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The MAXX: Maxximized, Volume 2

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This Limited-edition, oversized hardcover of The Maxx: Maxximized Volume 2 features a unique, custom-designed cloth slipcase and exclusive cover, and is signed by Maxx creator, Sam Kieth. Sam Kieth’s own quirky brand of brilliance has been wowing fans and inspiring cartoonists for more than 25 years. As one of the earliest creators for Image Comics, Kieth created The Maxx – This Limited-edition, oversized hardcover of The Maxx: Maxximized Volume 2 features a unique, custom-designed cloth slipcase and exclusive cover, and is signed by Maxx creator, Sam Kieth. Sam Kieth’s own quirky brand of brilliance has been wowing fans and inspiring cartoonists for more than 25 years. As one of the earliest creators for Image Comics, Kieth created The Maxx – a homeless superhero who lives in a box.


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This Limited-edition, oversized hardcover of The Maxx: Maxximized Volume 2 features a unique, custom-designed cloth slipcase and exclusive cover, and is signed by Maxx creator, Sam Kieth. Sam Kieth’s own quirky brand of brilliance has been wowing fans and inspiring cartoonists for more than 25 years. As one of the earliest creators for Image Comics, Kieth created The Maxx – This Limited-edition, oversized hardcover of The Maxx: Maxximized Volume 2 features a unique, custom-designed cloth slipcase and exclusive cover, and is signed by Maxx creator, Sam Kieth. Sam Kieth’s own quirky brand of brilliance has been wowing fans and inspiring cartoonists for more than 25 years. As one of the earliest creators for Image Comics, Kieth created The Maxx – a homeless superhero who lives in a box.

30 review for The MAXX: Maxximized, Volume 2

  1. 5 out of 5

    Sam Quixote

    The Maxx looks like your typical ‘90s superhero comic – ridiculously proportioned hero, lots of bombastic fighting, etc. – but Sam Kieth and William Messner-Loeb’s comic brilliantly uses the superhero medium to tell the story of a traumatised woman working through repressed memories. The superhero of the title doesn’t actually have a story and the character plays second fiddle to the woman, Julie, and her very down-to-earth problem, which makes The Maxx easily one of the most interesting superhe The Maxx looks like your typical ‘90s superhero comic – ridiculously proportioned hero, lots of bombastic fighting, etc. – but Sam Kieth and William Messner-Loeb’s comic brilliantly uses the superhero medium to tell the story of a traumatised woman working through repressed memories. The superhero of the title doesn’t actually have a story and the character plays second fiddle to the woman, Julie, and her very down-to-earth problem, which makes The Maxx easily one of the most interesting superhero stories ever! IDW continues its reprint of the series with the artwork re-worked, or “maxximised”, in this second volume but here the balance between plot and weirdness is a bit too skewed toward weirdness than in the first book. It’s an episodic volume that doesn’t really have an arc, where one chapter focuses on Maxx waking up as a Saturday morning kids’ cartoon, to Maxx fighting a Savage Dragon villain, to Julie and Maxx going to the grasslands of Pangaea, to Maxx and Pitt (a Hulk-inspired ‘90s creation) shrunk to the size of toy soldiers and battling an Isz in Julie’s apartment. While the concept of the series remains interesting, there seem to be too many pages of overly silly goofiness that don’t really go anywhere or add anything to the overall story. The Saturday morning cartoon chapter seemed to be an excuse for Kieth to play around with different artistic styles, while the fight with the shark villain from Savage Dragon felt like an overlong joke – Julie and her friend are talking about the gratuitous violence in media today which Kieth juxtaposes with, yes, gratuitous violence. Ha… ha. And the whole fight between Maxx, Pitt and the Isz too was bonkers – the miniature angle made it feel a bit like the Monster in My Pocket (remember those ‘90s toys?) comics that were published for a spell, but overall kinda pointless. However there are some excellent moments too when Kieth gets around to exploring Julie’s story. The whole grasslands setting is visually arresting and compelling, and also very revealing of her identity, and I like how Kieth’s teasing details out but not giving away too much. Like who Mister Gone (the villain of the last book) really is, and what’s under Maxx’s mask – is Julie the Maxx? Is Julie all of these characters or are they real? Has Julie gone too far or can she save herself? Kieth’s art has never looked better than it does in this series. This second volume really sees him take off so that there are some superb layouts, wonderful panels, and varied experiments with different drawing styles. The grasslands remains my favourite art of the book, though Julie is still a bit too overtly sexualised to be uncomfortable (but maybe that’s intentional, hinting at what her trauma has to do with?), but every page is spectacular. Savage Dragon and Pitt make cameos as do, surprisingly, Calvin & Hobbes! The Maxx Volume 2 is a little too meandering, a little too hallucinatory, for its own good and I’d like Kieth to rein in his artistic whims and focus more on the story, because when he does, it’s really great. But despite that, it’s still a decent addition to the series which I’m still interested in following – The Maxx is an entertaining, alternate take on the well-defined superhero genre that’s definitely worth reading. 3.5 stars

  2. 5 out of 5

    James DeSantis

    Well didn't think it could get weirder but it somehow did. This is mostly Maxx traveling through like almost a cartoon world. At first he's getting his back worked on and falls asleep and slips into a cartoon like world. Julie is also in her own dream-like world but you soon find out she's dealing with a lot of dark and personal issues. The book splits it up from her world she's in to where Maxx is meeting up and crossing over with different heroes such as Savage Dragon. The book's strength is m Well didn't think it could get weirder but it somehow did. This is mostly Maxx traveling through like almost a cartoon world. At first he's getting his back worked on and falls asleep and slips into a cartoon like world. Julie is also in her own dream-like world but you soon find out she's dealing with a lot of dark and personal issues. The book splits it up from her world she's in to where Maxx is meeting up and crossing over with different heroes such as Savage Dragon. The book's strength is mostly in the art for me. Sure, it's very 90's, but it's so well done. The landscapes can be breathtaking, the change of art styles is fun, everything runs so smooth and clashes well together. On the flipside the stories wage from trying too much (especially the first one in cartoon world) to being very powerful and sad (mostly anything with Julie). I do like the mystery behind it all too still, even though it does get very odd to the point of being hard to follow at times. Still, I do like mostly everything I'm reading. For the art alone this is a 4 or 5. But the story can be a bit much for me to fully invest in a 5. So A 3.5-4 it is.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Ryan

    This volume in the series is all about experimentation. Lots of crossover with other Image characters. A couple of dream sequences and every few pages seem to be done in a different style. Some of it works and some does not. Story still does not make sense.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Marcelo Soares

    O mais interessante é que tudo que eu reclamo no Spawn eu gosto no The Maxx. É confuso, será que isso está mesmo acontecendo? Os dois moram em algum beco imundo de alguma metrópole tomada pelo crime. A arte é exagerada. Os personagens se encontram e se desencontram de uma maneira meio maluca - aparece o Savage Dragon e o Pitt. E a história parece que não vai para frente. Mas por que aqui funciona? Porque aqui, apesar de tudo, eu acho que eu vejo um objetivo, uma motivação final para a história da Julie O mais interessante é que tudo que eu reclamo no Spawn eu gosto no The Maxx. É confuso, será que isso está mesmo acontecendo? Os dois moram em algum beco imundo de alguma metrópole tomada pelo crime. A arte é exagerada. Os personagens se encontram e se desencontram de uma maneira meio maluca - aparece o Savage Dragon e o Pitt. E a história parece que não vai para frente. Mas por que aqui funciona? Porque aqui, apesar de tudo, eu acho que eu vejo um objetivo, uma motivação final para a história da Julie, do Maxx e do Mr Gone. Eu acho que nós estamos explorando psiques atormentadas, traumatizadas e que precisam de uma certa ilusão para funcionar no mundo real, aos poucos isso vai aparecendo; uma página aqui, uma página ali, um quadrinho perdido, uma pergunta, nenhuma resposta clara e concisa. Claro que nada vai explicar porque o Maxx e o Pitt diminuíram de tamanho e enfrentaram um dos seres maléficos numa cozinha, mas não dá pra ter explicação pra tudo.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Quentin Wallace

    The weirdness continues and the art continues to look great. We have crossovers from other Image heroes in this volume, Savage Dragon and Pitt. And yes, they are really strange crossovers, probably some of the weirdest you'll see. But that works here since a straightforward crossover wouldn't have worked. This series is really too weird for me, but just interesting enough to keep me reading. The great art helps too. The weirdness continues and the art continues to look great. We have crossovers from other Image heroes in this volume, Savage Dragon and Pitt. And yes, they are really strange crossovers, probably some of the weirdest you'll see. But that works here since a straightforward crossover wouldn't have worked. This series is really too weird for me, but just interesting enough to keep me reading. The great art helps too.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Clint

    The subtextual gets crazy.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Saurio Saurio

    simplemente hermoso. confuso, eso sí, pero hermoso.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Steve Portigal

    Even more confusing than the previous volume, while still unfortunately nothing really happens. A lot of visual chaos that is super creative, but, sigh, just tough to get through. I see there are several volumes to go and while I read the first two on Hoopla, the rest aren't available there and it seems probably not worth it to track the rest down. I admit I read the plot summary on Wikipedia and if at all accurate, then uhh jeez I'm not sure I have any desire at all to keep going. Even more confusing than the previous volume, while still unfortunately nothing really happens. A lot of visual chaos that is super creative, but, sigh, just tough to get through. I see there are several volumes to go and while I read the first two on Hoopla, the rest aren't available there and it seems probably not worth it to track the rest down. I admit I read the plot summary on Wikipedia and if at all accurate, then uhh jeez I'm not sure I have any desire at all to keep going.

  9. 4 out of 5

    XO

    !?

  10. 5 out of 5

    Leonel_Olivieri

    Bueno 7/10 "Hulk morado se da vergazos con toda clase de personajes disparatados". Bueno 7/10 "Hulk morado se da vergazos con toda clase de personajes disparatados".

  11. 5 out of 5

    Oron

    It's inriguing, and original, but a little too wierd for me. It's inriguing, and original, but a little too wierd for me.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Dony Grayman

    Tomo 2 de 7. Primera edición argentina, basada en la nueva remasterización USA. Incluye personajes y artistas invitados.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Malapata

    Un bajón después del buen comienzo del volumen anterior. Se apuntan datos importantes para la historia, pero el ritmo es, en general, demasiado lento.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Malum

    More mind-bending weirdness, with Savage Dragon and Pitt showing up to the party.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Fugo Feedback

    De la mano del creador de Vaca y Pollito, con visitas de Savage Dragon y Pitt y con charlas filosóficas entre una chica acomplejada y un cacho de arcilla malvada, este segundo tomo no sólo no baja el nivel del primero sino que se juega a irse un poquito más al carajo todavía. Y eso que lo mejor está por venir...

  16. 4 out of 5

    Patrick

    Fantastic tale. Wonderful marriage of art and story.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Jennifer

    Volume 2 was heavy with cross-overs (ie: Mako of "Savage Dragon" and the title character of "Pitt") that added nothing to the overall story and that were even a bit disorienting (and only slightly in a fun surreal Kieth kinda way). In addition, V2 included some heavy-handed (read: uninteresting, unoriginal) analysis of violence in pop culture (and the censorship thereof) that fell rather flat. Nevertheless, plenty of laugh-out-loud humor, intriguing character development (Mr. Gone & Julie), and, Volume 2 was heavy with cross-overs (ie: Mako of "Savage Dragon" and the title character of "Pitt") that added nothing to the overall story and that were even a bit disorienting (and only slightly in a fun surreal Kieth kinda way). In addition, V2 included some heavy-handed (read: uninteresting, unoriginal) analysis of violence in pop culture (and the censorship thereof) that fell rather flat. Nevertheless, plenty of laugh-out-loud humor, intriguing character development (Mr. Gone & Julie), and, of course, captivating Kieth artwork was also present throughout (hence the 4 rather than 3 star rating). In sum, I don't regret buying this volume, but I doubt that I will revisit it as often as the rest of the series.

  18. 5 out of 5

    C. Varn

    This continues Sam Keith's Maxx, and the backstory continues to develop as does the focus on Julie as well as Sera. Mr. Gone's role is slightly clarified, although his origins remain obscure. The art is strong and the new coloring does make it pop, Sam Kieth and William Messner-Loeb's depiction of trauma is still surreal but believable. The only qualm I have with this volume is attempted crossovers with other 90s Image hero's book while actually slightly hurt the continuity as it makes the "real This continues Sam Keith's Maxx, and the backstory continues to develop as does the focus on Julie as well as Sera. Mr. Gone's role is slightly clarified, although his origins remain obscure. The art is strong and the new coloring does make it pop, Sam Kieth and William Messner-Loeb's depiction of trauma is still surreal but believable. The only qualm I have with this volume is attempted crossovers with other 90s Image hero's book while actually slightly hurt the continuity as it makes the "reality" of the situation more questionable and really seems to be superfluous to both the character's and the plot.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Keith Irwin

    I always kind of felt like that in the beginning, The Maxx was just supposed to be about The Maxx, Julie, and Mr. Gone and then they kind of exhausted that and had to start bringing in others. At this point, they've definitely had to do that. But, it still works. It's still an interesting read. This volume includes a Calvin and Hobbes tribute that's very cute. I always kind of felt like that in the beginning, The Maxx was just supposed to be about The Maxx, Julie, and Mr. Gone and then they kind of exhausted that and had to start bringing in others. At this point, they've definitely had to do that. But, it still works. It's still an interesting read. This volume includes a Calvin and Hobbes tribute that's very cute.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Annette Jordan

    The wonderful weirdness continues , and the story is definitely darker . Once again the art is standout.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Sean O'Hara

  22. 5 out of 5

    Adrian

  23. 4 out of 5

    Anna Ryan-Punch

  24. 5 out of 5

    Elizabeth Britannia

  25. 5 out of 5

    Robert A.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Flare

  27. 4 out of 5

    Melanie

  28. 4 out of 5

    Gautham Selvamohan

  29. 5 out of 5

    Delanie

  30. 4 out of 5

    Jeremy E. Evans

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