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At the Pulpit: 185 Years of Discourses by Latter-day Saint Women

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At the Pulpit showcases the tradition of Latter-day Saint women's preaching and instruction by presenting 54 speeches given from 1831 to 2016, with selections from every decade since the founding of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. The discourses, given by women both well known and obscure, represent just some of the many contributions of women to Latter-da At the Pulpit showcases the tradition of Latter-day Saint women's preaching and instruction by presenting 54 speeches given from 1831 to 2016, with selections from every decade since the founding of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. The discourses, given by women both well known and obscure, represent just some of the many contributions of women to Latter-day Saint thought. In addition to being a scholarly history, At the Pulpit is intended as a resource for contemporary Latter-day Saints as they study, speak, teach, and lead. These discourses allow readers to hear the historical and contemporary voices of Latter-day Saint women--voices that resound with experience, wisdom, and authority.


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At the Pulpit showcases the tradition of Latter-day Saint women's preaching and instruction by presenting 54 speeches given from 1831 to 2016, with selections from every decade since the founding of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. The discourses, given by women both well known and obscure, represent just some of the many contributions of women to Latter-da At the Pulpit showcases the tradition of Latter-day Saint women's preaching and instruction by presenting 54 speeches given from 1831 to 2016, with selections from every decade since the founding of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. The discourses, given by women both well known and obscure, represent just some of the many contributions of women to Latter-day Saint thought. In addition to being a scholarly history, At the Pulpit is intended as a resource for contemporary Latter-day Saints as they study, speak, teach, and lead. These discourses allow readers to hear the historical and contemporary voices of Latter-day Saint women--voices that resound with experience, wisdom, and authority.

30 review for At the Pulpit: 185 Years of Discourses by Latter-day Saint Women

  1. 5 out of 5

    Tayler Morrell

    I do consider myself a feminist. Not a in-your-face-women-are-better-than-men-let's-march-and-protest-women-need-the-priesthood type of feminist. But, I do believe that the church wouldn't be as successful without its female leaders. We have a really important duty in the church--no matter what church you belong to. I even wrote a short series about women in the scriptures for She Teaches Fearlessly (before moving, pregnancy, and other issues got in the way!) So, when I saw that this book had 185 I do consider myself a feminist. Not a in-your-face-women-are-better-than-men-let's-march-and-protest-women-need-the-priesthood type of feminist. But, I do believe that the church wouldn't be as successful without its female leaders. We have a really important duty in the church--no matter what church you belong to. I even wrote a short series about women in the scriptures for She Teaches Fearlessly (before moving, pregnancy, and other issues got in the way!) So, when I saw that this book had 185 years worth of discourses from prominent women in the LDS Church, I was thrilled to be able to read it. It is set up so simply. Each "chapter" is one woman's discourse. There is a short contextual biography of the woman and the talk she gave before the actual excerpt. Then, there is an excerpt or full-text of her sermon, poetry, hymn, or letter. And that's something else that I really liked--the discourses are all in different formats--it's not all just Sunday School or General Conference talks. It really shows that women can teach and preach the Gospel in many formats. You can feel the Spirit and learn from it in different ways and at different times and in different scenarios. When I read this, I have a highlighter and a pen ready, just as if I were doing scripture study or reading church magazines. There is so much goodness in this book.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Sara

    This is one of the most inspiring collection of talks that I have ever read! A must-read for any LDS woman! Each discourse includes a brief preface with biographical information on each speaker that is as intriguing as the talks themselves. These are such gifted yet truly humble women who have made wonderful contributions to the Church. The Church Historian's Press has done a marvelous job with this volume! This is one of the most inspiring collection of talks that I have ever read! A must-read for any LDS woman! Each discourse includes a brief preface with biographical information on each speaker that is as intriguing as the talks themselves. These are such gifted yet truly humble women who have made wonderful contributions to the Church. The Church Historian's Press has done a marvelous job with this volume!

  3. 4 out of 5

    Heidi Robbins (Heidi Reads...)

    I loved reading and studying the important words of women from our church history and present day. Recently a friend mentioned that she thought it would be wonderful if one year the lesson manual for Relief Society and Priesthood classes was a compilation of talks from the female general auxiliary presidents. I agreed, and soon after I was presented with the opportunity to review this book, which is just what we had been thinking about, but even better since it also includes women who are not we I loved reading and studying the important words of women from our church history and present day. Recently a friend mentioned that she thought it would be wonderful if one year the lesson manual for Relief Society and Priesthood classes was a compilation of talks from the female general auxiliary presidents. I agreed, and soon after I was presented with the opportunity to review this book, which is just what we had been thinking about, but even better since it also includes women who are not well known but have an interesting history and poignant testimony. It strengthened my own testimony to read such a wide variety of talks, rich with gospel principles, gratitude for the Relief Society, and strong examples of enduring and overcoming hardship. Each individual's brief background is set forth before their address and I especially appreciated it for the historical context as well as instilling a feeling of admiration for the woman whose words I was about to read. Each discourse is significant in some way and I felt edified by each. One of my favorites was "An Elevation So High Above the Ordinary" given by Eliza R. Snow in 1872, where she encourages the women in regards to both spiritual and intellectual edification, as well as the necessary development of domestic skills as a foundation for daily life and upon which to build "finer accomplishments". Another that stood out to me was "Drifting, Dreaming, Directing" by Ardeth G. Kapp in 1980 about the importance of standing immovable in matters of principle and making choices based on motivation from a relationship with the Savior and personal revelation, instead of drifting with the crowd, our faithfulness simply based on practices and tradition, existing on "borrowed light". At the Pulpit is an amazing book that is perfect for personal gospel study and as a resource for teaching lessons or devotionals in the home and church. I highly recommend it to members of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints and those who want to learn more about the history and spirituality of Mormon women. (I received a complimentary copy of the book; all opinions in this review are my own)

  4. 5 out of 5

    Abbey

    I will second what a friend told me because it was soo true. Some of the material from the 1800's is rough going, but it really picked up 1900 and beyond. No joke I wanted to share almost every single talk I read. It's the same gospel, but as a woman it fed my soul to read these talks written by my sisters. I very much appreciate the editors' efforts to include voices from minority women, converts, women without high position, and women from outside of the United States. Some favorites included t I will second what a friend told me because it was soo true. Some of the material from the 1800's is rough going, but it really picked up 1900 and beyond. No joke I wanted to share almost every single talk I read. It's the same gospel, but as a woman it fed my soul to read these talks written by my sisters. I very much appreciate the editors' efforts to include voices from minority women, converts, women without high position, and women from outside of the United States. Some favorites included the discourses by Ardeth Kapp, Elsie Talmadge Brandley, Linda Burton, Judy Brummer, Virginia Pearce, Francine Bennion, and Sheri Dew. There are several discourses that are only available on the gospel library app (not in the print version) and one of those- 'Serious Reflection Precedes Revaltion' by Maurine Jensen Proctor- was an absolute favorite as well. The Gospel Library app also includes links to many modern talks so you can listen to the actual discourse.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Verona

    Women have always had an important place and role in the Church of Jesus Christ of latter day saints. I have enjoyed these talks given by women through the years at important women's meetings, firesides, education weeks, conferences, and general conferences of the church. I have been very impressed with the education, the intellect, the deep thinking, the vocabulary, and the spirituality of these women, particularly the women in the pioneer days of the church. Their goals were far reaching and t Women have always had an important place and role in the Church of Jesus Christ of latter day saints. I have enjoyed these talks given by women through the years at important women's meetings, firesides, education weeks, conferences, and general conferences of the church. I have been very impressed with the education, the intellect, the deep thinking, the vocabulary, and the spirituality of these women, particularly the women in the pioneer days of the church. Their goals were far reaching and they possessed an energy and enthusiasm that I didn't realize they had. I have been inspired by their words and their counsel. I can highly recommend this book to all. You will be uplifted and learn much, as I did.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Jolie

    It's no secret to any of my friends that my reading choices tend toward the fictional. Picking up a book of religious discourses is not typical for me. However, this book felt so important, and the reading of it was so inspiring, that I was happy about my foray into less typical realms. I'd like to suggest that you will be, too. At the Pulpit provides, as suggested, a look at women whose words have been delivered over pulpits of one form or other during the past 185 years of church history. This It's no secret to any of my friends that my reading choices tend toward the fictional. Picking up a book of religious discourses is not typical for me. However, this book felt so important, and the reading of it was so inspiring, that I was happy about my foray into less typical realms. I'd like to suggest that you will be, too. At the Pulpit provides, as suggested, a look at women whose words have been delivered over pulpits of one form or other during the past 185 years of church history. This is a critical--perhaps essential--book to read, then, as finding women's voices in church history can be difficult and discouraging, and the reading of them proves that having this access is necessary and nourishing. The structure of the book is straightforward, functional, and accessible. The discourses are arranged chronologically, each is prefaced with biographical and historical information, and the end notes show the thorough research spent on each. There is also a comprehensive index, which will make this volume an excellent resource when writing talks, giving lessons, or seeking for personal study. There is a real need--for men and women both--to hear from women in the church. Women make up at least half our population, after all, and are spoken of as equal partners. Yet our representation in spoken and written word is far less than would be expected. Uncovering and celebrating the voices of the past will lead to greater understanding and greater expectations moving forward. Some of the women whose words are included are familiar names--such as Lucy Mack Smith, Eliza R Snow, Sheri Dew, Chieko Okazaki, Elaine L Jack, Julie B Beck, and Linda K Burton--but there are many whose names and stories are less well-known, but no less important and valuable. They spoke on issues of importance for their days, but their wisdom rings true today.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Becky

    At the Pulpit: 185 Years of Discourses by Latter-day Saint Women validates how women in the Church have responded to the call to “speak up and speak out,” to “expound scripture, exhort the church,” and give voice to the “fire in the bones.” This unique, first-of-its-kind publication will hopefully not be the last compilation of soul stirring messages spoken from women’s faithful hearts. The historical backgrounds that shaped the speakers’ lives and thoughts make a significant contribution to thi At the Pulpit: 185 Years of Discourses by Latter-day Saint Women validates how women in the Church have responded to the call to “speak up and speak out,” to “expound scripture, exhort the church,” and give voice to the “fire in the bones.” This unique, first-of-its-kind publication will hopefully not be the last compilation of soul stirring messages spoken from women’s faithful hearts. The historical backgrounds that shaped the speakers’ lives and thoughts make a significant contribution to this work. The selected messages show both similarities and differences in the challenges and opportunities women in the Church have faced through the ages and in different countries as membership has expanded worldwide. The book captures the humor, spunk, humanity and humility, as well as the intelligence and courage of each speaker, whether she be a shy new member mentioned in the minutes of a long-ago meeting or a polished well-seasoned leader speaking at General Conference or writing a speech to be delivered before the National Council of Women. The issues and challenges of women never really change. Themes of health, family, education, poverty and personal improvement fill these calls from the pulpit to demonstrate faith in Jesus Christ through the application of timeless principles of self-worth, hard work, and true charity.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Heidi

    What a piece of work! After reading this book it's clear that numerous hours of work went into creating it and it shows. Discourses by female leaders in the LDS Church (The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints) combine to make this a tour de force. Not only are the talks powerful doctrinally, but they also give a glimpse into different times and places and how things have both changed and stayed the same over time. All of these women made a difference during the times in which they lived. What a piece of work! After reading this book it's clear that numerous hours of work went into creating it and it shows. Discourses by female leaders in the LDS Church (The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints) combine to make this a tour de force. Not only are the talks powerful doctrinally, but they also give a glimpse into different times and places and how things have both changed and stayed the same over time. All of these women made a difference during the times in which they lived. Some of these women I remember myself. Reading this was both eye-opening and informative. I especially think the timing on the release of this book can't be an accident. With some questioning women's role in the Church, I couldn't be more pleased with this book that clearly demonstrates the strong and ongoing role that women have in the LDS Church. This is the sort of book that could be read over and over again with the reader learning new things every time. It's also an excellent resource as it includes extensive footnotes and an appendix. The release of this book is truly a service to both members and nonmembers alike as well as female and male readers.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Patty

    Excellent on all accounts. I read an essay every day or so over the course of many months. They were always interesting, insightful, and frequently uplifting as I considered their life and the times in which they lived. I love reading about the life of women in different times. Although their challenges varied, as did their resources and successes, there is an overriding commonality that bind them together. There are lessons to be learned from each one individually and as a group collectively.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Anna

    This book is an excellent compilation of talks that encompass early church history to modern day. I loved the biographical preface before each talk that helped the reader know more about the speaker and the time in which she lived. It is remarkable to consider that this was one of very few churches that empowered women to preach to public audiences in the 1800s. Women were not given that opportunity until 140 years later in most faith traditions. The difference in life experiences in the 1800s a This book is an excellent compilation of talks that encompass early church history to modern day. I loved the biographical preface before each talk that helped the reader know more about the speaker and the time in which she lived. It is remarkable to consider that this was one of very few churches that empowered women to preach to public audiences in the 1800s. Women were not given that opportunity until 140 years later in most faith traditions. The difference in life experiences in the 1800s and their concerns contrasted to now is starkly apparent, but the gospel of Jesus Christ is the same and applies to all in any circumstance. I really liked "The Religious Crisis of Today" by Elsie Talmade Brandley, "Drifting, Dreaming, Directing" by Ardeth G Kapp, "A Latter-day Saint Theology of Suffering" by Francine R. Bennion, "The Unknown Treasure" by Jutta B. Busche, "Knowing Who You are--and Who you Have Always Been" by Sheri Dew, "Baskets and Bottles" by Chieko Okazaki, and "Our Father in Heaven Has a Mission for Us" by Judy Brummer.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Val

    At the Pulpit: 185 Years of Discourses by Latter-Day Saint Women is a valuable addition to the growing corpus of LDS literature for a number of reasons—and this assessment is from a male member of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (sometimes called the Mormon Church). First, it represents the first collection of which I’m aware that contains, in chronological order, discourses by LDS women from the founding of the Church in 1830. I found it fascinating to follow the evolution of wom At the Pulpit: 185 Years of Discourses by Latter-Day Saint Women is a valuable addition to the growing corpus of LDS literature for a number of reasons—and this assessment is from a male member of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (sometimes called the Mormon Church). First, it represents the first collection of which I’m aware that contains, in chronological order, discourses by LDS women from the founding of the Church in 1830. I found it fascinating to follow the evolution of women’s voices in the Church from mid-19th-century near-dismissal to the status of full partnership they have today, from more domestic and feminine concerns to insightful and practical theological discussions. The biographical information introducing each speaker and the context in which the words of the speaker were delivered allows for a rare exploration of the contribution women have made to the LDS Church, American society, and the world over the past 185 years. The notes that take up a substantial portion of the end of the book contain information that deepens and expands that exploration. While this book contains solid scholarly research into the context of each talk, the talks can be read and enjoyed for their own merits. I shouldn’t have been surprised by the insights the sisters have brought to the gospel conversation, but I was. Surprises are often in this book. Consider Elizabeth Ann Whitney’s extemporaneous song sung under the influence of the gift of tongues as interpreted by Parley P. Pratt in 1835. Or how often sisters spoke of Mother in Heaven toward the end of the 19th century (for example, Matte Horne Tingey in 1893). Or some of the deeper doctrines of exaltation we rarely hear preached anymore over the pulpit (for example, Bathsheba W. Smith’s discourse in 1905). Perhaps the most remarkable surprise for me was reading Francine R. Bennion’s talk given in 1986 at a Brigham Young University women’s conference. Titled “A Latter-day Saint Theology of Suffering,” it is the most rational, inspiring exploration of the issue of mortal suffering I’ve ever encountered. Every member should have the privilege of reading it—not just every member of the Church, but every member of the human race. Who, you might be asking, is Francine Bennion? One of the surprises in the book is that, in addition to speakers with well-known names (to Latter-day Saints at least) like Emma Smith and Eliza R. Snow are women you may never have heard of. One of the more delightful I found is Judy Brummer, who grew up under Apartheid in South Africa learning to speak Xhosa. After joining the Church, she served a mission to Xhosa-speaking people in South Africa and later translated Church literature, including Selections from the Book of Mormon, into Xhosa. Her account of her experiences, as delivered at a 2012 fireside, is highly inspiring and a hoot to read. I give a full five-stars to At the Pulpit and recommend it to anyone interested in learning—and being inspired by—what Latter-day Saint women have been talking about for nearly two centuries. I consider it a must-read.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Kerra

    This took me a very very long time to read. I enjoyed it, but I also felt like several sections dragged. It felt like a lot of the oldest stuff was just thrown in, and I didn’t see some sermons I would consider “classics” among the more modern works. Bottom line though, I did gain respect for the women who have helped build the church through the years

  13. 5 out of 5

    Emily

    This compilation of talks by LDS women is unlike any other book I've read. I am impressed by the introduction that prepares the reader with an understanding of the role of women in the LDS church, explaining even the shortcomings of their words not always being recorded for history. Each talk stands alone as an insight not only of the woman giving the talk, but also the time period of when it was given. I appreciate the background life sketch of each woman at the beginning of each chapter. The ta This compilation of talks by LDS women is unlike any other book I've read. I am impressed by the introduction that prepares the reader with an understanding of the role of women in the LDS church, explaining even the shortcomings of their words not always being recorded for history. Each talk stands alone as an insight not only of the woman giving the talk, but also the time period of when it was given. I appreciate the background life sketch of each woman at the beginning of each chapter. The talks are compiled chronologically, and with each chapter, you gain an appreciation of the experience, struggles and strengths of the LDS woman at that time. The book is also excellently referenced. The appendix, notes and index at the back add considerable information and make this book a useful source of historical knowledge. At the Pulpit would be a great addition to anyone's library to help appreciate and recognize the history of the LDS woman. I can highly recommend this read.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Becky Stucki

    While reading At the Pulpit I could not help but wonder what women of previous centuries would have given to have such a resource at their fingertips. We may often feel the challenges and trials we confront are unique, however, the discourses and experience of these Latter-Day Saint women are a reminder that our “burdens may be light” by developing a strong testimony of Christ and of true gospel principles. Throughout all of history - and throughout the history of The Church of Jesus Christ of L While reading At the Pulpit I could not help but wonder what women of previous centuries would have given to have such a resource at their fingertips. We may often feel the challenges and trials we confront are unique, however, the discourses and experience of these Latter-Day Saint women are a reminder that our “burdens may be light” by developing a strong testimony of Christ and of true gospel principles. Throughout all of history - and throughout the history of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints- God has relied on woman to be a “light to the world”. Each of the life experiences and discourse of the women presented in this book are testimony to the need, the possibility, and the influence of such women. Whether looking for encouragement, strength, or guidance these, along with other personal insights, may be found by reading At the Pulpit. I did run into formatting frustrations, but hopefully these have been attended to and fixed by the publisher.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Rosemary

    This is such a valuable volume. Even though it offers just a taste -- only 54 talks--out of the many discourses given over 185 years of church history, the variety of the collection is admirable. Some are talks delivered to a general church audience, which would be accessible in the archives of the church website. But many are not, like the talk given by Lucrecia Suarez de Juarez at a Mexico and Central America Area Conference in 1972, or the talk given by Ellenor Jones, a biracial YLMIA leader, This is such a valuable volume. Even though it offers just a taste -- only 54 talks--out of the many discourses given over 185 years of church history, the variety of the collection is admirable. Some are talks delivered to a general church audience, which would be accessible in the archives of the church website. But many are not, like the talk given by Lucrecia Suarez de Juarez at a Mexico and Central America Area Conference in 1972, or the talk given by Ellenor Jones, a biracial YLMIA leader, at her ward meeting in 1882. Some talks are theologically rich, like Francine Bennion's "A Latter-Day Saint Theology of Suffering" given in 1986. Some are more interesting for their historical context, like Mattie Horne Tingey's address at the Chicago World Fair in 1893. All are accompanied by thorough annotations and biographical information. A useful General Conference index is included in an appendix.

  16. 5 out of 5

    camille fredrickson

    I wish I could give this book 10 stars, but I guess 5 will do. I started reading it a year ago and found it filled a void I didn’t know existed. Reading these powerful talks from powerful women was a balm. I highly recommend this book to EVERYONE. I’m saddened by the thought that most men probably won’t read this book and will miss out on these amazing talks. I’m so glad I got this book and read it. I look forward to reading it for many years to come!

  17. 5 out of 5

    Emilee

    Where has this book been all my life?? Diving into the discourses of women of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints spanning 185 years gave me a perspective on my heritage like I’ve never known. Honestly, my favorite part was reading the biographies of the sisters—to see how diverse a set of instrument God has in his women leaders is inspiring and heartening as I blaze my own path, hand in hand with faith. 10/10 recommend.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Gary

    I loved reading these discourses, but I enjoyed perhaps even more what I learned from the widely varied backgrounds and incredible contributions to building the kingdom of God on earth by these women and by extension so many others. I am in awe and I feel grateful.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Misty DeRosier

    I'm really impressed by the meticulous historical research that went into not only compiling these talks, but into the lives of the women and the historical context in which their words were given. The diversity of thought was fascinating. The bonus chapters at the end are not to be missed. I'm really impressed by the meticulous historical research that went into not only compiling these talks, but into the lives of the women and the historical context in which their words were given. The diversity of thought was fascinating. The bonus chapters at the end are not to be missed.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Heather Hoyt

    I loved this. It was inspiration and deep and helpful and just good.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Anita Eyre

    Jenny Reeder and Kate Holbrook have put together one of the most important books on women in the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. At the Pulpit gives us historical insight into the extraordinary lives of LDS women from the early 1830s up until the present times. It includes discourses of leaders such as Eliza R. Snow, Mattie Horne Tingey, Sarah M. Kimball, Elsie Talmage Brandley, Jutta B. Busche, Chieko N. Okakzaki, Gladys N. Sitati etc. Each woman demonstrates her spiritual capacity Jenny Reeder and Kate Holbrook have put together one of the most important books on women in the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. At the Pulpit gives us historical insight into the extraordinary lives of LDS women from the early 1830s up until the present times. It includes discourses of leaders such as Eliza R. Snow, Mattie Horne Tingey, Sarah M. Kimball, Elsie Talmage Brandley, Jutta B. Busche, Chieko N. Okakzaki, Gladys N. Sitati etc. Each woman demonstrates her spiritual capacity and strength - even in times when this was not the norm. To state a few quotes I love: "Now we understand that instead of depending entirely on our husbands for salvation and position, we have to work them out ourselves." Eliza R. Snow "Let mother impress upon their children the principles of justice and equal rights, and the women of the next generation will not have to beg and plead for what rightfully belongs to them." Mattie Horne Tingey "According to my belief, to know the fundamental truths of the gospel is to leave one free to go far and wide, anchored by that knowledge, in search of all else that earth and sea and skies have to teach." Elsie Talmadge Brandley In regards to the youth "Listen to what they have to say; open your hearts and minds to their problems. Never bid them be silent, but inspire them to cry out to you the innermost questions of their souls. Forget your own convictions in listening to them; remember your convictions only when you come to make reply." Elsie Talmage Brandley "Jesus Christ never condemned the honest heart. His wrath was kindled against the hypocritically empty rule-keeping of the Pharisees." Jutta B. Busche. I loved seeing how from early on in LDS history women stood for their own personal truth as well as the truth found in the gospel of Jesus Christ. They came from a variety of backgrounds such as single mothers, midwives, an actress, plural wives, growing up in exceeding poverty, orphaned at a young age, first female (unmarried) missionaries, women of Danish, British, German, Scottish, Mexican, Japanese and Kenyan background etc. These women were strong, faithful, outspoken, and powerful. At the Pulpit will inspire many woman to stand stronger and know and feel their personal strength. LDS women have a tremendous legacy to follow. If you would like to browse through the book, read a few chapters then please visit www.churchhistorianspress.org/at-the-....

  22. 5 out of 5

    Keith

    Chapter 32 was especially meaningful, I highlighted several portions. Here are some of them. Chapter 32: “It is natural for the young and immature mind to think that what to it is new must of necessity be new to the world. Comparatively inexperienced students are discovering from time to time apparent discrepancies between the faith of their fathers and the development of modern thought, and these they are apt to magnify and exaggerate, when as a matter of fact their great-grandfathers met the sa Chapter 32 was especially meaningful, I highlighted several portions. Here are some of them. Chapter 32: “It is natural for the young and immature mind to think that what to it is new must of necessity be new to the world. Comparatively inexperienced students are discovering from time to time apparent discrepancies between the faith of their fathers and the development of modern thought, and these they are apt to magnify and exaggerate, when as a matter of fact their great-grandfathers met the same seeming difficulties and yet survived. Believe not those who assert that the gospel of Jesus Christ is in any way opposed to progress or inconsistent with advancement.“ Chapter 32: “The way of youth may not be our way; their language may seem frank and strange and irreverent to us; but to them we, perhaps, appear strange too. We might regard youth and maturity as travelers, bound for an oriental port. Youth may travel east, into the rising sun; age may go west, toward the evening shadows; but at their common destination they will meet and realize that both were headed straight in their course of travel; but there will always be between them the difference of experience along the way.” Chapter 33: ““If you are too busy to serve the Lord, you are too busy.”” Chapter 41 also very much impressed me. Chapter 43 Wow - a lot to ponder here. Chapter 47 “Decisions and Miracles” Wow because of God’s blessing in her life. Chapter 52 was so impressive that I captured the ear of my wife and read out of it to her. Bonus Chapter 6 Is meaningful. Bonus Chapter 7: “Imagine … a family home evening in which children are invited and expected to come prepared to ask questions about what they are reading and learning in the Book of Mormon—or about an issue that recently was emphasized in a gospel discussion. … And imagine further that the children ask questions the parents are not prepared adequately to answer. … What a glorious opportunity for family members to search the scriptures together and to be tutored by the Holy Ghost.”

  23. 5 out of 5

    Dustin Tyler Joyce

    Really an excellent collection amplifying the voices of Latter-day Saint women — this has been needed for some time. Some of the earliest discourses are not as rich as one might hope, and reinforce gender roles of the time, but that is to be expected when the existing historical records are so scant. But some of the later discourses are breathtaking in their depth. I especially enjoyed Francine R. Bennion’s “A Latter-day Saint Theology of Suffering” from 1986 — quite possibly the best discourse Really an excellent collection amplifying the voices of Latter-day Saint women — this has been needed for some time. Some of the earliest discourses are not as rich as one might hope, and reinforce gender roles of the time, but that is to be expected when the existing historical records are so scant. But some of the later discourses are breathtaking in their depth. I especially enjoyed Francine R. Bennion’s “A Latter-day Saint Theology of Suffering” from 1986 — quite possibly the best discourse on Latter-day Saint theology I’ve ever read. The introductions to each discourse are essential reading in and of themselves, especially as they show the civic engagement of women in earlier periods of the church’s history and that so many of these women do not fit the standard boxes we’ve established as ideal in the modern church.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Kathy

    A truly remarkable collection of addresses by Latter-day Saint Women. I was pleased to see how even the very early discourses had messages I could incorporate into my life. Three of the more recent talks (well, if you count 1986 and forward as recent) really touched my heart: "A Latter-day Saint Theology of Suffering" by Francine R. Bennion, "The Unknown Treasure" by Jutta B. Busche, and "Get a Life" by Elaine L. Jack. The digital version in the Gospel Library includes several "bonus chapters" t A truly remarkable collection of addresses by Latter-day Saint Women. I was pleased to see how even the very early discourses had messages I could incorporate into my life. Three of the more recent talks (well, if you count 1986 and forward as recent) really touched my heart: "A Latter-day Saint Theology of Suffering" by Francine R. Bennion, "The Unknown Treasure" by Jutta B. Busche, and "Get a Life" by Elaine L. Jack. The digital version in the Gospel Library includes several "bonus chapters" that are well-worth reading, too. This is definitely a 5-star book.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Laurie Moreland

    This is an incredible book! I heartily recommend to men and women in the Church everywhere. The talks, spanning almost 200 years of Church and world history, are as relevant and instructive today as they were when they were given. Meaty doctrine, sisterly encouragement, and a window into their world were served up with interesting anecdotes by these faithful women, speaking in a variety of settings. (Wish we had more than just the snippets that were available to us from the early years.) As wond This is an incredible book! I heartily recommend to men and women in the Church everywhere. The talks, spanning almost 200 years of Church and world history, are as relevant and instructive today as they were when they were given. Meaty doctrine, sisterly encouragement, and a window into their world were served up with interesting anecdotes by these faithful women, speaking in a variety of settings. (Wish we had more than just the snippets that were available to us from the early years.) As wonderful as the speeches were, the background information preceding the talks that gave context was excellent, as well. I wish I had read a hard copy instead of listening to it through LDS library. Two reasons: First, I was always hearing tidbits and gems that I wanted to pull out and use in my current calling or to send to friends. Would have highlighted many passages! Second, the robot voice that was reading it to me was distracting and not great.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Amy Makechnie

    Fantastic compilation of women speaking literally "at the pulpit" at a time when few women did (1840), to the present. At once intellectual, scholarly and spiritual, Dr's Reeder and Holbrook have done a fantastic job researching, compiling, and editing this treasure trove. A watershed book that should leave women feeling empowered to speak! Loved this. Fantastic compilation of women speaking literally "at the pulpit" at a time when few women did (1840), to the present. At once intellectual, scholarly and spiritual, Dr's Reeder and Holbrook have done a fantastic job researching, compiling, and editing this treasure trove. A watershed book that should leave women feeling empowered to speak! Loved this.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Kim

    This was a hard to book to get through. But I am so glad I stuck to it. It was interesting to read through each bio before each talk. A lot has happened in the world and in church history in the past 185 years. Each women was experiencing their own life, but also represent a small part of what women in history at that time were going through. I think there is a thought that things right now are harder than they have ever been, that the world is in a harder place that it has ever been. Reading th This was a hard to book to get through. But I am so glad I stuck to it. It was interesting to read through each bio before each talk. A lot has happened in the world and in church history in the past 185 years. Each women was experiencing their own life, but also represent a small part of what women in history at that time were going through. I think there is a thought that things right now are harder than they have ever been, that the world is in a harder place that it has ever been. Reading these talks helps me to see that things right now are not as bad as they have ever been, but also that there are always hard things to deal with. And each time these women, over 185 years of talks, bear testimony that God loves us and is there for us as we seek guidance and answers and have faith in his goodness...even when things are very hard. At the Pulpit Favorite Quotes Introduction -(p xxiii) 1958 Joseph Fielding Smith “You can speak with authority, because the Lord has placed authority on you.” -(p xxiii) “Women throughout church history...have seen their authority to speak as coming not only from official positions within the church but also by virtue of their expertise, their personal experience and conviction, and the witness of the Holy Spirit. Often multiple sources of authority, entwined together, reinforce their common strength. -(p xxiv) “God requires effort and faith on our part.” Irina Kratzer -(p xxiv) “My dear sisters, whatever your calling, whatever your circumstances, we need your impressions, your insights, and your inspiration…The kingdom of God is not and cannot be complete without women who make sacred covenants and then keep them, women who can speak with the power and authority of God!...We need you to speak up and speak out ” (Russell M. Nelson) -(p4) Lucy Mack Smith “ We call ourselves Latter-day Saints and profess to have come out from among the world for the purpose of serving God with a determination to serve him with our whole might, mind, and strength...will you suffer yourselves to begin at the very first sacrifice of comfort to complain and murmur like the children of Israel?...Where is your faith? Where is our confidence in God? How can you expect the Lord to prosper you when you are continually murmuring against him?” -(p. 43) Eliza R. Snow “When you see one step before you, take it, and do not wait to see where is the next--if we see one step, it is not for us to stand still, until we can see the way clear in the distance, but more forward and the way will be opened before us, step by step...God requires us to make effort.” -(p. 55 ) Eliza R. Snow. (1872) Snow encouraged women to expand their priorities beyond domestic routines and to also include broader issues of social reform, home manufacture, and intellectual and spiritual discussion. “Saints of God can be edified by nothing by the Spirit of God…. It is uphill, and if you continue you will attain something much higher than those who go downhill.” -(p. 63) Mary Ann Freeze 1879. “Let us attend faithfully to all our meetings and seek knowledge from every available source, for knowledge is power, and the more we possess the more capable we will be in assisting the great latter-day work.” -(p. 70) Lille Freeze 1880. “Life was not given to us that we might eat, sleep, make money, and die, but we [know] the necessity of cultivating the mind, and administering to the needs of an immortal soul, and training the heart in the ways of obedience to God and the light of inspiration. We caught a glimpse of a higher and more noble object of living.” -(p. 85) Mattie Horne Tingey 1893. “We impress upon our girls the necessity of preparing themselves to become pure, strong, intelligent wives and mothers...it is a woman’s right--nay more, it is her duty--to demand from the husband and father the same purity of life and character the she herself maintains and that he demands from her...Let woman prepare herself to stand side by side, shoulder to shoulder with her husband in all the affairs of life, to be a wise counselor and helpmeet unto him, as her Creator designed she should be; let mothers impress upon their children the principles of justice and equal rights, and the women of the next generation will not have to beg and plead for what rightfully belongs to them. Why is it that today there is so much broader a view taken of women’s position that before? Because woman herself is beginning to feel that she is an intelligent, responsible being, with a mind capable of the highest intelligence, with talents that it is her duty to develop and use for the advancement and elevation of the human family. This feeling is gradually but steadily growing; it is being felt throughout the world, and it will continue to grow until it becomes a power in the earth.” -(p. 95) Ann M. Cannon 1901. “Be not discouraged in praying again and again for the same thing. God understands our needs, he will bless us in his own way.” -(p. 124) Jennie B. Knight 1924. “My father has often said: ‘Hate hurts the hater worse than the hated’...In our homes let us not hold grudges one towards another, but seek and pray daily to find a way to forgive one another, remembering that forgiveness is like mercy, ‘it is twice blessed, it blesses him that gives and him that receives.’...So let us each and all bury our grievances whether they pertain to our immediate family, our church, our neighbor, and cover this pitfall that deprives us of happiness with a slab of forgetfulness and forgive as we hope to be forgiven.” -(p129) Amy Brown Lyman 1926. “ Faith in our Heavenly Father and in his Son Jesus Christ is an asset to any individual. It helps him to be a brave and courageous individual. It helps to make him a positive and forceful character as opposed to a negative and vacillating one. It helps him to have confidence in himself and confidence in others; to believe in himself and to believe in others; to be generous to those in need and charitable to those less fortunate; to be cheerful, hopeful, and optimistic…Let us cling to the belief that faith with good works is an asset.” -(p. 133) Lalene H Hart 1933. “Let us sens seriously the responsibility that rests upon us to rise and shine and show the way to a doubting, waiting, skeptical world that there is a God in heaven, that Jesus Christ lives, and that he is interested in the welfare of his children.” -(p. 142) Elsie Talmage Brandley 1394. “Listen to what [the youth] have to say; open your hearts and minds to their problems. Never bid them be silent, but inspire them to cry out to you the innermost questions of their souls. Forget you own convictions in listening to them; remember your convictions only when you come to reply.” -(p. 151) Mary J. Wilson 1949. “Through faith we have the power to be selective, to know the wheat from the chaff...We must remember that no one ever finds life worth living. It has to be made worth living...Charles W. Eliot of Harvard Classics [claimed] that anyone could become well educated by spending fifteen minutes a day in intelligent study. Be ever alert to your opportunities. Study. Seek good companions. Insist upon filling your life with eternal riches.” -(p. 163) Margaret C. Pickering 1950. “Never in the history of civilization have more people of all ages and in all lands felt more restless, insecure, confused, and afraid. Never has the world had greater need for a testament of faith through practical demonstrations of brotherly love...It does not do much good to talk about such big things as ‘humanity,’ ‘democracy,’ and the ‘brotherhood of man’ unless we can bring them down and apply them to our next-door neighbor, as that is were international amity and the brotherhood of man begins. The Prophet Joseph said at one of the early meeting of the society: ‘Let your labor be confined mostly to those around you in your own circle.’” -(p. 195) Ardeth G. Kapp “Being faithful does not not necessarily develop faith...To have faith in him is to know him, to know his doctrine, and to know that the course of our life is in harmony with and acceptable to him. It is relatively easy to be faithful, but faith is born out of study, fasting, prayer, meditation, sacrifice, service, and, finally, personal revelation… “I am convinced for some of our sister who have a magnificent dream but who will never fully realize its fulfillment because they feel that their righteous husband will take care of it, and they fail to prepare for their part in this eternal partnership. “There are still others of our sisters who have the misunderstanding that priesthood is synonymous with me, and so they excuse themselves and have no concern for studying its importance in their own lives. The term priesthood is used without qualification, whether it is referring to a bearer of the priesthood, priesthood blessings, and priesthood ordinances. Our hearts should cry out in either case, and we should raise our voices and shout warnings to sisters whose dreams are built on such faultry foundations. “Our greatest dreams will be fulfilled only as we come to understand fully and experience the blessings of the priesthood, the power of the priesthood, and the ordinances of the priesthood in our own lives...we quickly realize that all the saving blessings of the priesthood are for boys and girls, men and women… “Now, we can follow the Brethren blindly, as one of my non-Mormon friends claims that we do--and I might add that it is safer and better to follow them blindly than not at all--but that could be an abdication of our responsibility to direct our own lives and become spiritually independent. Again, following the practices is alone is not enough. We must come to know the reason, indeed the doctrinal bases, for the practice; otherwise, when the practice or tradition is questioned or changed, those who do not understand the principle are prone to waver… “It is in coming to know our Savior and the saving principles that he taught through the gospel of Jesus Christ that we become different. And we need to be recognized as different.” Eliza R. Snow said “She walked not in the borrowed light of other, but faced the morning unafraid and invincible.” -(p. 220) Francine Bennion 1988. “Does it really matter what we think? Can’t we just be kind and patient, without worrying about various points of theology? It matters. For one thing, our assumptions affect how kind and patient we are likely to become...what we believe is central to what we do about it...Many who believe God is causing the suffering will not, or feel they cannot ask him for help or comfort at the very time they need it most...The better we understand what is at the core of LDS doctrine, the better we can distinguish what is not. We live with natural law. Nobody is manipulating every human decision that would affect every human experience...We are not coddled toddlers in playschool...we are not preparing to meet reality someday. We are in it here and now….I know the love of God. It is one of the very few things I do know with absolute certainty. I think suffering on this is earth is an indication of God’s trust, God’s love....If we are to be like God, we cannot live forever in fear that we may meet something that will scare us or that will hurt us. We have to be able, as he is able, to meet what comes of others’ agency, and of living in a lawful universe that allows creation of a habitable planet only when it allows also the difficulties that come in natural operations of such a planet. ...I find hope for understanding and changing what I can, but also hope for transcending what I cannot...I am able to hurt and survive....Let us become more like our God, who is good.” -(p. 239) Jutta B. Busche 1991. “When we truly learn to love God, we learn to love all things--others, ourselves, all creation, because God is in all, with all, and through all.”

  28. 5 out of 5

    Kennedy Hansen

    This was a great compilation of speeches/talks made by lds women over the years. I was surprised by some and touched by some as well.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Sarah Stewart

    Okay, so I haven't finished all of this (I've been listening to all the ones that had links to the original speeches from the Gospel Library App) but the LDS Theology of Suffering talk completely blew my mind and I have been recommending it to pretty much everyone I've talked to. I will never forget sitting in the car late at night and having my breath taken away by the depth and beauty and truth of what she was saying. That talk changed my life, and I love nothing more than pure doctrine of tha Okay, so I haven't finished all of this (I've been listening to all the ones that had links to the original speeches from the Gospel Library App) but the LDS Theology of Suffering talk completely blew my mind and I have been recommending it to pretty much everyone I've talked to. I will never forget sitting in the car late at night and having my breath taken away by the depth and beauty and truth of what she was saying. That talk changed my life, and I love nothing more than pure doctrine of that nature. Listen to it, read it, then talk to me about it because I would love to hear your reaction.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Sunny Dent

    Inspirational! In reading At The Pulpit I admire the good Latter-day Saint women whose advice, talks, articles and testimonies are shared in this volume by The Church Historian’s Press of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. Over fifty LDS sisters share their experiences, understandings and deep convictions related to their membership and responsibilities in living their religion. The entries date back 185 years to the very beginning days of the LDS Church and continue chronologically Inspirational! In reading At The Pulpit I admire the good Latter-day Saint women whose advice, talks, articles and testimonies are shared in this volume by The Church Historian’s Press of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. Over fifty LDS sisters share their experiences, understandings and deep convictions related to their membership and responsibilities in living their religion. The entries date back 185 years to the very beginning days of the LDS Church and continue chronologically through 2016. It is apparent that women had a leadership role and voice in the work of the Church from its earliest days. Over the time span the articulation of gospel doctrine evolves as these sisters and the Church grow to a worldwide organization. There are several chapters on the topic of prayer, which I found inspirational, confirming my personal belief in its power and resulting peace. Perhaps my favorite part of the book is the brief biographical sketch about each woman at the beginning the chapters. These are diverse women! They represent various ages, marital status, races, cultures, education levels and backgrounds as to how they found themselves as “Mormons”. I especially loved reading about the women in the 19th century. They were resilient in surviving the conditions of the time and several were involved with national women’s organizations, female suffrage and equal rights. From early pioneers who made their way from distant places to the mountains of the west to current pioneers in Africa, these women encourage and inspire!

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