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Superman: Homem de Aço

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O multiverso mudou para sempre após o épico evento da Crise nas Infinitas Terras. Onde havia um número incalculável de Terras, com muitas e diferentes versões do Superman, agora havia apenas uma Terra e um Homem de Aço. Esse foi o início de uma nova era para o Superman com as relações entre Clark Kent e seus amigos, sua família e seus inimigos reexaminados e voltados para O multiverso mudou para sempre após o épico evento da Crise nas Infinitas Terras. Onde havia um número incalculável de Terras, com muitas e diferentes versões do Superman, agora havia apenas uma Terra e um Homem de Aço. Esse foi o início de uma nova era para o Superman com as relações entre Clark Kent e seus amigos, sua família e seus inimigos reexaminados e voltados para um público moderno.


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O multiverso mudou para sempre após o épico evento da Crise nas Infinitas Terras. Onde havia um número incalculável de Terras, com muitas e diferentes versões do Superman, agora havia apenas uma Terra e um Homem de Aço. Esse foi o início de uma nova era para o Superman com as relações entre Clark Kent e seus amigos, sua família e seus inimigos reexaminados e voltados para O multiverso mudou para sempre após o épico evento da Crise nas Infinitas Terras. Onde havia um número incalculável de Terras, com muitas e diferentes versões do Superman, agora havia apenas uma Terra e um Homem de Aço. Esse foi o início de uma nova era para o Superman com as relações entre Clark Kent e seus amigos, sua família e seus inimigos reexaminados e voltados para um público moderno.

30 review for Superman: Homem de Aço

  1. 4 out of 5

    Alejandro

    Superman is born again for a new generation! I bought this in its single comic book issues, but I chosen this TPB edition to be of making a better overall review. This TPB collects “The Man of Steel” #1-6. Creative Team: Writer & Illustrator: John Byrne Inks: Dick Giordano THE FIRST SUPER-HERO IS TOLD ONCE AGAIN Since the creation of Superman in 1938, it’s not like his origin had been the same, since once a while, here and there, creative teams added their own visions and details to the foundat Superman is born again for a new generation! I bought this in its single comic book issues, but I chosen this TPB edition to be of making a better overall review. This TPB collects “The Man of Steel” #1-6. Creative Team: Writer & Illustrator: John Byrne Inks: Dick Giordano THE FIRST SUPER-HERO IS TOLD ONCE AGAIN Since the creation of Superman in 1938, it’s not like his origin had been the same, since once a while, here and there, creative teams added their own visions and details to the foundations of the first super-hero ever, forging a new kind of genre. However, it was pretty much the same history for Superman since his creation as comic book character until 1986, until THE crisis… …the Crisis on Infinite Earths came and DC wasn’t the same anymore since its even before it was a sole company. It wasn’t 1938 anymore and the readers had outgrown even the Silver Age style of storytelling. It was necessary to evolve, to update the whole run of titles in DC Comics… …and it was needed to do it for The Man of Steel. It was a job for John Byrne!!! His vision of how the Last Son of Krypton would be able to function in the 80s was so solid, so inspired, that even nowadays, after two more reboots of DC Comics and even a newer origin’s story, you still can catch seeds of Byrne’s vision in the new versions of Superman and his world of action. BOTH COMIC BOOK CHARACTERS BUT… John Byrne had a tremendous responsibilty in retelling once again the new “canon” origin for Superman in the Post-Crisis DC Universe, but he knew something that sometimes people tend to forget or missing in the process of looking new angles to tell Superman’s origin… …that what works for Batman DOES NOT work for Superman! They may be the World’s Finest, but they are different type of comic book characters, they may defend the same principles but they opposite sides of a same coin. So, in Byrne’s vision, Superman wasn’t a real boy scout anymore, but hardly he was a dark knight, he still was fighting his never-ending battle for truth, justice and freedom, but then you could feel the character, thinking and acting in the mature way that readers needed of him to be in the Bronze Age of comic books in the goold ol’ 80s. So, while I am not thrilled of having Superman and Batman fighting each other, Byrne’s vision was right about that it was impossible for such characters to be in the “same page” about how to take against villains and other kind of threats. DIFFERENT BACKGROUNDS BUT STILL THE USUAL SUSPECTS Superman doesn’t totally developed all his powers until reaching young adulthood, so he wasn’t Superboy when he was younger (something that since then has been respected), and since Bizarro was originally introduced in Superboy comic books, then the super-villain found a new interpretation in this miniseries too, then with adult Superman. Jor-El doesn’t wear Rao’s sign on the chest of his Flash Gordon-like costume, in fact that 30’s costume is no more, but now Kryptonian’s fashion sense gave him a proper alien look. Jonathan and Martha Kent were still alive during Superman’s adult life (that I love that concept since I think that it is like an “overkill” that Kal-El / Clark Kent not only lost his birth parents but also his adoptive parents), and since in this version, Kal-El arrived still in formation inside of a birthing matrix of his Kryptonian ship, this 80’s Superman was “born” on Earth, and even thanks a blizzard that isolated Kent’s farm in Smallville, it was possible to make people believe that Clark was the real son of the Kents and not adopted. Lois Lane isn’t obsessed of getting married with Superman, but she is a truly fearless adult career woman of the 80s, top reporter of the Daily Planet in Metropolis. And easily, the best update by John Byrne to Superman’s comic books was… …Lex Luthor. Lex isn’t a mad scientist anymore, not even wear a power armor, but he remained to be an evil guy, becoming something even more insidious, more dangerous, more intimidating… …the CEO of a multi-millionaire business company. Thanks to this brilliantly inspired updated to the classic supervillain, Lex Luthor was finally able to interact in a whole new way with the rest of characters in the title, that even got him to be President of the United States (later in comics, not here in this TPB)… …mmh… …wait a minute… …evil millionaire CEO that got to become President of the United States?!!! …mmh… …where have I heard that this happened also? Mmh, silly me! I must be mistaken! Things like that only happen in comic books, right? Right? Well, in any case, there isn’t a single doubt that John Byrne accomplished the tall order of fast-forwarding Superman’s titles to become powerful once again and therefore able to cope with 80’s era and beyond, until nowadays.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Chad

    Somewhat dated, especially the women's clothing and hairstyles, but I still really enjoyed it. I like Byrne's classic take on Supes, that he just wants to help people because he's an altruistic person. His Lois is more difficult to like, but I'm guessing her icy demeanor will defrost as times goes on. This version of Lex Luthor has since become the norm, the rich, powerful businessman jealous of Superman. Up to this point, Luthor had just been a mad scientist who sent giant robots and the like a Somewhat dated, especially the women's clothing and hairstyles, but I still really enjoyed it. I like Byrne's classic take on Supes, that he just wants to help people because he's an altruistic person. His Lois is more difficult to like, but I'm guessing her icy demeanor will defrost as times goes on. This version of Lex Luthor has since become the norm, the rich, powerful businessman jealous of Superman. Up to this point, Luthor had just been a mad scientist who sent giant robots and the like after Superman. I also liked how they made him older and a childhood friend of Perry White instead of growing up with Superman. Kudos to Marv Wolfman for the Lex revamp. I found it interesting that large gaps in time occur between each issue, covering about the first 10 years of Clark Kent's adult life. Bryne's art is fantastic. He brings his classic 80's polish to it that he applied to most of the Marvel universe over the decade.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Donovan

    In 1986, Superman was relaunched alongside Batman and Wonder Woman following the epic Crisis on Infinite Earths. While Frank Miller reinvented Batman and George Perez mythologized Wonder Woman, John Byrne, a Marvel writer, did something...readable. This book is 30 years old. So I give it some contextual leeway. And in the book's defense, I haven't read any Golden or Silver Age Superman. In fact, Crisis is as far back as my reading goes. But I feel like those nearly 400 pages adequately acquainted In 1986, Superman was relaunched alongside Batman and Wonder Woman following the epic Crisis on Infinite Earths. While Frank Miller reinvented Batman and George Perez mythologized Wonder Woman, John Byrne, a Marvel writer, did something...readable. This book is 30 years old. So I give it some contextual leeway. And in the book's defense, I haven't read any Golden or Silver Age Superman. In fact, Crisis is as far back as my reading goes. But I feel like those nearly 400 pages adequately acquainted me with Supes, and I don't remember him being this...Shy? Weird? Disapproving? Naive? It's hard to pinpoint what's off. Needless to say I'm not a huge fan of John Byrne's characterization. Lois Lane is kind of a crazy bitch. She manipulates Supes into saving her so she can get an interview. Because she's an army brat she somehow has the combat training necessary to do things like neutralize a dozen armed terrorists. And against all odds Supes has a crush on her. She really seems to hate him yet obsess over him, and he goes out of his way to be nice to her and save her. They're like Sam and Diane, except Sam owns the bar because he got their first, and Diane constantly insults and connives to steal the bar out from under him. Sounds like romance to me, what about you? It just feels like Byrne is forcing the "romance" on the reader. Or he really doesn't understand romance. Oddly enough I like Clark Kent. Maybe because he's so easy to write. Superman interestingly calls Clark Kent his "fortress of solitude" because it's a place he can disappear into. And his disguise is based on Jonathan, with slick hair and round glasses. Which I never knew! Clark gets his job at the Daily Planet with the first Superman interview, he's a nice guy, he loves and visits his parents. He's just enjoyable to read about. But I don't know why the hell he does what he does to Lana Lang and falls head over boots for Lois Lane. Must be the Ls. John Byrne also doesn't know Batman. Superman rags on Bats and threatens to arrest him for vigilantism. Excuse me, Supes, your irony is showing. Then Bats threatens him with a death trap which will kill an innocent bystander. The one thing everyone knows about Batman is that he never, ever kills because of his damn origin story. So yeah. Byrne doesn't know Bats. At all. Apart from some unusual characterization and simple plots, it's not bad. In fact it's perfectly readable. The Kents are lovable. The origin story, which I've read a thousand times, is pretty cool, though the reason for Krypton's demise is vague. The classic characters are there, Luthor rules Metropolis. And we get to see Bizarro. This feels like good-hearted small town boy meets big brawny bruiser fights the baddies. There's depth, action, and emotion. Dick Giordano's artwork is actually pretty good for the time. So a decent read overall, definitely dated, but not a classic in my opinion.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Subham

    Reread: 24/08/2022 I kinda love it after reading this again! I love the way it redoes the origin of Superman in such a fun manner and him meeting Lois and Bruce the first time, itmakes for a compelling read and you understand more about him by the people who had an influence over his life and then going against villains like Magpie and Bizarro was so fun lol and then the end with Ma and Pa kent and the reason he is Superman and I just love that aspect of him and it really is so great! The art her Reread: 24/08/2022 I kinda love it after reading this again! I love the way it redoes the origin of Superman in such a fun manner and him meeting Lois and Bruce the first time, itmakes for a compelling read and you understand more about him by the people who had an influence over his life and then going against villains like Magpie and Bizarro was so fun lol and then the end with Ma and Pa kent and the reason he is Superman and I just love that aspect of him and it really is so great! The art here especially makes you nostalgic for some reason and like the way they capture the essence of Superman is so awesome! ______________________________________________________________ This was so good! I finally understand the hype about this volume after reading it. It's a perfect restart to Superman for this era with this. It tells the origin of Superman and his time in Smallville and going to metropolis, getting a job and meeting Perry and Lois, making his first appearance as Superman and saving people, teaming with Batman to stop Magpie, going off against Luthor and then Bizarro and finding out about his origins and dealing with that. It's such a fantastic volume and I was loving it throughout like some stuff done here is classic and will remembered throughout time plus I like the many subplots being hinted at here. a must read!

  5. 5 out of 5

    Sam Quixote

    John Byrne's classic 1986 reboot of the character is a surprisingly good read. I was expecting a full-on cheese-fest (and to an extent that is what I got) but it's also enjoyable and fun. A comic book that's aged like fine wine! Full review here! John Byrne's classic 1986 reboot of the character is a surprisingly good read. I was expecting a full-on cheese-fest (and to an extent that is what I got) but it's also enjoyable and fun. A comic book that's aged like fine wine! Full review here!

  6. 5 out of 5

    Artemy

    Man of Steel is an interesting and educational read for sure, but I didn’t fall in love with this take on the character. Byrne’s origin feels simplistic, cold and sterile, and not really resembling anything I’ve grown to know and love about Superman. It’s very readable and visually pretty for its time, but as a straight up origin story I still prefer books by Waid, Morrison or Johns over this.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Paul Dinger

    This is really one of Byrne's best works as a writer and artist. As a writer, he creates anew a Superman for our age who believes in morality and wonders what he can do. He even tries without the costume and sees a real reason why he should use it. Bryne wisely avoids the mistake of many writers and makes Krypton as ambigeous as possible. WE know more about his origen that Superman does. Bryne's run on Superman was about his confronting this myth and finding what works, you can see this on a sma This is really one of Byrne's best works as a writer and artist. As a writer, he creates anew a Superman for our age who believes in morality and wonders what he can do. He even tries without the costume and sees a real reason why he should use it. Bryne wisely avoids the mistake of many writers and makes Krypton as ambigeous as possible. WE know more about his origen that Superman does. Bryne's run on Superman was about his confronting this myth and finding what works, you can see this on a small scale in this series. Who is Lois, Jimmy? Why did Clark act the way he does, why did he take a job with a newspaper, wear glasses? Every bit of the mythos is questioned and what doesn't work is junked and what can work is kept. YOu can really see all the hard work he will poor into this, which will become Bryne's greatest disappointment, as you read it all the wonderful ideas will become apparent that Bryne was never able to play on, and that others would. His original Lex Luthor, his version of Krypton, his making of Superman less powerful but no less of a hero. His charecterization of Batman. The saddest part is that you can see things he wasn't able to do. I can't recommend this work enough.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Ronald

    Oh dear, this did not age well at all. I remember buying this comic as it first came out in single issues. This was the first real reboot. This story by John Byrne turned Superman from an overpowered uninteresting unbeatable and frankly silly character into our modern hero of today. Before this reboot the editors would buy the silliest covers staring Superman and then make the writer or writers make a story that would match the cover. This was going to fix all that. Yet despite all the improvemen Oh dear, this did not age well at all. I remember buying this comic as it first came out in single issues. This was the first real reboot. This story by John Byrne turned Superman from an overpowered uninteresting unbeatable and frankly silly character into our modern hero of today. Before this reboot the editors would buy the silliest covers staring Superman and then make the writer or writers make a story that would match the cover. This was going to fix all that. Yet despite all the improvement to Superman and his backstory to make it something more modern; the story itself did not age well. Is it just me or did it all seem like making Superman and DC Comics more like the Superman Movie? Lex Luthor even looks like Gene Hackman! Which leads us to the worst part of the entire reboot and something that really needs to be fixed. Lex Luthor is now some super rich yet incompetent business man. A man obsessed with buying the affection of Lois Lane (well ignore the whole part where she strips to her undies and puts on Clark's suit jacket - though she managed to fight the terrorists well in the getup without exposing parts of her body). Luthor is just so rich that no matter how many people he kills or has killed, how many building he destroys, ships he sinks, lives he ruins his lawyers somehow keep him out of jail. Mind you he confesses to his crimes in front of live TV cameras at times yet somehow gets away with it. Apparently when the world knows you are jealous of Superman you can do anything you want and still get elected President. Having everyone in the world but Lois/Clark/Perry think Luthor is good is just boringly bad sloppy writing. Anyway, I had forgotten had bad this reboot was for Batman as a character. Oh lord. It is another darker grittier Batman. This Batman needs a friend stat! So not a total loss for the time. But it just does not age well. You should read this volume for a look at a classic reboot. It should be a five star review but for the passage of time.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Jesse A

    This book is definitely dated but, you know what, I kinda dug it.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Garrett

    Not a bad Superman origin. I don't know why DC kept changing the canon origin of Superman as there are three different pre new 52 canon Superman origin stories. Not a bad Superman origin. I don't know why DC kept changing the canon origin of Superman as there are three different pre new 52 canon Superman origin stories.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Whitney

    We've all heard of Superman. Whether you've read about him or watched his TV series and/or movies, many people can agree that Superman is a character that has been rehashed too many times. How often can we hear his life story without getting tired of it? We know this guy so well, that it feels like he's been around since...well, always. Man of Steel is nothing new in the plethora that is DC. Told over 10 years, we watch as Clark Kent goes from high school to Metropolis to the Daily Planet. He We've all heard of Superman. Whether you've read about him or watched his TV series and/or movies, many people can agree that Superman is a character that has been rehashed too many times. How often can we hear his life story without getting tired of it? We know this guy so well, that it feels like he's been around since...well, always. Man of Steel is nothing new in the plethora that is DC. Told over 10 years, we watch as Clark Kent goes from high school to Metropolis to the Daily Planet. He invents the alter-ego Superman and has his mommy sew his costume. Superman's skin is unbreakable. You would assume he'd need endless replacement costumes during his career, what with all the flying around policing petty crime, but nope! When Clark wears clothes, they don't rip or get dirty. How nice for him. Speaking of Clark thinking he's a cop, he flies over to Gotham City to arrest Batman. This guy is so full of black and white justice that he tries to turn Batman into a villain. Lol, right... There are a few redeeming qualities to this story, though: -Like how Lois is a badass. Crazy, but a badass. She has no problem driving her car into a lake, insulting the most powerful man in Metropolis, or grabbing a gun from a criminal during a hold up. Lois has an attitude that dares anyone to take her on. Clark's as dull as a wall, so here's hoping Lois can change that. -Lex Luthor thinks he's a pimp and won't take no for an answer. He reminds me of a kid who just wants to join the popular club but was rejected. He's got the whole world, but he peaked in high school. He even goes as far as to 'clone?' Superman. The science of this is not explained, but we can guess the logic used is from 1938. -The art is dated but that's part of the nostalgic fun. It's the 80s and you can tell it's the eighties, but it is drawn very well. You have to give props to John Bryne for remembering Lex's male-pattern baldness as time skips by. The color choices are pleasing to the eye and don't drag you out of the story (unlike seeing a high school Clark Kent with gorilla muscles). It's interesting to see that as Clark (his true personality) he is clueless, passive, and almost pathetic with women. Superman does way better. Even when Clark is at his darkest, he seems feeble instead of strong. Almost like he lacks confidence in who he is as a person. This, I assume, stems from not knowing his origins, his biological parents, or what he's capable of. Or, I could be reading too deep into this and it's just really shitty writing (we won't even talk about the lame average Joe 'disguise'. Oh, and it's not a comic without some random fake science side plot: And a REALLY ugly villain: Overall, 3.5 stars. This volume was very campy, but it was solid in its time. It helped lay down the bricks for what we know of Superman today. For that, I enjoyed this read.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Jamie

    My personal favourite version of Big Blue's origin story, Byrne nailed the innocence, hope, and wonder that encapsulates exactly what Superman is supposed to stand for, and his pencils are just as fresh and delightful to the eye as they were when I first read the biweekly issues back when I was a kid. My personal favourite version of Big Blue's origin story, Byrne nailed the innocence, hope, and wonder that encapsulates exactly what Superman is supposed to stand for, and his pencils are just as fresh and delightful to the eye as they were when I first read the biweekly issues back when I was a kid.

  13. 4 out of 5

    John Yelverton

    Despite the fact that this book completely hit the reset button on Superman's origin story, it was so well done that there is very little if any room for complaint. Despite the fact that this book completely hit the reset button on Superman's origin story, it was so well done that there is very little if any room for complaint.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Logan

    A decent read! So this one originally came out in 80s after Crisis on Infinite Earths which was DCs first major reboot of the comics! While Frank Miller was rebooting Batman, John Byrne was given the job of rebooting Superman! This series is what now days would be considered a pretty standard Origin Story, but at the time it was obviously very new. Artwork will be hit or miss for some, but me I'm an absolute sucker for 80s and 90s art, so it was treat for me! Story was like I said pretty standar A decent read! So this one originally came out in 80s after Crisis on Infinite Earths which was DCs first major reboot of the comics! While Frank Miller was rebooting Batman, John Byrne was given the job of rebooting Superman! This series is what now days would be considered a pretty standard Origin Story, but at the time it was obviously very new. Artwork will be hit or miss for some, but me I'm an absolute sucker for 80s and 90s art, so it was treat for me! Story was like I said pretty standard, it had some stand out moments though, like a proper iteration of Lois Lane(Many comics don't write her properly in my opinion), and a pretty cool issue where Superman meets Batman for the first time, however my only gripe with that issue, is that while I was reading it I was thinking less "This a job for Superman!" and more "NAH NAH NAH NAH NAH BATMAN!", so ya Batman stole the show a bit there. But otherwise a pretty decent Superman read, not the greatest one I've ever read, but far from the worst!

  15. 4 out of 5

    Douglas Gibson

    I know many fans will find this 1986 version of Superman's origin story cheesy, but I like a little cheese with my superhero stories, they take me back to my childhood when everything did not have to be so dark and meta. Byrne's art in this book is perfection with his version of Superman being my definitive artistic representation (his Lex and Lois- not so much)! I know many fans will find this 1986 version of Superman's origin story cheesy, but I like a little cheese with my superhero stories, they take me back to my childhood when everything did not have to be so dark and meta. Byrne's art in this book is perfection with his version of Superman being my definitive artistic representation (his Lex and Lois- not so much)!

  16. 4 out of 5

    Jason Pierce

    There's a review down there somewhere, I promise. Comic book project explanation: I've decided to reread all my Superman and Batman comics. Time will tell if I actually pull this off, and I expect it will take a year or two. When I get to one where a trade paperback came out for the story, I'll post a review on here and also catch everyone up on what happened between the books. I feel it's a service the Goodreads community desperately needs, and I shall not shirk my duty! I collected for a few mont There's a review down there somewhere, I promise. Comic book project explanation: I've decided to reread all my Superman and Batman comics. Time will tell if I actually pull this off, and I expect it will take a year or two. When I get to one where a trade paperback came out for the story, I'll post a review on here and also catch everyone up on what happened between the books. I feel it's a service the Goodreads community desperately needs, and I shall not shirk my duty! I collected for a few months in sixth grade in late 1989 through early 1990 when Santa Claus gave me some, but allowance money being tight, and a love for the video game arcade setting in, I didn't stick with it. But I got back into it around 1994, got several back issues, and the long and short of it is that I have everything from somewhere in 1992 through sometime in 2000 when Lex Luthor was running for president. (I understand he wins, but I think I quit collecting before those issues came out, and I don't think I even read those since I was away at college, and was just getting them because I always had. Sad day.) I also have a few other comic books from the 80's and early 90's that I picked up here and there (this particular miniseries being part of that), and I'll be happy to educate you on those as well. Before The Man of Steel miniseries: DC rebooted everything around 1986 which is when this story came out and started everything fresh in the "Modern Age" of comics, but more on that later. I have about a dozen Superman titles from the "Bronze Age" that I picked up at some comic book convention. They're mostly stand alone stories that featured villains I like such as Mongul. I also wanted a few old Lex Luthor stories, and I must say I prefer the modern age Lex to the one before that. Bronze Age Luthor was more of a mad scientist with a ridiculous green and purple war suit which I've never been a fan of. This is too gay even for me. It was indestructible (except for the time Superman punched a hole straight through it, but Lex was fucking with Supe's brain via some psychic rod that planted false memories in his head). Lex also lived on an island in the Atlantic nobody could find which was really a giant meteor from planet Lexor that Luthor lived on from time to time but accidentally blew up in a battle with Superman, killing every inhabitant including his wife and son. He blames Superman for this, but it was really a joint effort and more Lex's fault if you ask me. This causes him to hate Superman even more, but the best is the story which explains why Lex hates Superman at all. Yep, you guessed it. Lex and Superboy were BFF's in Smallville, and Lex was even working on something that would make Supes immune to the effects of Kryptonite when something went drastically wrong, and Superman, trying to put it out, accidentally blew a bunch of chemicals on Lex's head which caused him to lose all his hair. Hell hath no fury like a Luthor scalped. The reboot did away with all that nonsense as well as a lot of Superman's powers. He used to be able to operate in space (in the reboot he still requires oxygen so can only chill in space for as long as he can hold his breath), and he could even fly to the center of the universe to take care of matters. Not the galaxy, the universe. It didn't take him long to get there either. His Supervision could see things in other galaxies from Earth, and he also had some telepathic thing going on, though I think it might've been Supergirl who facilitated those. The reboot also rewrote his history and relationships with several characters, but first... ...a few words from our sponsors: As silly as some of the Bronze Age stories got, I found some of the advertisements even more amusing. Some of it's due to historical reasons. Remember when OJ Simpson was so adored that kids wanted his autograph? Or when Bill Cosby saying "if you can't send you" didn't have a sinister connotation? American Red Cross, indeed. This was a plea to harems across America; the "send money" bit was just a distraction, for he sure didn't need it. And I'm not sure why Batman (and several other superheroes) ever bothered to learn how to fight when they could neutralize any threat with some Hostess Twinkies. And just what the fuck is up with this retarded kid? And while I support the following ad wholeheartedly, I bet the likes of it haven't been seen in a comic book in nearly 40 years. (We now pause to give Pierce time to fight off the temptation to air his gun control debate views which nobody here is interested in reading...) OK, I'm back, and I think it's time for the... REVIEW: This is the beginning of it all, my favorite DC Comics era. I'm sure it's my favorite because it's what I grew up with, but it's quite possible this era actually is the best. Stuff before the Modern Age was sillier, and while I enjoyed reading some of those, I'm glad I'm caught up to this part now. What little I've seen of the latest reboots which happened in 2011 and then again just a year or two ago has not impressed me. Perhaps I'm too old for the new stuff. I could also be too conservative; a lot of stuff in comics now lean a lot further left than they used to. But the 90's... great stuff. This story covers a 10 year span from the time Superman is 18 until he's 28 or so, excluding the prologue which shows him leaving Krypton as a baby. It undorkifies Clark which is cool. I loved dorky Clark in the movies, and some of his bumbling antics in the comics are funny, but normal Clark is better. This also sets up his relationship with Lois Lane. Turns out he's smitten with her from the start, though it'll be a few years before they start dating and a few more before they marry... but I'm getting ahead of myself. They just meet and start working together in this story. I really enjoyed the third segment where Superman goes to Gotham to nab Batman and turn him in to the police. Batman totally pwns Supes, but not in a fist fight which would've been stupid. Let's just say Superman learns that his way isn't the only way to do things, and that his way might not work as well in Gotham where a more subtle yet grittier approach is needed. Lex Luthor is still a genius, but not the maniacal mad scientist of yesteryear, and he and Superman weren't childhood friends. Here he's a business man who manages to skirt the law and has almost everybody fooled into thinking he's on the up and up with everything. Superman learns otherwise pretty quickly and keeps his eye on Luthor, but he can never prove anything when bad things happen even though he knows Luthor is behind it. This Luthor is so much more fun to hate than that silly purple and green thing. As for supervillains, the only one we get to see is Bizarro. At least the first one. There will be another one later if I recall. But I'm cool with there being no big, superpower baddies in this miniseries, and it being set up the way it was. It gives us everything we need to proceed into the real action starting in the Superman titles of which there were only three at that point, one of them being brand new: But I'm getting ahead of myself again. I don't even remember what happens in it. If you're a fan of Superman in the modern age comics, then this story is perfect for starting off. Next checkpoint: Superman #39 (linked below) Other Superman reviews: Superman #39 Krisis of the Krimson Kryptonite Panic in the Sky The Death of Superman World without a Superman The Return of Superman Bizarro's World The Fall of Metropolis Superman/Doomsday: Hunter/Prey Superman: Zero Hour The Death of Clark Kent The Trial of Superman Superman: The Wedding and Beyond Superman: Transformed!

  17. 4 out of 5

    Michael Sorbello

    The planet Krypton is dying, Jor-El and Lara send their newborn away in a space pod in hopes that he'll find a happier life on a planet where humans are still in touch with their morals and emotions unlike Krypton where science has evolved so far that people became disconnected from the world and each other. The space pod lands in a peaceful countryside on Earth, discovered by Jonathan and Martha Kent who adopt the mysterious alien baby and name him Clark Kent. Blessed with incredible strength, The planet Krypton is dying, Jor-El and Lara send their newborn away in a space pod in hopes that he'll find a happier life on a planet where humans are still in touch with their morals and emotions unlike Krypton where science has evolved so far that people became disconnected from the world and each other. The space pod lands in a peaceful countryside on Earth, discovered by Jonathan and Martha Kent who adopt the mysterious alien baby and name him Clark Kent. Blessed with incredible strength, endurance and the ability to fly at extreme speeds, Clark learns from the love and kindness given to him from his adoptive parents and channels it into the desire to become the gentle guardian of mankind; adequately nicknamed Superman. A simple and campy origin story for Superman, showing his early days as an easygoing teenager in the peaceful countryside, a young man working as a journalist in the city and a charming hero who takes down evildoers without lethal force. The dialogue can be a bit silly at times and the villains are cartoonishly one-dimensional in this iteration, but the interactions between Clark, his lovely and eccentric coworker Lois and his caring adoptive parents were all very well done. There's a chapter where Superman teams up with Batman in Gotham to stop a crazed jewel thief and their clashing morals make for an entertaining 'friendship' between them. The final chapter was surprisingly emotional, having Clark confront his past as Superman which makes him realize that choosing the path of a superhero will force him to give up having normal relationships with people and other important things from his childhood that hurt to let go of. He also learns of his origins as a being from another world that can never hope to live a completely ordinary life. In spite of his conflicting emotions, Clark comes to terms with his identity as a man raised on Earth and grows up quite a bit in a short amount of time. *** My Social Media My YouTube Channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCPPs... My Instagram Account: https://www.instagram.com/michael_sor... My Wattpad Account: https://www.wattpad.com/user/Michael-... My Twitter Account: https://twitter.com/SorbelloHorror My Facebook Account: https://www.facebook.com/michael.sorb...

  18. 4 out of 5

    Nı§hca

    This is my first superman comic and loved it.♡ This was a really very fun and fast paced read. After crisis on infinite earths, all the flagship characters of DC were rebooted with thier new origin stories for modern audiences so superman was rebooted with this origin story in 1986 by John Byrne. This book is devided in 6 chapters and they all are very well written and very informative. First chapter has a prologue which is very similar to live action Man of steel (2013) movie but after prologue This is my first superman comic and loved it.♡ This was a really very fun and fast paced read. After crisis on infinite earths, all the flagship characters of DC were rebooted with thier new origin stories for modern audiences so superman was rebooted with this origin story in 1986 by John Byrne. This book is devided in 6 chapters and they all are very well written and very informative. First chapter has a prologue which is very similar to live action Man of steel (2013) movie but after prologue, everything is different than movie. These chapters make us familiar with all the essential characters of superman. There is first meeting with Luis lane, first meeting with Lex luthor, first meeting with Batman etc. The character of superman is also very well written and very interesting interpretation. Luis lane was bit hilarious in this one and Lex is very different with his curly red hair.😂 final chapter made me feel bit sad about Lana lang, she deserves better! The Art of this book is bit dated on today's standards but it's still good considering the fact that this is 35 years old book. Some dialogues are very corny but most of are good. There are lots of cool moments. The pacing of stories are very nice and it's very easy to read. Overall It's very good origin story of superman! For new comic readers who want to start reading and understand superman, this is perfect book to start. ♡Thank you for Reading!♡

  19. 5 out of 5

    Nerdish Mum

    A perfectly fine and readable reboot of Superman to bring him into the modern times (In the 80's). I enjoyed the story with Bizarro and I liked the introduction to Magpie (I'm about 99% sure this was her debut but correct me if I'm wrong). The artwork looks like what everything since has been based on as to how Superman and Lois Lane etc look so it was definitely a defining moment, just not my favourite style of art. A perfectly fine and readable reboot of Superman to bring him into the modern times (In the 80's). I enjoyed the story with Bizarro and I liked the introduction to Magpie (I'm about 99% sure this was her debut but correct me if I'm wrong). The artwork looks like what everything since has been based on as to how Superman and Lois Lane etc look so it was definitely a defining moment, just not my favourite style of art.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Himanshu Karmacharya

    DC did a fine job hiring John Byrne to reinvent their greatest Superhero ever. The Man of Steel is obviously old, and may feel dated to some. But it has got heart and quality that one may not easily find in Superhero comic books nowadays. It is indeed a superhero story and involves action, supervillains, supernemesis, but also it is a story of coming-of-age and exploring oneself. John Byrne has done an impressive job with both the writing and the art by delivering this must read Superman story.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Shannon Appelcline

    Man of Steel (#1-6). A generation on, it's almost impossible to conceive how entirely revolutionary John Byrne's take on Superman was. He recreates everything about the character, making Clark is something more than a milksop, reimagining Lois and Lana as their own people, and reenvisioning Luthor as a tycoon, not a mad scientist. The result brings Superman down to Earth in multiple ways, by making him a more realistic character and his world closer to ours. This is the comic that skillfully set Man of Steel (#1-6). A generation on, it's almost impossible to conceive how entirely revolutionary John Byrne's take on Superman was. He recreates everything about the character, making Clark is something more than a milksop, reimagining Lois and Lana as their own people, and reenvisioning Luthor as a tycoon, not a mad scientist. The result brings Superman down to Earth in multiple ways, by making him a more realistic character and his world closer to ours. This is the comic that skillfully set the template for at least a decades worth of story, and it remains an intriguing new beginning even today [5/5].

  22. 5 out of 5

    Gavin

    I should have read this before I started reading the more modern Superman Origin stories...this is the daddy of those. John Byrne redid Superman for the 80s, a few years before I started getting into comics. The look of Superman and Clark Kent here is pure what I grew up with. There's some good stuff, and some other stuff that makes it apparent this book is 27 years old. This Superman has some seriously sanctimonious moments where he tries to put Batman in jail, then figures out Batman's Gotham i I should have read this before I started reading the more modern Superman Origin stories...this is the daddy of those. John Byrne redid Superman for the 80s, a few years before I started getting into comics. The look of Superman and Clark Kent here is pure what I grew up with. There's some good stuff, and some other stuff that makes it apparent this book is 27 years old. This Superman has some seriously sanctimonious moments where he tries to put Batman in jail, then figures out Batman's Gotham is no Metropolis. Also, this Lex Luthor is the ridiculous Redheaded Tubby one that is kind of hard to take seriously, even though he's the bad guy. Lois here is 80s woman at it's best, tough, high-fashion, yuppie to the max (also seriously hot, which is strange to say...) I didn't care for the last issue (#6) where it seemed like Byrne ran out of time from DC and had to cram a whole lot into the final issue of the miniseries. I also didn't love the whole Rah-Rah American parts, but then again...Late Cold War Era...Reagan was still president when this came out! The art is solid Byrne, which I remember from the Superman I read as a kid in the late 80s. There's also much less sci-fi stuff, and some of the parts don't ring true, like Clark's prowess on the football field in High School...but then again, this was all true and authentic Superman when I was a little kid, so perhaps there've been way too many reboots since that I think of Byrne's as outdated, but then again, 1986 was a long time ago. Imagine how 1959 Superman would have looked in 1986 (the same 27yrs later) so I suppose in that regard it's held up fairly well. Enjoyable, but perhaps don't read any modern Superman too soon before you read this. I enjoyed feeling like a kid again reading this, before Doomsday and Superman's death, rebirth, and all the crazy shit that's happened since. What's here the most is the potential for where this Superman could go, and Byrne deserves a lot of credit for all that he did for Superman and updating him for a new generation. Worth a read, even beyond the nostalgia factor I got.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Candy Atkins

    This is where Superman started for me back in the 80s. I think the Justice League/Super friends cartoon ended and I was looking for more and found the DC. I recently spotted a copy in a bookstore and gave it another read. It doesn't hold up to modern day Superman but it was still enjoyable (except for Lois) This is where Superman started for me back in the 80s. I think the Justice League/Super friends cartoon ended and I was looking for more and found the DC. I recently spotted a copy in a bookstore and gave it another read. It doesn't hold up to modern day Superman but it was still enjoyable (except for Lois)

  24. 4 out of 5

    Jerry

    Practically everyone in America knows that Clark Kent and Superman are the same guy, and that Lois Lane is his gal pal...but, how much do you truly know about the only surviving Kryptonian? Though I watched superhero shows--including Lois & Clark, which is one of my three shows for next month--and films here and there during my childhood and teenage years, I didn't really get into Marvel and DC's stories until about a decade ago; it was a DVD of Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles: Fast Forward that con Practically everyone in America knows that Clark Kent and Superman are the same guy, and that Lois Lane is his gal pal...but, how much do you truly know about the only surviving Kryptonian? Though I watched superhero shows--including Lois & Clark, which is one of my three shows for next month--and films here and there during my childhood and teenage years, I didn't really get into Marvel and DC's stories until about a decade ago; it was a DVD of Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles: Fast Forward that convinced me to check out what I'd been missing. Since then, I have devoured practically every story featuring Batman, the X-Men, the Power Rangers, etc., I could get my hands on, whether in print (prose or comic) or audiovisual, including both animated and live-action productions. So, something like this is right up my alley. It seems that Supe tends to get a bit of a bad rap; I've known multiple people who have criticized everything from his brightly colored costume to the fact that he is only vulnerable to kryptonite to even the alleged "cheesiness" of his stories. Well, maybe I'm just a sucker for an action tale, but, I've been a fan of Mr. Kent for a while, and probably always will be. As you'd expect from the above writing and the four-star rating, I enjoyed this. The artwork was fabulous, the stories were great fun, and, better yet, the content was cleaner than most comic book omnibuses I've read over the last few years. There was occasional profanity--if there weren't any, I would have given this five stars instead--but, trust me when I say that the language and crudity found in at least three-quarters of the more modern DC and Marvel collections I've read make this look Disney clean.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Michael

    Years ago, a friend shoved a copy of the collector's edition first issue of this Superman reboot into my hands and said I should make it part of my comic book collection. And while I can clearly recall having the collector's cover issue in my collection for years, I can't recall much about reading it at the time. (In fact, I may not have read it on the off chance that I'd bend the spine and decrease the collect-ability value of the comic in question). Reading this six-issue reboot of Superman thi Years ago, a friend shoved a copy of the collector's edition first issue of this Superman reboot into my hands and said I should make it part of my comic book collection. And while I can clearly recall having the collector's cover issue in my collection for years, I can't recall much about reading it at the time. (In fact, I may not have read it on the off chance that I'd bend the spine and decrease the collect-ability value of the comic in question). Reading this six-issue reboot of Superman thirty plus years later, I'm impressed by how big an influence it had on just about every version of Superman that's appeared in pop culture since that time. The six issues reflect a lot of the high points of one of my favorite shows of the '90s, Lois and Clark. Whether it's Clark's parents still being around to serve as sounding boards to Lex Luthor being a billionaire industrialist with his own mischievous agenda that he's upset gets hijacked by Superman's appearance on the scene, John Bryne's take still echoes through comics and pop culture today. In many ways, I kept feeling like what Bryne was doing with Superman was what Brian Michael Bendis did with Spider-Man in the Ultimate Spider-Man line -- it was giving a character relevance to a new generation of fans. And certainly, the Man of Steel needed that refresh in the 80's. This reboot opened the door to many of the other Super storylines to come, including the infamous Death of Superman storyline in the 90's. With an introduction by sci-fi great Ray Bradbury, this collection of six issues is a refreshing reboot of one of the iconic comic characters. It's worth looking at if you haven't read it before or visiting again if you haven't read it in a while.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Daniel Kukwa

    With the upcoming (*shudder*) DC Comics everything-and-the-kitchen-sink reboot, it cleanses the palate to look back at John Byrne's relaunch of Superman, post-Crisis on Infinite Earths, back in the misty dawn of history, circa 1985. It's an origin story that strips Superman down to his most successful, basic characteristics...but loses none of his gravitas or back-story elements. It's fabulous stuff, and it breaks my heart to think it's all be chucked into the dustbin. Ahh...for simpler, happier With the upcoming (*shudder*) DC Comics everything-and-the-kitchen-sink reboot, it cleanses the palate to look back at John Byrne's relaunch of Superman, post-Crisis on Infinite Earths, back in the misty dawn of history, circa 1985. It's an origin story that strips Superman down to his most successful, basic characteristics...but loses none of his gravitas or back-story elements. It's fabulous stuff, and it breaks my heart to think it's all be chucked into the dustbin. Ahh...for simpler, happier days..

  27. 4 out of 5

    Alexander

    When DC chose to revamp it's characters in the 1980s, they went to one of the best writers and artists in the business for their most well known character. John Byrne's retelling of Superman's origin and early years is almost pitch perfect in every regard, grounding the character and refreshing him at the same time. This is the version that existed until the New 52 revamp in 2011 and is the one I find most appealing of all the iterations of this character. Must read for comic book fans. When DC chose to revamp it's characters in the 1980s, they went to one of the best writers and artists in the business for their most well known character. John Byrne's retelling of Superman's origin and early years is almost pitch perfect in every regard, grounding the character and refreshing him at the same time. This is the version that existed until the New 52 revamp in 2011 and is the one I find most appealing of all the iterations of this character. Must read for comic book fans.

  28. 4 out of 5

    David

    Good looking if sometimes odd reboot of the man of steel.

  29. 5 out of 5

    MC

    A year and a half ago, DC Comics rebooted their line with the Flashpoint mini-series. Though there are frequently smaller “reboots” of certain parts of the continuities at both DC and Marvel Comics, there is rarely a resetting and re-imagining of the content on the order that DC introduced in 2011. In fact, the last such reboot of similar proportions (for DC Comics) was the GIANT crossover event that came to define “crisis crossovers” in the comics industry. That crossover event was Crisis on In A year and a half ago, DC Comics rebooted their line with the Flashpoint mini-series. Though there are frequently smaller “reboots” of certain parts of the continuities at both DC and Marvel Comics, there is rarely a resetting and re-imagining of the content on the order that DC introduced in 2011. In fact, the last such reboot of similar proportions (for DC Comics) was the GIANT crossover event that came to define “crisis crossovers” in the comics industry. That crossover event was Crisis on Infinite Earths, which ran from April 1985 to March 1986. Anyone reading this may very well be wondering what in the world Crisis on Infinite Earths has to do with the graphic novel Superman, The Man of Steel: Vol. 1. The answer is simple. The events of Infinite Earths were explicitly put in place in order to streamline and simplify the very, very complicated DC Multiverse wherein in many different parallel worlds and universes with different version of the characters from different eras existed. In essence, the door was to be shut on the Golden, Silver, and Bronze Ages of Comics. A new continuity was to be introduced. Many heroes had their origins, enemies, and so forth, re-imagined. When it came to Superman, the job of re-imagining the Man of Steel for a new age was given to acclaimed comics writer John Byrne. The issues that make up this compendium being reviewed are the complete mini-series that Byrne wrote reintroducing Superman in his Post-Crisis persona. Chiefly, different elements from the Christopher Reeve Superman films, and other sources were used, with a mind to have him be slightly different from his pre-Crisis identity. Now, this was not a difference at the core of who he was, but a difference that took all of these disparate ideas about his origins, and, in turn, put them together into one story that told THE definitive origin of Superman. The other characters also came across differently than how they were written pre-Crisis, but with their best aspects of previous ages intact. Lex came across as different, and a tad strange, to be honest. Some of his characterization in this story was eventually changed, though much stayed the same. The whole ruthless businessman that is the opposite of Bruce Wayne and Oliver Queen was kept, and has been kept for a quarter century. He was also arguably more brilliant than before. Lois Lane was more like her plucky, independent Golden Age self. A beautiful, intelligent, tough-as-nails reporter. Sure, she still needs to be saved, but not to the ridiculous degree she did in the Silver and Bronze Ages of Comics. Just look at some of her exploits where she kicks butts and takes names in the Classic Fleischer Superman cartoons, and know that the then-new Lois made that Fleischer Lois look like a wuss. Batman was different as well, as they kept the traditional “smart-guy and meticulous planner” aspects of his many renderin. gs of previous years, while dropping the more silly stuff. A character of interest to me was that of Lana Lang. At that point, she was based on the Annette O'Toole version in Superman III. The version then was far, far superior to the modern version inspired by the Smallville television show. Thankfully, as of the "New 52" reboot earlier mentioned with Flashpoint, she is being reverted to that earlier version from the 1986 John Byrne re-imagining. And this is completely for the better. As you can tell, I rather liked this version of Lana Lang with the sillier stuff dropped, but still a good character, not the more anti-heroic character of recent years due to Smallville. In fact, saying that the comics writers “dropped the sillier stuff” is a good description of this period post-Crisis. Arguably they went too far eventually, giving us the reviled and pathetic “Dark Age of Comics” with moral myopias and no true heroes, but that is a topic for another day, and a few years down the line from this point in the mid '80's. The art here is nothing to write home about. While other comics, such as Star Wars under Marvel (as it wound down no less), and the post-Crisis Batman books were beautifully rendered, this was typical, average fare at best. But the story, however, was good, and was the strength of the volume. While maintaining the goodness and wholesomeness of the previous renditions of Clark Kent, this version was different, and was growing into the role. It wasn't the ease with which he grew into his role previously. He had a harder, and more uncertain time of it. Yet, he was just as good and noble as ever. If the writers of the upcoming Superman film, The Man of Steel took actual inspiration from this comic, instead of the Nolan Batman films (which are crap that could be called “Batman In Name Only”), it would be an excellent starting point. That is how good this series was. I can't recommend this enough, not just for those who want just a good, fun, comics adventure, but also for those who are interested in reading a fundamental piece of the Superman mythos.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Lior

    In 1986, DC Comics rebooted the Superman origin story, following the reboot of the entire DC Universe after Crisis on Infinite Earths, and this min-series by John Byrne was the kick0ff. All the usual people and places are present here: Kansas, Ma and Pa Kent, The Daily Planet, Lois Lane, Lex Luthor, etc. The story is mostly episodic, catching up with Superman every few years, visiting him in key moment: his first public appearance in Metropolis, his first conflict with Luthor... interestingly en In 1986, DC Comics rebooted the Superman origin story, following the reboot of the entire DC Universe after Crisis on Infinite Earths, and this min-series by John Byrne was the kick0ff. All the usual people and places are present here: Kansas, Ma and Pa Kent, The Daily Planet, Lois Lane, Lex Luthor, etc. The story is mostly episodic, catching up with Superman every few years, visiting him in key moment: his first public appearance in Metropolis, his first conflict with Luthor... interestingly enough, only by issue 6 does superman learn who he really is and where he came from. The writing is a bit outdated, this being an 80's comic it's somewhat on the corny side, with multiple thought balloons giving the reader exposition masquerading as character rumination. It's a narrative tool that will strike the modern reader as silly, but it has to be accepted as a product of its time. The dialogue itself is also quite on the nose, but Byrne portrays Superman as the ultimate good, staying fairly close to the character's original ethos, with Lois Lane shown as the independent, strong and of course beautiful woman that she is, and Luthor as a dastardly villain who is apparently also fluent in Chinese. I would have loved to see more continuity between the issues, but this is obviously meant to cover lots of ground with limited amount of pages. The artwork is fantastic, penciled by Byrne and inked by Dick Giordano, it captures the essence of the genre in a clean and efficient way, making every character distinct. There aren't a lot of action scenes here, but the ones that do appear carry enough weight to be impressive. All in all it's an enjoyable time capsule and a lesson in efficient storytelling, just be aware that the style of comic book writing - even superheroes - has changed a great deal in the last 30 years.

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