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Run Silent, Run Deep (CLASSICS OF NAVAL LITERATURE)

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This is a story of the silent service—the submarine crews which destroyed the Japanese merchant marine. A narrative taut with drama, told with the intimacy of a confession, it deals with two strong-headed men: their loves, their jealousies, and their destinies in the lonely and desperate struggle between the hunter and the hunted. Few war novels will rival Run Silent, Run This is a story of the silent service—the submarine crews which destroyed the Japanese merchant marine. A narrative taut with drama, told with the intimacy of a confession, it deals with two strong-headed men: their loves, their jealousies, and their destinies in the lonely and desperate struggle between the hunter and the hunted. Few war novels will rival Run Silent, Run Deep in the naked realism of its action. None will surpass its rising excitement and brilliant descriptions of men in combat. Unlike many war novels, here is a story that deals with war from the perspective of command. Edward Beach re-creates with fidelity the anguish, agony, and triumphs of command decisions. In Commander Richardson, he has created a character who embodies all that is fine, all that is human, in an excellent naval officer. In a sense, Run Silent, Run Deep is a monument, not to the misfits and the mistakes, but to those men who rose to greatness under the sometimes unbearable tensions of action.


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This is a story of the silent service—the submarine crews which destroyed the Japanese merchant marine. A narrative taut with drama, told with the intimacy of a confession, it deals with two strong-headed men: their loves, their jealousies, and their destinies in the lonely and desperate struggle between the hunter and the hunted. Few war novels will rival Run Silent, Run This is a story of the silent service—the submarine crews which destroyed the Japanese merchant marine. A narrative taut with drama, told with the intimacy of a confession, it deals with two strong-headed men: their loves, their jealousies, and their destinies in the lonely and desperate struggle between the hunter and the hunted. Few war novels will rival Run Silent, Run Deep in the naked realism of its action. None will surpass its rising excitement and brilliant descriptions of men in combat. Unlike many war novels, here is a story that deals with war from the perspective of command. Edward Beach re-creates with fidelity the anguish, agony, and triumphs of command decisions. In Commander Richardson, he has created a character who embodies all that is fine, all that is human, in an excellent naval officer. In a sense, Run Silent, Run Deep is a monument, not to the misfits and the mistakes, but to those men who rose to greatness under the sometimes unbearable tensions of action.

30 review for Run Silent, Run Deep (CLASSICS OF NAVAL LITERATURE)

  1. 4 out of 5

    W

    I watched this movie on youtube and it was great. The presence of Burt Lancaster helped too and Clark Gable is there as well. Gable plays the captain and Lancaster the executive officer of a submarine.Both are in conflict because the captain first denies the executive officer his shot at command and then recklessly pursues a dangerous,almost suicidal mission disobeying orders from the high command. Great action sequences of war at sea.It's been compared to the German submarine film,Das Boot.I thin I watched this movie on youtube and it was great. The presence of Burt Lancaster helped too and Clark Gable is there as well. Gable plays the captain and Lancaster the executive officer of a submarine.Both are in conflict because the captain first denies the executive officer his shot at command and then recklessly pursues a dangerous,almost suicidal mission disobeying orders from the high command. Great action sequences of war at sea.It's been compared to the German submarine film,Das Boot.I think it's better. Great entertainment.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Ed

    I remember watching the 1958 movie version of this 1955 maritime novel starring Clark Gable and Burt Lancaster on TV as a kid. The claustrophobic confines of life aboard a submarine intrigued me. I finally got around to reading the novel all these years later. It was a humdinger for me. Rousing battle scenes, lots of technical details about diesel-powered submarines, and even a sprinkling of romance. The time period of the 1940s and World War Two appeals to me. The novel has a few things (stilte I remember watching the 1958 movie version of this 1955 maritime novel starring Clark Gable and Burt Lancaster on TV as a kid. The claustrophobic confines of life aboard a submarine intrigued me. I finally got around to reading the novel all these years later. It was a humdinger for me. Rousing battle scenes, lots of technical details about diesel-powered submarines, and even a sprinkling of romance. The time period of the 1940s and World War Two appeals to me. The novel has a few things (stilted prose, lots of exclamation marks, etc.) I didn't prefer, but they didn't dilute my reading enjoyment. Just go along with the sweeping adventure and ride the subs into battle and on patrol. It's one of the better books I've read this year.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Colin Birge

    Before there was Tom Clancy, there was Commander Edward L. Beach, Jr. If Clancy had studied hard, he might have qualified to change the ink in Beach's pen. Run Silent Run Deep is a classic novel of World War II Pacific theatre submarine warfare. Beach was a WWII submarine veteran himself, and wrote a gripping, plausible thriller about life under the sea and the perils of making war there. It's a book of its time: women are nearly invisible, the Japanese are insulted when they're not feared, and t Before there was Tom Clancy, there was Commander Edward L. Beach, Jr. If Clancy had studied hard, he might have qualified to change the ink in Beach's pen. Run Silent Run Deep is a classic novel of World War II Pacific theatre submarine warfare. Beach was a WWII submarine veteran himself, and wrote a gripping, plausible thriller about life under the sea and the perils of making war there. It's a book of its time: women are nearly invisible, the Japanese are insulted when they're not feared, and the hero is such a 40s American White Man you can practically see the starch in his collar and the pants belted around his chest. You can't ignore any of that, but if you set the book in context, it stands up as a classic thriller. My copy, incidentally, is the one that my late grandfather owned. He himself was a proud World War II Navy vet, though he'd served on the shore. He thought Beach's novel was one of the best adventure stories ever written. Who am I to argue?

  4. 4 out of 5

    Richard Fuller

    I read this book in high school. ( A L-o-n-g time ago ) This book started it all....the exploits of Sam Dealey, Morton, Gano, O'Kane.....the ships, Trigger, Wahoo, Harder. From this book forward, I was hooked on warships. First were the subs, after that came the Battleships..then cruisers, and finally ending up with DesRon23 and Arleigh Burke. I was the only kid at my high school who could rattle of the entire fleet that attacked Pearl Harbor! While that may be a dubious distinction, the love of I read this book in high school. ( A L-o-n-g time ago ) This book started it all....the exploits of Sam Dealey, Morton, Gano, O'Kane.....the ships, Trigger, Wahoo, Harder. From this book forward, I was hooked on warships. First were the subs, after that came the Battleships..then cruisers, and finally ending up with DesRon23 and Arleigh Burke. I was the only kid at my high school who could rattle of the entire fleet that attacked Pearl Harbor! While that may be a dubious distinction, the love of ships that began with this book, grew and stood with me throughout my life. I think this book is probably a classic by now. It certainly should be. Captain Beach takes us through the inner workings of the older pre-war S-boat submarines. By the time he takes command of his new construction sub, Walrus, the reader has a good working knowledge of what a submarine IS. Throughout the book, the reader is submerged in the world of submarines, and submarine warfare. The tale he weaves is one that the reader can dive into and enjoy, from Cmdr Richardsons first encounter with Bungo Pete, his enforced shore duty, finally being given command of Eel. The reader is swept along through encounter after encounter, and can't help but feel the loss when Richardsons former exec, Jim Bledsoe, is given command of Walrus, enters the Bungo Straits, and is lost. Richardson begs to be let into Area 7, the Bungo Suido, and destroy Bungo Pete himself. He succeeds, and the war ends shortly afterwards, Eel making only three more patrols. The rest is the story of what happens in Washington D.C..... There is no pornographic imagery in the writing, and the language is written in the style of the late '40s, early '50s, so no problem for the younger generation. I highly recommend this book for anyone who loves ships, submarines and action!!

  5. 5 out of 5

    Patrick Peterson

    16 Jan. 2019 - I just saw a friend list this in his read list and it brought back some good memories. I think I read it one summer when I was Jr. High or High School (in the late 60s or early 70s) age. I remember liking it very much, since it was about war, which was a totally fascinating subject to me at the time. I could not get enough of war stories from watching Combat, Rat Patrol and The Gallant Men on TV, to movies such as The Longest Day, The Great Escape, Stalag 13, Patton, Sink the Bism 16 Jan. 2019 - I just saw a friend list this in his read list and it brought back some good memories. I think I read it one summer when I was Jr. High or High School (in the late 60s or early 70s) age. I remember liking it very much, since it was about war, which was a totally fascinating subject to me at the time. I could not get enough of war stories from watching Combat, Rat Patrol and The Gallant Men on TV, to movies such as The Longest Day, The Great Escape, Stalag 13, Patton, Sink the Bismark, etc. I certainly grew out of that stage and have developed a major antipathy to war. But the feelings of what it was like to command a submarine in Japanese waters during WWII still are in my mind from this book: the constant tension, the fear, the claustrophobia, and the exhilaration or at least release, when one major danger was vanquished, before others could build.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Bob Mayer

    A classic in the vein of Das Boot, but not quite as good. The mindset of different military people fascinates me. Navy people think Army people are strange for sleeping the mud while Army people think Navy people are weird for being on ships. But submariners are a breed apart. One of the scariest things I did in Special Ops was a submarine lock-out. I commanded a maritime operations team, which meant we'd all graduated the Royal Danish Navy's combat swim school. Surface swimming and infiltration a A classic in the vein of Das Boot, but not quite as good. The mindset of different military people fascinates me. Navy people think Army people are strange for sleeping the mud while Army people think Navy people are weird for being on ships. But submariners are a breed apart. One of the scariest things I did in Special Ops was a submarine lock-out. I commanded a maritime operations team, which meant we'd all graduated the Royal Danish Navy's combat swim school. Surface swimming and infiltration and exfiltration but NOT scuba. So when we went in the escape hatch to do a lock out, the entry hatch was locked behind us. We had to hold our breaths as the hatch filled. Then wait until pressure equalized and someone inside the sub opened the outer hatch. Those moments when both hatches are locked and the compartment is full of water is a bit nerve-wracking. My hats off to all who prowled the deeps.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Ben

    Shallow characterizations, superficial war perspective, average writing. Lots of -"Make heading 70 degrees" -"70 degrees, aye" dialog. Kind of fun, and an interesting storyline, but of the WW2 US navy books I've been reading this is not the best. Shallow characterizations, superficial war perspective, average writing. Lots of -"Make heading 70 degrees" -"70 degrees, aye" dialog. Kind of fun, and an interesting storyline, but of the WW2 US navy books I've been reading this is not the best.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Bill Rogers

    This is one of my favorite war stories. It was a major best seller when it came out, ten years after World War II. It has a level of authenticity you seldom find in military fiction. It is a submarine book which reads as if it were written by someone who had commanded a submarine in wartime, for an extraordinary reason: It was. So why isn't this book more widely available? I couldn't find a current paperback or ebook edition at all. The edition I show here is the only one I found. It may still be This is one of my favorite war stories. It was a major best seller when it came out, ten years after World War II. It has a level of authenticity you seldom find in military fiction. It is a submarine book which reads as if it were written by someone who had commanded a submarine in wartime, for an extraordinary reason: It was. So why isn't this book more widely available? I couldn't find a current paperback or ebook edition at all. The edition I show here is the only one I found. It may still be available new, but my copy is an ex-library copy, used of course, purchased through the mail. As pointed out in the introduction of this edition, not only had Edward L. Beach Jr. served as executive officer and then captain of American submarines in the Pacific in World War II, at the time he wrote this book he was still a serving naval officer. This is an amazing piece of work for somebody to have knocked out in their spare time from a job which had them on call 24 hours a day. It reads as authentic, not only in the detailed and correct description of operating a combat submarine, but in the horror of a campaign marked by savagery on both sides. I will not speak of war crimes as I don't want to moralize here. I will just say that there was little quarter asked or given by either side in the Pacific War. Most military fiction sanitizes this, in a one-sided manner more often than not. In its small way Run Silent, Run Deep does not. That makes it rare and special in this genre. I have read complaints that certain characters such as Laura, Commander Richardson's love interest, aren't well realized. This doesn't particularly bother me. If she is an ideal seen only from a distance, that reflects the reality of the situation of men aboard a submarine thousands of miles from those they loved. To them home and family are dreams, not a real presence. The lack of development of a character barely seen and almost unknown is realistic. If anything about this is not realistic, it is that Richardson would fall in love so quickly with someone he had met so seldom. I first read this book a long time ago. I'm pleased to find it holds up well to my memory of it.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Leila

    When I saw this title I was excited as I thought it was the book version of a movie I have always placed as a favourite among World War II tales re submarines versus destroyers. Perhaps not the usual taste for an elderly lady to enjoy, but then I have always had a weakness for sea stories, perhaps because I was born at the start of World War II and saw many video clips of military action at sea in the cinema way back in the 1940s. I was however disappointed to find this was not what I thought. I When I saw this title I was excited as I thought it was the book version of a movie I have always placed as a favourite among World War II tales re submarines versus destroyers. Perhaps not the usual taste for an elderly lady to enjoy, but then I have always had a weakness for sea stories, perhaps because I was born at the start of World War II and saw many video clips of military action at sea in the cinema way back in the 1940s. I was however disappointed to find this was not what I thought. It is a very detailed account of the life of an American submarine captain and the running of his Sub.. I confess I did skip it pretty often as I made my way through it. I wouldn't read it again.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Art

    I read this book in High school and found it interesting. The idea of living in a small space like sardines. The constant fear of Depth Charges. The failure of torpedoes to explode on contact. No news from home. Isolation, dirty, Little or no fresh air.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Fredrick Danysh

    A novel about the World War II submarine service. Commander Edward Richardson and the crew of the Waldrus are operating in Japanese waters with its dangers when they become the hunted.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Jeffo

    Fantastic book, ultimate suspense, very realistic,I cannot say anymore.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Tom Vetter

    Great book! Read this in submarine school in 1972, and got my copy autographed by Ned Beach way back then. One more reason why I wanted to write someday too!

  14. 5 out of 5

    Tom Stamper

    This novel puts you inside a World War II submarine and inside the mind of a man in charge of such a vessel. The intimacy of the skipper's thoughts and his inner conflicts round out the realities of such responsibilities in a way that straight history wouldn't capture. The story encompasses the whole war from fitting a ship in Connecticut to fighting the Japanese in the Pacific theater. What the book does well is capture the mix of boredom of waiting for something to happen followed by the terro This novel puts you inside a World War II submarine and inside the mind of a man in charge of such a vessel. The intimacy of the skipper's thoughts and his inner conflicts round out the realities of such responsibilities in a way that straight history wouldn't capture. The story encompasses the whole war from fitting a ship in Connecticut to fighting the Japanese in the Pacific theater. What the book does well is capture the mix of boredom of waiting for something to happen followed by the terror of being in the middle of battle. Now this is the captain's story from start to finish. You don't know what the radio man thinks or the torpedo loader thinks or what the cook worries about. But you do come away with an idea of the great burdens of leadership in a time of war. The downside is that there are certain choices such as giving the captain the longing for a love interest that seem a little tacked on to make it more novelistic. There is also a lot of navy and sub lingo here that the layman reader has to decipher or just read past. I got a bit bogged down in the middle of the story and had to put it away for a few weeks before returning. The effort is worth it if you are interested in World War II and military history and submarines especially. If you are looking for a more general interest approach to World War II then something like Herman Wouk's the Winds of War is probably a better match. Like many I came to the novel having seen the 1958 film with Clark Gable and Burt Lancaster. Although it borrows a few plot points it's a much different story. Gable is way too old to be playing the Commander and Lancaster is too mature to be the number 2 man. And the movie also borrows its main conflict from The Caine Mutiny for some reason. I wouldn't say the book was better. I would suggest you watch the movie first to get the feel of the claustrophobia of submarine life and then go back and read the novel to understand the intricacies of being a commander.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Alex

    “Every grave on land and in that ocean is a tomb to an ideal. Some of the ideals are wrong, some right. But the graves are never wrong—they are monuments to the heroic men of either side who sleep there. For who has the right to say to the men who bear the brunt of the battle, ‘This was wrong, this was worthless to die for?’ Is not the warrior the purest and most heroic of all, because he dies for his beliefs? It is the men who send the warriors on their quests who must answer to that question.” “Every grave on land and in that ocean is a tomb to an ideal. Some of the ideals are wrong, some right. But the graves are never wrong—they are monuments to the heroic men of either side who sleep there. For who has the right to say to the men who bear the brunt of the battle, ‘This was wrong, this was worthless to die for?’ Is not the warrior the purest and most heroic of all, because he dies for his beliefs? It is the men who send the warriors on their quests who must answer to that question.” A surprisingly dark and cynical WW2 submarine book. Highly technical and very claustrophobic. You can tell it's written by someone with experience in these situations.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Nancy Ellis

    Wonderful classic of World War 2 submarine warfare in the Pacific. One of the best ever written, better than the movie, of course, although the movie is terrific, too. Since early childhood I've been fascinated by warships, especially those involved in WW2, with a particular love for submarines. This book makes you feel as if you were there, which is not surprising since it's based on the author's personal experiences and knowledge. Wonderful classic of World War 2 submarine warfare in the Pacific. One of the best ever written, better than the movie, of course, although the movie is terrific, too. Since early childhood I've been fascinated by warships, especially those involved in WW2, with a particular love for submarines. This book makes you feel as if you were there, which is not surprising since it's based on the author's personal experiences and knowledge.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Candace Simar

    The history of submariners in WW2 is fascinating and this book tells it well.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Sully Augustine

    I read a library hardbound over the past few evenings. I'm surprised I never read it before. The beginning is a bit choppy, but once it gets going the story is gripping, although it's probably not for someone not interested in WW2 or Naval type matters. I read a library hardbound over the past few evenings. I'm surprised I never read it before. The beginning is a bit choppy, but once it gets going the story is gripping, although it's probably not for someone not interested in WW2 or Naval type matters.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Doug

    I wanted to read this because I liked the movie so much. As it turned out it was pretty hard to find a copy. No library I could find had it and very few used book sellers had it. I did buy a former library copy now withdrawn only to find myself disappointed as I read the first third to half, wishing I hadn't wasted the $14 on it. However, the book picks up in the last half and becomes quite the page-turner. I found it hard to put down. The characterization becomes better (although that's certain I wanted to read this because I liked the movie so much. As it turned out it was pretty hard to find a copy. No library I could find had it and very few used book sellers had it. I did buy a former library copy now withdrawn only to find myself disappointed as I read the first third to half, wishing I hadn't wasted the $14 on it. However, the book picks up in the last half and becomes quite the page-turner. I found it hard to put down. The characterization becomes better (although that's certainly not the strength of the book), but what really captured my attention was the descriptions of submarine warfare. (The author was a submarine commander in WWII.) The love interest was shallow and predictable but it doesn't constitute a major portion of the book. So, if you're interested in the Pacific theater of WWII and particularly submarine warfare, and if you see it at some used book store, it makes a very engaging read.

  20. 5 out of 5

    MuffinManNick Lemp

    In this story an american captian of a submarine tells his story of how he got the medal of honnor. The main charaters are Rich(the captian), Jim, and the other officers and crew of the submarine. In this story they are sent to area seven on patrol off the Japanese coast and are told to sink all merchant ships. Im not going to ruin this story so the last thing Ill say is that the main enemy besides Japan in the book is a Japanese destroyer captian who seems to know the names of all the subs he a In this story an american captian of a submarine tells his story of how he got the medal of honnor. The main charaters are Rich(the captian), Jim, and the other officers and crew of the submarine. In this story they are sent to area seven on patrol off the Japanese coast and are told to sink all merchant ships. Im not going to ruin this story so the last thing Ill say is that the main enemy besides Japan in the book is a Japanese destroyer captian who seems to know the names of all the subs he attacks and is an extremely good sub hunter. His name is Bungo Pete and he patrols area seven hunting for subs. This book is a very good, supenceful, action book.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Malek

    I really loved this book, mostly because of the way he brought home the experience of a submariner in WWII. The captain is not an overly heroic figure, makes mistakes, has weaknesses, and gets hurt several times. But overall he is competent, makes good decisions, and makes his mark in a tough war. So I found it fairly balanced. The transition from nitty-gritty to romantic prose and back is sometimes not that smooth, but otherwise well written. The author was an actual WWII sub skipper and so the I really loved this book, mostly because of the way he brought home the experience of a submariner in WWII. The captain is not an overly heroic figure, makes mistakes, has weaknesses, and gets hurt several times. But overall he is competent, makes good decisions, and makes his mark in a tough war. So I found it fairly balanced. The transition from nitty-gritty to romantic prose and back is sometimes not that smooth, but otherwise well written. The author was an actual WWII sub skipper and so the book is almost autobiographical. This book really gives you a sense of how close WWII was at times as well, the Japanese really wreaked havoc on the US Navy.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Bob

    One of the best submarine movies ever made is based on this book, yet the book is completely different, and, of course, much better than the movie. Detailed explanations of the methods of firing torpedoes in WWII combined with riveting action make this book equal or better than anything Tom Clancy ever wrote. As for the movie, pre Vietnam Hollywood wasn't ready for the shocking ending of this book. One of the best submarine movies ever made is based on this book, yet the book is completely different, and, of course, much better than the movie. Detailed explanations of the methods of firing torpedoes in WWII combined with riveting action make this book equal or better than anything Tom Clancy ever wrote. As for the movie, pre Vietnam Hollywood wasn't ready for the shocking ending of this book.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Curtis Taylor

    Reading about the history of those who went before you is a great experience. To read about those battle while you yourself are cruising through those same waters as you are heading into harms way was an awesome encouragement. My Father served on submarines while he was in the Navy. To read Skipper Beach's stories is to understand more of what my Dad went through. Skipper Beach is an Outstanding Author and a great American Hero. To read his stories is in fact, an honor. Reading about the history of those who went before you is a great experience. To read about those battle while you yourself are cruising through those same waters as you are heading into harms way was an awesome encouragement. My Father served on submarines while he was in the Navy. To read Skipper Beach's stories is to understand more of what my Dad went through. Skipper Beach is an Outstanding Author and a great American Hero. To read his stories is in fact, an honor.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Carolyn

    I learned more respect for the submarine warfare of World War II, even with radar, they were really exposed out there. A tense, drama about life onboard a submarine hunting for the enemy off the coast of Japan. Well written, and it kept my attention. A very unlikely book for me, but necessary to help understand the risks men had to take when technology and radr was fairly new. Brave souls.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Brian

    This book was awesome, and a compliment to "UP Periscope", which I also just finished. Bravery in the sub force in WWII as well as some character development made a interesting read - just like the first time I read in in 1963 (or so). This book was awesome, and a compliment to "UP Periscope", which I also just finished. Bravery in the sub force in WWII as well as some character development made a interesting read - just like the first time I read in in 1963 (or so).

  26. 5 out of 5

    Ed Gray

    I should recuse myself since Ned Beach was a great and close friend of my father, also a submarine officer who made five combat war patrols in the Pacific in WWII. But the hell with that -- this is a really good, dead-on realistic, gripping book.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Joe

    If you want to learn about life in a submarine and how they operated in the war this book is for you.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Grant

    it's been a long time since i read this, but i came across it in the library the other day. it has really bad dialogue. overall you'd have a better time playing a game of "Battleship". it's been a long time since i read this, but i came across it in the library the other day. it has really bad dialogue. overall you'd have a better time playing a game of "Battleship".

  29. 5 out of 5

    Joe White

    Although fiction, contained enough detail to have been extracted from actual events. Best sub book out there for wwII action in the Pacific.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Aaron Oliver

    I think maybe my love for submarine video games (set during WW II) just might have developed when I read this novel. Although at the time I read this book, I never knew it had also been made into a movie in 1958, starring Clark Gable and Burt Lancaster. Beach was a real-life submariner during World War II, who was in the Battle of Midway and participated in numerous combat patrols, earning 10 decorations for gallantry, including the Navy Cross. Run Silent Run Deep in reflection is well-paced; how I think maybe my love for submarine video games (set during WW II) just might have developed when I read this novel. Although at the time I read this book, I never knew it had also been made into a movie in 1958, starring Clark Gable and Burt Lancaster. Beach was a real-life submariner during World War II, who was in the Battle of Midway and participated in numerous combat patrols, earning 10 decorations for gallantry, including the Navy Cross. Run Silent Run Deep in reflection is well-paced; however, it does take its time getting up to speed with the actual combat action. Using the concept of a Navy tape recording made by Commander Edward J. Richardson, the story begins with him and the story's primary figures training for submarine warfare. We learn a lot about the characters, their relationships, and the tools of underwater combat. Tension is created early with the two key players in the story, Richardson and Jim Bledsoe when the first is forced to withdraw a command approval for the latter. Although they will continue to serve together throughout most of the story, this friction is an ongoing thread throughout the book. Run Silent Run Deep kicks off when the crew moves from training to the action in the Pacific Ocean. We blow-up countless Japanese ships, and escape from several Imperial destroyers. Like any good story, we are quickly introduced to the arch-villain. Captain Tateo Nakame, nicknamed Bungo Pete. As the skipper of the destroyer Akikaze, he has an almost mystical power in sinking American submarines. During the novel, the terror of Bungo Pete will have its effect on our characters and end with a thrilling confrontation that tests the metal of our naval forces.

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