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Rhetorics of Whiteness: Postracial Hauntings in Popular Culture, Social Media, and Education

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Winner, CCCC Outstanding Book Award in the Edited Collection Category, 2018 With the election of our first black president, many Americans began to argue that we had finally ended racism, claiming that we now live in a postracial era. Yet near-daily news reports regularly invoke white as a demographic category and recount instances of racialized violence as well as an incr Winner, CCCC Outstanding Book Award in the Edited Collection Category, 2018 With the election of our first black president, many Americans began to argue that we had finally ended racism, claiming that we now live in a postracial era. Yet near-daily news reports regularly invoke white as a demographic category and recount instances of racialized violence as well as an increased sensitivity to expressions of racial unrest. Clearly, American society isn’t as color-blind as people would like to believe. In Rhetorics of Whiteness: Postracial Hauntings in Popular Culture, Social Media, and Education, contributors reveal how identifications with racialized whiteness continue to manifest themselves in American culture. The sixteen essays that comprise this collection not only render visible how racialized whiteness infiltrates new twenty-first-century discourses and material spaces but also offer critical tactics for disrupting this normative whiteness. Specifically, contributors examine popular culture (novels, films, TV), social media (YouTube, eHarmony, Facebook), education (state law, the textbook industry, dual credit programs), pedagogy (tactics for teaching via narratives, emotional literacy, and mindfulness) as well as cultural theories (concepts of racialized space, anti-dialogicism, and color blindness). Offering new approaches to understanding racialized whiteness, this volume emphasizes the importance of a rhetorical lens for employing whiteness studies’ theories and methods to identify, analyze, interpret, and interrupt representations of whiteness. Although whiteness studies has been waning as an active research field for the past decade, the contributors to Rhetorics of Whiteness assert that it hasn’t lost its relevancy because racialized whiteness and issues of systemic racism persist in American society and culture today. Few whiteness studies texts have been published in rhetoric and composition in the past decade, so this collection should quickly become mandatory reading. By focusing on common, yet often overlooked, contemporary examples of how racialized whiteness haunts U.S. society, Rhetorics of Whiteness serves as a valuable text for scholars in the field as well as anyone else interested in the topic.


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Winner, CCCC Outstanding Book Award in the Edited Collection Category, 2018 With the election of our first black president, many Americans began to argue that we had finally ended racism, claiming that we now live in a postracial era. Yet near-daily news reports regularly invoke white as a demographic category and recount instances of racialized violence as well as an incr Winner, CCCC Outstanding Book Award in the Edited Collection Category, 2018 With the election of our first black president, many Americans began to argue that we had finally ended racism, claiming that we now live in a postracial era. Yet near-daily news reports regularly invoke white as a demographic category and recount instances of racialized violence as well as an increased sensitivity to expressions of racial unrest. Clearly, American society isn’t as color-blind as people would like to believe. In Rhetorics of Whiteness: Postracial Hauntings in Popular Culture, Social Media, and Education, contributors reveal how identifications with racialized whiteness continue to manifest themselves in American culture. The sixteen essays that comprise this collection not only render visible how racialized whiteness infiltrates new twenty-first-century discourses and material spaces but also offer critical tactics for disrupting this normative whiteness. Specifically, contributors examine popular culture (novels, films, TV), social media (YouTube, eHarmony, Facebook), education (state law, the textbook industry, dual credit programs), pedagogy (tactics for teaching via narratives, emotional literacy, and mindfulness) as well as cultural theories (concepts of racialized space, anti-dialogicism, and color blindness). Offering new approaches to understanding racialized whiteness, this volume emphasizes the importance of a rhetorical lens for employing whiteness studies’ theories and methods to identify, analyze, interpret, and interrupt representations of whiteness. Although whiteness studies has been waning as an active research field for the past decade, the contributors to Rhetorics of Whiteness assert that it hasn’t lost its relevancy because racialized whiteness and issues of systemic racism persist in American society and culture today. Few whiteness studies texts have been published in rhetoric and composition in the past decade, so this collection should quickly become mandatory reading. By focusing on common, yet often overlooked, contemporary examples of how racialized whiteness haunts U.S. society, Rhetorics of Whiteness serves as a valuable text for scholars in the field as well as anyone else interested in the topic.

37 review for Rhetorics of Whiteness: Postracial Hauntings in Popular Culture, Social Media, and Education

  1. 5 out of 5

    Matt Sautman

    This anthology does an excellent job at framing whiteness studies’ pertinence to 21st century cultural studies and education. Rhetorics of Whiteness is framed into five subsections that primarily deal with these two larger academic disciplines, with more experienced scholars in the field providing reflections to frame each section. I definitely recommend this to anyone interested in whiteness as a rhetorical performance.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Bonnie

  3. 4 out of 5

    Matthew

  4. 4 out of 5

    Shell

  5. 5 out of 5

    Nate Cloyd

  6. 4 out of 5

    Virginia Crank

  7. 4 out of 5

    Juho Hankela

  8. 4 out of 5

    Justin PJ

  9. 5 out of 5

    Catherine

  10. 5 out of 5

    Lynn Lewis

  11. 5 out of 5

    Kristi Mcduffie

  12. 4 out of 5

    Matt Homer

  13. 4 out of 5

    Katherine

  14. 5 out of 5

    Prasanna

  15. 5 out of 5

    Hazim Hardeman

  16. 5 out of 5

    Amber

  17. 4 out of 5

    Jeremy

  18. 4 out of 5

    Tammie

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    Katie Fuller

  20. 5 out of 5

    Taylor Thompson

  21. 5 out of 5

    Fernando

  22. 4 out of 5

    Kerry Baker

  23. 5 out of 5

    Caitlin

  24. 4 out of 5

    Ann McBee

  25. 4 out of 5

    Kristen Deane

  26. 5 out of 5

    Desiree

  27. 4 out of 5

    Sam Lane

  28. 4 out of 5

    Claire

  29. 4 out of 5

    Leslie

  30. 5 out of 5

    Caroline

  31. 4 out of 5

    Caitlin Murphy

  32. 4 out of 5

    Erika

  33. 5 out of 5

    Krys (Krys Reads)

  34. 4 out of 5

    Sean

  35. 5 out of 5

    Amy

  36. 5 out of 5

    Autumn Frykholm Damann

  37. 4 out of 5

    Lafayette Batts

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