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Scoring the Screen: The Secret Language of Film Music

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(Music Pro Guide Books & DVDs). Today, musical composition for films is more popular than ever. In professional and academic spheres, media music study and practice are growing; undergraduate and postgraduate programs in media scoring are offered by dozens of major colleges and universities. And increasingly, pop and contemporary classical composers are expanding their rea (Music Pro Guide Books & DVDs). Today, musical composition for films is more popular than ever. In professional and academic spheres, media music study and practice are growing; undergraduate and postgraduate programs in media scoring are offered by dozens of major colleges and universities. And increasingly, pop and contemporary classical composers are expanding their reach into cinema and other forms of screen entertainment. Yet a search on Amazon reveals at least 50 titles under the category of film music, and, remarkably, only a meager few actually allow readers to see the music itself, while none of them examine landmark scores like Vertigo, To Kill a Mockingbird, Patton, The Untouchables, or The Matrix in the detail provided by Scoring the Screen: The Secret Language of Film Music . This is the first book since Roy M. Prendergast's 1977 benchmark, Film Music: A Neglected Art, to treat music for motion pictures as a compositional style worthy of serious study. Through extensive and unprecedented analyses of the original concert scores, it is the first to offer both aspiring composers and music educators with a view from the inside of the actual process of scoring-to-picture. The core thesis of Scoring the Screen is that music for motion pictures is indeed a language, developed by the masters of the craft out of a dramatic and commercial necessity to communicate ideas and emotions instantaneously to an audience. Like all languages, it exists primarily to convey meaning . To quote renowned orchestrator Conrad Pope (who has worked with John Williams, Howard Shore, and Alexandre Desplat, among others): "If you have any interest in what music 'means' in film, get this book. Andy Hill is among the handful of penetrating minds and ears engaged in film music today."


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(Music Pro Guide Books & DVDs). Today, musical composition for films is more popular than ever. In professional and academic spheres, media music study and practice are growing; undergraduate and postgraduate programs in media scoring are offered by dozens of major colleges and universities. And increasingly, pop and contemporary classical composers are expanding their rea (Music Pro Guide Books & DVDs). Today, musical composition for films is more popular than ever. In professional and academic spheres, media music study and practice are growing; undergraduate and postgraduate programs in media scoring are offered by dozens of major colleges and universities. And increasingly, pop and contemporary classical composers are expanding their reach into cinema and other forms of screen entertainment. Yet a search on Amazon reveals at least 50 titles under the category of film music, and, remarkably, only a meager few actually allow readers to see the music itself, while none of them examine landmark scores like Vertigo, To Kill a Mockingbird, Patton, The Untouchables, or The Matrix in the detail provided by Scoring the Screen: The Secret Language of Film Music . This is the first book since Roy M. Prendergast's 1977 benchmark, Film Music: A Neglected Art, to treat music for motion pictures as a compositional style worthy of serious study. Through extensive and unprecedented analyses of the original concert scores, it is the first to offer both aspiring composers and music educators with a view from the inside of the actual process of scoring-to-picture. The core thesis of Scoring the Screen is that music for motion pictures is indeed a language, developed by the masters of the craft out of a dramatic and commercial necessity to communicate ideas and emotions instantaneously to an audience. Like all languages, it exists primarily to convey meaning . To quote renowned orchestrator Conrad Pope (who has worked with John Williams, Howard Shore, and Alexandre Desplat, among others): "If you have any interest in what music 'means' in film, get this book. Andy Hill is among the handful of penetrating minds and ears engaged in film music today."

48 review for Scoring the Screen: The Secret Language of Film Music

  1. 5 out of 5

    David

    So my second book on writing music for film in less than a year. This one was more accessible from my point of view and fascinating. But once again I give fair warning this is still way beyond my knowledge and is really targeted at university level students and budding film composers. However I still enjoyed it and some fascinating choices of film scores, not the usual with the chapters on Perfume and The War Of The Roses being standouts.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Ryan

    Excellent. I was skeptical because I’m already well versed in the subject of film scoring (it’s literally my degree), but I picked up some interesting insights, discovered new scores I hadn’t previously heard (particularly Perfume) and thoroughly enjoyed the book.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Christopher Heckman

    This book started off promising, explicitly describing the "secret" language (such as the Hermann Chord, nonfunctional harmony, and Avro Part's compositional techniques), but then in the middle, the author started analyzing the scores without mentioning any major breakthroughs. I'm not a movie person, so a good deal of the movies mentioned were lost on me, and for most of the rest, I will need to do another listen-through. That's not a bad way to spend time, though. This book started off promising, explicitly describing the "secret" language (such as the Hermann Chord, nonfunctional harmony, and Avro Part's compositional techniques), but then in the middle, the author started analyzing the scores without mentioning any major breakthroughs. I'm not a movie person, so a good deal of the movies mentioned were lost on me, and for most of the rest, I will need to do another listen-through. That's not a bad way to spend time, though.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Lord

    4.7

  5. 5 out of 5

    Adam Lutz

  6. 4 out of 5

    Max

  7. 5 out of 5

    Evan Rogers

  8. 5 out of 5

    Frank Lehman

  9. 5 out of 5

    Chris Fletcher

  10. 4 out of 5

    Martin Nondal Mason

  11. 4 out of 5

    Michael Despotopoulos

  12. 4 out of 5

    STE3Z

  13. 4 out of 5

    Marco Vismara

  14. 5 out of 5

    Justin Joyce

  15. 5 out of 5

    Isaac Melton

  16. 4 out of 5

    Joseph Sporck

  17. 4 out of 5

    Thomas Wright

  18. 4 out of 5

    Drew Conley

  19. 5 out of 5

    Jack Williams

  20. 4 out of 5

    Graham

  21. 4 out of 5

    Roberto Figus

  22. 5 out of 5

    David Caton

  23. 5 out of 5

    Gregory Fisher

  24. 5 out of 5

    Kiara

  25. 5 out of 5

    Andrew B Lent

  26. 5 out of 5

    Steven Cen

  27. 5 out of 5

    Gabriele

  28. 4 out of 5

    Karissa Soo

  29. 4 out of 5

    Franco Lucero

  30. 5 out of 5

    Jesse

  31. 5 out of 5

    Ben

  32. 4 out of 5

    Pablo

  33. 5 out of 5

    Martin Bouchard

  34. 5 out of 5

    Niall-Conor

  35. 5 out of 5

    Nicole

  36. 4 out of 5

    Philipp Grzemba

  37. 5 out of 5

    Matt

  38. 5 out of 5

    Giuseppe Corcella

  39. 5 out of 5

    Firenze

  40. 5 out of 5

    Sebastian

  41. 5 out of 5

    Shannon

  42. 4 out of 5

    Shannon

  43. 4 out of 5

    Gonza Lorenzo

  44. 5 out of 5

    Nadav Blumer

  45. 4 out of 5

    Kathleen Becker

  46. 5 out of 5

    Paulo

  47. 4 out of 5

    Achal Yadav

  48. 5 out of 5

    Carl

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