Hot Best Seller

The Complete Peanuts, Vol. 26: Comics & Stories

Availability: Ready to download

This book collects all of Schulz’s rare, non-strip Peanuts art: storybooks, comic book stories, single-panel gags, advertising art, book illustrations, photographs—even a recipe! With close to 1000 Peanuts images included, all created by Schulz himself, no true Peanuts library would be complete without this final volume. As a fitting end to The Complete Peanuts series, Jea This book collects all of Schulz’s rare, non-strip Peanuts art: storybooks, comic book stories, single-panel gags, advertising art, book illustrations, photographs—even a recipe! With close to 1000 Peanuts images included, all created by Schulz himself, no true Peanuts library would be complete without this final volume. As a fitting end to The Complete Peanuts series, Jean Schulz, who was instrumental in putting this beloved series together, provides an emotional introduction to the volume.


Compare

This book collects all of Schulz’s rare, non-strip Peanuts art: storybooks, comic book stories, single-panel gags, advertising art, book illustrations, photographs—even a recipe! With close to 1000 Peanuts images included, all created by Schulz himself, no true Peanuts library would be complete without this final volume. As a fitting end to The Complete Peanuts series, Jea This book collects all of Schulz’s rare, non-strip Peanuts art: storybooks, comic book stories, single-panel gags, advertising art, book illustrations, photographs—even a recipe! With close to 1000 Peanuts images included, all created by Schulz himself, no true Peanuts library would be complete without this final volume. As a fitting end to The Complete Peanuts series, Jean Schulz, who was instrumental in putting this beloved series together, provides an emotional introduction to the volume.

30 review for The Complete Peanuts, Vol. 26: Comics & Stories

  1. 5 out of 5

    Greg Brozeit

    Seeing the totality of Charles Schulz's daily work for more than 50 years reveals the real value of the The Complete Peanuts. Schulz was a genius. He had remarkable consistency, was willing to change but focused on fundamental truths and simplicity. He pointed out many truths about Americans. How many of them do not like coconut. The superiority of women. Routine as ritual. Some words are just plain funny; how could one not laugh repeatedly at Zamboni? Much like Asterix, Peanuts was an introduct Seeing the totality of Charles Schulz's daily work for more than 50 years reveals the real value of the The Complete Peanuts. Schulz was a genius. He had remarkable consistency, was willing to change but focused on fundamental truths and simplicity. He pointed out many truths about Americans. How many of them do not like coconut. The superiority of women. Routine as ritual. Some words are just plain funny; how could one not laugh repeatedly at Zamboni? Much like Asterix, Peanuts was an introduction to history, in this case the air and trenches of World War I, the exploits of enlisted men in World War II, Valley Forge, Civil War battlefields, and the French Foreign Legion. Most importantly, the totality of Schulz's work demonstrates how nostalgia, whether based on reality or contrived, is an essential American trait. I guess like all retrospectives like this there has to be a clunker...and this is it. To fill out the requisite design needed to fill 13 two-volume dustcover boxes, a 26th volume was needed. This one collects a number of things that were not part of the daily strip that were verified to be of his pen, not the cottage industry of illustrators who did most of the marketing materials. It's OK, but I could have lived without it and the final filler of random drawings gave it the feel of an incomplete high school paper, albeit in a fabulously designed and executed volume. The final part is an essay by Schulz's widow, Jean. But as nice as she is and as in love as she and Schulz were, we don't learn much we didn't know already. My conclusion is that Schulz was a singular intellect who was a good and relatively boring--regular, self-effacing--person. His work is the feature, not his biography. It reminded me a lot of Anton Bruckner. Sometimes brilliance doesn't have to come in dramatic packages.

  2. 4 out of 5

    David Blankenship

    I have always loved Peanuts, even as I have winced at the way Schultz (and his publisher, distributor, and estate) has sold the characters to any marketing agent willing to pay for them. After reading all the volumes to this point I was afraid that this final one was better titled, '101 Ways to Monetize Peanuts'. Yet I enjoyed most of this volume, as it focuses on all the non-daily efforts such as cartoon books, special compilations, and even advertising. Some of it is yet quite amusing (particu I have always loved Peanuts, even as I have winced at the way Schultz (and his publisher, distributor, and estate) has sold the characters to any marketing agent willing to pay for them. After reading all the volumes to this point I was afraid that this final one was better titled, '101 Ways to Monetize Peanuts'. Yet I enjoyed most of this volume, as it focuses on all the non-daily efforts such as cartoon books, special compilations, and even advertising. Some of it is yet quite amusing (particularly 'Things I've Learned' and some of the golf cartoons). Well worth a look.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Leaflet

    Even Snoopy's novel, 'It Was a Dark and Stormy Night', is published here in its entirety. Even Snoopy's novel, 'It Was a Dark and Stormy Night', is published here in its entirety.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Rick

    Comics and Stories, 1950-2000 is a bonus book in this outstanding series, The Complete Peanuts, whose previous 25 volumes collected all the original daily and Sunday strips by Schulz from that same fifty year time span; but, alas, this is more for the completist than the fan or general reader. It is a hodge-podge of cartoons, strips for special occasions and publications, advertising strips (Ford Falcon, for example), spot art, and special theme books. Some of it is fine, a few bits are splendid Comics and Stories, 1950-2000 is a bonus book in this outstanding series, The Complete Peanuts, whose previous 25 volumes collected all the original daily and Sunday strips by Schulz from that same fifty year time span; but, alas, this is more for the completist than the fan or general reader. It is a hodge-podge of cartoons, strips for special occasions and publications, advertising strips (Ford Falcon, for example), spot art, and special theme books. Some of it is fine, a few bits are splendid, most are in between fine and so-so. There is a nice introduction and a word from the series’ superb designer, Seth, and a touching but overlong afterward by Schulz’s widow. If you don’t have the others, get the others. If you are not a completist, borrow this one from a friend who is or there is the library.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Pedro Fernández

    Otro volumen para coleccionistas y amantes de "Peanuts". Aquí uno puede descubrir arte perdido, arte comercial y más, que no se había visto en años. Algunos pueden leerse como cómics, otros los puedes pasar rápido. Vale la pena el último texto que acompaña el libro. La segunda esposa de Schulz cierra esta serie de la mejor manera, con un retrato humano del artista. Otro volumen para coleccionistas y amantes de "Peanuts". Aquí uno puede descubrir arte perdido, arte comercial y más, que no se había visto en años. Algunos pueden leerse como cómics, otros los puedes pasar rápido. Vale la pena el último texto que acompaña el libro. La segunda esposa de Schulz cierra esta serie de la mejor manera, con un retrato humano del artista.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Mark Schlatter

    A quick note: the Goodreads entry for this volume says it collects "all" of the rare Peanuts material in non-strip form. As the introduction to the book states, it doesn't; there's simply too much stuff. But there's some nice comic book stories, reprints of Peanuts books (that often reused plots of strips but with new art), and cartoons published outside of the regular strip. Nothing here is necessary for the casual Peanuts reader, but I appreciated three things in particular. First, there's a c A quick note: the Goodreads entry for this volume says it collects "all" of the rare Peanuts material in non-strip form. As the introduction to the book states, it doesn't; there's simply too much stuff. But there's some nice comic book stories, reprints of Peanuts books (that often reused plots of strips but with new art), and cartoons published outside of the regular strip. Nothing here is necessary for the casual Peanuts reader, but I appreciated three things in particular. First, there's a collection of all the stories written by Snoopy that nicely highlights the most goofy side of Schulz's sense of humor. Second, the collection of golf and tennis cartoons published outside the strip (but with Peanuts characters) is wonderful. Third, there's an essay by Seth (who designed the look of the books in this series) with a cartoon by Joe Matt that is almost worth the price of admission by itself.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Brian Hutzell

    With the completion of this book, I have now read the entire Complete Peanuts. This volume, like the “Bonus Material” on a DVD, is largely unnecessary. It is also very heavily dominated by Snoopy, who is really better off left as a side character. Nevertheless, my hat is off to Seth and Fantagraphics for producing this wonderful set of books dedicated to what surely is one of the great comic strips of all time!

  8. 5 out of 5

    Dustybooks

    The last two volumes of the series — it’s really over, after thirteen years — only include about a year’s worth of strips, Schulz having retired at the end of 1999. That happened to be his best year of material since the mid-1970s, and given the uptick in the strip’s humor and richness at the end, it seems hard to fathom that he didn’t know it was ending, but he didn’t. He didn’t draw another strip after his cancer diagnosis, which means not a single Peanuts was drawn with that knowledge. (The f The last two volumes of the series — it’s really over, after thirteen years — only include about a year’s worth of strips, Schulz having retired at the end of 1999. That happened to be his best year of material since the mid-1970s, and given the uptick in the strip’s humor and richness at the end, it seems hard to fathom that he didn’t know it was ending, but he didn’t. He didn’t draw another strip after his cancer diagnosis, which means not a single Peanuts was drawn with that knowledge. (The final strip, containing his letter to readers, recycles old artwork.) This is particularly eerie when taking into account that the last football strip, for instance, features a unique scenario in which we don’t get to find out whether Charlie Brown managed to kick the ball or not. (I went into this in another post recently.) The book is rounded out by the complete run of Schulz’s pre-Peanuts strip, L’il Folks, a splendid addition (though a bit difficult to read since it’s in a different page orientation) that’s complemented nicely in the 26th and final volume, an initially unplanned addition, by all of his contributions to the Saturday Evening Post during the late ’40s. That final book also contains a host of odds and ends, original artwork by Schulz for other Peanuts-related ventures through the years like some of the rare complete stories he authored and illustrated for the many Peanuts comic books, and a bunch of material for advertisements and books. I had spoken to Nat Gertler before the release and he was pretty thrilled about what he was getting to include, but unfortunately some of his ideas got wiped afterward and I have to admit I found the book a bit disappointing. What’s there is mostly good and nice to have, and I loved the comic book stuff, but I really don’t need pages and pages of the kids shilling for cars and cameras. It’s sad to know there won’t be any further volumes and to know that I’ve now read every single solitary Peanuts… but I plan on a special related project soon.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Sammy

    With Volume 26, The Complete Peanuts project comes to an end. And while it will be another decade or so before I've worked my way through much of the series, this final volume is an important capper to an incredible career. This really is a volume for completists and collectors only, a hodgepodge of advertising material, easter eggs, and other appearances of the Peanuts gang from across their 50-year lifespan. (Or, I should say, their first first fifty years, as they continue in other formats to With Volume 26, The Complete Peanuts project comes to an end. And while it will be another decade or so before I've worked my way through much of the series, this final volume is an important capper to an incredible career. This really is a volume for completists and collectors only, a hodgepodge of advertising material, easter eggs, and other appearances of the Peanuts gang from across their 50-year lifespan. (Or, I should say, their first first fifty years, as they continue in other formats to this day!) But this really showcases the commitment that the producers have shown to the series, and the wonderful way Schulz's legacy will live on for decades to come. At its lowest points, the monetisation of Peanuts could be depressing, disillusioning, and often plain dull. But at its best, as in some of the classic TV specials, the characters overflow with vibrancy, proving what a wonderful, broad, mature world Schulz created. This is also a part of that. Thanks again, Mr. Schulz.

  10. 5 out of 5

    iloveromance

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. This book really surprised me (in a good way!), because I thought it was just a book of comic strips. It's much more than that. Inside these pages are comics from the Saturday Evening Post (some of which made me laugh out loud!), classic and hilarious strips from 1957-1959, a large section of strips used in advertising, the obligatory Christmas strips (including Charlie Brown's Brown's Christmas Stocking and A Christmas Story). There is a section of Snoopy and the Red Baron, the Sopwith Camel, Sn This book really surprised me (in a good way!), because I thought it was just a book of comic strips. It's much more than that. Inside these pages are comics from the Saturday Evening Post (some of which made me laugh out loud!), classic and hilarious strips from 1957-1959, a large section of strips used in advertising, the obligatory Christmas strips (including Charlie Brown's Brown's Christmas Stocking and A Christmas Story). There is a section of Snoopy and the Red Baron, the Sopwith Camel, Snoopy the Writer along with the complete novel, "It Was A Dark And Stormy Night " (which I didn't realize that he had actually finished, so Yea. Snoopy!), a collection of single cartoons called "Things I Learned ", golf and tennis cartoons, Spot Drawings and a lengthy but wonderful afterword by Charles' wife, Jean Schulz (which I am still in the process of reading). Despite the differences in my expectations, I really loved this book and now I'm going to read the whole series.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Rob Hermanowski

    How to review Charles Schulz's entire collected "Peanuts" comic strip? To quote the publisher: "Fantagraphics Books is proud to present the most ambitious publishing project in the history of the American comic strip: the complete reprinting of Charles M. Schulz's classic, Peanuts. Considered to be one of the most popular comic strips in the history of the world, Peanuts is, for the first time, collected in its entirety." These strips are collected in 26 volumes (the first 25 contain two year se How to review Charles Schulz's entire collected "Peanuts" comic strip? To quote the publisher: "Fantagraphics Books is proud to present the most ambitious publishing project in the history of the American comic strip: the complete reprinting of Charles M. Schulz's classic, Peanuts. Considered to be one of the most popular comic strips in the history of the world, Peanuts is, for the first time, collected in its entirety." These strips are collected in 26 volumes (the first 25 contain two year sequences of the strip in most volumes, with volume 26 collecting miscellaneous drawings and side projects involving the "Peanuts" characters. It is particularly fascinating to read the first few years of this strip - Schulz is experimenting with the look of each character, and the general tone of the "Peanuts" most of us would come to know from our childhoods does not really cement itself until the 1960's. That decade, and the 1970's strips, are probably the high water mark for Schulz's creativity and subtle cultural commentary, but "Peanuts" (and Schulz) remained surprisingly relevant for me all the way through the final decade of the 1990's. Fantagraphics has produced a worthy testament to the amazing work that Charles Schulz created - they present the strips accurately and in a straightforward style, and also feature forwards by various luminaries (Garrison Keillor, Walter Cronkite, Diana Krall, Bill Clinton, Barack Obama, and many others) and a touching, lengthy afterward by Charles Schulz's widow Jean Schulz in the final volume. These 26 volumes are truly a wonderful tribute to the great Charles M. Schulz, and his magnificent half century achievement that is "Peanuts."

  12. 5 out of 5

    Dan Gorman

    Fascinating denouement to Fantagraphics's documentary edition of Peanuts. The editors compile a sample of Charles Schulz's comic book stories, pre-Peanuts strips, holiday stories, advice manuals, advertisements (especially for the 1962 Ford Falcon), and sports tournament gags. Apparently Schulz was a fiend for golf, hockey, and tennis! Reprinted booklets about Snoopy's adventures as a novelist and World War I Flying Ace are the volume's highlights. Jean Schulz, the cartoonist's widow, provides a Fascinating denouement to Fantagraphics's documentary edition of Peanuts. The editors compile a sample of Charles Schulz's comic book stories, pre-Peanuts strips, holiday stories, advice manuals, advertisements (especially for the 1962 Ford Falcon), and sports tournament gags. Apparently Schulz was a fiend for golf, hockey, and tennis! Reprinted booklets about Snoopy's adventures as a novelist and World War I Flying Ace are the volume's highlights. Jean Schulz, the cartoonist's widow, provides an afterword that, while meandering and featuring a bit of name-dropping, is heartfelt. Mrs. Schulz connects her reminiscences to the conclusions of Schulz's biographers, creating a unique interplay between memoir and historical analysis. The Fantagraphics editions of Peanuts give the cartoons superior treatment, and will be resources for fans and aspiring cartoonists for decades to come.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Meltha

    Everybody has cultural landmarks that they remember from when they were kids: Sesame Street, Mr. Rogers, Saturday morning cartoons, etc. Charlie Brown and Snoopy were definitely part of my world growing up, and it was wonderful to visit with the gang in this. To be honest, this was not what I was expecting. I ordered volume 1 through an interlibrary loan, and somehow I got the final volume instead, which is a collection of non-comic strip drawings, ads, books, one-shots, and other material that Everybody has cultural landmarks that they remember from when they were kids: Sesame Street, Mr. Rogers, Saturday morning cartoons, etc. Charlie Brown and Snoopy were definitely part of my world growing up, and it was wonderful to visit with the gang in this. To be honest, this was not what I was expecting. I ordered volume 1 through an interlibrary loan, and somehow I got the final volume instead, which is a collection of non-comic strip drawings, ads, books, one-shots, and other material that featured the Peanuts characters. I very clearly remember read "It Was a Dark and Stormy Night" when I was a kid as well as some of the others here. The fairly long article written by Jean Schulz, Charles Schulz's widow, was warm and interesting. I honestly enjoyed this. Also, I feel compelled to buy a 1960s Ford Falcon now. And some Butternut bread.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Matti Karjalainen

    Complete Peanuts -sarjan viimeisestä osaa varten on samojen kansien väliin kerätty yhtä jos toista Charles M. Schulzin pitkältä uralta. Lukija voi tutustua muun muassa Saturday Evening Post -lehteen piirrettyihin Li'l Folks -strippeihin, jotka julkaistiin vuosina 1948-1950 ja jotka olivat eräänlainen Tenavien esiaste. Lievästi hämmentäviltä tuntuvat puolestaan Fordia varten tehdyt mainosstripit, joissa Jaska Jokunen ja kumppanit päivittelevät uuden automallin edullista hintaa ja vähäistä kulutus Complete Peanuts -sarjan viimeisestä osaa varten on samojen kansien väliin kerätty yhtä jos toista Charles M. Schulzin pitkältä uralta. Lukija voi tutustua muun muassa Saturday Evening Post -lehteen piirrettyihin Li'l Folks -strippeihin, jotka julkaistiin vuosina 1948-1950 ja jotka olivat eräänlainen Tenavien esiaste. Lievästi hämmentäviltä tuntuvat puolestaan Fordia varten tehdyt mainosstripit, joissa Jaska Jokunen ja kumppanit päivittelevät uuden automallin edullista hintaa ja vähäistä kulutusta. Suomalaisille tutumpia mahtavat olla Ressu ja Punainen paroni -sekä Ressu kirjoittaa kirjan "Oli synkkä ja myrskyinen yö" -pokkareihin koottu materiaali. Lopputeksteissä Jean Schulz muistelee edesmennyttä miestään.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Amanda

    As much as I love Peanuts, and as much as I enjoyed seeing some material I hadn't seen before, I wasn't crazy about this book. Much of it felt like filler- a large portion of it was old Ford ads featuring the Peanuts gang that I couldn't have cared less about- and, in all honesty, the layout was a bit of a turnoff. The entire book had to be turned sideways on numerous occasions because the pages were printed that way. This is definitely not one of the better Peanuts anthologies I've come across, As much as I love Peanuts, and as much as I enjoyed seeing some material I hadn't seen before, I wasn't crazy about this book. Much of it felt like filler- a large portion of it was old Ford ads featuring the Peanuts gang that I couldn't have cared less about- and, in all honesty, the layout was a bit of a turnoff. The entire book had to be turned sideways on numerous occasions because the pages were printed that way. This is definitely not one of the better Peanuts anthologies I've come across, but if you're strictly interested in material you might not have seen anywhere else, it's a decent bet.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Mouse

    I have mixed feelings about this collection. It's sort of awkward and clunky, especially for sharing with an 8 year old. It's more of a collectors book for the avid Peanuts collector, which... I'm not sure if there really are any. We enjoyed it but lots of it was pointless and seemed like just filler (like the advertising stuff). I have mixed feelings about this collection. It's sort of awkward and clunky, especially for sharing with an 8 year old. It's more of a collectors book for the avid Peanuts collector, which... I'm not sure if there really are any. We enjoyed it but lots of it was pointless and seemed like just filler (like the advertising stuff).

  17. 5 out of 5

    Lee Anne

    The final volume of the magnificent Fantagraphics Peanuts books collects odds and ends, standalone books, corporate shills, and so forth. It ends with a long and loving essay from the widow Schulz. For completists only.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Jenette

    I can’t say I’d ever realised just how much advertising for Ford, Schultz had done! This was an enjoyable addition to the rest of my collection.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Yosef Shapiro

    This volume contains Peanuts material that has not been reprinted in many years. It skid has a long afterword written by Schulz's widow that is very interesting. This volume contains Peanuts material that has not been reprinted in many years. It skid has a long afterword written by Schulz's widow that is very interesting.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Andrew Shaffer

    Do you like Snoopy? And advertising? Then there’s plenty here for you, my friend.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Todd Glaeser

    An entertaining collection of Peanuts/ Schultz ephemera. The last of the series.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Michael P.

    There is some unevenness is this book collecting some of Mr. Schulz's books, comic book stories, and other art, but the beautiful afterword by Jean Schulz raises this one to five stars. There is some unevenness is this book collecting some of Mr. Schulz's books, comic book stories, and other art, but the beautiful afterword by Jean Schulz raises this one to five stars.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Benn Allen

    This is the absolute final volume of "The Complete Peanuts" series. It contains some comic book stories, advertising art and other non-newspaper comic strips odds and ends Schulz did over the years. As noted in the forward, these are not all such items written/drawn by Sparky, it tends to negate the "Complete" on the title of this series. And as fascinating as most of the entries in this volume are, if you have or have read the previous 25 books, you can safely skip this one for the most part. T This is the absolute final volume of "The Complete Peanuts" series. It contains some comic book stories, advertising art and other non-newspaper comic strips odds and ends Schulz did over the years. As noted in the forward, these are not all such items written/drawn by Sparky, it tends to negate the "Complete" on the title of this series. And as fascinating as most of the entries in this volume are, if you have or have read the previous 25 books, you can safely skip this one for the most part. The best reasons to own are. the reprints of little children's books Schulz did that have not been in print for decades and the wonderful essay written by Jean Schulz, Charles' second wife. The essay is insightful and well worth reading.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Morlando K

    We love the peanuts comics, found it in book form and was thrilled to read them!

  25. 4 out of 5

    Abby Rogers

  26. 4 out of 5

    Lisa

  27. 4 out of 5

    Katrina

  28. 4 out of 5

    Federico Kereki

  29. 5 out of 5

    Panda Incognito

  30. 5 out of 5

    Collin Brumagin

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...