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The Complete Works of William Shakespeare (37 plays, 160 sonnets and 5 Poetry Books With Active Table of Contents)

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This collection gathers together the works by William Shakespeare in a single, convenient, high quality, and extremely low priced Kindle volume! The Comedies of William Shakespeare A Midsummer Night's Dream All's Well That Ends Well As You Like It Love’s Labour ’s Lost Measure for Measure Much Ado About Nothing The Comedy of Errors The Merchant of Venice The Merry Wives of Windsor Th This collection gathers together the works by William Shakespeare in a single, convenient, high quality, and extremely low priced Kindle volume! The Comedies of William Shakespeare A Midsummer Night's Dream All's Well That Ends Well As You Like It Love’s Labour ’s Lost Measure for Measure Much Ado About Nothing The Comedy of Errors The Merchant of Venice The Merry Wives of Windsor The Taming of the Shrew The Two Gentlemen of Verona Twelfth Night; or, What you will The Romances of William Shakespeare Cymbeline Pericles, Prince of Tyre The Tempest The Winter's Tale The Tragedies of William Shakespeare King Lear Romeo and Juliet The History of Troilus and Cressida The Life and Death of Julius Caesar The Life of Timon of Athens The Tragedy of Antony and Cleopatra The Tragedy of Coriolanus The Tragedy of Hamlet, Prince of Denmark The Tragedy of Macbeth The Tragedy of Othello, the Moor of Venice Titus Andronicus The Histories of William Shakespeare The Life and Death of King John The Life and Death of King Richard the Second The Tragedy of King Richard the Third The first part of King Henry the Fourth The second part of King Henry the Fourth The Life of King Henry V The first part of King Henry the Sixth The second part of King Henry the Sixth The third part of King Henry the Sixth The Life of King Henry the Eighth The Poetical Works of William Shakespeare The Sonnets Sonnets to Sundry Notes of Music A Lover's Complaint The Rape of Lucrece Venus and Adonis The Phoenix and the Turtle The Passionate Pilgrim


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This collection gathers together the works by William Shakespeare in a single, convenient, high quality, and extremely low priced Kindle volume! The Comedies of William Shakespeare A Midsummer Night's Dream All's Well That Ends Well As You Like It Love’s Labour ’s Lost Measure for Measure Much Ado About Nothing The Comedy of Errors The Merchant of Venice The Merry Wives of Windsor Th This collection gathers together the works by William Shakespeare in a single, convenient, high quality, and extremely low priced Kindle volume! The Comedies of William Shakespeare A Midsummer Night's Dream All's Well That Ends Well As You Like It Love’s Labour ’s Lost Measure for Measure Much Ado About Nothing The Comedy of Errors The Merchant of Venice The Merry Wives of Windsor The Taming of the Shrew The Two Gentlemen of Verona Twelfth Night; or, What you will The Romances of William Shakespeare Cymbeline Pericles, Prince of Tyre The Tempest The Winter's Tale The Tragedies of William Shakespeare King Lear Romeo and Juliet The History of Troilus and Cressida The Life and Death of Julius Caesar The Life of Timon of Athens The Tragedy of Antony and Cleopatra The Tragedy of Coriolanus The Tragedy of Hamlet, Prince of Denmark The Tragedy of Macbeth The Tragedy of Othello, the Moor of Venice Titus Andronicus The Histories of William Shakespeare The Life and Death of King John The Life and Death of King Richard the Second The Tragedy of King Richard the Third The first part of King Henry the Fourth The second part of King Henry the Fourth The Life of King Henry V The first part of King Henry the Sixth The second part of King Henry the Sixth The third part of King Henry the Sixth The Life of King Henry the Eighth The Poetical Works of William Shakespeare The Sonnets Sonnets to Sundry Notes of Music A Lover's Complaint The Rape of Lucrece Venus and Adonis The Phoenix and the Turtle The Passionate Pilgrim

30 review for The Complete Works of William Shakespeare (37 plays, 160 sonnets and 5 Poetry Books With Active Table of Contents)

  1. 5 out of 5

    Daniel Cowan

    Simply put, When you have The Complete Works of William Shakespeare you have one of the best works of literature ever written. I would definitely place it in the top 10 best works of literature of all time. I bought this book at special price from here: https://www.amazon.com/Complete-Works... Simply put, When you have The Complete Works of William Shakespeare you have one of the best works of literature ever written. I would definitely place it in the top 10 best works of literature of all time. I bought this book at special price from here: https://www.amazon.com/Complete-Works...

  2. 5 out of 5

    clara

    *i didn't actually read this collection: this book is being used as "all shakespeare ever written."* after finishing a blissful little re read of The Tempest, i hopped over to goodreads to review it... and literally experienced an existential crisis. why, you may ask? i realized -horror of horrors- i haven't shelved a single shakespeare play on here. and im walking around saying he's my favorite author!!! so i compiled, firstly, a list of the shakespeare i've read, so i could shelve and review i *i didn't actually read this collection: this book is being used as "all shakespeare ever written."* after finishing a blissful little re read of The Tempest, i hopped over to goodreads to review it... and literally experienced an existential crisis. why, you may ask? i realized -horror of horrors- i haven't shelved a single shakespeare play on here. and im walking around saying he's my favorite author!!! so i compiled, firstly, a list of the shakespeare i've read, so i could shelve and review it. let's see. 1. The Tempest 2. Julius Caesar 3. Macbeth 4. The Taming of the Shrew 5. Romeo and Juliet hm. it feels like i've read more than that. i guess because i've seen them performed or read abridged versions of them. ah. and that's when i had a ✨brilliant idea!✨ i could make this year *drumroll* The Year Of The Great Shakespeare Tbr! truly a great plan, considering i already have a huge tbr, am currently in a reading slump, and have school things to read, not to mention im in multiple plays and have a million other miscellaneous things to do right now. and god knows what this year is even going to look like anyways. but i decided to go for it. here is my grand plan. ☽ read the original versions of ☾ -As You Like It -Much Ado About Nothing -A Midsummer Nights Dream -The Two Noble Kinsman -A Winter's Tale -Hamlet -Othello -Antony and Cleopatra -Henry VIII -The Merry Wives of Windsor ☽ memorize a monologue from ☾ - A Midsummer Nights Dream or Much Ado About Nothing - The Two Noble Kinsman (there's this great lesbian romance monologue from a bi character i loveeee and need to learn) -Hamlet or Macbeth depending on what i find and like. then, what with my marc antony speech, i will have a comedic, romantic, historic, and tragic monologue! *theater nerd moment* heh anyways. on with the plan: ☽ read retellings of/acquire more knowledge of ☾ -Pericles, Prince Of Tyre -The Two Gentlemen of Verona -All's Well That Ends Well -Titus Andronicus -The Merchant Of Venice -All the Henrys (or Henries? Idk) -King Lear ☽ ignore ☾ -King John -Corialanus -Anything I Forgot and there you are. the grand will-use-up-valuble-time-until-i-forget-about-it-and-it-is-never-seen-again plan!! woohoo! also, i have a feeling a lot of my "read the original versions of" books will transfer to the last list over time. just to prepare you for that. tl;dr: im going to try (and fail) to read, memorize, and learn about more shakespeare. despite my busy schedule and already-huge tbr. THIS IS A VERY BAD IDEA. KIDS, DONT TRY THIS AT HOME.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Alexxy

    Read so far: *The Tempest *The Two Gentlemen of Verona - 3 Stars (It's been a while seen I've read Shakespeare. Was this one easier, or had I gotten better at old-timey English?) Read so far: *The Tempest *The Two Gentlemen of Verona - 3 Stars (It's been a while seen I've read Shakespeare. Was this one easier, or had I gotten better at old-timey English?)

  4. 4 out of 5

    Richard Seltzer

    I binge-read Shakespeare as research for my novel Shakespeare's Twin Sister. And this edition was particularly good for that. Rereading Shakespeare is like playing a piece of music. The pleasure grows as you learn it, until you can watch it in your mind without looking at the words, like you can play the music without looking at the score and then can hear the music without playing it. I binge-read Shakespeare as research for my novel Shakespeare's Twin Sister. And this edition was particularly good for that. Rereading Shakespeare is like playing a piece of music. The pleasure grows as you learn it, until you can watch it in your mind without looking at the words, like you can play the music without looking at the score and then can hear the music without playing it.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Daniel Polansky

    Not bad.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Marius

    I abandoned this edition because of the annoying political agenda that permeated introductory articles and explanatory notes. I want an edition that is free from today's ideologies and to enjoy solely the TIMELESS Art of Shakespeare. I hope my new edition based on the First Folio will be more equidistant. 5. AS YOU LIKE IT (p. 401-437) 6 Iul 2015 - 4. MUCH ADO ABOUT NOTHING (p. 365-400) 20 Mai 2015 - 24 Mai 2015 3. ROMEO AND JULIET (p. 1251-1294) 26 Feb 2015 - 02 Mar 2015 2. TWELFTH NIGHT (p. 438-4 I abandoned this edition because of the annoying political agenda that permeated introductory articles and explanatory notes. I want an edition that is free from today's ideologies and to enjoy solely the TIMELESS Art of Shakespeare. I hope my new edition based on the First Folio will be more equidistant. 5. AS YOU LIKE IT (p. 401-437) 6 Iul 2015 - 4. MUCH ADO ABOUT NOTHING (p. 365-400) 20 Mai 2015 - 24 Mai 2015 3. ROMEO AND JULIET (p. 1251-1294) 26 Feb 2015 - 02 Mar 2015 2. TWELFTH NIGHT (p. 438-473) 13 Feb 2015 - 16 Feb 2015 1. A MIDSUMMER NIGHT'S DREAM (p. 249-284) 17 Nov 2014 - 21 Nov 2014

  7. 4 out of 5

    Suzanne

    My beloved Complete Shakespeare from college into which I occasionally dip. I have only read certain plays and a few sonnets. Have not nearly completed my education in the Bard, but I like knowing it's there. May 28, 2015: re-read Hamlet. Still not my favorite. I've always wished I liked or at least appreciated it more. This weekend will re-watch Kenneth Branaugh's "full-text" film, hoping for the "aha" moment. My beloved Complete Shakespeare from college into which I occasionally dip. I have only read certain plays and a few sonnets. Have not nearly completed my education in the Bard, but I like knowing it's there. May 28, 2015: re-read Hamlet. Still not my favorite. I've always wished I liked or at least appreciated it more. This weekend will re-watch Kenneth Branaugh's "full-text" film, hoping for the "aha" moment.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Liz Estrada

    By reading Timon of Athens, I can now say I have read them all!!! As a theater major, it is my duty and pleasure.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Erin Germain

    Finally finished reading this. I don't mean that in a "thank goodness that's over" way, just that it wasn't something I could really tear through. Overall, I enjoyed it. Shakespeare is one of those, like all mortals, who has his good moments and his not-so-good moments. When he is good, he is brilliant. When he is bad, he is terrible. And there were a few I can say I did not enjoy, at all. I'm probably inviting the Pitchfork and Torches crowd, but I have to say that I have never enjoyed Romeo and Finally finished reading this. I don't mean that in a "thank goodness that's over" way, just that it wasn't something I could really tear through. Overall, I enjoyed it. Shakespeare is one of those, like all mortals, who has his good moments and his not-so-good moments. When he is good, he is brilliant. When he is bad, he is terrible. And there were a few I can say I did not enjoy, at all. I'm probably inviting the Pitchfork and Torches crowd, but I have to say that I have never enjoyed Romeo and Juliet. It isn't the star-crossed lovers theme, or the feuding families, or anything really specific, simply that I have, since the first time I read it in high school, wanted to reach in to shake Juliet and smack Romeo upside the head. I wasn't overly fond of Richard III, but much of that stems from the fact that Shakespeare and I are on opposite sides of the fence regarding the Plantagenets and the Tudors. Richard III is one of my favorites royals and he was writing plays during the reign of Elizabeth I, Henry VII's granddaughter. To some extent, politics must take precedence. Still, it's a well-written play, and I can enjoy it for that, even if I disagree with the premise. My favorite has to be The Tempest, which I read in high school. I love the relationship between Prospero and Ariel. It just sets up a great tone and I never tire of reading it. Poems and sonnets, there were ones I enjoyed and those I wasn't quite as fond of. Still, that's what is so great about a large body of work like this - there is something for everyone and we all can have our opinions about each and every play, poem, and sonnet.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Tori

    2021 Review: For almost 10 years this book has sat on my Currently Reading list, a daunting task which I have slowly chipped away at overtime until today I close the book and can say I've read the Complete Works of William Shakespeare. What a ride. I find it difficult to turn around and rate Shakespeare. There are honestly parts of this where I pulled myself through, zoned out, lost all track of what was happening, or just didn't feel anything. But Shakespeare isn't really written to be read, and 2021 Review: For almost 10 years this book has sat on my Currently Reading list, a daunting task which I have slowly chipped away at overtime until today I close the book and can say I've read the Complete Works of William Shakespeare. What a ride. I find it difficult to turn around and rate Shakespeare. There are honestly parts of this where I pulled myself through, zoned out, lost all track of what was happening, or just didn't feel anything. But Shakespeare isn't really written to be read, and I know the same plays that I slowly worked through, sometimes unjoyfully, could very well have me on the edge of my seat in rapturous delight if I saw them performed. There is so much that is not said in this book that gets brought to life by an actor on stage. So much room for them to add feeling, or inflection, or action and reaction. It makes the book come across flat and the performance come alive. 50 different actors can all tackle Hamlet and bring something new and interesting without compromising what's on the page. It's amazing. And even in just reading Shakespeare's incomparable wordplay is evident. His works are truly worthy of being the quintessential classics they are known to be. 2012 Comments: Found a copy at Goodwill, and since I'm constantly looking for new classics to add to my bookshelf picked it up. (Besides, I'm in a Shakespeare mood.) It's pages are so pretty and look aged. And the cover is hardcover and velvet <3 I might just stroke it occasionally. How awesome for 2 dollars! :D

  11. 4 out of 5

    Nick

    [2015-2016] Read to page 438. In retrospect it was ridiculous to think that I could ever get through this whole thing, but damn if I didn't try. I realized I wasn't going to finish halfway through As You Like It, when I read like the fiftieth cuckold joke in that play and asked myself, "What am I really getting out of this?" True, I hadn't made it to the tragedies, i.e., the Shakespeare plays people actually care about, but I was looking at 300 more pages of comedies and 450 of histories before I [2015-2016] Read to page 438. In retrospect it was ridiculous to think that I could ever get through this whole thing, but damn if I didn't try. I realized I wasn't going to finish halfway through As You Like It, when I read like the fiftieth cuckold joke in that play and asked myself, "What am I really getting out of this?" True, I hadn't made it to the tragedies, i.e., the Shakespeare plays people actually care about, but I was looking at 300 more pages of comedies and 450 of histories before I got there. (If you're wondering why I didn't just skip around: you're missing the point.) Someday I'll probably read the tragedies I never had to read in high school, but for now I'm all Shakespeared out.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Sommer Ann McCullough

    It's Shakespeare, what more need I say? Over my first semester I read, in brilliant British accents with Ashley, the following plays from the anthology: Hamlet King Lear romeo and Juliet Midsummer Night's Dream Twelfth Night Taming of the Shrew Richard III Henry IV (part 1 and 2) Othello Much Ado About Nothing It's Shakespeare, what more need I say? Over my first semester I read, in brilliant British accents with Ashley, the following plays from the anthology: Hamlet King Lear romeo and Juliet Midsummer Night's Dream Twelfth Night Taming of the Shrew Richard III Henry IV (part 1 and 2) Othello Much Ado About Nothing

  13. 4 out of 5

    jobiwan6

    Sorry to be such a cliche, but I consider Shakespeare to be the greatest writer and poet in the English language, and his is the standard to which I hold all writing. Shakespeare's gift is to exalt all aspects of the human experience, while also entertaining, amusing, and moving us. Truth, beauty and humor - this stuff feeds your soul. Sorry to be such a cliche, but I consider Shakespeare to be the greatest writer and poet in the English language, and his is the standard to which I hold all writing. Shakespeare's gift is to exalt all aspects of the human experience, while also entertaining, amusing, and moving us. Truth, beauty and humor - this stuff feeds your soul.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Ricky Kimsey

    The Complete Shakespeare When I bought this it was under a dollar at the time. I always wanted to read the complete works of William Shakespeare having encountering a couple of his plays in my literature class in high school. I only wish this edition had footnotes to help with the language and historical context.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Brent

    If my house burned and this was the only thing saved, I’d be.....well, I’d be pissed off. But at least I’d have the best book in my collection.

  16. 5 out of 5

    William

    Obviously, I didn't read all of Shakespeare's writings. In fact, I only read Julius Caesar. I had never read Shakespeare before now, and it was a real treat. Julius Caesar was incredibly interesting and historically educating. I had not thought much of it before, but this particular moment of the death of Julius and the rise of Octavius, and the death of Cicero and Marcus Brutus - this whole account and unrest was the time in which Jesus was born into, though several hundred miles to the east. On Obviously, I didn't read all of Shakespeare's writings. In fact, I only read Julius Caesar. I had never read Shakespeare before now, and it was a real treat. Julius Caesar was incredibly interesting and historically educating. I had not thought much of it before, but this particular moment of the death of Julius and the rise of Octavius, and the death of Cicero and Marcus Brutus - this whole account and unrest was the time in which Jesus was born into, though several hundred miles to the east. One of the fascinating things about this event was the official failing of Rome's mixed constitution by becoming too monarchical with cult of personality leaders. This translation read very well, and I look forward to future Shakespeare reads.

  17. 5 out of 5

    H. Thompson

    A standard on my studying list, a good start if you're a writer who wants to study the classics A standard on my studying list, a good start if you're a writer who wants to study the classics

  18. 5 out of 5

    Ph. D.

    Took me the entire pandemic, but I read it all. I had to reward myself with one of the good ones to get myself through the histories and a few dogs (sacrilege, I know, but the Bard did write a few dogs). My final tally: 5 Willies (3): Hamlet, Macbeth, Julius Caesar 4 Willies (8): The Tempest, Othello, King Lear, Romeo & Juliet, A Midsummer Night's Dream, The Merry Wives of Windsor, The Merchant of Venice, Henry V 3 Willies (16): As You Like It, The Comedy of Errors, The Taming of the Shrew, Anto Took me the entire pandemic, but I read it all. I had to reward myself with one of the good ones to get myself through the histories and a few dogs (sacrilege, I know, but the Bard did write a few dogs). My final tally: 5 Willies (3): Hamlet, Macbeth, Julius Caesar 4 Willies (8): The Tempest, Othello, King Lear, Romeo & Juliet, A Midsummer Night's Dream, The Merry Wives of Windsor, The Merchant of Venice, Henry V 3 Willies (16): As You Like It, The Comedy of Errors, The Taming of the Shrew, Antony & Cleopatra, Richard III, Much Ado About Nothing, Henry IV, Pts.1 and 2, Coriolanus, All's Well that Ends Well, Twelfth Night, Two Gentlemen of Verona, Troilus and Cressida, The Winter's Tale, Sonnets and Other Poems 2 Willies (7): Henry IV Pt. 2, Henry VIII, Measure for Measure, Love's Labour's Lost, The Two Noble Kinsmen, Venus & Adonis, The Rape of Lucrece 1 Willie (7): King John, Cymbeline, Pericles, Henry IV Pts. 1 and 3, Timon of Athens, Titus Andronicus If you have indulged me thus far, gentle reader, herewith I present a bonus track: A Shakespearean Ode from the Bard of Hamilton: When I consider where my life has been, The things that I have gained, and what was lost: What I was sure was mine to go and win, But in the winning, failed to count the cost — My every action issued from a choice That moved me toward or farther from the truth. I’ve learned that everyone deserves a voice; The price I paid for wisdom was my youth. The only gifts that last are those we give, And what we give is what we get to keep. “Do unto others” is the way to live; God’s grace is free, but very far from cheap. My legacy (and all that I’m sure of): The only thing is faith expressed through love.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Sarah

    So the way this is going to work is this: Starting now (1/9/19) I'll make a note of which plays I read each year. I like to read at least two, usually in the summer, to keep my hand in. I've done my best to list below the dates on which I think I read the plays before this year, but no guarantees. Someday I'm really going to have to read the poetry instead of just the plays... Have read: A Midsummer Night's Dream (2003, 2009, 2013) The Merchant of Venice (2008, 2009) The Merry Wives of Windsor (2017 So the way this is going to work is this: Starting now (1/9/19) I'll make a note of which plays I read each year. I like to read at least two, usually in the summer, to keep my hand in. I've done my best to list below the dates on which I think I read the plays before this year, but no guarantees. Someday I'm really going to have to read the poetry instead of just the plays... Have read: A Midsummer Night's Dream (2003, 2009, 2013) The Merchant of Venice (2008, 2009) The Merry Wives of Windsor (2017) The Winter's Tale (2017) The Tempest (2009, 2018) Henry VI Part I (2016, 2018) Henry VI Part II (2016, 2018) Henry VI Part III (2016, 2019) Richard III (2016, 2019) Richard II (2015, 2018) Henry IV Part I (2009, 2015, 2018) Henry IV Part II (2015, 2018) Henry V (2015, 2018) Titus Andronicus (2013) Romeo and Juliet (2004, 2009) Hamlet (2007, 2009, 2011) Othello (2009, 2014) King Lear, 1608 Quarto & 1623 Folio (2018) Macbeth (2006, 2007, 2009, 2013, 2017)

  20. 4 out of 5

    Б. Ачболд

    This is a very quick 'review' of the Complete Pelican edition. (1) Great value. Everything in one volume. (2) Quality of annotations pretty good for the most part. There will be moments of frustration (unnecessary annotation, annotations missing or unclear, etc.). Various professors have annotated the different plays, so it depends. But Penguin strikes just about the right balance between too much and too little annotation, I think, for the person who simply wants to read and enjoy Shakespeare. I' This is a very quick 'review' of the Complete Pelican edition. (1) Great value. Everything in one volume. (2) Quality of annotations pretty good for the most part. There will be moments of frustration (unnecessary annotation, annotations missing or unclear, etc.). Various professors have annotated the different plays, so it depends. But Penguin strikes just about the right balance between too much and too little annotation, I think, for the person who simply wants to read and enjoy Shakespeare. I've read three Arden volumes, and they are a bit over annotated, although that could sometimes be a good thing. (3) Choice of typeface (Adobe Minion): A-. Paper quality: B+. (4) Distance from text to annotation (which affects reading speed): B+. But this is because it's a huge volume, and you wouldn't get such a great value if it wasn't a big volume. (5) Quality of introductions, etc.: generally okay. I don't spend much time with them.

  21. 5 out of 5

    sch

    2021 Jul. Notes on introductory essays: * The Pelican introduction to MEASURE FOR MEASURE is worlds apart from the parallel essay in the Riverside edition (1997): sane, wise, less self-involved. Think I'll stick with this older text. * The PERICLES introduction by James G. McManaway is suitably text-critical. * The CYMBELINE introduction by Robert B. Heilman is bloated (too much general discussion of genre) but contains a good point about the subtle or relative complexity of characters, both major 2021 Jul. Notes on introductory essays: * The Pelican introduction to MEASURE FOR MEASURE is worlds apart from the parallel essay in the Riverside edition (1997): sane, wise, less self-involved. Think I'll stick with this older text. * The PERICLES introduction by James G. McManaway is suitably text-critical. * The CYMBELINE introduction by Robert B. Heilman is bloated (too much general discussion of genre) but contains a good point about the subtle or relative complexity of characters, both major and minor. * The WINTER'S TALE introduction by Baldwin Maxwell combines a charming invitation to the play with a concise explanation of Shakespeare's sources and a brief historical survey of criticism, ending with E.M.W. Tillyard's interpretation. 2018 Jul. Reading select introductions to plays and the general essays at the beginning of the volume.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Fostergrants

    i am not comfortable enough to do a critique of shakespeare so i will review the book itself...this was my first ever "fancy book". a shiny green leather-ish cover with gold letters and big swan printed on the front. the edges of the page are gilded and there was a rich green ribbon bookmark - i thought all these things were so expensive at the time and it made me think the words within had to be very important. i have used this book as a table, a plant stand, a weapon, a leaf press and just dec i am not comfortable enough to do a critique of shakespeare so i will review the book itself...this was my first ever "fancy book". a shiny green leather-ish cover with gold letters and big swan printed on the front. the edges of the page are gilded and there was a rich green ribbon bookmark - i thought all these things were so expensive at the time and it made me think the words within had to be very important. i have used this book as a table, a plant stand, a weapon, a leaf press and just decor. a boyfriend gave it to me when i was 16 - i'm 40 now so the gilding is faded and the ribbon is pea soup colored, but i still love it - and i've actually read quite a bit of it. thank you MS - i have not forgotten.

  23. 4 out of 5

    H

    Favorite play read: Julius Caesar Favorite play performed: Twelfth Night Favorite character: Actors playing the wall & moon in Midsummer Night's Dream Favorite line: from Two Gents of Verona SPEED: How then? shall he marry her? LAUNCE: No, neither. SPEED: What, are they broken? LAUNCE: No, they are both as whole as a fish. Favorite adaptation/modernization: Rosencrantz & Guildenstern Are Dead Skipped most of the 150 sonnets. Have now read or seen, in historical order: Richard III Taming of the Shrew Titus A Favorite play read: Julius Caesar Favorite play performed: Twelfth Night Favorite character: Actors playing the wall & moon in Midsummer Night's Dream Favorite line: from Two Gents of Verona SPEED: How then? shall he marry her? LAUNCE: No, neither. SPEED: What, are they broken? LAUNCE: No, they are both as whole as a fish. Favorite adaptation/modernization: Rosencrantz & Guildenstern Are Dead Skipped most of the 150 sonnets. Have now read or seen, in historical order: Richard III Taming of the Shrew Titus Andronicus Romeo and Juliet Two Gentlemen of Verona Love's Labour's Lost A Midsummer Night's Dream 1 Henry IV Henry V Twelfth Night As You Like It Julius Caesar Hamlet Othello Measure For Measure Macbeth Antony and Cleopatra The Tempest

  24. 5 out of 5

    jordan

    On 5 May 2012, I finished Shakespeare. The thirty-seven canonical plays, plus Two Nobel Kinsmen and Edward III, and the poetry included in the Complete Pelican Shakespeare.* This is to say I have read it all, not that I have unpacked it all. I am far more familiar with some plays than others, and I am far more interested in working further with some plays than others. *I don't actually have a specific memory of reading Much Ado About Nothing, but I've seen it twice on stage (plus once on film) an On 5 May 2012, I finished Shakespeare. The thirty-seven canonical plays, plus Two Nobel Kinsmen and Edward III, and the poetry included in the Complete Pelican Shakespeare.* This is to say I have read it all, not that I have unpacked it all. I am far more familiar with some plays than others, and I am far more interested in working further with some plays than others. *I don't actually have a specific memory of reading Much Ado About Nothing, but I've seen it twice on stage (plus once on film) and I'm pretty certain I did read it lo, these many years ago (Jesus, the plays that we have read!), so I will count it.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Jeff

    This is one of the 2 tomes I've listed here that I haven't read completely... (the other is Perrin's Literature Sound and Structure) but this was my text book for my lit class on Shakespeare, and as the title suggests its got everything Billy boy ever wrote.... or whoever you believe wrote whatever. Anyway the stuff attributed to Shakespeare. I'm not gonna count the sonnets but among plays here's what I've completed: Twelfth Night Macbeth Hamlet Romeo & Juliet Henry V Henry IV (both) Richard III King Le This is one of the 2 tomes I've listed here that I haven't read completely... (the other is Perrin's Literature Sound and Structure) but this was my text book for my lit class on Shakespeare, and as the title suggests its got everything Billy boy ever wrote.... or whoever you believe wrote whatever. Anyway the stuff attributed to Shakespeare. I'm not gonna count the sonnets but among plays here's what I've completed: Twelfth Night Macbeth Hamlet Romeo & Juliet Henry V Henry IV (both) Richard III King Lear As You Like It Measure for Measure I keep it around for the day that I eventually cross all 36 off the list.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Shallan

    I absolutely adore Shakespeare, which most would call crazy, considering the supposedly complicated language and confusing plots. I agree that sometimes the language is slightly difficult to understand, but if you immerse yourself in it, it becomes much easier to comprehend. I love how Shakespeare is able to take the most simple ideas and weave them into a beautiful story, where the characters are the only thing carrying the plot. I recommend this book to anyone who enjoys history, plays, poetry I absolutely adore Shakespeare, which most would call crazy, considering the supposedly complicated language and confusing plots. I agree that sometimes the language is slightly difficult to understand, but if you immerse yourself in it, it becomes much easier to comprehend. I love how Shakespeare is able to take the most simple ideas and weave them into a beautiful story, where the characters are the only thing carrying the plot. I recommend this book to anyone who enjoys history, plays, poetry reading and Old English. Even if you hate all of these things, but love books, it would be a good book to read!

  27. 4 out of 5

    Stephanie McClure

    So far I've read The Tragedy of Julius Caesar, great play as are they all. I'm currently reading Much Ado About Nothing. Will be reading The Tragical History of Hamlet Prince of Denmark, then Measure for Measure, and lastly The Tragedy of Othello the Moor of Venice. I would love to read the rest of the plays but sadly I probably will not unless I take another Shakespeare class. I have finished Much Ado, Hamlet, Measure for Measure, and Othello! I loved all of these plays. I now, fully understand So far I've read The Tragedy of Julius Caesar, great play as are they all. I'm currently reading Much Ado About Nothing. Will be reading The Tragical History of Hamlet Prince of Denmark, then Measure for Measure, and lastly The Tragedy of Othello the Moor of Venice. I would love to read the rest of the plays but sadly I probably will not unless I take another Shakespeare class. I have finished Much Ado, Hamlet, Measure for Measure, and Othello! I loved all of these plays. I now, fully understand why Shakespeare is regarded as the greatest writer of all time.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Angela Randall

    The complete works of shakespeare, including all plays, sonnets and poems, are available free to read/download/print here: http://www.opensourceshakespeare.org/ We own the Illustrated Stratford Shakespeare: The complete works of shakespeare, including all plays, sonnets and poems, are available free to read/download/print here: http://www.opensourceshakespeare.org/ We own the Illustrated Stratford Shakespeare:

  29. 5 out of 5

    Salvatore

    Worth it. There are some shit plays and poetry. There are some brilliant turns of phrase. Words, words, words: Characters, characters, characters: there are a lot of them here. To see the mind of the creator develop, try new things, and reuse successful devices - all of these are rather fascinating to me and indeed why I like to read an author's full work. Screw you, Harold Bloom: Shakespeare didn't invent the human. He was human. And knew how to express that (occasionally) via poetry and drama Worth it. There are some shit plays and poetry. There are some brilliant turns of phrase. Words, words, words: Characters, characters, characters: there are a lot of them here. To see the mind of the creator develop, try new things, and reuse successful devices - all of these are rather fascinating to me and indeed why I like to read an author's full work. Screw you, Harold Bloom: Shakespeare didn't invent the human. He was human. And knew how to express that (occasionally) via poetry and drama with some talent, some humour, some missteps, and a full fathom five's worth of words.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Adam

    In my opinion as a proto-scholar of Renaissance and 17th C. studies, this is the Shakespeare collection that strikes the best balance between scholarship and readability. Commentary is offered by such notables as Stephen Orgel of Stanford and Peter Holland, Director of the Shakespeare Institute. It includes all alternative folio and quarto renditions and the text is presented in an eye-friendly font, but most importantly, its not too heavy!

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