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The Future of University Credentials: New Developments at the Intersection of Higher Education and Hiring

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2017 Phillip E. Frandson Award for Literature in the Field of Professional, Continuing, and/or Online Education, University Professional and Continuing Education Association (UPCEA) The Future of University Credentials offers a thorough and urgently needed overview of the burgeoning world of university degrees and credentials. At a time of heightened attention to how univer 2017 Phillip E. Frandson Award for Literature in the Field of Professional, Continuing, and/or Online Education, University Professional and Continuing Education Association (UPCEA) The Future of University Credentials offers a thorough and urgently needed overview of the burgeoning world of university degrees and credentials. At a time of heightened attention to how universities and colleges are preparing young people for the working world, questions about the meaning and value of university credentials have become especially prominent. Sean Gallagher guides us through this fast-changing terrain, providing much-needed context, details, and insights.   The book casts a wide net, focusing on traditional higher education degrees and on the myriad certificates and other postsecondary awards that universities and other institutions now issue. He describes the entire ecosystem of credentials, including universities and colleges, employers, government agencies, policy makers and influencers—and, not least, the students whose futures are profoundly affected by these certifications. And he looks intently at where university credentials might be headed, as educational institutions seek to best serve students and employers in a rapidly changing world.   The result is an unprecedented, comprehensive look at the current credentialing landscape in higher education—as well as at the future challenges and opportunities for this vital field.


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2017 Phillip E. Frandson Award for Literature in the Field of Professional, Continuing, and/or Online Education, University Professional and Continuing Education Association (UPCEA) The Future of University Credentials offers a thorough and urgently needed overview of the burgeoning world of university degrees and credentials. At a time of heightened attention to how univer 2017 Phillip E. Frandson Award for Literature in the Field of Professional, Continuing, and/or Online Education, University Professional and Continuing Education Association (UPCEA) The Future of University Credentials offers a thorough and urgently needed overview of the burgeoning world of university degrees and credentials. At a time of heightened attention to how universities and colleges are preparing young people for the working world, questions about the meaning and value of university credentials have become especially prominent. Sean Gallagher guides us through this fast-changing terrain, providing much-needed context, details, and insights.   The book casts a wide net, focusing on traditional higher education degrees and on the myriad certificates and other postsecondary awards that universities and other institutions now issue. He describes the entire ecosystem of credentials, including universities and colleges, employers, government agencies, policy makers and influencers—and, not least, the students whose futures are profoundly affected by these certifications. And he looks intently at where university credentials might be headed, as educational institutions seek to best serve students and employers in a rapidly changing world.   The result is an unprecedented, comprehensive look at the current credentialing landscape in higher education—as well as at the future challenges and opportunities for this vital field.

36 review for The Future of University Credentials: New Developments at the Intersection of Higher Education and Hiring

  1. 5 out of 5

    Marks54

    What is the relationship between university credentials and the professional labor market and especially the corporations that hire large number of university graduates expecting them to be able to perform well on the job? That is what Scott Gallagher’s book is about. These are issues that have been rolling around for quite a while and which seem especially influenced by economic and labor market developments. For example, after the Crash of 2008, large numbers of millenials graduated out into a What is the relationship between university credentials and the professional labor market and especially the corporations that hire large number of university graduates expecting them to be able to perform well on the job? That is what Scott Gallagher’s book is about. These are issues that have been rolling around for quite a while and which seem especially influenced by economic and labor market developments. For example, after the Crash of 2008, large numbers of millenials graduated out into a job market that was one of the fiercest and most unforgiving while students only a few years ahead of them seemed to do well - getting hired and starting off their careers. The shift in considering higher education increasingly if not completely in terms of jobs and careers, has continued since the 2008 Great Recession and has only been exacerbated by changes in technology that put more and more emphasis on computing skills and coding. Seen this way, Gallagher’s book is valuable as a thoughtful update to a continuing discussion that usefully sets out the right debates and goes over the issue well. Things are changing and while predictions of a MOOC revolution and related shifts have not occurred, enough is happening that all of the parties involved need to pay attention. University based credentials are still around and important but private sector alternatives, along with other certifications, are becoming more important and are increasingly demonstrating their value to those in the workforce. What will come of it? However, COVID-19 came around. In an instant, all the major and most of the minor institutions of higher education shifted to online education and spent quite a bit to make the transition. The whole sector got much better at online learning that would have been the case without the virus. At the same time, students now had to take their classes online while continuing to pay full fare, more or less. They were right to wonder what they were paying for and why online education was superior to subscriptions to Netflix, Hulu, and Disney=. Then there were the major employers who found out how to manage large workforces at home and had to think hard about their operations, hiring, and staffing to see how to evaluate a workforce that was online and at home. Finally, Federal and State governments had to think harder about infrastructure in the context of a rapid decline in tax revenues such as happened when the economy ground to a halt. So just about all of the issues raised by Mr. Gallagher have gotten supercharged and thoroughly blended during the pandemic. This makes Gallagher’s book quite valuable as a prompt for what comes next in terms of the evolution of how universities and private sector organizations adjust to the post-COVID world to provide students, workers, and those looking for work with relevant training and credentials that will permit them to prosper. If only he had the answers! That’s ok - it is a thoughtful and useful book.

  2. 4 out of 5

    C. Patrick G. Erker

    Should my kid (or should I!) borrow tens of thousands of dollars to pay for a degree from a mid-tier university? Should I take time off from work to pursue an alternative credential at a coding academy? Should my company sponsor a branded credential of our own? As an investor, where do I put my education bets in the near term? Should we as a society rethink how we fund and incentivize providers of post-secondary education? If you're asking yourself some of these questions, then you may find Sea Should my kid (or should I!) borrow tens of thousands of dollars to pay for a degree from a mid-tier university? Should I take time off from work to pursue an alternative credential at a coding academy? Should my company sponsor a branded credential of our own? As an investor, where do I put my education bets in the near term? Should we as a society rethink how we fund and incentivize providers of post-secondary education? If you're asking yourself some of these questions, then you may find Sean Gallagher's The Future of University Credentials a timely and fascinating study. While Gallagher's book is focused primarily on the future, it also provides an excellent summary of the past as context, reminding or informing readers of both overarching, society-wide education trends (such as the land grant university movement in the 1800s, or the installation of community college capacity this past century), and of more recent, sometimes failed, experiments in credential innovation (such as the first way of IT certifications to online education programs of the 1990s and 2000s). I was less familiar with players or programs such as JFK's online MBA program (from the 1980s!) to university.com, UNext, Fathom, Universitas21 Global, and AllLearn. Many of these efforts were led by premier academic institutions, but often failed to turn great promise into great results. The author notes that these players faced regulatory headwinds - among them licensing, accreditation, and aid - that slowed their growth. Gallagher's focus ultimately is on where universities and other providers of higher education meet employers. While he tends to spend more time on the university side, he covers incredibly important points on the employer side too, among them, prehire assessments and talent analytics, LinkedIn's role in all of this, and competency-based hiring. Companies are getting much smarter when it comes to how they hire and develop the best people, and an entire cottage industry of players is cropping up to support this. From companies dedicated to providing diverse talent pools and minimizing inherent bias while maximizing the reach of employers, to those working to assess candidates' competencies based on the specific needs of the employer, there is and will continue to be much innovation here. Companies may, as the author notes, decide to play a bigger role in the credentialing game than they already do. Beyond offering credentials in partnership with MOOCs (see Google and Coursera's IT certificate, or AT&T, Georgia Tech, and Udacity's computer science degree), or offering certificates of their own (Cisco, IBM, Microsoft, and others have long been and continue to be in this game.) The author's sources for the book show both his commitment to traditional research along with a high degree of relevance. In addition to using his own research results from work at Northeastern, the author quotes a number of luminaries who are helping to fund, guide, and evaluate the future, among them Ryan Craig of University Ventures, author Jeff Selingo, and Lauren Rivera of Kellogg. And he talks to a huge number of talent and learning professionals who are experimenting with many of the innovative approaches covered here. He also pulls the latest thinking as reported in ed tech media such as Ed Surge and Class Central. It's a very useful mix of academia and practicum - perhaps not surprising, coming from someone who has spent so much time at Northeastern, a university known for such overlap. I've been working in this space this year (although this review represents my opinion only and not that of my employer), and found the work incredibly helpful, even a couple years after it was published. I grabbed a signed copy at ASU+GSV and hope to have a chance to talk to Gallagher at some point about his work!

  3. 5 out of 5

    Samir Mejia Carrera

  4. 5 out of 5

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  5. 4 out of 5

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  8. 4 out of 5

    Sharonmhansengmail.Com

  9. 5 out of 5

    Lori

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  11. 5 out of 5

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  14. 5 out of 5

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  16. 5 out of 5

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  20. 4 out of 5

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  21. 4 out of 5

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  22. 5 out of 5

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  27. 5 out of 5

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  34. 4 out of 5

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  35. 5 out of 5

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  36. 5 out of 5

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