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The Whole Art of Detection: Lost Mysteries of Sherlock Holmes

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Internationally bestselling author Lyndsay Faye was introduced to the Sherlock Holmes mysteries when she was ten years old and her dad suggested she read Sir Arthur Conan Doyle’s short story The Adventure of the Speckled Band. She immediately became enamored with tales of Holmes and his esteemed biographer Dr. John Watson, and later, began spinning these quintessential cha Internationally bestselling author Lyndsay Faye was introduced to the Sherlock Holmes mysteries when she was ten years old and her dad suggested she read Sir Arthur Conan Doyle’s short story The Adventure of the Speckled Band. She immediately became enamored with tales of Holmes and his esteemed biographer Dr. John Watson, and later, began spinning these quintessential characters into her own works of fiction—from her acclaimed debut novel, Dust and Shadow, which pitted the famous detective against Jack the Ripper, to a series of short stories for the Strand Magazine, whose predecessor published the very first Sherlock Holmes short story in 1891. Faye’s best Holmes tales, including two new works, are brought together in The Whole Art of Detection, a stunning collection that spans Holmes’s career, from self-taught young upstart to publicly lauded detective, both before and after his faked death over a Swiss waterfall in 1894. In The Lowther Park Mystery, the unsociable Holmes is forced to attend a garden party at the request of his politician brother and improvises a bit of theater to foil a conspiracy against the government. The Adventure of the Thames Tunnel brings Holmes’s attention to the baffling murder of a jewel thief in the middle of an underground railway passage. With Holmes and Watson encountering all manner of ungrateful relatives, phony psychologists, wronged wives, plaid-garbed villains, and even a peculiar species of deadly red leech, The Whole Art of Detection is a must-read for Sherlockians and any fan of historical crime fiction with a modern sensibility.


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Internationally bestselling author Lyndsay Faye was introduced to the Sherlock Holmes mysteries when she was ten years old and her dad suggested she read Sir Arthur Conan Doyle’s short story The Adventure of the Speckled Band. She immediately became enamored with tales of Holmes and his esteemed biographer Dr. John Watson, and later, began spinning these quintessential cha Internationally bestselling author Lyndsay Faye was introduced to the Sherlock Holmes mysteries when she was ten years old and her dad suggested she read Sir Arthur Conan Doyle’s short story The Adventure of the Speckled Band. She immediately became enamored with tales of Holmes and his esteemed biographer Dr. John Watson, and later, began spinning these quintessential characters into her own works of fiction—from her acclaimed debut novel, Dust and Shadow, which pitted the famous detective against Jack the Ripper, to a series of short stories for the Strand Magazine, whose predecessor published the very first Sherlock Holmes short story in 1891. Faye’s best Holmes tales, including two new works, are brought together in The Whole Art of Detection, a stunning collection that spans Holmes’s career, from self-taught young upstart to publicly lauded detective, both before and after his faked death over a Swiss waterfall in 1894. In The Lowther Park Mystery, the unsociable Holmes is forced to attend a garden party at the request of his politician brother and improvises a bit of theater to foil a conspiracy against the government. The Adventure of the Thames Tunnel brings Holmes’s attention to the baffling murder of a jewel thief in the middle of an underground railway passage. With Holmes and Watson encountering all manner of ungrateful relatives, phony psychologists, wronged wives, plaid-garbed villains, and even a peculiar species of deadly red leech, The Whole Art of Detection is a must-read for Sherlockians and any fan of historical crime fiction with a modern sensibility.

30 review for The Whole Art of Detection: Lost Mysteries of Sherlock Holmes

  1. 4 out of 5

    Barbara

    If you're a big fan of the Sherlock Holmes stories penned by Arthur Conan Doyle you'll enjoy this book. This collection of Sherlock Holmes tales written by Lyndsay Faye captures Conan Doyle's style, characterizations, old-timey language, flowery descriptions, quirky mysteries, sly humor.....everything that defines the original chronicles. In these narratives Holmes artfully deals with a variety of intriguing cases such as: the haunting of Colonel Warburton, a former soldier in the Texas Army who If you're a big fan of the Sherlock Holmes stories penned by Arthur Conan Doyle you'll enjoy this book. This collection of Sherlock Holmes tales written by Lyndsay Faye captures Conan Doyle's style, characterizations, old-timey language, flowery descriptions, quirky mysteries, sly humor.....everything that defines the original chronicles. In these narratives Holmes artfully deals with a variety of intriguing cases such as: the haunting of Colonel Warburton, a former soldier in the Texas Army who has terrifying nightly visions of murderous Tejanos; an injured beggar dressed to the nines and a toff dressed in rags; the inexplicable poisoning of an entire family; a heinous country clinic for disturbed patients; a mysteriously missing twin brother; a corpse in the bath - with no wounds - drained of blood; a spiritualist with newfangled photochemical methods; an opera singer who's repeatedly kidnapped and released; and more. In one very amusing story Lord Templeton, an effete dandy, invites Holmes and his 'doctor friend' (Weston? Wilson?) to a secret meeting of the Diadem Club. It seems the wealthy club members - ministers, baronets, and so on - are tasked with finding 'clever and famous people to bring into the fold'. (This strongly reminds of the Steve Carell movie "Dinner for Schmucks." LOL). Holmes, of course, is appalled by the idea, but goes at the urging of his brother Mycroft. As in the original stories Holmes often disdains food and sleep, razzes on Scotland Yard detectives, makes lightning quick assessments of strangers, exchanges humorous banter with Watson, meets colorful ruthless miscreants, and collaborates with Inspector Lestrade. For his part, Watson sadly grieves after the death of his wife and happily rejoices when Holmes (whose 'death' devastated him) returns. On this note, a scene where Lestrade upbraids Holmes about the heartache caused by his phony demise at the Reichenbach Falls is very fitting. Lyndsay Faye does a wonderful job continuing the Sherlock Holmes saga with these excellent stories. I'd highly recommend this book to mystery readers, particularly Sherlock Holmes fans. Keep on writing Ms. Faye! Thanks to Netgalley, the author, and the publisher for a copy of this book. You can follow my reviews at http://reviewsbybarbsaffer.blogspot.com/

  2. 4 out of 5

    Magdalena aka A Bookaholic Swede

    I have read quite a lot of Sherlock Holmes stories written by authors than Sir Arthur Conan Doyle. Some good, some less than good. However, this collection is one of the finest I have ever read and the stories really feel like they were written by Conan Doyle himself. The book's stories are both before he met Watson and both before and after his "death". All stories are high in quality and some are easier to solve than others. I especially like the dynamic relationship between Watson and Holmes. I have read quite a lot of Sherlock Holmes stories written by authors than Sir Arthur Conan Doyle. Some good, some less than good. However, this collection is one of the finest I have ever read and the stories really feel like they were written by Conan Doyle himself. The book's stories are both before he met Watson and both before and after his "death". All stories are high in quality and some are easier to solve than others. I especially like the dynamic relationship between Watson and Holmes. Sometimes, Watson is made out to be a stumbling buffoon, but in this collection is Watson more a fitting partner to Holmes. They work well together, and they are very good friends. In this book, we meet damsels in distress, murders, thieves, etc. One story that comes to mind is one that takes place during The Hound of Baskerville because it's told through Holmes point of view, and also because it explains why Holmes stayed back in London while Watsons traveled to Dartmoor with Sir. Baskerville. And, that is just one story among many good. It's a splendid collection, and now I want to read Dust and Shadow by Lyndsay Faye! I want to thank the publisher for providing me with a free copy through NetGalley for an honest review!

  3. 4 out of 5

    Tom Mathews

    Lyndsay Faye is no stranger to the world of Sherlock Holmes. Having penned the popular Dust and Shadow: An Account of the Ripper Killings by Dr. John H. Watson in which the great consulting detective takes on the greatest criminal of his day, the notorious Jack the Ripper, Faye is now reintroducing Holmes to the world in the format that it is most familiar with, as an anthology of short stories. In The Whole Art of Detection Faye presents her readers with fifteen newly uncovered cases in four se Lyndsay Faye is no stranger to the world of Sherlock Holmes. Having penned the popular Dust and Shadow: An Account of the Ripper Killings by Dr. John H. Watson in which the great consulting detective takes on the greatest criminal of his day, the notorious Jack the Ripper, Faye is now reintroducing Holmes to the world in the format that it is most familiar with, as an anthology of short stories. In The Whole Art of Detection Faye presents her readers with fifteen newly uncovered cases in four sections. The first section, Before Baker Street, begins with The Case of Colonel Warburton's Madness, in which Watson describes events that occurred in San Francisco before he and Holmes met and Holmes offers his assessment of what actually happened. Other stories are told in a variety of formats including excerpts from Holmes’s notes on cases. This format is particularly interesting as it doesn’t have Watson’s innate kindness to soften the disdain that Holmes often feels for those who lack his mental prowess. The section The Early Years is also interesting in that it gives readers an insight into Watson’s mental state after losing his best friend to Reichenbach Falls and his wife to disease only to learn that Holmes had been alive for three years and hadn’t bothered to let his trusted friend know. The remaining sections, The Return and The Later Years contain more traditional stories. In some, though, Faye takes pains to use the story’s plot to shed light on the quirkier aspects of Holmes’s personality. One of the most fascinating tales in Faye’s collection is The Adventure of the Memento Mori. In it, Holmes and Watson encounter a twisted doctor who shocks the detectives with the wanton brutality of his mental health treatments. The treatments that so offended them; ice baths, electricity, starvation, isolation, and mercury tablets, were commonly accepted treatments for mental illness until well into the twentieth century. Holmes’s reaction, though, was so extreme that readers might wonder if he had deep-seated issues of his on with regards to psychiatric treatment: “The depths to which human depravity can sink will never cease to confound me. What are we to make of the species in light of this room? Where is progress? Where is logic? Where is reason itself when a savage smashing his comrade’s skull with a rock would be kinder treatment of the race? I ask you, what is the limit of our perversion? Hell is empty,” Holmes concluded under his breath. “And all the Devils are here.” Only once in the entire collection was I disappointed by what I read and that is not in Faye’s portrayal of Holmes or Watson but in a matter of historical accuracy. in the first story "The Case of Colonel Warburton's Madness", Faye referred to “pitched fighting between the Texians - that is, the Anglo settlers - and the Tejanos”. As I understand it a Tejano, then as now, is a Hispanic resident of Texas. As Faye mentioned Sam Houston and the Battle of San Jacinto she had to be referring to was the Texas Revolution that was fought between the residents of Texas and a Mexican army led by Gen. Antonio López de Santa Anna. At that time, there was no “pitched fighting between the Texians and the Tejanos”. The Texians and Tejanos were largely united in their efforts to resist the authority of a distant Mexican government. While some Tejanos sided with Mexico, most joined with the Texians and fought for their independence. Captain Juan Seguin and a company of Tejanos fought alongside Austin, Eight Tejanos fought and died defending the Alamo and three others were signers of the Texas Declaration of Independence. In short, suggesting that the white and Hispanic settlers of Texas were at war with each other at this time does a disservice to both. Simon Vance is an accomplished narrator and his stately British accent immediately reminds the reader of the older, stodgier portrayals of Dr. Watson. I may personally prefer the younger portrayals of Watson this is familiar, and therefore comforting territory. Bottom Line: There have been many pastiches written about A. Conan Doyle’s marvelous detective duo but few really dig deep and make an effort to get to the heart of who Sherlock Holmes was and why he behaved the way he did. Lyndsay Faye a sincere effort to do so and has written many stories that would be a credit to John Watson’s portfolio. 4 ½ stars. *Quotations are cited from an advanced reading copy and may not be the same as appears in the final published edition. The review was based on an advanced reading copy obtained at no cost from the publisher in exchange for an unbiased review. While this does take any ‘not worth what I paid for it’ statements out of my review, it otherwise has no impact on the content of my review. FYI: On a 5-point scale I assign stars based on my assessment of what the book needs in the way of improvements: *5 Stars – Nothing at all. If it ain’t broke, don’t fix it. *4 Stars – It could stand for a few tweaks here and there but it’s pretty good as it is. *3 Stars – A solid C grade. Some serious rewriting would be needed in order for this book to be considered great or memorable. *2 Stars – This book needs a lot of work. A good start would be to change the plot, the character development, the writing style and the ending. *1 Star - The only thing that would improve this book is a good bonfire.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Suzy

    Well done, Lyndsay Faye! I've been on a Sherlock Holmes binge for about the last 6 weeks. I think it has come to a pause, but this collection of short stories added recently to the Holmes canon really hit the spot. While not every single one was a wow, most were really enjoyable, and I believe if put in a collection side-by-side with Conan Doyle penned Sherlock short stories, it would be hard to tell the difference. Great fun! Why I'm reading this: Continuing my Sherlock Holmes binge! I discovere Well done, Lyndsay Faye! I've been on a Sherlock Holmes binge for about the last 6 weeks. I think it has come to a pause, but this collection of short stories added recently to the Holmes canon really hit the spot. While not every single one was a wow, most were really enjoyable, and I believe if put in a collection side-by-side with Conan Doyle penned Sherlock short stories, it would be hard to tell the difference. Great fun! Why I'm reading this: Continuing my Sherlock Holmes binge! I discovered this collection of short stories while perusing the writings of Lyndsay Faye. I have her latest The Paragon Hotel on my tbr, but thought I'd continue the Sherlock theme with this one.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Ashley

    I’ve read quite a bit of Sherlock Holmes pastiche, though by no means even close to all of it, and so far, I think Lyndsay Faye’s version of Holmes and Watson is my favorite. This collection is made up of fifteen stories published over a period of ten years, many of them in The Strand, the very same magazine that published Conan Doyle’s original stories. All of the stories mimic Conan Doyle’s style, as Faye (a member of the Baker Street Irregulars) is a player of the Great Game (all players behav I’ve read quite a bit of Sherlock Holmes pastiche, though by no means even close to all of it, and so far, I think Lyndsay Faye’s version of Holmes and Watson is my favorite. This collection is made up of fifteen stories published over a period of ten years, many of them in The Strand, the very same magazine that published Conan Doyle’s original stories. All of the stories mimic Conan Doyle’s style, as Faye (a member of the Baker Street Irregulars) is a player of the Great Game (all players behave as if everything ACD wrote actually happened, and Holmes and Watson were real). She makes it very easy to believe. In my opinion, she hits just the perfect balance of mimicry and improvement. Conan Doyle’s writing could at times be a bit dry, and his stories were always plot-based, which didn’t leave much room for emotional development, which was nearly all of it between the lines. I get most of that from fanfic, which this essentially is. It’s basically professionally written fanfic with official backing (how much more official can you get besides being published in The Strand?) The stories here are clever, the mysteries in the vein of something Conan Doyle would have written, and yet she also adds in little touches: Watson coping with the death of his wife and of Holmes, Holmes finally admitting he was a patronizing asshole to his client Mary Sutherland back in “A Case of Identity,” Watson trying to feed Holmes up (which is a staple of Sherlock Holmes fanfic). I just really enjoyed this, and will definitely be coming back to it in the future. I was already a fan of Faye for having written Jane Steele (<3), but now I’m even more excited to read the rest of her stuff, including the novel-length Holmes pastiche she wrote about Holmes going up against Jack the Ripper, which I already own. [4.5 stars]

  6. 4 out of 5

    K.L. Beckmeyer

    Overly Modernized and Overly Talkative Fan-Fiction. While this series of short stories gains a star at the debut of the first two shorts which dive into Sherlock Holmes' life before Baker Street, the rest of the shorts quickly become tedious and reveal an alternate universe where our beloved Sherlock Holmes is a gossipy goose. Overly Modernized and Overly Talkative Fan-Fiction. While this series of short stories gains a star at the debut of the first two shorts which dive into Sherlock Holmes' life before Baker Street, the rest of the shorts quickly become tedious and reveal an alternate universe where our beloved Sherlock Holmes is a gossipy goose.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Andy

    Excellent narration. Stories are uneven, ranging from meh to very good.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Elinor Gray

    I would give this book ten stars if I could. Lyndsay is a queen among pasticheurs, and delivers wholeheartedly with this collection. Her Holmes and Watson are living, breathing, snarking partners who adore one another and work together with beautiful efficiency. They care for one another so palpably, and this is what drives the Holmes stories from Doyle's conception of them to their eternal popularity. The mysteries here are drawn from unpublished cases and each of them is brilliantly built and I would give this book ten stars if I could. Lyndsay is a queen among pasticheurs, and delivers wholeheartedly with this collection. Her Holmes and Watson are living, breathing, snarking partners who adore one another and work together with beautiful efficiency. They care for one another so palpably, and this is what drives the Holmes stories from Doyle's conception of them to their eternal popularity. The mysteries here are drawn from unpublished cases and each of them is brilliantly built and so true to the original spirit of the canon. Also they are married. Ten thumbs up.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Michael Wertz

    Reads like Laurie King's books about Holmes. That's not meant as a compliment. I wish female Sherlockian's would stop trying to make Holmes a feminist. Reads like Laurie King's books about Holmes. That's not meant as a compliment. I wish female Sherlockian's would stop trying to make Holmes a feminist.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Caidyn (he/him/his)

    Basically, I love Lyndsay Faye. And this is an ARC that was provided for me by Netgalley and the publisher for an honest opinion. My honest opinion is that Lyndsay Faye is fantastic. She was the one who introduced me into Holmes pastiches with Dust and Shadow: An Account of the Ripper Killings by Dr. John H. Watson and then she turned Jane Eyre on its head with Jane Steele. I was eager to get my hands on this when I saw she was coming out with another book and it was available to request on Netg Basically, I love Lyndsay Faye. And this is an ARC that was provided for me by Netgalley and the publisher for an honest opinion. My honest opinion is that Lyndsay Faye is fantastic. She was the one who introduced me into Holmes pastiches with Dust and Shadow: An Account of the Ripper Killings by Dr. John H. Watson and then she turned Jane Eyre on its head with Jane Steele. I was eager to get my hands on this when I saw she was coming out with another book and it was available to request on Netgalley. My rating is four stars, which I got from averaging all my ratings for the short stories themselves. A great read. Fit for anyone who enjoys a bit of Holmes in their life. The Case of Colonel Warburton's Madness - 4/5: For some reason, I always get really worried about the first story in a short story collection. It sets the tone. It can either set me up to look forward to the rest of the stories or to not. Good thing is, this one set it up perfectly. It was classicly set up like something I could expect out of Doyle. And it was just fun. That's always my mark with these types of mysteries. The Adventure of the Magical Menagerie - 4/5: Yes, another great story. I thought that the mystery itself was a bit lackluster (but I enjoyed that it tied back into another case Doyle wrote and I actually just finished rereading), but the heart of it was lovely. It stressed something that people seem to forget so often. Sherlock Holmes has a heart and cares. He just pretends that he doesn't to save himself. I could go on for pages about this, but I'll cut myself off here. The Adventure of the Vintner's Codex - 4.5/5: Ugh, this one was so much fun. I was absorbed in it the whole time and it was just great. I caught myself laughing at certain points, then it always came back to something heartfelt. It really rang true to the original stories with how it was told and the writing. Plus, she ended the before Baker street section at the perfect time with this story. Anything after this and I'd start getting a bit bored. The Adventure of the Honest Wife - 4/5: Loved it. Holmes being a bit of an ass and also pulling a trick he showed with Irene Adler. Plus, it was an interesting case with a surprising amount of twists to it. It's short, but everything was there. Lots of twists, some interesting characters who felt fully fleshed out, and a nod to the classic stories. Great pastiche and I may bump my rating up later. The Adventure of the Beggar's Feast - 3.5/5: For some reason, I kept spacing out throughout this story. Not that it wasn't well-written or dull. I chalk it up to midterms week. But, really, it was a good story that wasn't entirely expected. Maybe I should have guessed something from the title, but, well, I obviously didn't. And I like that it didn't exactly have a resolution to it, not at least one you would expect with this being modeled off of Doyle. Memoranda Upon the Gaskell Blackmailing Dilemma - 4.5/5: Okay, it's gone back up. This story was just fun. And I know I keep repeating myself, but I'm serious. Holmes pastiches for me have to be fun. But, this one was unique in the collection thus far. It was taken from Holmes' notebook and a play on the other case Holmes had during the Baskerville mystery. The Lowther Park Mystery - 3/5: Not my favorite. It felt a bit too fast at times, fast enough that I couldn't really nail down the characters or the exact mystery. I'm sure if I read it again, I'd like it better. But as a first read through it just felt too rushed. An Empty House - 4.5/5: For a mystery that wasn't really a mystery, this was better spun than the whole of BBC Sherlock series four. I'd say it's a joke but I'm not joking. This was short but extremely sad, not to mention a great way to bridge time at Baker Street with the things that may or may not have happened while Holmes was gone. But, seriously, this was depressing. The Adventure of the Memento Mori - 4.5/5: First, this was grade-A creepy. And an almost direct follow-up story to the one before this. Which I appreciate. But, moreover, this was creepy. Second, it was sweet. As I said, it was a direct follow-up to the one before this, so there were things that had to be bridged and explained in some ways. And, it was. Holmes has a heart. Something that we all know. Notes Regarding the Disappearance of Mr. James Phillimore - 4/5: A really intriguing story and I sort of expected it. Reminded me of a Poirot mystery that I can't remember the name of. But, delightful nonetheless. I hadn't guessed the intricacies of the mystery, but I at least had guessed some of the core ideas in it. The Adventure of the Willow Basket - 4/5: Creepy, good, a lot of emotions with an underrated character. Completely enjoyable and a great way to round out the section of after Sherlock returned to Baker street. I wish I had paid a bit more attention to the mystery, but I loved how Lestrade actually got some sort of recognition for once. The Adventure of the Lightless Maiden - 5/5: I think that this one might be my favorite. All because it was interesting, combined a hint of Doyle's obsession with the supernatural, and really was sweet. Holmes does have a heart. Or, he does and then proceeds to intellectualize it away. (Which is one of Freud's defense mechanisms.) The Adventure of the Thames Tunnel - 4.5/5: I don't remember the case that this one was based off of. Maybe I read it, maybe I haven't yet. But, I will and now I know some of the ending for it. But, anyways, this was a fun mystery. I wasn't exactly expecting the twist, but I wasn't completely shocked by it either. The Adventure of the Mad Baritone - 4/5: Interesting one. Not quite exciting and I got a bit confused for a bit of it, at my own fault since I wasn't paying as much attention to the story as I should have been, but I wasn't expecting it. Bit of fun. Notes Upon the Diadem Club Affair - 4.5/5: I love the ones that are told through Holmes' notes. They're just delightful and you get a glimpse into his mind. Plus Faye does it amazingly. It was a great note to end things on, even if I feel that the case didn't catch my interest.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Melora

    3 ½ stars. I enjoyed this, but not nearly as much as I did her earlier full length Holmes tale, Dust and Shadow: An Account of the Ripper Killings by Dr. John H. Watson. I think the problem for me is that in this collection of short stories, published in Strand Magazine and elsewhere between 2009 and 2016, Faye needs to spend time firmly establishing in each story how lean and chiseled her hero is, how self-consciously uninterested in food, and how devoted he and Watson are to one another, and t 3 ½ stars. I enjoyed this, but not nearly as much as I did her earlier full length Holmes tale, Dust and Shadow: An Account of the Ripper Killings by Dr. John H. Watson. I think the problem for me is that in this collection of short stories, published in Strand Magazine and elsewhere between 2009 and 2016, Faye needs to spend time firmly establishing in each story how lean and chiseled her hero is, how self-consciously uninterested in food, and how devoted he and Watson are to one another, and the mysteries themselves sometimes feel, not merely “secondary,” but, as in the case of the last story, barely an afterthought. Each new tale opens with the suggestion of delightfully “Holmesian” intricacies, but then the relationship between Holmes and Watson devours the author's attention and the mysteries are rushed. Pleasant, but forgettable.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Laura

    I have read one other book by Lyndsey Faye (Jane Steele), and I loved it. This book is no different. If you are a fan of the television show "Sherlock", I think you will enjoy this book. Written in the manner of several stories across the Sherlock's timeline from when he was just starting out to his later years, the book kept me enthralled. Maybe it shows the fan-girl in me, but I kept hearing the voices of Benedict Cumberbatch and Martin Freeman. Evan so, I believe that Ms. Faye stays true to t I have read one other book by Lyndsey Faye (Jane Steele), and I loved it. This book is no different. If you are a fan of the television show "Sherlock", I think you will enjoy this book. Written in the manner of several stories across the Sherlock's timeline from when he was just starting out to his later years, the book kept me enthralled. Maybe it shows the fan-girl in me, but I kept hearing the voices of Benedict Cumberbatch and Martin Freeman. Evan so, I believe that Ms. Faye stays true to the feel of Sherlock Holmes. While she references what I would call Sherlockian canon, she never delves into the past stories. These are the mysteries that Sir Arthur Conan Doyle could've written but didn't. All in all, a most enjoyable book. Thank you NetGalley for allowing me ARC in exchange for an hones review.

  13. 5 out of 5

    MissSusie

    Fantastic collection of short stories that fit seamlessly into the Sherlock Holmes Canon. Faye's writing feels like she channeled Doyle because these stories are so authentic to the characters. Of course Simon Vance's narration was once again spot on he is the perfect voice for these books and once again does an awesome job! Fantastic collection of short stories that fit seamlessly into the Sherlock Holmes Canon. Faye's writing feels like she channeled Doyle because these stories are so authentic to the characters. Of course Simon Vance's narration was once again spot on he is the perfect voice for these books and once again does an awesome job!

  14. 4 out of 5

    Jason Parent

    Finally, a book about Holmes and Watson post-Conan Doyle that actually adds to the literature. I would say that all but one of Faye's stories were so in tune with the characters and writing style of the originals that they might have been written by Conan Doyle himself. The one that seemed a stretch was one in which Faye waxes poetic through the character of Holmes in a manner that didn't seem true to the character, though others may disagree. An argument could be made that post fake fall into f Finally, a book about Holmes and Watson post-Conan Doyle that actually adds to the literature. I would say that all but one of Faye's stories were so in tune with the characters and writing style of the originals that they might have been written by Conan Doyle himself. The one that seemed a stretch was one in which Faye waxes poetic through the character of Holmes in a manner that didn't seem true to the character, though others may disagree. An argument could be made that post fake fall into falls, Holmes' humanity slipped out more often from behind his usual demure yet arrogant public face, an approach Faye seems to take in presenting a more likable Holmes. Either way, the large majority of the stories fit in form, skill and interest, even those written by the famous sleuth himself - brilliantly written and certainly recommended!

  15. 4 out of 5

    Marlene

    Originally published at Reading Reality I have an often-confessed penchant for Sherlock Holmes pastiches. As a consequence, I’ve read a lot of them. Some take the Holmes canon into entirely different directions, like Laurie R. King’s Holmes/Russell series, A Study in Scarlet Women by Sherry Thomas, or Stephanie Osborn’s Displaced Detective series. Others serve to either extend the existing canon or act as homages to it, attempting to recreate the style and the period of Conan Doyle’s original wor Originally published at Reading Reality I have an often-confessed penchant for Sherlock Holmes pastiches. As a consequence, I’ve read a lot of them. Some take the Holmes canon into entirely different directions, like Laurie R. King’s Holmes/Russell series, A Study in Scarlet Women by Sherry Thomas, or Stephanie Osborn’s Displaced Detective series. Others serve to either extend the existing canon or act as homages to it, attempting to recreate the style and the period of Conan Doyle’s original work, using his immortal characters and merely telling us new stories in the same spirit. One of the best of the latter type that I have read was Lyndsay Faye’s Dust and Shadow: An Account of the Ripper Killings by Dr. John H. Watson. In that story, she relates the investigation of the Jack the Ripper case as conducted by Sherlock Holmes and documented by his faithful friend, Dr. John Watson. If you have any interest either in Sherlock Holmes, Jack the Ripper, or late Victorian-set historical fiction, this book is a winner on all fronts. I’ve been hoping for years that the author would return to Holmes, and she finally has in The Whole Art of Detection. Unlike the recent collaborative collections of Holmes pastiches edited by Laurie R. King and Leslie S. Klinger, which do contain some marvelous stories each time, The Whole Art of Detection is the output of a single mind, just as the original Holmes canon was. And also like the canon, all of the stories in The Whole Art of Detection are set in Holmes’ native Victorian age, and for the most part purport to be written by Dr. John Watson in his inimitable style. And it feels as if we are back there again. These stories feel like the familiar Holmes. They read as though they are part of the whole, merely a part that has been hidden until now. It is marvelous to immerse oneself back in that time and place, and with these two singular characters. As much as I enjoyed the whole book, the stories that I loved the most were the two that were not told as stories, but as diary entries. It is clear within the stories that Watson is writing for his audience in The Strand Magazine, but in An Empty House we get to read a bit of Watson’s personal diary during March and April of 1894. At that time, Watson was recovering from the recent death of his wife Mary, and still dealing with the death of his friend Sherlock Holmes at Reichenbach Falls three years earlier. Watson’s method of dealing with Holmes’ death was to continue writing up their previous cases, as he is still doing within the pages of his diary. As a method for handling the stages of grief, neither the reader nor Watson himself is certain of its efficacy. And it is completely insufficient for helping him to handle his feelings about Mary’s recent passing. So we read Watson in his internal travails, his and his friends’ attempts to help him, and his resolution to finally quit England and his memories altogether. And then a miracle occurs. In Memoranda Upon the Gaskell Blackmailing Dilemma, on the other hand, we have a rare case narrated by Holmes himself. Like all the cases in The Whole Art of Detection, this case is firmly set not just within the original canon, but at a specific point within that canon. In this case, we see what Holmes was doing in September of 1888 when he sent Watson to Baskerville Hall ahead of him. In addition to viewing Holmes’ rather non-traditional resolution of this case, we also have the opportunity to read Holmes’ own thoughts and feelings about this case, the Baskerville mess, and his thoughts about his friendship with Watson and the fame that has resulted from Watson’s publications. It is a fascinating peek into a mind that we normally only see from the outside. Escape Rating A: As is clear, I loved this book and had an utterly marvelous time dipping back into the adventures of Holmes and Watson. While many of these stories have been published before, this is the first time that they have all been gathered together. And there are a lot of them, so hunting them all down would be a task almost worthy of Holmes himself. Just like Dust and Shadow, this collection gives the reader the feeling that we are back there again at 221B, sitting invisibly by their fireplace and listening to them discuss their cases. Like the original canon, these are all cracking good stories, and they run the gamut of the strange, the unusual, the criminal and the bizarre that the originals did. As a 21st century reader, I have a sense that there is a bit more acknowledgement of the true depths of their friendship than was true in the originals. But I might be mistaken about that. I guess I’ll have to go back and read them again. Something to anticipate with great pleasure.

  16. 4 out of 5

    charlotte,

    Galley provided by publisher I have never been Sherlock Holmes' biggest fan. Sure, I read them (or rather, my mum read them too me, and freaked me out a little), but I've not read any Holmes stories in at least 10 years. Lyndsay Faye's take on Holmes and Watson is wholly refreshing and, although some stories worked better than others, totally in the vein of the originals (or, what I can recall of the originals). My first thought on starting the book, within the first paragraph, was how uncannily s Galley provided by publisher I have never been Sherlock Holmes' biggest fan. Sure, I read them (or rather, my mum read them too me, and freaked me out a little), but I've not read any Holmes stories in at least 10 years. Lyndsay Faye's take on Holmes and Watson is wholly refreshing and, although some stories worked better than others, totally in the vein of the originals (or, what I can recall of the originals). My first thought on starting the book, within the first paragraph, was how uncannily similar to Arthur Conan Doyle's writing the style is. Lyndsay Faye has managed to mimic his style so closely that it reads as if it would slot into his stories with ease. If I had any problem with the style it would be that, occasionally, the descriptiveness of the writing didn't suit the context it was in, like in the first few stories, where it's just Watson and Holmes recounting stories, the speech seemed somewhat stilted because it was very descriptive. But that problem disappears for the most part after the part one. The best stories were, in fact, the ones that were written as entries into Holmes' diary. These were amusing, and managed not to seem condescending, as can happen when your detective is a Brilliant Detective who is a genius and therefore sees links mere mortals would not. Part three was the saddest of the parts, as it follows Holmes' "death" (which, I'll admit, I never read), and this is where Lyndsay Faye's ability to make me emotional comes into play. It's very subtle; most of the time it's just a sentence thrown in almost carelessly, which is able to just force you to stop and think. It's a skill that most of my favourite authors appear to have, and she repeatedly does the same in her Timothy Wilde Mysteries. Overall I think this is a great set of Sherlock Holmes stories which stay true to the characters and style (it's clear that she has done copious amounts of research, and is a huge fan of the original stories herself), and should satisfy both avid fans and those who are perhaps less so.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Meaghan

    Holmes fanatics rejoice! Finally there is a collection of stories that adequately celebrate, and imitate, the original. I am always suspicious when approaching a book that carries on where the original left off. Death Comes to Pemberley, Rebecca’s Tale, The House of Silk, and The Oriental Casebook of Sherlock Holmes all failed with varying degrees of embarrassment. As a reader, I was left angry, disappointed and frustrated by those titles. A fatal flaw in those and so many similar books is the tem Holmes fanatics rejoice! Finally there is a collection of stories that adequately celebrate, and imitate, the original. I am always suspicious when approaching a book that carries on where the original left off. Death Comes to Pemberley, Rebecca’s Tale, The House of Silk, and The Oriental Casebook of Sherlock Holmes all failed with varying degrees of embarrassment. As a reader, I was left angry, disappointed and frustrated by those titles. A fatal flaw in those and so many similar books is the temptation to somehow recreate a more formal past. Silk dresses and fancy mansions overshadow a good story with interesting characters. I’ve often argued that what makes Holmes so good, and so evergreen, is the simplicity. The style of writing is not fanciful and the adventures are varied. The loss of a gem or a horse is found next to dictionary transcription and a quiet child in equal measure. Please read my full review: http://mwgerard.com/review-the-whole-...

  18. 4 out of 5

    Saumen

    Buddy read with ~Rajeshawri~ Now A days I get somewhat interested in Sherlock Holmes pastiches. And this is certainly the best so far.Those who have read original holmes may find Doyel's language so great and flowery.I never have imagined anyone but Doyle can write in such great way. Faye’s best Holmes tales, including two new works, are brought together in The Whole Art of Detection, a stunning collection that spans Holmes’s career, from self-taught young upstart to publicly lauded detective, bot Buddy read with ~Rajeshawri~ Now A days I get somewhat interested in Sherlock Holmes pastiches. And this is certainly the best so far.Those who have read original holmes may find Doyel's language so great and flowery.I never have imagined anyone but Doyle can write in such great way. Faye’s best Holmes tales, including two new works, are brought together in The Whole Art of Detection, a stunning collection that spans Holmes’s career, from self-taught young upstart to publicly lauded detective, both before and after his faked death over a Swiss waterfall in 1894. With Holmes and Watson encountering all manner of ungrateful relatives, phony psychologists, wronged wives, plaid-garbed villains, and even a peculiar species of deadly red leech, The Whole Art of Detection is a must-read for Sherlockians and any fan of historical crime fiction with a modern sensibility Amazing, but true, Faye pulled it off so gorgeously, that I was becoming confused. There are 15 beautifully crafted stories divided into four parts.Storyline is very intriguing and some stories are written by Holmes himself. Also watson has got some nice exposure, too. Overall,Readers will not miss Doyle much if they decide to pick this book up!This was my second time reading this book, and still this book has got no rust!!

  19. 4 out of 5

    Eva Müller

    "I require your assistance, and you suppose you're too good for my money! Well, you aren't, Mr. Holmes!" "On the contrary. I suspect that I've been too good for better people's money as a matter of fact." The cases Holmes investigates in pastiches are often grand and important. Conspiracies that involve powerful people. Killers that are so clever nobody but Holmes even knows that they're out there. Cases where the future of the world is at stake (or worse: The future of England). That doesn't have "I require your assistance, and you suppose you're too good for my money! Well, you aren't, Mr. Holmes!" "On the contrary. I suspect that I've been too good for better people's money as a matter of fact." The cases Holmes investigates in pastiches are often grand and important. Conspiracies that involve powerful people. Killers that are so clever nobody but Holmes even knows that they're out there. Cases where the future of the world is at stake (or worse: The future of England). That doesn't have to be a bad thing but to me the point of the original stories has always been that Holmes didn't investigate important cases. He investigated interesting cases. And sometimes it would turn out that there wasn't even a crime behind it all, only an interesting story. But that was enough. The Whole Art of Detection captures exactly that spirit. All but one stories are about mundane things but that doesn't mean that they're boring. Just because somebody's actions don't have far-reaching consequences doesn't mean they can't do really clever things that are interesting to read about. Now in some of the stories the solution was quite easy to guess which is a minor drawback but since I enjoyed everything else about them so much I didn't really mind it. Especially because apart from engaging mysteries Faye is also great at writing the relationship between Holmes and Watson and showing how much they care about each other. If you want to be nit-picky you might argue that it's a bit too much. Not because they express their emotions in a manner that would have been inappropriate for Victorian gentlemen but because almost every story has a few lines (or more) that show that, while Conan Doyle used such scenes very sparsely. I, however, am not nit-picky about that. I just enjoy it very much. ARC received from NetGalley in exchange for an honest review.

  20. 4 out of 5

    D

    It is difficult for me to read any Holmes pastiche. Even the better ones fall upon my ear like the high school band assaying Souza. One recognizes the broad outlines, the various boxes checked off (Watsonian weather ruminations, obligatory deductive flourishes, etc), but somehow it just does not get there. I read this because friends urged it on me who had enjoyed Ms Faye's prior novel, which I have yet to read. One often gets the tantalizing impression here that if one could take bits and piece It is difficult for me to read any Holmes pastiche. Even the better ones fall upon my ear like the high school band assaying Souza. One recognizes the broad outlines, the various boxes checked off (Watsonian weather ruminations, obligatory deductive flourishes, etc), but somehow it just does not get there. I read this because friends urged it on me who had enjoyed Ms Faye's prior novel, which I have yet to read. One often gets the tantalizing impression here that if one could take bits and pieces of each of these short stories and excise the inevitable and probably unavoidable syntactic anachronisms one might reach the Promised Land of a paragraph or two which could not be distinguished from the "tincture Conan Doyle." This is not the fault of Ms Faye, whose dry wit, and love of these characters can be seen in every story in this book, but of the reader expecting more than could be given. She avoids many of the pitfalls into which have fallen so many previous pasticheurs (populating them with every notable figure of the Victorian and Edwardian eras foremost among them), but she was not born in the 1850's. Rex Stout was once asked his opinion of authors who it seems are now called, in a loathsome locution, "continuators." He replied, "I don't know whether to call them vampires or cannibals. Let them roll their own." I understand that Ms Faye is now rolling her own, and am pleased to hear it. It seems to me a less hazardous enterprise for a writer of her obvious felicity of expression, and talent, than the one evidenced by this book.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Brandon Forsyth

    I've never read Lyndsay Faye before now, but I might have to go out and read everything she's ever deigned to commit to print. This goes beyond Holmes fan service, to the point where I will proudly display this collection of stories alongside Conan Doyle's. There were at least two that made me want to stand up and cheer - or maybe shoot a patriotic VR into my wall. If you're a sucker for the Holmes/Watson relationship at all, this is required reading. There's maybe one mediocre story in this col I've never read Lyndsay Faye before now, but I might have to go out and read everything she's ever deigned to commit to print. This goes beyond Holmes fan service, to the point where I will proudly display this collection of stories alongside Conan Doyle's. There were at least two that made me want to stand up and cheer - or maybe shoot a patriotic VR into my wall. If you're a sucker for the Holmes/Watson relationship at all, this is required reading. There's maybe one mediocre story in this collection, and while Holmes stories can sometimes feel like a dime a dozen, the other eleven here are more than worth the $40.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Alan Teder

    This series of short stories captures many of the hallmarks of the Sherlock Holmes canon as established by Arthur Conan Doyle, but the actual mystery and solution elements of the individual cases receive a short shrift. None of the villains or the plots were all that memorable, but the overall Holmesian aura was still very well done. It seemed like more care was taken in recreating the ACD style, but not enough on actual clever plots. I listened to the Audible Audio edition thanks to an Audible D This series of short stories captures many of the hallmarks of the Sherlock Holmes canon as established by Arthur Conan Doyle, but the actual mystery and solution elements of the individual cases receive a short shrift. None of the villains or the plots were all that memorable, but the overall Holmesian aura was still very well done. It seemed like more care was taken in recreating the ACD style, but not enough on actual clever plots. I listened to the Audible Audio edition thanks to an Audible Daily Deal. The narration by audiobook veteran Simon Vance was excellent.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Pia

    While I did like this book and enjoyed reading it, I didn't love it. My mistake, perhaps, as the same has happened to me with the "remakes" of Agatha Christie's books. You have great characters, good plots and amazing writers but the whole doesn't seem to gel together. I've been a Sherlock Holmes fan since I was quite young, and I've re read most of the books several times. The plots are very smart and Sherlock Holmes and Watson flow through the books, where their personalities complement each oth While I did like this book and enjoyed reading it, I didn't love it. My mistake, perhaps, as the same has happened to me with the "remakes" of Agatha Christie's books. You have great characters, good plots and amazing writers but the whole doesn't seem to gel together. I've been a Sherlock Holmes fan since I was quite young, and I've re read most of the books several times. The plots are very smart and Sherlock Holmes and Watson flow through the books, where their personalities complement each other and grow with each book. In this book, some of the stories were much better than others, that is that I found them quite uneven. Also, I can't picture Holmes and his relations with women as they are described in this book. And Watson is not as interesting as in the original stories. Overall, a pleasant read but not comparable to the original. I received an ARC of this book in exchange for an honest review.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Amy Sturgis

    Lyndsay Faye is the author of one of my favorite novel-length Sherlock Holmes pastiches, Dust and Shadow, and her short Sherlockian works similarly do not disappoint. She has a wonderful grasp of Watson's voice, and the few stories told from Holmes's point of view are both carefully crafted and laugh-out-loud funny. Although Faye is adept at constructing mysteries in these stories, her focus and forte is characterization. Over and over again, these stories celebrate and unpack the unique bond be Lyndsay Faye is the author of one of my favorite novel-length Sherlock Holmes pastiches, Dust and Shadow, and her short Sherlockian works similarly do not disappoint. She has a wonderful grasp of Watson's voice, and the few stories told from Holmes's point of view are both carefully crafted and laugh-out-loud funny. Although Faye is adept at constructing mysteries in these stories, her focus and forte is characterization. Over and over again, these stories celebrate and unpack the unique bond between Holmes and Watson (and, for that matter, others in their orbit, such as Mycroft and Lestrade) in a very loving (although, yes, sometimes repetitive) way. The more you know Arthur Conan Doyle's canon, and the more you care about these heroes, the more you will find to appreciate in these tales.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Sue Smith

    There aren't too many out there that can keep to the soul of Sherlock Holmes and make you believe - but Lyndsay Faye is one. I loved this book. All the little stories and glimpses into the life and circumstances, small treats and journal entries - and staying true to one of the most beloved and memorable fictional characters of our day - is just a treat. Ah the balm of good writing! Never underestimate it my friends!! There aren't too many out there that can keep to the soul of Sherlock Holmes and make you believe - but Lyndsay Faye is one. I loved this book. All the little stories and glimpses into the life and circumstances, small treats and journal entries - and staying true to one of the most beloved and memorable fictional characters of our day - is just a treat. Ah the balm of good writing! Never underestimate it my friends!!

  26. 4 out of 5

    Valerie

    Bravo! I've read a variety of Holmes pastiches. Gate's are possibly the best I've tried in years. Hers capture the spirit and the tone of classic Conan-Doyle. Her stories are well plotted, interesting mysteries, well thought out with some appreciated but not inexplicable twists. So many authors today seem to base their Holmes on Sherlock, which I love but which are not classic Holmes and Watson. Faye has mostly avoided this trap. Highly recommended if you like classic Holmes' stories. Bravo! I've read a variety of Holmes pastiches. Gate's are possibly the best I've tried in years. Hers capture the spirit and the tone of classic Conan-Doyle. Her stories are well plotted, interesting mysteries, well thought out with some appreciated but not inexplicable twists. So many authors today seem to base their Holmes on Sherlock, which I love but which are not classic Holmes and Watson. Faye has mostly avoided this trap. Highly recommended if you like classic Holmes' stories.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Susan

    These mysteries cover the whole span of Holmes' career. I enjoyed all the stories in the collection and could easily imagine Watson and Holmes speaking from these tales. They are told from both their view point starting with a mystery Watson had never been able to solve which occurred while he lived in California. An entertaining book. A NetGalley Book These mysteries cover the whole span of Holmes' career. I enjoyed all the stories in the collection and could easily imagine Watson and Holmes speaking from these tales. They are told from both their view point starting with a mystery Watson had never been able to solve which occurred while he lived in California. An entertaining book. A NetGalley Book

  28. 4 out of 5

    Sam (Clues and Reviews)

    Lyndsay Faye’s The Whole Art of Detection: Lost Mysteries of Sherlock Holmes was completely outside of my reading comfort zone. Having never read a novel by Faye (and from what I have been hearing, this is a mistake!), I wasn’t sure what to expect. Now that I have finished, I must say, although the novel was not for me, I was impressed with her writing ability. According to the media kit I received with this book and the Goodreads synopsis, Faye was a huge Sherlock Holmes fan and began to spin H Lyndsay Faye’s The Whole Art of Detection: Lost Mysteries of Sherlock Holmes was completely outside of my reading comfort zone. Having never read a novel by Faye (and from what I have been hearing, this is a mistake!), I wasn’t sure what to expect. Now that I have finished, I must say, although the novel was not for me, I was impressed with her writing ability. According to the media kit I received with this book and the Goodreads synopsis, Faye was a huge Sherlock Holmes fan and began to spin Holmes and his trusty sidekick Watson into her own works of fiction. As with all novels I read, I was perusing some reviews, and found that any that reflect this novel in a negative light commonly state that it reads like a piece of “fan fiction”. Well ya. Of course it does. Faye never claims to make up Holmes or to try to completely reinvent the wheel. Instead, she takes what works from the classic Sherlock Holmes stories and adds her own twist to it. And she does it well! The novel covers Holme’s career, beginning before he arrived on Baker Street and moving along chronologically. I loved the language. I do not enjoy a lot of classic fiction (I blame it on everything I was forced to read during my English undergrad in university), but I do love the sayings of the time. By Jove! My good man! On the contrary! The novel is written like an anthology and I think this is the thing I liked the most about it. It could easily be placed on your nightstand to be picked up whenever the mood strikes. Each story is short and to the point. No commitment is needed to read the book in its entirety. I have never been a “ride of die” Sherlock Holmes fan, and that perspective has not changed, so for that reason alone, I am rating this novel 3/5 stars. However, if you love the classic Sherlock Holmes story, then you have found your next read my good man!

  29. 5 out of 5

    Melania &#x1f352;

    @~65% This Is a case of it’s not you it’s me

  30. 5 out of 5

    Tony

    The Whole Art of Detection is an entertaining, but not particularly inspired, collection of Sherlock Holmes stories. By far my two favorites were the tales told from the perspective of Holmes, himself. True Holmes devotees may find some deeper value in this anthology. But, casual fans--like myself--will likely not encounter anything to raise their level of interest in literature's most famous sleuth. The Whole Art of Detection is an entertaining, but not particularly inspired, collection of Sherlock Holmes stories. By far my two favorites were the tales told from the perspective of Holmes, himself. True Holmes devotees may find some deeper value in this anthology. But, casual fans--like myself--will likely not encounter anything to raise their level of interest in literature's most famous sleuth.

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