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Not Now, Bernard: Limited Edition Slipcase

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Limited edition of only 300 to celebrate the 35th anniversary, each signed and numbered by David McKee and accompanied by a portfolio containing a print from the book. Loved by children, monsters and adults for thirty five years, this beautiful limited edition slipcase is a must-own classic, with an introduction by former Children's Laureate Michael Rosen. Bernard has a pro Limited edition of only 300 to celebrate the 35th anniversary, each signed and numbered by David McKee and accompanied by a portfolio containing a print from the book. Loved by children, monsters and adults for thirty five years, this beautiful limited edition slipcase is a must-own classic, with an introduction by former Children's Laureate Michael Rosen. Bernard has a problem. There's a monster in the back garden but his mum and dad are too busy to notice. So Bernard tries to befriend the monster… and that doesn't go quite to plan.


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Limited edition of only 300 to celebrate the 35th anniversary, each signed and numbered by David McKee and accompanied by a portfolio containing a print from the book. Loved by children, monsters and adults for thirty five years, this beautiful limited edition slipcase is a must-own classic, with an introduction by former Children's Laureate Michael Rosen. Bernard has a pro Limited edition of only 300 to celebrate the 35th anniversary, each signed and numbered by David McKee and accompanied by a portfolio containing a print from the book. Loved by children, monsters and adults for thirty five years, this beautiful limited edition slipcase is a must-own classic, with an introduction by former Children's Laureate Michael Rosen. Bernard has a problem. There's a monster in the back garden but his mum and dad are too busy to notice. So Bernard tries to befriend the monster… and that doesn't go quite to plan.

30 review for Not Now, Bernard: Limited Edition Slipcase

  1. 5 out of 5

    Ken

    Another favourite from my childhood that I wanted to revisit as a parent, I certainly didn't remember it being so bleak! All Bernard wanted to do was engage in conversation with his mum and dad, but they kept brushing him off. They still didn't notice that the monster in the garden ate Bernard and then took his place. The message of this picture is certainly aimed at parents during bedtime stories, it's so vital to give your child the time and attention that they deserve. Another favourite from my childhood that I wanted to revisit as a parent, I certainly didn't remember it being so bleak! All Bernard wanted to do was engage in conversation with his mum and dad, but they kept brushing him off. They still didn't notice that the monster in the garden ate Bernard and then took his place. The message of this picture is certainly aimed at parents during bedtime stories, it's so vital to give your child the time and attention that they deserve.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Shoeb Narot

    ‘Not Now, Bernard” By David McKee A great little book from my primary school years. I couldn’t help myself when I saw this on the shelf at my local library, I took it out straight away. I can remember my year 2 teacher reading this book to us and I clearly remember relating to Bernard’s experience in the story. The story is about a young boy called Bernard who is trying to seek his parent’s attention. His parents are reluctant to give him that attention and as a result, the monster eats up Bernard… ‘Not Now, Bernard” By David McKee A great little book from my primary school years. I couldn’t help myself when I saw this on the shelf at my local library, I took it out straight away. I can remember my year 2 teacher reading this book to us and I clearly remember relating to Bernard’s experience in the story. The story is about a young boy called Bernard who is trying to seek his parent’s attention. His parents are reluctant to give him that attention and as a result, the monster eats up Bernard… His parents don’t even realize they are talking to a monster and not Bernard, even the monster is puzzled by this! The story portrays a classic scenario of parents not giving their children the time of day. The story has a great punch line that the children love to shout out each time the parents say ‘Not Now, Bernard’. A book with lots of humor, and a strong message for parents telling them to listen to their young ones even if they are busy. It may be something really important as the case of poor Bernard! I would recommend this book to young children in KS1 and it would make a great read aloud book for EYFS children, they can be encouraged to call out the punch line in the book ‘Not Now, Bernard’.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Chantal

    What a lovely and cute story. I couldn't help myself then to laugh at times. A great classic read with a good powerful message in it. Loved it. What a lovely and cute story. I couldn't help myself then to laugh at times. A great classic read with a good powerful message in it. Loved it.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Laura Cope

    This short, simple story tackles the issue of a young boy who tries to get the attention of his mum and dad, and yet every attempt is met with a "Not now, Bernard". Bernard is so fed up, that he goes into the garden, gets eaten by a monster, and his mum and dad still don't notice! In fact, the monster ends up tucked up nicely in Bernard's bed! To me, this book was quite sad as Bernard is left vying for his parents' attention, but to no avail. It is not clear whether the monster is real, or a figm This short, simple story tackles the issue of a young boy who tries to get the attention of his mum and dad, and yet every attempt is met with a "Not now, Bernard". Bernard is so fed up, that he goes into the garden, gets eaten by a monster, and his mum and dad still don't notice! In fact, the monster ends up tucked up nicely in Bernard's bed! To me, this book was quite sad as Bernard is left vying for his parents' attention, but to no avail. It is not clear whether the monster is real, or a figment of Bernard's imagination in his attempt to amuse himself and also in a stretch to get through to his parents. Although the illustrations throughout are lively and vibrant, the story ends rather unfortunately, and to me, does not display much hope for any children who could be suffering from a lack of attention at home. The book could be suitable for children with special educational needs due to its repetitive nature and simple, yet effective, imagery. For young children, however, (who the book is aimed at due to its simplistic nature) I feel that the book could be quite upsetting if understood, especially for children in a similar situation.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Paul Browne

    A thought provoking picture book that raises more questions than it answers. The ending is quite a surprise.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Hugh Stuart

    This is a classic that I somehow missed as a child but it was well worth the wait. It's a very simple story for the very young and I think would be ideal for reading aloud to a reception or KS1 class. It concerns the systematic neglect of the eponymous Bernard and his subsequent demise at the hands of a monster he meets in his garden. The monster engages in some very upsetting and destructive behaviour but is also ignored and is ultimately punished by taking Bernard's role in the household and b This is a classic that I somehow missed as a child but it was well worth the wait. It's a very simple story for the very young and I think would be ideal for reading aloud to a reception or KS1 class. It concerns the systematic neglect of the eponymous Bernard and his subsequent demise at the hands of a monster he meets in his garden. The monster engages in some very upsetting and destructive behaviour but is also ignored and is ultimately punished by taking Bernard's role in the household and being put to bed with a glass of milk. My favourite bit is the look on the monster's face when he realises he has doomed himself to a life of suburban maltreatment. On a deeper reading perhaps Bernard is the monster? Perhaps, indeed, we all have a monster inside of us. But probably not.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Francesca Lee

    I think this story has a very powerful message. At first I thought it was about a monster eating Bernard but it turned out that Bernard was the monster because of him getting angry from constantly getting ignored from his parents. It was an interesting story, not a typical picture book to read.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Mark

    Bernard’s got a problem because he’s found a monster in the back garden but his parents are too preoccupied to notice him let alone heed his warnings. If he’s eaten, will they even notice? Beautifully written and illustrated - David McKee also created the wonderful Mr Benn - this works really well as a picture book (the monster is quite thrilling and scary to kids) but I found it incredibly sad, as an adult, to read. With his dad barely there (he’s only in two parts) and his mum only offering pr Bernard’s got a problem because he’s found a monster in the back garden but his parents are too preoccupied to notice him let alone heed his warnings. If he’s eaten, will they even notice? Beautifully written and illustrated - David McKee also created the wonderful Mr Benn - this works really well as a picture book (the monster is quite thrilling and scary to kids) but I found it incredibly sad, as an adult, to read. With his dad barely there (he’s only in two parts) and his mum only offering practical support - making him dinner, making him go to bed - Bernard is pretty much on his own, nobody eats with him and he’s expected to take himself to bed. Sad but recommended.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Tamsin

    I'm not sure what to make of this book... on the one hand, it is a story with a strong reminder/message to parents to listen and engage with their children. But on the other hand, I did enjoy the silliness of the story, with the illustrations of the monster adapting to Bernard's life and the repetition of 'Not now, Bernard.' A book for both adults and children. I'm not sure what to make of this book... on the one hand, it is a story with a strong reminder/message to parents to listen and engage with their children. But on the other hand, I did enjoy the silliness of the story, with the illustrations of the monster adapting to Bernard's life and the repetition of 'Not now, Bernard.' A book for both adults and children.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Hannah

    This book was interesting as there is more to it than you first expect. It is quite simple to read, basic vocabulary and sentence structure but a rather deep story if you take the time to reflect. This makes it suitable for all ages, developing comprehension. One thing to bear in mind is it may be sensitive to some children so it is important to know your class before reading it together.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Kelly Neal

    Very funny. Opportunity to use expression for characterisation.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Ché Constable

    This is one of my personal favourites from my own primary school days. I cannot wait to engage my future classes in reading this spectacular book with! :)

  13. 5 out of 5

    Georgina Peachey

    This book explores a young boys struggle to gain attention from his parents as he is repeatedly told 'not now, Bernard'. This is a great picture book which can highlight to both parents and children the need to make time for each other, with fun animations to lighten the tone. The change of character to a monster represents Bernard acting out to try and get his parents attention. Overall, this book would be a great text for a child and parent to read together. This book explores a young boys struggle to gain attention from his parents as he is repeatedly told 'not now, Bernard'. This is a great picture book which can highlight to both parents and children the need to make time for each other, with fun animations to lighten the tone. The change of character to a monster represents Bernard acting out to try and get his parents attention. Overall, this book would be a great text for a child and parent to read together.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Zoe

    This text repeats the phrase 'not now, Bernard' throughout the book which as a reader made me feel sorry for Bernard because he wasn't being listened to by his parents. During the story Bernard comes across a monster in his garden and goes in to tell his mother who responds with 'not now, Bernard', as the story carries on Bernard gets eaten up by the monster. At first I was shocked because I thought how can the story carry on from this, however, after reading on I realised that the monster was r This text repeats the phrase 'not now, Bernard' throughout the book which as a reader made me feel sorry for Bernard because he wasn't being listened to by his parents. During the story Bernard comes across a monster in his garden and goes in to tell his mother who responds with 'not now, Bernard', as the story carries on Bernard gets eaten up by the monster. At first I was shocked because I thought how can the story carry on from this, however, after reading on I realised that the monster was resembling Bernard's inner anger and the reason why his parents kept on saying to the 'monster' 'not now, Bernard' was because deep down it still was Bernard. This story could be explored and taught in a variety of contexts, firstly the teacher could read the text to the children to enable them to get to know the characters and the plot. Then once the children have an understanding of the text, the teacher could transform the classroom into a TV show (have an image of the TV show name on the whiteboard and set up three chairs at the front of the classroom). The teacher could pretend to be the TV presenter and set the scene, three children could act as the mum, dad and Bernard. The rest of the class as the audience could think of questions to ask each character, whilst the children ask questions the teacher could scribe key phrases and responses on the whiteboard. This activity would be an effective way for the children to get to know a text and a great way of incorporating dialogic talk into the classroom. I found a website with a range of cross curricular teaching ideas around the book Not now, Bernard- https://www.teachingideas.co.uk/libra...

  15. 4 out of 5

    Jess Hancock

    I liked this book as a child and obviously didn't read any more into it, than a monster eating Bernard. As an adult and parent, this book gives a very strong message indeed. Spending time with our children, listening to them and acknowledging their existence. We are always so very 'busy', but what are we actually doing? It can probably wait. I should read this more often to remind myself of my own parent-child relationship. I liked this book as a child and obviously didn't read any more into it, than a monster eating Bernard. As an adult and parent, this book gives a very strong message indeed. Spending time with our children, listening to them and acknowledging their existence. We are always so very 'busy', but what are we actually doing? It can probably wait. I should read this more often to remind myself of my own parent-child relationship.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Jess Peck

    After hearing this book in a seminar it’s really made me think of how this could be incorporated into many cross curricular aspects in school. The book is about a boy called Bernard who discovers a monster in the garden. Although it took me until the end of this book to realise this, as at first I thought Bernard had been eaten by a monster. It was actually in fact Bernard expressing his anger towards his parents who never made time to listen to him instead would just repeat “NOT NOW BERNARD” In After hearing this book in a seminar it’s really made me think of how this could be incorporated into many cross curricular aspects in school. The book is about a boy called Bernard who discovers a monster in the garden. Although it took me until the end of this book to realise this, as at first I thought Bernard had been eaten by a monster. It was actually in fact Bernard expressing his anger towards his parents who never made time to listen to him instead would just repeat “NOT NOW BERNARD” In the future I would really like to incorporate this book into talk and drama. I would like to create a conscience alley whereby half the class could be expressing why the parents haven’t made time for him and the other half conveying why Bernard’s feelings. I would also like to integrate hot seating, where the children could use talking partners to come up with some key questions to ask the parents and also Bernard. In turn allowing the children to understand the potential underlying reasons for the strong emotions in the book. Other than Drama: -children could write a story which might explain where the monster came from - using ICT the children might design their own monster and give him/ her a story using the paint programme -in PSHCE the children could have a group discussion on how it feels to be ignored, whilst the teacher magpies the ideas on the board.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Becky Sparkes

    This book is all about a boy called Bernard who is very neglected and never gets attention from his parents. This is a good book about teaching children the importance of inclusion and not ignoring each other. As a result of being ignored from his parents Bernard was eaten by a monster. Drama activity: Jeremy Kyle style show- have Bernard and his mum and dad and get the audience to ask them questions.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Hayley Craig

    I thoroughly enjoy this story and whilst it is very funny it also makes you really think. Sometimes when people are too busy they really don't notice what is around them and what is happening. I think it is important to take from this that those little tasks can also be done later. This would be a useful story to get children to open up and discuss feelings, perhaps things that could be happening at home. Im sure children would also love to shout out 'not now bernard'. I thoroughly enjoy this story and whilst it is very funny it also makes you really think. Sometimes when people are too busy they really don't notice what is around them and what is happening. I think it is important to take from this that those little tasks can also be done later. This would be a useful story to get children to open up and discuss feelings, perhaps things that could be happening at home. Im sure children would also love to shout out 'not now bernard'.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Lydia

    Bernard is ignored repetitively by his parents and is ended up being eaten up by a monster. It is repetitive and an easy read. Bernard has a problem, as he has found a monster in the back garden, but his parents don't listen, as he tried to tell them that theres a monster and he needs help. He goes outside eventually by himself and that doesn't go to plan, as his parents are simply to busy to listen to their son. Bernard is ignored repetitively by his parents and is ended up being eaten up by a monster. It is repetitive and an easy read. Bernard has a problem, as he has found a monster in the back garden, but his parents don't listen, as he tried to tell them that theres a monster and he needs help. He goes outside eventually by himself and that doesn't go to plan, as his parents are simply to busy to listen to their son.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Jasmine Longworth

    I really enjoyed reading this book and I think children would really enjoy it and find it humorous. After discussing it and looking into the deeper meaning it provides an interesting insight into children experiencing neglect.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Jonathan Ayres

    A classic from my childhood that I used to love and still love today! Bernard wants attention from his mum, but she just won't believe him or even acknowledge him so much so, that mum doesn't realise Bernard isn't there anymore... Very funny and a great read aloud book. A classic from my childhood that I used to love and still love today! Bernard wants attention from his mum, but she just won't believe him or even acknowledge him so much so, that mum doesn't realise Bernard isn't there anymore... Very funny and a great read aloud book.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Anna

    We have just read this in the language seminar with Mat. It was so clever in the way we used this text and how everyone was engaged in it. I loved the anecdote from Mat about his previous class as well!! Will definitely be using this in the classroom.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Luke Nicholls

    A hilarious and possibly shocking exploration of what becomes of a child when they are ignored- and the monster that lurks inside all of us!

  24. 5 out of 5

    Tim Jacobs

    Great book, I remember being read this as a kid and absolutely loved it, now I can read it to my kids.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Hannah Middleton

    Repetitive lines that children can join in with, children are likely to agree and bring with them real-life experiences into the book

  26. 4 out of 5

    George Orton

    so good lmao

  27. 4 out of 5

    Megan Ledbetter

    Short and simple book which is effective when working with children because it portrays a clear message. His parents are ignoring him so much that he goes into the garden and gets eaten by a monster, they fail to notice this has happened to him. The pictures throughout the story are really effective and work alongside the rest of the story.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Chloe Nobbs

    a funny and interactive book that kids will love to join in with. bright colourful pictures and funny plot twists. class discussion could include talking about the parent’s neglect of Bernard and a debate on whether they are good or bad parents etc

  29. 5 out of 5

    Ayomide Eluyera

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. The level of childhood neglect and monster neglect in this book is absurd. I pray McKee did not use any personal experience when writing this book

  30. 5 out of 5

    Fiona Hill

    Sad story about a boy whose parents ignore - but a good message for parents and for children whose parents perhaps do ignore them to relate to - but also you would have to be sensitive about this too. His parents don't even notice when Bernard turns into a monster and children could discuss what the monster actually is. Also the repetitive 'NOT NOW, BERNARD' is something children would enjoy joining in on. Sad story about a boy whose parents ignore - but a good message for parents and for children whose parents perhaps do ignore them to relate to - but also you would have to be sensitive about this too. His parents don't even notice when Bernard turns into a monster and children could discuss what the monster actually is. Also the repetitive 'NOT NOW, BERNARD' is something children would enjoy joining in on.

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