Hot Best Seller

Shalom in Psalms: A Devotional from the Jewish Heart of the Christian Faith

Availability: Ready to download

The ancient Jewish life-giving balm in Psalms helps us recover our equilibrium in a world where so much knocks us off balance and steals our shalom. This devotional and Tree of Life Version of the Bible come from the heart of today's Messianic Jewish movement to provide the Jewish essence of Psalms in a way that promises shalom for the heart and soul. The ancient Jewish life-giving balm in Psalms helps us recover our equilibrium in a world where so much knocks us off balance and steals our shalom. This devotional and Tree of Life Version of the Bible come from the heart of today's Messianic Jewish movement to provide the Jewish essence of Psalms in a way that promises shalom for the heart and soul.


Compare

The ancient Jewish life-giving balm in Psalms helps us recover our equilibrium in a world where so much knocks us off balance and steals our shalom. This devotional and Tree of Life Version of the Bible come from the heart of today's Messianic Jewish movement to provide the Jewish essence of Psalms in a way that promises shalom for the heart and soul. The ancient Jewish life-giving balm in Psalms helps us recover our equilibrium in a world where so much knocks us off balance and steals our shalom. This devotional and Tree of Life Version of the Bible come from the heart of today's Messianic Jewish movement to provide the Jewish essence of Psalms in a way that promises shalom for the heart and soul.

58 review for Shalom in Psalms: A Devotional from the Jewish Heart of the Christian Faith

  1. 4 out of 5

    Jason Kanz

    According to the front cover, Shalom in the Psalms (Baker, 2017) is described as "a devotional from the Jewish heart of the Christian faith." When quickly scanning the text, one quickly sees that the devotional first presents a psalm in its entirety in the Tree of Life Version, followed by a brief reflection or meditation by one or more of the three authors: Jeffrey Seif, Glenn Blank, and Paul Wilbur. Reading through the book, I had a few observations. First, I was grateful that this book was app According to the front cover, Shalom in the Psalms (Baker, 2017) is described as "a devotional from the Jewish heart of the Christian faith." When quickly scanning the text, one quickly sees that the devotional first presents a psalm in its entirety in the Tree of Life Version, followed by a brief reflection or meditation by one or more of the three authors: Jeffrey Seif, Glenn Blank, and Paul Wilbur. Reading through the book, I had a few observations. First, I was grateful that this book was approached communally by a D.Min., worship leader, and literary editor. Each presents a different perspective on the Psalms and their varying voices were welcome in the book. Although most of us who have come to love the Bible have benefited from our individual meditations, there is real strength in communal study. I particularly liked that some of the meditations were co-authored because one then hears different voices. Second, I have not been familiar with the Tree of Life Version of the Bible, a translation initially developed by the Jewish Publication Society in 1917. I always find it interesting to read translations with which I am unfamiliar. The TLV version is no different. One of the things most Christian readers will find with this version is that various Hebrew words are retained. This forces one to slow down and not simply gloss over the reading. Poets know that word choice can intentionally slow a person down and that is certainly true here. There were a few times when I found it distracting, however. Finally, I appreciated the commentators' willingness to ask questions of the text. In his reflection on Psalm 51, one of my favorite Psalms, Paul Wilbur wrote, "I don't really understand verse 6, because the sin was not only against the Lord and His righteousness; David also sinned grievously against Uriah his friend and Bathsheba, Uriah's wife" (p. 124). Too often, when reading the Bible, we assert our understanding, rather than seeking to listen. Wilbur reminds us that it is good to do that. On the whole, I would recommend this book. I suspect it will be a resource for me as I continue to explore the Psalms. I received a copy of this book for review from Baker Books. The views presented here are my own.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Bob

    Summary: A devotional based on the Tree of Life Version (TLV) of the Bible, a Messianic Jewish translation of scripture. The Psalms, or the Tehillim, have been the prayer and worship book of God’s people for thousands of years, extending before the Christian era, at very least to their post-exilic collection, and in some form, back to the temple or even tabernacle worship of King David. They have been memorized by children, set to music numerous times, used in liturgy, prayed corporately, and dev Summary: A devotional based on the Tree of Life Version (TLV) of the Bible, a Messianic Jewish translation of scripture. The Psalms, or the Tehillim, have been the prayer and worship book of God’s people for thousands of years, extending before the Christian era, at very least to their post-exilic collection, and in some form, back to the temple or even tabernacle worship of King David. They have been memorized by children, set to music numerous times, used in liturgy, prayed corporately, and devotionally, giving words and voice to the deepest longings and experiences of the human heart. This book is a new entry into a long history of devotional literature centered around the Psalms. What singles this out from others is that it is based on a new translation of the Bible, the Tree of Life Version (TLV). It includes the text of all 150 Psalms and devotional readings written by the three authors, including two of the editors of the TLV (Seif and Blank), and a career musician (Wilbur). All three are messianic Jewish Christians and the vision of this translation is to provide a Jewish-friendly translation of the Bible. This includes reverence for the four-letter unspoken name of God, always translated in this version as Adonai, transliteration of Hebrew terms like shalom, kedoshim, and shofar, speaking of Messiah as Yeshua. I understand that the whole Bible also follows the Jewish ordering of the books. It is interesting how this is applied with the Psalms. The superscriptions at the beginning of many of the Psalms are included in the verse numberings. This can cause some confusion if this version is cited, probably requiring parenthetical citations of the standard version verses where they differ. The Psalms follow the Hebrew or Masoretic text numbering of the Psalms (followed by Protestant and modern Catholic versions) rather than the Greek Septuagint (followed by the Eastern Orthodox). Here is a comparison of Psalm 8 in TLV and NIV translations: Psalm 8 1 For the music director, upon the Gittite lyre: a psalm of David. 2 Adonai our Lord, how excellent is Your Name over all the earth! You set Your splendor above the heavens. 3 Out of the mouths of babies and toddlers You established power, because of Your enemies, to silence the foe and the avenger. 4 When I consider Your heavens, the work of Your fingers, the moon and the stars, which You established— 5 what is man, that You are mindful of him? And the son of man, that You care for him? 6 Yet You made him a little lower than the angels, and crowned him with glory and majesty! 7 You gave him dominion over the works of Your hands. You put all things under their feet: 8 all sheep and oxen, and also beasts of the field, 9 birds in the air, and fish in the ocean— all passing through the paths of the seas. 10 Adonai our Lord, how excellent is Your Name over all the earth! Tree of Life Version (TLV) Tree of Life (TLV) Translation of the Bible. Copyright © 2015 by The Messianic Jewish Family Bible Society. Used by permission. Psalm 8 For the director of music. According to gittith. A psalm of David. 1 Lord, our Lord, how majestic is your name in all the earth! You have set your glory in the heavens. 2 Through the praise of children and infants you have established a stronghold against your enemies, to silence the foe and the avenger. 3 When I consider your heavens, the work of your fingers, the moon and the stars, which you have set in place, 4 what is mankind that you are mindful of them, human beings that you care for them? 5 You have made them a little lower than the angels and crowned them with glory and honor. 6 You made them rulers over the works of your hands; you put everything under their feet: 7 all flocks and herds, and the animals of the wild, 8 the birds in the sky, and the fish in the sea, all that swim the paths of the seas. 9 Lord, our Lord, how majestic is your name in all the earth! New International Version (NIV) Holy Bible, New International Version®, NIV® Copyright ©1973, 1978, 1984, 2011 by Biblica, Inc.® Used by permission. All rights reserved worldwide. Apart from the transliterations and use of Adonai and the verse variations, I found the translation generally tracks closely with standard translations. The devotional readings vary depending on the authors. Those by Jeffrey Seif and Glenn Blank tend to be a bit more commentary including Jewish backgrounds of the text as well as good personal application. The latter is also true of Paul Wilbur’s contributions but he brings in much more of his experience of setting these works to music and references some of these efforts, most of which were unfamiliar to me. Except for very long Psalms, most are two to three paragraphs in length. This book is a good devotional resource for someone who wants to get more of a Jewish perspective on the Psalms. It is also a good introduction to the Tree of Life Version for those considering purchasing the whole Bible in this translation. This seems especially to be a devotional resource that might be deeply appreciated by someone in a messianic Jewish congregation. It reminded me that when I read and pray the Psalms, I join a line of people extending back far before the Christian era who lamented, struggled with enemies from without and their own sins within, cried out for deliverance, and celebrated the God who heard them. ____________________________ Disclosure of Material Connection: I received this book free from the publisher. I was not required to write a positive review. The opinions I have expressed are my own.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Kelsey Bryant

    I read this as a devotional over a period of several months. I loved the Tree of Life translation of the Psalms and the relevant and relatable insights the authors gleaned from each psalm. It's neat that Paul Wilbur commented on the ones that either he or friends of his have written into worship songs that I know. I read this as a devotional over a period of several months. I loved the Tree of Life translation of the Psalms and the relevant and relatable insights the authors gleaned from each psalm. It's neat that Paul Wilbur commented on the ones that either he or friends of his have written into worship songs that I know.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Jim Rickard

    Great book This is my second time reading this book. I read a chapter a day and loved it. I always am blessed by the word of God and the commentary was great.

  5. 4 out of 5

    J.K. Turner

    My Rating - If you are looking for something Level - Longish (about 350 pages) Summary The subtitle more or less gets tells you what you need to know about this book. The intent is to be a devotional on the Psalms from Messianic Jews.  However, there are no days (40, 365, etc) or actual dates (a year in the Psalms). It is just a Psalm and then a devotional/commentary that follows which is written by one or two (usually Seif and Blank) of the authors. The goal of the devotional is to get to the Jewi My Rating - If you are looking for something Level - Longish (about 350 pages) Summary The subtitle more or less gets tells you what you need to know about this book. The intent is to be a devotional on the Psalms from Messianic Jews.  However, there are no days (40, 365, etc) or actual dates (a year in the Psalms). It is just a Psalm and then a devotional/commentary that follows which is written by one or two (usually Seif and Blank) of the authors. The goal of the devotional is to get to the Jewish roots and understanding of the Psalms, and to that end, the authors us the Tree of Life version(TLV) of the Bible; for which Sief and Blank are translators. My Thoughts The TLV is an interesting version, you can check out their website to read about their driving principles. Some are fairly innocuous, using Yeshua instead of Jesus (or Miriam and Jacob, instead of Mary and James). Though, when you don't change all names, it leads to the feeling of that guy that studied abroad and now over pronounces the few words he knows. Likewise they use Adonia for LORD/YHWH, and use a few other words such as Shalom, which are somewhat familiar, though others I did not know and they never offered and translation note or explanation. This seems like a major oversight if your goal is to bring this view to those who don't already know. Looking around their site I could ascertain whether their translation was literal or dynamic equivalent, though I suspect it was the latter. Overall the translation seemed readable and understandable, with the few exceptions of untranslated words. As for the devotional part, it isn't quite there. There are two problems (ish), the first one being, that often this worked more as a light commentary than devotional. I know the line can blur, and I actually prefer the commentary type more, but that isn't always what people are looking for. Not necessarily a problem, but something for which to be aware. The second, much bigger issue is that the book is not broken into any type of daily format. They could have tried to fit it into 365, or picked some other random number (40, 200, etc.), but instead just offered their devotion/commentary after each chapter. So, that means one morning you may read a Psalm that is a few lines with maybe a paragraph of devotion. Then a week or two later, you'll read Psalm 119 (the longest verse in the Bible, longer than books such as James or Ruth) followed by pages of commentary. Again, this can work fine as a commentary, but a devotional is really set more for the 5-20 minute a day framework. This really fails as that model, which wouldn't be such a big deal were it not for the subheading. If you are expecting a 10 minute morning devotional, broken into nice segments, you aren't going to get it. Depending on the day, I would read two of the Psalms with both devotionals, if they were short (thing the 80's and 130's) or for longer ones, sometimes I'd read just the verse, then come back the next day and read the commentary. Overall, I think it worked to something like 200 or so days, which works fine if you have  Lent and/or Advent devotional to though in as well. Overall, I enjoyed it, but the format should have been different. If you know that going in and plan to work around it, it can work well for a devotional. If you really like the Psalms, or are just looking for something different in a commentary, or especially if you are looking for a Jewish (or at least modern Messianic Jewish) perspective it is worth picking up. *I received a free copy of this book in exchange for an honest review. More reviews at MondayMorningTheologain.com

  6. 5 out of 5

    Rachel Schmoyer

    This book is more of a light commentary than a devotional. The real treasure of the book is the translation of the Psalms. The Tree of Life Version was translated by Jewish Christian scholars. The translation was easy to understand. At the same time, the word choice called to attention the first audience of the book. I don’t often hear from Hebrew scholars when learning about the Psalms. My understanding of the Psalms was deepened because of the explanations of the meanings of the original Hebre This book is more of a light commentary than a devotional. The real treasure of the book is the translation of the Psalms. The Tree of Life Version was translated by Jewish Christian scholars. The translation was easy to understand. At the same time, the word choice called to attention the first audience of the book. I don’t often hear from Hebrew scholars when learning about the Psalms. My understanding of the Psalms was deepened because of the explanations of the meanings of the original Hebrew words. I liked that the Scripture was printed right along with the devotional. And each devotional varied in length and by author so that they were not rigid in form, but felt like the author was just explaining the Psalm to the reader. But this also means that the devotionals were little more than explanations of the Psalms. 90% of the applications were broad, sweeping, general application questions that only require Sunday School answers like “when I sing praise to His name I feel strength. How about you?” or “it’s good to remember God’s works on our behalf, isn’t it?”. Shalom in Psalms lacked the deep, convicting applications with specific applications I expect in a devotional. If you are looking for an easy, breezy reading of the Psalms with an emphasis on Jewish culture and the Hebrew language, this book is for you. If you are looking for a simple Psalms commentary for teaching a short Bible lesson, this book would also be helpful. But if you are looking for a deeply personal devotional full of hard-hitting conviction, you will be disappointed.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Mary Lou

    From well-known Jewish Messianic scholars around the world comes this new Tree of Life Version of the Psalms. The translation adds depth to Christian people’s appreciation of the Psalms since Christianity is built at the foundation of Jewish spirituality in its truest from. In this translation the scholars through commentary provide insight into Jesus as Messiah and background into how the Psalms were celebrated in Judaism and in Messianic circles today. Shalom is a Hebrew concept of wholeness an From well-known Jewish Messianic scholars around the world comes this new Tree of Life Version of the Psalms. The translation adds depth to Christian people’s appreciation of the Psalms since Christianity is built at the foundation of Jewish spirituality in its truest from. In this translation the scholars through commentary provide insight into Jesus as Messiah and background into how the Psalms were celebrated in Judaism and in Messianic circles today. Shalom is a Hebrew concept of wholeness and blessing from God that recurs repeatedly throughout the Psalms. Surely this is why the Psalms are so beloved and turned to in times of distress and praise. They epitomize the blessing that God gives and gives again to those who turn to Him in faith. The volume is a welcome addition to the literature of one of the most beloved portions of the Bible. Four stars. Mary Lou Codman-Wilson, Ph.D. 2/9/2017

  8. 4 out of 5

    Amy

    Never have I been able to read the Psalms with better understanding! I personally do not like poetry so I typically avoid reading the Psalms. But I didn't like that I was avoiding it. So I sought out a book that would help me understand what I was reading, and this book did just that! The authors are Messianic Jews, so they provide insight into some of the Jewish history, culture and traditions that are expressed in the Psalms that had previously gone over my head. Thanks to this book, I read th Never have I been able to read the Psalms with better understanding! I personally do not like poetry so I typically avoid reading the Psalms. But I didn't like that I was avoiding it. So I sought out a book that would help me understand what I was reading, and this book did just that! The authors are Messianic Jews, so they provide insight into some of the Jewish history, culture and traditions that are expressed in the Psalms that had previously gone over my head. Thanks to this book, I read through the Psalms, enjoyed it, understood a lot more of it, and was encouraged and challenged by the Words of God.

  9. 4 out of 5

    James

    Shalom in Psalms is a sort of devotional commentary. The words to each psalm are printed out, from the Tree of Life Version ( a Messianic Jewish translation from the Jewish Family Bible Society), followed by a brief devotional reflection. These are generally two or three pages long, though a short psalm like Psalm 117, only warrants a paragraph and a long psalm like Psalm 119 has 9 pages of devotional notes. The authors comment on the text, make canonical connections with Torah and to Jesus the Shalom in Psalms is a sort of devotional commentary. The words to each psalm are printed out, from the Tree of Life Version ( a Messianic Jewish translation from the Jewish Family Bible Society), followed by a brief devotional reflection. These are generally two or three pages long, though a short psalm like Psalm 117, only warrants a paragraph and a long psalm like Psalm 119 has 9 pages of devotional notes. The authors comment on the text, make canonical connections with Torah and to Jesus the Messiah, and to the contemporary Messianic community. The three authors, Jeffery Seif, Glenn Blank and Paul Wilbur take turns writing the reflections for each psalm (often Seif or Blank, with some Wilbur). The three men bring together linguistic scholarship, pastoral concern, and insight into worship. Wilbur is an artist and worship leader. Blank is a pastor, the Rabbi of Beit Simcha in Allentown, and a Bible translator. Seif is the project manager for the Messianic Jewish Family Bible Project. There is a lot to like about this book. The translation and notes are designed to reflect both the Jewish particularity of the Psalms and to highlight ways that the text points forward to Jesus the Messiah. They handle the text and the various genres well (i.e. lament psalms, psalms of praise, royal psalms, psalms of thanksgiving, wisdom psalms). They deal difficult themes (like the baby bashing in Psalm 137) with pastoral sensitivity. The explore the setting of life in the Psalms and draw connections to today. Wilbur especially shares stories from his songwriting and the worshipping community. As a devotional commentary, this is pretty good. The Bible nerd in me wishes they discussed their translation method and their text-critical decisions for particular verses (i.e. 'kiss the son' or 'kiss his feet' in Psalm 2:12 is one text critical passage where modern translations are divided. The TLV follows the BHS with 'kiss the Son' but it would be fun to see how they weigh the textual evidence). I realize this is a devotional pitched at non-scholars so text criticism is outside of their purview. But with the TNV translation, some textual notes would be a nice addition. This is a nice devotional to delve deeper into the world of the psalms and what they have to teach us about the life of prayer (from a Jewish Christian perspective). I give it four stars. Note: I received this book from the publisher in exchange for my honest review.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Terry Perrine

    Shalom in Psalms is truly an excellent book. I had been previously unaware of the Tree of Life Bible translation. In essence, it is a Messianic Jewish translation of the modern Bible, the Old Covenant portion of which is an English rendering of the Hebrew Bible. (Significantly more can be said of the Tree of Life translation than I am able to explain in this review.) This being said, Shalom in Psalms is the Tree of Life translation of the book of Psalms, coupled with what is coined "devotional" Shalom in Psalms is truly an excellent book. I had been previously unaware of the Tree of Life Bible translation. In essence, it is a Messianic Jewish translation of the modern Bible, the Old Covenant portion of which is an English rendering of the Hebrew Bible. (Significantly more can be said of the Tree of Life translation than I am able to explain in this review.) This being said, Shalom in Psalms is the Tree of Life translation of the book of Psalms, coupled with what is coined "devotional" commentary, but what I would consider to be a commentary that is part devotional and part Bible study. The authors have created a beautiful reprint of this version of the Psalms, with a useful and attractive presentation that is very versatile. It can be used as a daily devotional, a reference book, or for general reading. It is the author's hope that this presentation of the Psalms will help the reader to find shalom again through their presentation in this book. I believe they have accomplished their goal.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Paul C.

    What I appreciate most about this translation (called the Tree of Life Version , or the TLV) of the Psalms is that it unapologetically maintains the Jewishness of the Psalms. While our translations, English or otherwise, struggle to maintain the original tone of Jewishness in the Old and New Testament, the TLV wrestles to bring some of that Jewishness back while not being entirely wooden. The layout of Shalom in Psalms is simple: after each Psalm there is a short and commentary on that Psalm by o What I appreciate most about this translation (called the Tree of Life Version , or the TLV) of the Psalms is that it unapologetically maintains the Jewishness of the Psalms. While our translations, English or otherwise, struggle to maintain the original tone of Jewishness in the Old and New Testament, the TLV wrestles to bring some of that Jewishness back while not being entirely wooden. The layout of Shalom in Psalms is simple: after each Psalm there is a short and commentary on that Psalm by one of three authors, or at times there will be two authors together, offering their insight. The commentary takes you verse by verse but in a very brief manner, aimed at being more devotional than academic. I absolutely loved the treatment of Psalm 22. As Christians we often read this Psalm and allow ourselves to be transported automatically to the rugged cross of our Lord, not realizing that the author (who we (mostly) presume is David) is actually going through turmoil. Meaning, Psalm 22 is about his experience and is only later applied to Jesus. As mentioned, Shalom in Psalms is more for devotional reading than critical study. I personally have thoroughly enjoyed it and am happy to add it to my collection of books though I will use it “devotionally” rather than the study of Scripture. *I received my copy free in exchange for an honest review from Baker

  12. 5 out of 5

    Michelle

    `Shalom in Psalms` is a devotional written from a Messianic Jewish perspective by authors Jeffrey Seif, Glenn Blank, and Paul Wilbur, This book of Psalms is written using the Messianic Jewish Bible, the Tree of Life version. After each chapter of scripture, there is a summary by at least one of the authors. I like that the font is large enough to read without many problems if any. I would like to see some illustrations dispersed throughout the book, to break up the monotony. I feel like the aut `Shalom in Psalms` is a devotional written from a Messianic Jewish perspective by authors Jeffrey Seif, Glenn Blank, and Paul Wilbur, This book of Psalms is written using the Messianic Jewish Bible, the Tree of Life version. After each chapter of scripture, there is a summary by at least one of the authors. I like that the font is large enough to read without many problems if any. I would like to see some illustrations dispersed throughout the book, to break up the monotony. I feel like the authors did a great job and are very knowledgeable in their areas of expertise. This book would make a great study book for homeschoolers, private schools, and for personal reflection. I recommend this book to anyone wanting to go deeper in studying the Psalms. Disclaimer: "I was provided a free copy of this book. All opinions are my own."

  13. 5 out of 5

    Debbie

    "Shalom in Psalms" is a devotional that works through the Psalms. Each devotional started with one of the psalms in the Tree of Life Version followed by commentary by one (or more) of the three authors. They focused on what the psalm was saying and how we can relate to it even now. Hebrew words or phrases that don't translate well into English were further explained to help readers understand the psalm. Also, as the authors are Messianic Jews, they point out how the Messiah is seen in the psalms "Shalom in Psalms" is a devotional that works through the Psalms. Each devotional started with one of the psalms in the Tree of Life Version followed by commentary by one (or more) of the three authors. They focused on what the psalm was saying and how we can relate to it even now. Hebrew words or phrases that don't translate well into English were further explained to help readers understand the psalm. Also, as the authors are Messianic Jews, they point out how the Messiah is seen in the psalms and give a Jewish viewpoint on some repeated themes in the psalms. I liked these devotions and felt encouraged by them. After reading a bunch of Christian books that imply that good Christians are joyful and evangelistic at all times, it was nice to read a devotional acknowledging that circumstances can get us distressed, depressed, or angry. But the psalms also point back to God as our Savior even when we wonder why He's "hiding His face" or taking so long. Overall, I'd highly recommend this devotional. I received an ebook review copy of this book from the publisher through NetGalley.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Lisa Anne Morrow

    I am so thankful that Baker Publishing Group chose me to receive a free copy of this book in a Goodreads giveaway. I have the Tree of Life Bible, and this Tree of Life version of the Psalms, with devotional/commentary was superb!

  15. 5 out of 5

    victoria

    By Jeffrey Seif, Glenn Blank and Paul Wilbur A Devotional from the Jewish Heart of The Christian Faith This is book was helping to organizing and make more understanding what is the originally Bible meant and it more understood. I was so excited to read and learn more about the TLV and make me fell more fulfilled as person. Shalom in Psalms offered are unique and interesting inside into the history of the Jewish poems speak of healing and deliverance, prayer and praise, and lament and hope “ I rece By Jeffrey Seif, Glenn Blank and Paul Wilbur A Devotional from the Jewish Heart of The Christian Faith This is book was helping to organizing and make more understanding what is the originally Bible meant and it more understood. I was so excited to read and learn more about the TLV and make me fell more fulfilled as person. Shalom in Psalms offered are unique and interesting inside into the history of the Jewish poems speak of healing and deliverance, prayer and praise, and lament and hope “ I received this book from Baker Books Bloggers program in exchange for this review “

  16. 5 out of 5

    Jamie Holloway

    Love! I will be rereading this devotional and hopefully one day purchase The Tree of Life Bible. I am also currently writing up my review for Jamie Chases Butterflies. I will post by this weekend.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Mike

  18. 5 out of 5

    Jesus B Cano Jr

  19. 5 out of 5

    Yohanes Tewodros

  20. 4 out of 5

    Cathy

  21. 5 out of 5

    Saphraneet

  22. 5 out of 5

    Alan Cousins

  23. 4 out of 5

    Cj

  24. 5 out of 5

    Nicholas

    SHALOM IN PSALMS by Jeffrey Seif, Glenn Blank and Paul Wilbur (Baker Books; 2015). Subtitled, "A Devotional from The Jewish Heart of The Christian Faith is somewhat misleading --- this book touching on all 150 of the psalms/songs in the Psalter is truly an eye-opening and unique devotional commentary on this most favorite of all biblical books. The three scholars actually work off a brand-new translation of the Bible, the Tree Of Life (TLV) version. Dr. Blank is the literary editor of the TLV tr SHALOM IN PSALMS by Jeffrey Seif, Glenn Blank and Paul Wilbur (Baker Books; 2015). Subtitled, "A Devotional from The Jewish Heart of The Christian Faith is somewhat misleading --- this book touching on all 150 of the psalms/songs in the Psalter is truly an eye-opening and unique devotional commentary on this most favorite of all biblical books. The three scholars actually work off a brand-new translation of the Bible, the Tree Of Life (TLV) version. Dr. Blank is the literary editor of the TLV translation; Dr. Seif has an MDiv and leads a messianic congregation as well as teaching at university and seminary. And Paul Wilbur, one of the pioneers of the early modern worship music scene is a songwriter and worship leader. These three men who love Jesus their Jewish Messiah, as well as the richness and beauty of the Psalms show themselves to be more than able expositors of the Hebrew terms and ways of thinking, which add so many nuances and color to these most expressive words found in the Psalter. No wonder the Church of Christ have been using the Psalms for over 2000 years to express pains, doubts, confusion, as well as wonderment, awe and praise to the Almighty One. A most unique, entertaining and enlightening book on the Psalms for the average layman would be hard to imagine. Most highly recommended!

  25. 5 out of 5

    Aileen Delgado

  26. 4 out of 5

    Holly Jensen

  27. 5 out of 5

    Barthelemy Jacques

  28. 4 out of 5

    Dawn

  29. 5 out of 5

    Caroline

  30. 5 out of 5

    Tima

  31. 5 out of 5

    Micielle

  32. 4 out of 5

    Frederick Rotzien

  33. 4 out of 5

    Vickie

  34. 4 out of 5

    Ms. Reader

  35. 5 out of 5

    Monique

  36. 4 out of 5

    Wanda

  37. 4 out of 5

    Sandra Beck

  38. 5 out of 5

    Sue

  39. 5 out of 5

    Mary

  40. 5 out of 5

    Stacia Chappell

  41. 5 out of 5

    Pam

  42. 5 out of 5

    Anne Marie

  43. 5 out of 5

    Debee Sue

  44. 4 out of 5

    Pegi Sweeney

  45. 4 out of 5

    Ted

  46. 5 out of 5

    Donna Barney

  47. 5 out of 5

    Roxanne

  48. 4 out of 5

    Cheryl Bradley

  49. 4 out of 5

    Robert

  50. 5 out of 5

    Jackie Morris

  51. 4 out of 5

    Edgar Connell

  52. 5 out of 5

    Kathy Heare Watts

  53. 5 out of 5

    Brooke

  54. 4 out of 5

    Chaplain2

  55. 4 out of 5

    Tammy Hornbeck

  56. 5 out of 5

    Pam

  57. 5 out of 5

    Jennifer

  58. 4 out of 5

    Debra Lucas

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...