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The Business of Good: Social Entrepreneurship and the New Bottom Line

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The Business of Good narrates the story behind social entrepreneurship as told by the individuals compelled to create a change in the world--not just another business. Serial and social entrepreneur Jason Haber intertwines case studies, anecdotes, and initiatives that have become part of the larger narrative of entrepreneurship. From Main Street to Wall Street, today’s soci The Business of Good narrates the story behind social entrepreneurship as told by the individuals compelled to create a change in the world--not just another business. Serial and social entrepreneur Jason Haber intertwines case studies, anecdotes, and initiatives that have become part of the larger narrative of entrepreneurship. From Main Street to Wall Street, today’s social entrepreneurs are rebooting capitalism, challenging the charitable industrial complex, and are disrupting the way companies do business with exciting innovations designed to solve society’s most vexing problems. In this book, Haber examines Capitalism 2.0, philanthropy, and the role and power of media alongside the world’s response as social entrepreneurship changes how we give, how we invest, and who we are.


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The Business of Good narrates the story behind social entrepreneurship as told by the individuals compelled to create a change in the world--not just another business. Serial and social entrepreneur Jason Haber intertwines case studies, anecdotes, and initiatives that have become part of the larger narrative of entrepreneurship. From Main Street to Wall Street, today’s soci The Business of Good narrates the story behind social entrepreneurship as told by the individuals compelled to create a change in the world--not just another business. Serial and social entrepreneur Jason Haber intertwines case studies, anecdotes, and initiatives that have become part of the larger narrative of entrepreneurship. From Main Street to Wall Street, today’s social entrepreneurs are rebooting capitalism, challenging the charitable industrial complex, and are disrupting the way companies do business with exciting innovations designed to solve society’s most vexing problems. In this book, Haber examines Capitalism 2.0, philanthropy, and the role and power of media alongside the world’s response as social entrepreneurship changes how we give, how we invest, and who we are.

30 review for The Business of Good: Social Entrepreneurship and the New Bottom Line

  1. 5 out of 5

    Jessica Crouse

    I enjoyed everything about this book: the case studies, the author's shared personal experiences, the quotes at the start of each chapter, and the big picture discussion. Reading this reminded me of my own grad school experience at a program geared to prepare its students to identify creative solutions to challenges and to not be afraid to step "outside of the box". This will be one of those books that I save on my bookshelf and re-read in the future. I would encourage you to read this if: - you i I enjoyed everything about this book: the case studies, the author's shared personal experiences, the quotes at the start of each chapter, and the big picture discussion. Reading this reminded me of my own grad school experience at a program geared to prepare its students to identify creative solutions to challenges and to not be afraid to step "outside of the box". This will be one of those books that I save on my bookshelf and re-read in the future. I would encourage you to read this if: - you identify yourself as an entrepreneur or social entrepreneur - you care about social good - you work for a non-profit - you like doing community service or volunteer work

  2. 4 out of 5

    Astri

    I have nothing against the author or writing and my rating for this book is completely personal. I was genuinely interested in this book when I got it, and I was hoping to be inspired by the social entrepreneurship concept delivered in this book. The writing was good, and easy to comprehend. It was also a short read and I managed to read it in one day. However, it felt short of my expectations and didn't inspire me at all. Perhaps this book is just not for me. Don't let my review stop you from r I have nothing against the author or writing and my rating for this book is completely personal. I was genuinely interested in this book when I got it, and I was hoping to be inspired by the social entrepreneurship concept delivered in this book. The writing was good, and easy to comprehend. It was also a short read and I managed to read it in one day. However, it felt short of my expectations and didn't inspire me at all. Perhaps this book is just not for me. Don't let my review stop you from reading this though! It may inspire you to be a social entrepreneur and help the world!

  3. 4 out of 5

    Robin

    This book contains some powerful stories that are worth reading. Those stories are separated by portions displaying extreme trust and faith in social entrepreneurship that could have done with more examples to guide by, and a few less "how awesome are we" moments. This book contains some powerful stories that are worth reading. Those stories are separated by portions displaying extreme trust and faith in social entrepreneurship that could have done with more examples to guide by, and a few less "how awesome are we" moments.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Audacia Ray

    The non-profit industrial complex is a mess, and it is entangled with capitalism in a complicated and often oppressive way. So I've been spending some time thinking and learning about different structures within capitalism for doing social change work, which has led me to social entrepreneurship and this horrorshow of a book about "Capitalism 2.0." Ok, so like obviously I have a complicated relationship with capitalism and also social change and I don't think the NPIC is doing too well with thos The non-profit industrial complex is a mess, and it is entangled with capitalism in a complicated and often oppressive way. So I've been spending some time thinking and learning about different structures within capitalism for doing social change work, which has led me to social entrepreneurship and this horrorshow of a book about "Capitalism 2.0." Ok, so like obviously I have a complicated relationship with capitalism and also social change and I don't think the NPIC is doing too well with those things. I think "disruptors" are a good idea, but where they are coming from matters, ie: grassroots, POC-led, lived experience-driven solutions plz. I don't believe that making money is necessarily evil, I like money. That said, I am into the concept of the triple bottom line, which assesses whether a business is good for people, planet, and profit instead of just being profit driven. But who are the arbiters of what's "good"? It cannot just be entrepreneurs, makers, people with ideas and access to capital operating under business rules without accountability, because they come up with fucked up ideas about how to reduce recidivism in youth who are sent to Rikers (hint: they aren't abolishing police or prisons or respecting human rights, soooo nope). These folks need to be accountability to the communities, er I mean markets, they are aiming at. Preferably with communities respected as stakeholders. But that's slow and not disruptive in the way entrepreneurs like so it appears to not be happening at all in these spaces. Except sometimes later there's a "whoops, my bad" (see: TOMS shoes). Also global capitalism driven by young, white, mostly male entrepreneurs is colonialist? So when the book says that "the work of social entrepreneurs is largely focused on bringing Capitalism 2.0" to the market of "four billion people in the developing world who earn less than $1,500 a year" that's a serious red flag. I mean, I feel suspicious of most international development work, whether it has the shiny entrepreneurial gleam or not. But building up the idea of people in the developing world as new consumers... I'm not sure how that's "good" exactly, unless they are also the worker owners of the companies that are producing the things. And that's not the thing happening in this book. So overall, I'm glad I read this book because it gave me a better sense of the thinking behind progressive rich folks who are excited about doing good but are actually well-intentioned monsters. Also it made me meditate more on the intrinsic harms of all things under capitalism. Cool story.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Rajat Jain

    "The change you create is far more important than the quantity you give or donate" The book has wonderful lessons. One that amazed me was when Jason mentioned ‘Failure is your friend, learn from it’ and ‘Principles over Profits’. This is Amazing book for social entrepreneurs! Awesome read! "The change you create is far more important than the quantity you give or donate" The book has wonderful lessons. One that amazed me was when Jason mentioned ‘Failure is your friend, learn from it’ and ‘Principles over Profits’. This is Amazing book for social entrepreneurs! Awesome read!

  6. 5 out of 5

    Tristan Bills

    It’s possible to make money while working on social causes, and many investors and entrepreneurs are already making a difference while enjoying impressive profits. Social entrepreneurship in a capitalism 2.0 world is here to stay, and we as a global society will all benefit.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Jose saldana gascon

    Overall, good informative and easy to read book. It provides insights on the dynamics that formed the social entrepreneurship movement, and it brings practical examples (eg, people, companies, organizations).

  8. 5 out of 5

    David Santiago

    It has some great examples of what social entrepreneurship is and why it is so relevant. It definitely has a very capitalist approach which sometimes feels like too much, but you can for sure learn a thing or two if you are interested in learning about the topic or want to do something yourself.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Tim Keller

  10. 5 out of 5

    Gibran

  11. 5 out of 5

    Peter

  12. 5 out of 5

    Lizzy Markus

  13. 5 out of 5

    Claire Boyer

  14. 4 out of 5

    Ragini Pillai

  15. 4 out of 5

    Oana

  16. 4 out of 5

    Tantya Saradina

  17. 5 out of 5

    Sarah Katz

  18. 5 out of 5

    Lina Vargas García

  19. 4 out of 5

    Pasang Tamang

  20. 4 out of 5

    Vincent Edwards

  21. 4 out of 5

    Jamie

  22. 5 out of 5

    Kenneth Boyle

  23. 5 out of 5

    Iulia Mica

  24. 4 out of 5

    DP

  25. 5 out of 5

    Evan Piekara

  26. 4 out of 5

    Amy Carroll

  27. 4 out of 5

    Sharon Johnson

  28. 4 out of 5

    John

  29. 5 out of 5

    Craig

  30. 5 out of 5

    Amjad Masood

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