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Silver Surfer: Origins

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SILVER SURFER ORIGINS Prepare yourselves for a galaxy full of star-spanning tales written by Stan Lee and drawn by John Buscema. Following the incredible story of the Silver Surfer, from his days serving the all-powerful Galactus, to his battles with some of the fiercest villains in the universe.


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SILVER SURFER ORIGINS Prepare yourselves for a galaxy full of star-spanning tales written by Stan Lee and drawn by John Buscema. Following the incredible story of the Silver Surfer, from his days serving the all-powerful Galactus, to his battles with some of the fiercest villains in the universe.

30 review for Silver Surfer: Origins

  1. 5 out of 5

    Scott Waldyn

    This collection is nothing short of beautiful. The character of Silver Surfer is grossly underrated. He has one of the biggest hearts of the Marvel Universe, and he carries with him such a forlorn Shakespearean quality. Whereas other Marvel heroes reflect the feelings and beliefs of their localized regions (mostly New York and big city life), The Silver Surfer is able to embody an all-encompassing global stage. Buscema and Lee take advantage of this platform to speak truth to power on the world' This collection is nothing short of beautiful. The character of Silver Surfer is grossly underrated. He has one of the biggest hearts of the Marvel Universe, and he carries with him such a forlorn Shakespearean quality. Whereas other Marvel heroes reflect the feelings and beliefs of their localized regions (mostly New York and big city life), The Silver Surfer is able to embody an all-encompassing global stage. Buscema and Lee take advantage of this platform to speak truth to power on the world's ailments, and it's stellar. The art is top-notch as well, and Buscema is able to perfectly balance between that far-out cosmic power and a down-to-earth realism that makes these stories all the more relatable. This collection of 6 issues is just about perfect.

  2. 5 out of 5

    A

    Good old comics from the Silver age. Filled with direct references to the dangers of eastern world as well as the violence of the human race, this book follows the Silver Surfer as he tries to understand mankind. A truly nostalgic experience to read this.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Markus Risser

    The Silver Surfer is a strange beast. Cosmic herald with almost unlimited power, child-like super-innocent Jesus figure and counter-culture symbol in one, the Surfer is one of Marvel's most iconic characters but never has been able to sustain a long-running own series. And if you look at it closely that's not too surprising. Norrin Radd may be a fascinating figure, but he is very one-dimensional with limited potential for great storytelling, making the Surfer a welcome supporting character who's The Silver Surfer is a strange beast. Cosmic herald with almost unlimited power, child-like super-innocent Jesus figure and counter-culture symbol in one, the Surfer is one of Marvel's most iconic characters but never has been able to sustain a long-running own series. And if you look at it closely that's not too surprising. Norrin Radd may be a fascinating figure, but he is very one-dimensional with limited potential for great storytelling, making the Surfer a welcome supporting character who's able to deliver great action and poignant commentary, but as the star of his own book he tends to get, dare I say it, boring. Fans tend to swoon over Surfer's philosophical monologues, but reading five issues en-block like in this Classics re-issue, you'll note that his musings are largely repetetive and, by the fourth issue, get a bit annoying (I'm also having my issues with the premise - the Marvel universe is full of strange characters that are widely accepted by the public, just look at The Thing, so I never really got why the whole world hates the Surfer and why he's never really able to make his intention not to harm anyone clear). The stories collected in this book include Norrin Radd's transformation into the Surfer by Galactus (who, for my taste, is a far more interesting character), his thwarting of an alien invasion and, most interestingly, the fifth issue, dealing with an attempt by the cosmic being The Stranger to destroy the Earth, which Surfer tries to stop with the help of a black scientist named Al Harper, who originally signed up to help Surfer crack Galactus' barrier. It's the best attempt to integrate the Surfer into a exciting and intelligent story (with Harper helping the Surfer because he reminds him of the racial hate he has encountered himself). The artwork is mostly great and there are several nice action scenes, but on the whole it's a rather tenacious read.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Ethan Manley

    An entertaining volume of stories and a good introduction to the Silver Surfer after his first appearance in the Galactus trilogy (although part of me wished I'd read some more of his FF appearances) These don't suffer from the same over explanation/narration as Lee's other writing, but while the Surfer's introspective philosophising is welcome, it does get a bit repetitive. The addition of Al in issue 5 shows that the Surfer works better when he has someone to talk to. Issues 1 and 5 are definit An entertaining volume of stories and a good introduction to the Silver Surfer after his first appearance in the Galactus trilogy (although part of me wished I'd read some more of his FF appearances) These don't suffer from the same over explanation/narration as Lee's other writing, but while the Surfer's introspective philosophising is welcome, it does get a bit repetitive. The addition of Al in issue 5 shows that the Surfer works better when he has someone to talk to. Issues 1 and 5 are definitely worth reading, issues 2-4 are okay. As with a lot of classic comics, while I admire the creativity involved in creating the appearances, characterisations, and mythology of the characters, I am certain that I will enjoy more modern story arcs more, simply due to the changes in storytelling methods over time. Buscema's art is good. Less stylised than Kirby's, but it does a good job of conveying the Surfer's emotions.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Gustavo

    Así como todos odian a Hulk y Hulk odia a todos, el Silver Surfer ama a todos y todos le temen aunque el los quiera salvar. Ya con esa premisa, podemos darnos cuenta de que la originalidad no es el fuerte de la trama de este comic. Aun asi, hay muchos elementos que son interesantes en su origen y en su relación con el universo Marvel por los que vale la pena leer este tomo. El arte de John Buscema es adecuado aunque no llega a los niveles de otros artistas de la época como Steranko y Kirby.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Swapnil Dubey

    I remember watching Silver Surfer cartoon show as a kid. I had some encounters with him in Marvel crossovers. But I had never imagined reading his solo book will be so much fun. The story, which collects Silver Surfer Origin #1-6, is written so well that I actually felt sorry for tragical life of Norrin Redd. The artwork is ace. I really appreciate classic stories and artworks of old times. The size of the book is small but even then fonts are not an issue in this collection.

  7. 4 out of 5

    James

    The Silver Surfer's attitude to humanity in the 1960s - that they're violent, reactionary idiots, who may possibly, possibly be worth defending - chimes very well with 2018. Everyone depicted in the mob scenes reacting to the Silver Surfer and others who are different basically sound like Trump supporters. The Silver Surfer's attitude to humanity in the 1960s - that they're violent, reactionary idiots, who may possibly, possibly be worth defending - chimes very well with 2018. Everyone depicted in the mob scenes reacting to the Silver Surfer and others who are different basically sound like Trump supporters.

  8. 4 out of 5

    The Nerd Herd Comic Book Club!

    A big thank you to everyone that read along this week and joined the discussion for Episode 46 - The Silver Surfer: Origins. We appreciate you all and hopefully we'll see you next week! 🤟🏻 Watch our review at Https://youtu.be/jF_yv5xZVqQ Or listen to the show on all Podcast providers! A big thank you to everyone that read along this week and joined the discussion for Episode 46 - The Silver Surfer: Origins. We appreciate you all and hopefully we'll see you next week! 🤟🏻 Watch our review at Https://youtu.be/jF_yv5xZVqQ Or listen to the show on all Podcast providers!

  9. 4 out of 5

    Mike

    Not Stan Lee's best work, but John Buscema's art is, as always, incredible. Worth a look--if you don't like the story, stop and just stare at the art. Not Stan Lee's best work, but John Buscema's art is, as always, incredible. Worth a look--if you don't like the story, stop and just stare at the art.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Allan Heron

    The Silver Surfer is an iconic Marvel character for a reason, and it's in these collected six issues of the late 1960's comic. Top notch. The Silver Surfer is an iconic Marvel character for a reason, and it's in these collected six issues of the late 1960's comic. Top notch.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Jon Arnold

    For all that Peter Parker’s brash youth defines the Brill Building optimism of the early 60s it’s the Norrin Radd (and to a lesser extent Stephen Strange) who defines Marvel’s output of the late 60s. He’s a curiosity caught at the point where comics are sliding from their pop song phase of one or two issue stories to trying to deal with more philosophical issues over a raised page count – it’s notable that each of the issues collected here runs to 40 pages, double the length of a normal book. Ra For all that Peter Parker’s brash youth defines the Brill Building optimism of the early 60s it’s the Norrin Radd (and to a lesser extent Stephen Strange) who defines Marvel’s output of the late 60s. He’s a curiosity caught at the point where comics are sliding from their pop song phase of one or two issue stories to trying to deal with more philosophical issues over a raised page count – it’s notable that each of the issues collected here runs to 40 pages, double the length of a normal book. Radd is, of course, the eponymous Silver Surfer; a preposterously conceived character who once travelled the universe on a surfboard but, due to betraying his master Galactus is now limited to the environs of Earth. The first issue fleshes out the backstory for the Surfer presented in the Fantastic Four comics in which he first appeared. Pre-Surfer Radd questions the morals and direction of his homeworld of Zenn La, and when the cosmic disaster known as Galactus arrives to eat his world he sacrifices himself to a life of subservience to save it. It’s interesting to note Lee and Buscema clearly presenting the Surfer’s philosophical nature as part of his time wandering the stars in search of tasty treats for Galactus and that a large part of his dissatisfaction with his existence is down to freshly imposed limits. It’s clear Galactus’s punishment is actually an effective one; allowing the Surfer the sight of the wider universe but keeping it tantalisingly out of his grasp. This seems prescient of post-space race times; where we’ve deliberately limited ourselves to Earth and its skies, a resonance the writers couldn’t possibly have imagined in a decade still pregnant with the possibilities presented by scientific advancement. Unfortunately the wonderful madness of the Surfer himself gets undermined a little by presentation. Where Peter Parker’s a smart-mouthed teen, Radd chimes more with the more introspective type of teen who lies in their bedroom bemoaning the state of the world and how they’re woefully misunderstood. It’s easy to see how that chimes with the stereotype of a comic book reader; indeed tracing the analogy I’m already overusing it’s possible to see Parker to Radd as the range already growing with its readers. Over the extended page counts it makes the Surfer miserable company; you get the feeling that were he human he’d be bemoaning the girl he can’t have at the bottom of a beer glass every evening. And such a take is hammered home in each story; the Surfer is misunderstood and bemoans the violent nature of mankind, the big hippy. None of these first five stories really find their way out of that rut, even the few truly sympathetic souls end up deceived or dead. The Surfer’s world is a small, cruel place. Buscema’s art sadly hasn’t aged particularly well, though it’s more than up to scratch in presenting some dynamic action set pieces and the fear and hatred that’s the general reaction to the Surfer. It’s competent but, lacking the idiosyncratic style of a Ditko or Romita, doesn’t present many memorable images beyond the striking free gift of a silver spaceman on a surfboard. And that’s the takeaway of these first few issues – there’s bags of potential in the raw material here but it remains no more realised at the beginning than at the end; he’s a strikingly coloured hamster running around the same wheel all the time. Full marks for the Surfer himself, not so much for the lack of doing anything truly interesting with the character.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Ondra Král

    Kvůli 30+ stranám na sešit je to zbytečně roztáhlé. Jinak průměrnej Lee

  13. 5 out of 5

    Andy Dainty

    self-important pretentious piffle.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Phillip Berrie

    Nothing great here with regard to story, but it was interesting to read the origin stories of one of the more unique of the Marvel characters.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Karl Hickey

  16. 5 out of 5

    Dennis Brock

  17. 5 out of 5

    Giorgio

  18. 5 out of 5

    Aaron Kidd

  19. 5 out of 5

    Lee Gannon

  20. 4 out of 5

    Dev Sodagar

  21. 4 out of 5

    Nipun Fernando

  22. 4 out of 5

    Gabriela Esteban

  23. 4 out of 5

    Michał Lewandowski

  24. 4 out of 5

    Jiří Pavlovský

  25. 5 out of 5

    Sergio

  26. 5 out of 5

    Christophe

  27. 4 out of 5

    Ian G

  28. 5 out of 5

    Shane1step

  29. 4 out of 5

    Alberto D'Angelo

  30. 5 out of 5

    Kami Garcia

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