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The Little Book of Restorative Justice in Education: Fostering Responsibility, Healing, and Hope in Schools

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A handbook for teachers and administrators on creating just and equitable learning environments for students; building and maintaining healthy relationships; healing harm and transforming conflict. Much more than a response to harm, restorative justice nurtures relational, interconnected school cultures. The wisdom embedded within its principles and practices is being welco A handbook for teachers and administrators on creating just and equitable learning environments for students; building and maintaining healthy relationships; healing harm and transforming conflict. Much more than a response to harm, restorative justice nurtures relational, interconnected school cultures. The wisdom embedded within its principles and practices is being welcomed at a time when exclusionary discipline and zero tolerance policies are recognized as perpetuating student apathy, disproportionality, and the school-to-prison pipeline. Relying on the wisdom of early proponents of restorative justice, the daily experiences of educators, and the authors’ extensive experience as classroom teachers and researchers, this Little Book guides the growth of restorative justice in education (RJE) into the future. Incorporating activities, stories, and examples throughout the book, three major interconnected and equally important aspects of restorative justice in education are explained and applied: creating just and equitable learning environments; building and maintaining healthy relationships; healing harm and transforming conflict. Chapters include: The Way We Do Things A Brief History of Restorative Justice in Education Beliefs and Values in Restorative Justice in Education Creating just and Equitable Learning Environments Nurturing Healthy relationships Repairing Harm and Transforming Conflict A Tale of Two Schools: Thoughts and Sustainability The Little Book of Restorative Justice in Education is a reference that practitioners can turn to repeatedly for clarity and consistency as they implement restorative justice in educational settings.


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A handbook for teachers and administrators on creating just and equitable learning environments for students; building and maintaining healthy relationships; healing harm and transforming conflict. Much more than a response to harm, restorative justice nurtures relational, interconnected school cultures. The wisdom embedded within its principles and practices is being welco A handbook for teachers and administrators on creating just and equitable learning environments for students; building and maintaining healthy relationships; healing harm and transforming conflict. Much more than a response to harm, restorative justice nurtures relational, interconnected school cultures. The wisdom embedded within its principles and practices is being welcomed at a time when exclusionary discipline and zero tolerance policies are recognized as perpetuating student apathy, disproportionality, and the school-to-prison pipeline. Relying on the wisdom of early proponents of restorative justice, the daily experiences of educators, and the authors’ extensive experience as classroom teachers and researchers, this Little Book guides the growth of restorative justice in education (RJE) into the future. Incorporating activities, stories, and examples throughout the book, three major interconnected and equally important aspects of restorative justice in education are explained and applied: creating just and equitable learning environments; building and maintaining healthy relationships; healing harm and transforming conflict. Chapters include: The Way We Do Things A Brief History of Restorative Justice in Education Beliefs and Values in Restorative Justice in Education Creating just and Equitable Learning Environments Nurturing Healthy relationships Repairing Harm and Transforming Conflict A Tale of Two Schools: Thoughts and Sustainability The Little Book of Restorative Justice in Education is a reference that practitioners can turn to repeatedly for clarity and consistency as they implement restorative justice in educational settings.

30 review for The Little Book of Restorative Justice in Education: Fostering Responsibility, Healing, and Hope in Schools

  1. 5 out of 5

    Becky Marder

    This book was a great introduction into the key values of restorative justice in education. It made me want to learn a lot more - a sign of a good book! Highly recommend as a quick read for educators interested in adding restorative justice to their practice. Also includes pages of recommended books and organizations to learn more.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Ciarra

    This book is incredibly insightful for individuals that are joining school leadership in restorative justice coordinator or coaching positions!

  3. 4 out of 5

    Katie Florida

    A helpful introduction to the concepts of restorative justice in education, what it is important, and practical considerations for it's implementation. Not a training guide, more a tool to persuade readers if the importance of this topic and give them history and context. A helpful introduction to the concepts of restorative justice in education, what it is important, and practical considerations for it's implementation. Not a training guide, more a tool to persuade readers if the importance of this topic and give them history and context.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Kristen Luppino

    A sussenct overview with many other resources listed. I learned a lot and made a lot of connections to some PD I've been in and other books I have read. Oh, and have made another list of books to read on similar topics! A sussenct overview with many other resources listed. I learned a lot and made a lot of connections to some PD I've been in and other books I have read. Oh, and have made another list of books to read on similar topics!

  5. 4 out of 5

    Anth

    This book has many points with which I agree, and I’m curious about how Restorative Justice in Education (RJE) could work in a school setting, though it takes a commitment. Toward the end, the book shows two schools who adopt RJE, one whose program excels and the other whose program deteriorates and is abandoned. I think my school district would be the ladder. It takes a commitment from year to year not for one year, and I think a program like this would start with great intentions and end with This book has many points with which I agree, and I’m curious about how Restorative Justice in Education (RJE) could work in a school setting, though it takes a commitment. Toward the end, the book shows two schools who adopt RJE, one whose program excels and the other whose program deteriorates and is abandoned. I think my school district would be the ladder. It takes a commitment from year to year not for one year, and I think a program like this would start with great intentions and end with miserable results. I was also thinking about how strategies like talking circles sound like a great way to create a sense of community and give students the opportunity for restoration but how hard it would be without co-teacher or smaller class sizes. It also has to start early. I could see elementary implementation first, then middle school implementation, then high school implementation, which talks to how much of a commitment this kind of program is or should be resourcefully and in longevity. I do wish this book would have made suggestions that the individual teacher could use in his or her classroom. Most of the approaches the book suggests are school-wise implementation policies.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Skylar Primm

    I read this book in a summer afternoon to (a) take a break from the internet and pre-school year anxiety and (b) refresh my thinking about restorative justice in our school. It’s a handy little book for both purposes, and I’m going to be carrying around the “two key beliefs” the authors advocate for: • Human beings are worthy>. • Human beings are interconnected with each other and the world. I plan to re-emphasize these points with my students this year, especially given our split between online an I read this book in a summer afternoon to (a) take a break from the internet and pre-school year anxiety and (b) refresh my thinking about restorative justice in our school. It’s a handy little book for both purposes, and I’m going to be carrying around the “two key beliefs” the authors advocate for: • Human beings are worthy>. • Human beings are interconnected with each other and the world. I plan to re-emphasize these points with my students this year, especially given our split between online and in-person learning.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Lauren Long

    For being a “little book” this book sure does provide a lot of information. The Little Book of Restorative Justice in Education provides the framework, history, some actionable steps, reflections, and many other resources to continue learning. The author states, “Restorative justice in education is not a program; it’s a framework”. It’s a way of living in a learning community that humanizes our students, honors dignity and values the worth and interconnectedness of all people. This book is a gre For being a “little book” this book sure does provide a lot of information. The Little Book of Restorative Justice in Education provides the framework, history, some actionable steps, reflections, and many other resources to continue learning. The author states, “Restorative justice in education is not a program; it’s a framework”. It’s a way of living in a learning community that humanizes our students, honors dignity and values the worth and interconnectedness of all people. This book is a great place to begin your journey of restorative justice in education.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Lizzie Kramer

    A perfect introduction that gets the gears working in the minds of educator personal on the steps staff in the education sector can do to implement RJE. This principle of “Restorative justice” is needed for “facilitating learning communities that nurture the capacity of people to engage with one another and their environment in a manner that supports and respects they inherent dignity and worth of all”

  9. 4 out of 5

    Matthew Provencio

    As a high school student, this book really makes me look at the way my school deals with discipline in a different lens. It has inspired me to gift the book to my principal as an act of trying to encourage a different form of dealing with troubled children. I am hoping that I can help the administration see this form of justice from a students point of view and they will understand why it would be a good idea to implement the ideas into the existing system.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Terry Jess

    I had higher hopes for this one after reading Fania Davis’s excellent entry in the series. I think perhaps it’s a great introductory text, if you are completely unfamiliar with restorative and relational work, but that’s not where I’m at. The 6th chapter on Repairing Harm and Transforming Conflict and last chapter that drives a little into implementation were most helpful.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Bob Marcacci

    Advocates building relationships as the core of successful instruction—not just relationships with students, but with colleagues, as well. In fact, we probably often do not realize how poorly we exemplify social interactions to our students when we fail to build those relationships successfully with our colleagues.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Poonam Dubal

    If you're looking for a great intro to restorative practices, definitely check this book out. It has a lot of the basics you need to understand the intent and philosophy behind restorative practices and also looks at the practical applications of restorative practices (e.g. circles, conferences) in different settings. If you're looking for a great intro to restorative practices, definitely check this book out. It has a lot of the basics you need to understand the intent and philosophy behind restorative practices and also looks at the practical applications of restorative practices (e.g. circles, conferences) in different settings.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Lisa Keuss

    Plenty is packed into this "little book". Provides a solid foundation for understanding the philosophy behind Restorative Justice and is practical enough to encourage a teacher to implement some of the practices. Plenty is packed into this "little book". Provides a solid foundation for understanding the philosophy behind Restorative Justice and is practical enough to encourage a teacher to implement some of the practices.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Nina

    This talks about restorative justice not just as a discipline practice, but as a system of beliefs, values, and practices. File under: textbook-esque Learned about: restorative justice, respect, dignity, teaching

  15. 5 out of 5

    Drick

    This book puts forth the concept of Restorative Justice in Education (as opposed to the more common Restorative Practices) and outlines the way a Restorative Justice approach to K-12 education call for a significant cultural change in K-12 education

  16. 4 out of 5

    Melissa Hodgins

    It's a great OVERVIEW of Restorative Justice in Education. It's a great OVERVIEW of Restorative Justice in Education.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Holly Booker

    Great lil resource and overview!

  18. 5 out of 5

    Samantha

    one of the best RJ books for teachers that I've read. one of the best RJ books for teachers that I've read.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Michelle Peet

    All educators need to read this.

  20. 4 out of 5

    R.

    Evans and Brooks (2016) conclude The Little Book of Restorative Justice by discussing sustainability of restorative justice education (RJE) in schools. Eastpoint Community and Sprucedale Regional were two case studies represented that had implemented RJE on a five-year plan. The two schools had completely different outcomes confirming that there isn’t a model to follow that will guarantee positive results. Each school has different individuals, attitudes, beliefs and circumstances that will cont Evans and Brooks (2016) conclude The Little Book of Restorative Justice by discussing sustainability of restorative justice education (RJE) in schools. Eastpoint Community and Sprucedale Regional were two case studies represented that had implemented RJE on a five-year plan. The two schools had completely different outcomes confirming that there isn’t a model to follow that will guarantee positive results. Each school has different individuals, attitudes, beliefs and circumstances that will contribute to the effectiveness of the implementation. The differences between the schools included level of RJE training, continued education of the staff, commitment of the stakeholders and following through on the five-year plan once original administrators that brought in RJE left the school or district. For schools to experience true transformation from RJE there must be buy-in from the community to ensure a strong foundation and continuity.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Heather

    How come others who have starred this book haven't written any words to connect? Is it because you just need to agree with the concept of how we should treat others because deep down we know it is right, but we also know it is not easy? I settled on the 3.5 stars because yes I agree with the ideas in this book, but am also faced with many, many questions on how do we get here when I think of my own students, classroom and school. Humans are amazing, complicated and sometimes stubborn creatures. W How come others who have starred this book haven't written any words to connect? Is it because you just need to agree with the concept of how we should treat others because deep down we know it is right, but we also know it is not easy? I settled on the 3.5 stars because yes I agree with the ideas in this book, but am also faced with many, many questions on how do we get here when I think of my own students, classroom and school. Humans are amazing, complicated and sometimes stubborn creatures. Worthy of love, dignity and respect in my opinion.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Caroline Sterr

  23. 5 out of 5

    Haven

  24. 5 out of 5

    Melissa Mascari

  25. 5 out of 5

    Andrea Hogan

  26. 4 out of 5

    Quinn

  27. 5 out of 5

    Stephen Shepherd

  28. 4 out of 5

    Kara Gordon

  29. 5 out of 5

    Tammy

  30. 5 out of 5

    Ann

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