement than anything to do with a serial killer. But overall it was informative, interesting, and shocking in many respects. Fits with the current societal problem of power leading to corruption.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Yesenia Cash

    The writing was hard to get into, I would have really appreciated to have been able to read this story because it’s a good story everyone must read about the Jeff Davis 8 deserve this. Unfortunately I couldn’t finish this book the writing style was boring and hard to follow.

  10. 4 out of 5

    rachel

    The thing of value in this book is the way it pokes (meteor-sized) holes in the idea that cops are extra righteous and morally virtuous because of their position as enforcers of law. The extent of corruption happening in plain sight in Jennings, LA is nearly unbelievable. However, if you, like me, wanted to know more about the women who were killed (aside from the fact that they were sex workers and hooked on crack), you will be left feeling sort of unsatisfied. I picked it up after catching abo The thing of value in this book is the way it pokes (meteor-sized) holes in the idea that cops are extra righteous and morally virtuous because of their position as enforcers of law. The extent of corruption happening in plain sight in Jennings, LA is nearly unbelievable. However, if you, like me, wanted to know more about the women who were killed (aside from the fact that they were sex workers and hooked on crack), you will be left feeling sort of unsatisfied. I picked it up after catching about 20 minutes in passing of an ID channel documentary featuring the sisters of Whitnei Dubois and their effort to keep pursuing justice in her memory. The show also featured the brothers of Loretta Chaisson talking about what she was like growing up. That personal touch seemed really lacking here, as Brown hurried to connect the dots from one member of the criminal underworld tangentially related to the victim to another, and then to list all of the crimes they ever committed together. Stated plainly, this is a t e d i o u s read.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Sarah

    So as far as a "true crime" book goes it's not up there with my favorites - Monster of Florence, Helter Skelter, Stranger Beside Me - but it was a good book, just more like long-form journalism. I wasn't captivated, but it's an important story. I hope his reporting will help to bring justice for these poor women and their families. Overall, I would recommend reading the book and never setting foot in Southwest Louisiana. So as far as a "true crime" book goes it's not up there with my favorites - Monster of Florence, Helter Skelter, Stranger Beside Me - but it was a good book, just more like long-form journalism. I wasn't captivated, but it's an important story. I hope his reporting will help to bring justice for these poor women and their families. Overall, I would recommend reading the book and never setting foot in Southwest Louisiana.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Sonnet

    Honestly? I think this should be required reading for Louisiana residents. The events behind these murders are...atrocious? Terrifying? Indescribably heartbreaking for anyone who loves Louisiana and wants her to be the best she can be. It's obvious that things were (and probably still are) amiss in Jennings, La. Sadly, there are other towns across the state and across the country with these same issues of corruption. A well-written, thoroughly researched account of these murders and the investig Honestly? I think this should be required reading for Louisiana residents. The events behind these murders are...atrocious? Terrifying? Indescribably heartbreaking for anyone who loves Louisiana and wants her to be the best she can be. It's obvious that things were (and probably still are) amiss in Jennings, La. Sadly, there are other towns across the state and across the country with these same issues of corruption. A well-written, thoroughly researched account of these murders and the investigation (or lack thereof) that accompanied them. He posits some plausible, even highly likely, theories of who was responsible, as well as clear motives and methods for these murders. A few typographical errors--very few--along the way, but the information is sound. Charts of victims, witnesses, suspects, law enforcement, and other major players are provided along with a timeline. Only thing I could have used was a chart of how everyone was related. One of the issues with a small town, especially one in La--it's hard to tell who is actually related and who just has the same French name. Brown does a good job of explaining those connections, though.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Alexis Braun

    While the case may be very interesting and suspenseful and Ethan Brown may be a very fine journalist and writer, this book was organized in such a way that it both confused and disinterested me. The jumping around from victim 1 to early history of the parish to another victim to the history of the last few sheriffs of the parish introduced so many persons important to the plot so quickly and all at the front, which made it hard for me to follow the nuances of the plot. Ultimately, I just wish th While the case may be very interesting and suspenseful and Ethan Brown may be a very fine journalist and writer, this book was organized in such a way that it both confused and disinterested me. The jumping around from victim 1 to early history of the parish to another victim to the history of the last few sheriffs of the parish introduced so many persons important to the plot so quickly and all at the front, which made it hard for me to follow the nuances of the plot. Ultimately, I just wish this book had been organized differently, because the story may be an important one about police corruption in America and the resulting stifling of justice in the communities affected by that corruption.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Bethany

    Brown, as a investigative reporter, blurs the lines too much. He's also a private investigator, but that gives him no license to offer his own personal opinions on what happened. The writing was not very compelling, the investigation was complicated and hard to follow, the graphics were difficult to read because of how they were formatted in the book. I'm sure Brown has ability, but he wrote this story as someone with a lot of knowledge of the case instead of as someone who has to explain the cas Brown, as a investigative reporter, blurs the lines too much. He's also a private investigator, but that gives him no license to offer his own personal opinions on what happened. The writing was not very compelling, the investigation was complicated and hard to follow, the graphics were difficult to read because of how they were formatted in the book. I'm sure Brown has ability, but he wrote this story as someone with a lot of knowledge of the case instead of as someone who has to explain the case step by step to a person with no knowledge. This could have been done a lot better.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Heather

    I've been waiting for this book for a while now, ever since the podcasts Thinking Sideways and Sword and Scale covered the case. I was engrossed by this book and the wait was well worth it. It's horrifying to think of the system that failed these women and may have ever been involved in their murders. I highly recommend this book. I've been waiting for this book for a while now, ever since the podcasts Thinking Sideways and Sword and Scale covered the case. I was engrossed by this book and the wait was well worth it. It's horrifying to think of the system that failed these women and may have ever been involved in their murders. I highly recommend this book.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Sarah Marie

    4 stars. I really enjoyed this one. It's a fantastic look into corruption and cover-ups that are prevalent in a small town in Louisiana and it's connection to political tycoons and law enforcement. Review to come. 4 stars. I really enjoyed this one. It's a fantastic look into corruption and cover-ups that are prevalent in a small town in Louisiana and it's connection to political tycoons and law enforcement. Review to come.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Lauren

    This book was so boring! I really thought it was going to be more interesting, but it wasn't even very conclusive. Really don't waste your time reading or listening to this book. This book was so boring! I really thought it was going to be more interesting, but it wasn't even very conclusive. Really don't waste your time reading or listening to this book.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Shirley Schwartz

    I had heard a lot about this book and heard a lot about the Jeff Davis 8. The Jeff Davis 8 consisted of group of eight women who had been involved in the sex and drug trade in the heart of Jefferson Davis County in Louisiana. All of the eight had been murdered between 2005 and 2008. Ethan Brown lives in New Orleans, and he spent a great deal of time in Jefferson Davis County completing extensive research into these crimes. The real travesty is that, to this day, these crimes have not been solved I had heard a lot about this book and heard a lot about the Jeff Davis 8. The Jeff Davis 8 consisted of group of eight women who had been involved in the sex and drug trade in the heart of Jefferson Davis County in Louisiana. All of the eight had been murdered between 2005 and 2008. Ethan Brown lives in New Orleans, and he spent a great deal of time in Jefferson Davis County completing extensive research into these crimes. The real travesty is that, to this day, these crimes have not been solved. During Brown's research he finds reams of information on law enforcement staff in the County, and in what appears to be their involvement in the drug and prostitution trade. Brown does a good job in the book of presenting the story. Everything that he has written has been personally researched through arrest records, interviews with people peripheral to the case, and thorough examination of newspaper articles, land titles and internet searches. I found the book a bit of a tough slog though, as there was almost too much fact, and the back stories are revealed in bits and pieces throughout the book. I prefer to read an expose in chronological order, and with one point-of-view at a time. What Brown has exposed in this book though is chilling and frightening. How can this kind of lawlessness go on for so long, and no outside agency be called in to deal with these very serious allegations? In some ways this expose makes it a bit easier for me to understand our very own unsolved disappearances and murders along "The Highway of Tears”. Society's most vulnerable people are truly the forgotten ones in this world.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Angela Young

    I live within 30 minutes of Jennings & had followed this story over the years. I couldn't wait to read the book. I am so glad that I did even though it is very disturbing to have so much crime in such a small town. For the first several chapters I could only read 5 or so pages at a time before I had to put it down - and let me say that I am a "reader" & I will finish a book in a day given the opportunity - but reading about people I knew, knew of (the Lake Charles connection), etc made me sick t I live within 30 minutes of Jennings & had followed this story over the years. I couldn't wait to read the book. I am so glad that I did even though it is very disturbing to have so much crime in such a small town. For the first several chapters I could only read 5 or so pages at a time before I had to put it down - and let me say that I am a "reader" & I will finish a book in a day given the opportunity - but reading about people I knew, knew of (the Lake Charles connection), etc made me sick to my stomach at the amount of corruption & back dealing & underhandedness going on on multiple levels. There will never be justice for the Jeff Davis 8 nor any of the other people that were killed along the way. This book makes me feel sad and embarrassed for the State that we are in. It should be an eye opener for many.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Eileen

    Good grief, what a hot mess this book was. It's a shame, because I love non-fiction; history, true crime, true events, and this tragic murder mystery deserves attention. But man, the chapters were all over the place, unfocused, just a jumble of facts whether directly related or not. The author spent years investigating this case, but the writing of this book was sub-par. He really needed a professional co-author or a very involved editor. I wanted to quit reading this book so many times, but bec Good grief, what a hot mess this book was. It's a shame, because I love non-fiction; history, true crime, true events, and this tragic murder mystery deserves attention. But man, the chapters were all over the place, unfocused, just a jumble of facts whether directly related or not. The author spent years investigating this case, but the writing of this book was sub-par. He really needed a professional co-author or a very involved editor. I wanted to quit reading this book so many times, but because it is relatively short at 200+ pages, I soldiered on. Only at the very end did it have any sort of cohesiveness, but it was too little too late. Even the ending really wasn't an ending, it was just the writing stopping, not really any sort of conclusion. So just no on this one. I had high hopes for this but nope.

  21. 5 out of 5

    SheriC (PM)

    I’m more than a little disappointed that I couldn’t get through this book, because I genuinely like true crime and from what I’ve read about it, this was great investigative journalism by the author. But the audiobook performance was just not working for me. It sounded like the narrator was reading a news article that he just didn’t find very interesting. I gave it more than my minimum 20 minutes of listening for audio before deciding to DNF, but I’m not rating it, as my issues with it are due t I’m more than a little disappointed that I couldn’t get through this book, because I genuinely like true crime and from what I’ve read about it, this was great investigative journalism by the author. But the audiobook performance was just not working for me. It sounded like the narrator was reading a news article that he just didn’t find very interesting. I gave it more than my minimum 20 minutes of listening for audio before deciding to DNF, but I’m not rating it, as my issues with it are due to the audio performance rather than the writing or content. Maybe I’ll try this one again sometime in the bound format.

  22. 5 out of 5

    G

    This felt important but not necessarily gripping. Brown offers an indelible portrait of the depths to which addiction can bring whole communities -- from the abjection of the addicts to the corruption of those who supply them with drugs -- and does some amazing investigative journalism along the way. His theories about the arcs of power that galvanized the murders of the Jeff Davis 8 make sense, and his portraits of the women are sensitive and thoughtful; he treats each as a real individual with This felt important but not necessarily gripping. Brown offers an indelible portrait of the depths to which addiction can bring whole communities -- from the abjection of the addicts to the corruption of those who supply them with drugs -- and does some amazing investigative journalism along the way. His theories about the arcs of power that galvanized the murders of the Jeff Davis 8 make sense, and his portraits of the women are sensitive and thoughtful; he treats each as a real individual with a lived experience worthy of value and care. But in the end, it was kind of boring -- I admired its aims more than its execution.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Aarica

    3.5 stars rounded up. I discovered this book while visiting a bookshop in the French Quarter of New Orleans. A local writer and on the staff recommended reading shelf. I bought it and it has sat tucked away on my shelf for two years! Today I dug in and finished it in a day. Brown writes very succinctly and the book has the PI vibe. Now more than when I bought this book has its relevance in police corruption, political interference, and violence against women grown. Gritty, honest, and well writt 3.5 stars rounded up. I discovered this book while visiting a bookshop in the French Quarter of New Orleans. A local writer and on the staff recommended reading shelf. I bought it and it has sat tucked away on my shelf for two years! Today I dug in and finished it in a day. Brown writes very succinctly and the book has the PI vibe. Now more than when I bought this book has its relevance in police corruption, political interference, and violence against women grown. Gritty, honest, and well written.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Jata Crochet

    Brown holds nothing back nor does he sugar coat the incidents! Loved it!

  25. 5 out of 5

    Alysha DeShaé

    This is definitely not my usual type of book. For starters, it's non-fiction; I like my reading to be an escape, but this came highly recommended and I'm glad I made the exception. It's also a crime book and, while I enjoy a good crime thriller, they pale in comparison to fantasy and sci-fi books for me. Being from Louisiana, I vaguely recall these murders being in the news. Not much, because I avoid the news as a general rule, but enough that I remember getting a new pepper-spray because of it. This is definitely not my usual type of book. For starters, it's non-fiction; I like my reading to be an escape, but this came highly recommended and I'm glad I made the exception. It's also a crime book and, while I enjoy a good crime thriller, they pale in comparison to fantasy and sci-fi books for me. Being from Louisiana, I vaguely recall these murders being in the news. Not much, because I avoid the news as a general rule, but enough that I remember getting a new pepper-spray because of it. I also remember gun shopping, but opting at the time not to get a handgun because I wasn't yet comfortable enough with guns. (Now I have and love my Sig!) I will again repeat my first comment about maybe skipping the "key figures" part at the beginning unless you are not familiar with Louisiana name pronunciation; it really did just make things more confusing for me. I will also say that, while I learned a lot about the general case, I also am not interested in reading more about it or about other cases. While this might be the opposite effect that the writer was going for (I would imagine that all nonfiction authors want to inspire you to read more about their topic with their own works), it really did show me that true crime (is that what this is considered? I don't even know!) is not something I want to regularly read. I had nightmares all last night because of my overactive imagination. :-( Considering that all of my knowledge about the case comes from this book (I know, I should have more sources to make an actual informed decision), I do feel that Jennings should probably do what Sorrento has done and get rid of their police department entirely. However, it sounds like the corruption might extend to other departments outside of the town. I'm not sure. I just don't see how a department so horribly run could not have been voted out of existence! Regardless, this sort of widespread corruption is what leads to the public distrusting law enforcement officers. If you enjoy true crime type books, historical(-ish) books, or books about your home state, you will probably enjoy this book and I do highly recommend it. It was fascinating, informative, and worth the time. :-)

  26. 4 out of 5

    Kimberly Jackson

    This book hit close to home because it's not to far from where I grew up in Louisiana. Overall, the book is sad because so many women lost their life over stupid things. It was probably my least favorite true crime book. It was a quick read, but reading some parts about how people beat the system is sickening. This book hit close to home because it's not to far from where I grew up in Louisiana. Overall, the book is sad because so many women lost their life over stupid things. It was probably my least favorite true crime book. It was a quick read, but reading some parts about how people beat the system is sickening.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Lady Jayme,

    THE CORRUPTION IS MIND-BLOWING!! While there is some theorizing and inclusion of rumor, Brown's information seems to be well-researched and presents a chilling picture of law enforcement incompetence, corruption, and culpability. I am from the area so I find this very compelling. I'm not sure how interesting someone from outside the state would find it. I'm too biased to be able to tell. THE CORRUPTION IS MIND-BLOWING!! While there is some theorizing and inclusion of rumor, Brown's information seems to be well-researched and presents a chilling picture of law enforcement incompetence, corruption, and culpability. I am from the area so I find this very compelling. I'm not sure how interesting someone from outside the state would find it. I'm too biased to be able to tell.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Sandra Burns

    Too many people to follow. Too many names, and I despise notes that I have to go back and forth to during the read.(in the back of the book.) This would have been better, if it was mainly about the victims and the Jefferson Davis Parish police department. Also, photo at the beginning, should be in the middle. IMHO. Two evenings I will never get back.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Dana

    I would give a rating of 3.5 stars. An interesting story, well researched and written. I think I expected something more in the presentation of the information, maybe more suspense? The corruption is incredible, the town and area of Lousiana come off sounding lawless. I would recommend this book, mostly because these women's stories should be told. I would give a rating of 3.5 stars. An interesting story, well researched and written. I think I expected something more in the presentation of the information, maybe more suspense? The corruption is incredible, the town and area of Lousiana come off sounding lawless. I would recommend this book, mostly because these women's stories should be told.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Laura

    Very interesting and compelling account of the Jeff Davis 8 case. It is infuriating how such a corrupt police force has simply hung on for the past decade (and longer). It's sad that none of these women will have justice brought to their killers--unless everyone involved in the corruption is booted from office, which seems (sadly) unlikely. Very interesting and compelling account of the Jeff Davis 8 case. It is infuriating how such a corrupt police force has simply hung on for the past decade (and longer). It's sad that none of these women will have justice brought to their killers--unless everyone involved in the corruption is booted from office, which seems (sadly) unlikely.

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