30 review for Modern Fiction

  1. 4 out of 5

    Olivia-Savannah

    I don't have too much to say. Woolf really focuses on how literature mimics life, and to what effect. She also takes the time to discuss what the relevance or point of this is - how much literature mimicking life makes a good story. However, I feel like there is so much to literature. And while she talks about a variety of authors, she didn't have enough time to hammer down on what the relevance or point is in literature mimicking life. I don't have too much to say. Woolf really focuses on how literature mimics life, and to what effect. She also takes the time to discuss what the relevance or point of this is - how much literature mimicking life makes a good story. However, I feel like there is so much to literature. And while she talks about a variety of authors, she didn't have enough time to hammer down on what the relevance or point is in literature mimicking life.

  2. 4 out of 5

    MARYAM

    A beautifully written essay about modern literature. It should be considered as one of the most significant essays on Modern Literature. Woolf’s essay contains an obvious and important message for the contemporary and future writers and they should work on it! Woolf suggests that writers should give some attention to ‘ordinary life’ and ‘ordinary mind’; it is the way the fiction should be. "The proper stuff of fiction" does not exist; everything is the proper stuff of fiction, every feeling, ever A beautifully written essay about modern literature. It should be considered as one of the most significant essays on Modern Literature. Woolf’s essay contains an obvious and important message for the contemporary and future writers and they should work on it! Woolf suggests that writers should give some attention to ‘ordinary life’ and ‘ordinary mind’; it is the way the fiction should be. "The proper stuff of fiction" does not exist; everything is the proper stuff of fiction, every feeling, every thought; every quality of brain and spirit is drawn upon; no perception comes amiss. And if we can imagine the art of fiction come alive and standing in our midst, she would undoubtedly bid us break her and bully her, as well as honour and love her, for so her youth is renewed and her sovereignty assured.” “Life is not a series of gig lamps symmetrically arranged; life is a luminous halo, a semi-transparent envelope surrounding us from the beginning of consciousness to the end. Is it not the task of the novelist to convey this varying, this unknown and uncircumscribed spirit, whatever aberration or complexity it may display, with as little mixture of the alien and external as possible? We are not pleading merely for courage and sincerity; we are suggesting that the proper stuff of fiction is a little other than custom would have us believe it.”

  3. 5 out of 5

    Parker Haley

    Beautifully written. Woolf wants to emphasize the lacking qualities in the ‘modern fiction’ of the early 20th century. She discusses how they do not capture an ‘ordinary mind’ of an ‘ordinary day’. Rather, they narrow their narratives upon this ostentatious and luxurious lifestyle that never even ruffles the question, ‘How am I suppose to live?’ She chastises Arnold Bennet, along with Galsworthy and Wells. She calls those three ‘materialist’ for reasons already mentioned. She does, however, prai Beautifully written. Woolf wants to emphasize the lacking qualities in the ‘modern fiction’ of the early 20th century. She discusses how they do not capture an ‘ordinary mind’ of an ‘ordinary day’. Rather, they narrow their narratives upon this ostentatious and luxurious lifestyle that never even ruffles the question, ‘How am I suppose to live?’ She chastises Arnold Bennet, along with Galsworthy and Wells. She calls those three ‘materialist’ for reasons already mentioned. She does, however, praise James Joyce for his writings touching upon the spirit. Lastly, she discusses the Russians authors great ability to, “... discern the features of a saint, if sympathy for the sufferings of others, love towards them, endeavour to reach some goal worthy of the most exacting demands of the spirit constitute saintliness.” Really a great critique.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Sofía Sierra

    Very good short essay to understand and appreciate Modernism. While it is one of my least favourite genres in English Literature, Woolf's essay makes me want to read Joyce's Ulysses and actually think of it as something enjoyable instead of a punishment. Very good short essay to understand and appreciate Modernism. While it is one of my least favourite genres in English Literature, Woolf's essay makes me want to read Joyce's Ulysses and actually think of it as something enjoyable instead of a punishment.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Robyn

    A woman after my own heart.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Meerysbookshelf

    With this essay Virginia Woolf enlightens the path towards a better understanding of English fiction. I specially liked the way she depicts the art of fiction as a SHE that is ready to be broken and bullied but also to be honoured and loved.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Alexandra Lucia Brînaru

    For a program-type essay, I feel like it gave across pretty well the aims of the modernists. And as a bonus (or maybe as expected from Woolf), it was also pretty poetic and pleasant to get through.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Melda

    Woolf's Modern Fiction can be regarded as one of the most important essays on Modern literature. In Modern Fiction, Woolf attempts to explain what is really needed to create modern literature, and why the old way of writing (belonging to "Edwardian" authors) is outdated. She criticises H.G. Wells, Arnold Bennett, and John Galsworthy for writing about "unimportant things", while praising authors such as James Joyce and Thomas Hardy. At the same time, the importance of writing about life, and writ Woolf's Modern Fiction can be regarded as one of the most important essays on Modern literature. In Modern Fiction, Woolf attempts to explain what is really needed to create modern literature, and why the old way of writing (belonging to "Edwardian" authors) is outdated. She criticises H.G. Wells, Arnold Bennett, and John Galsworthy for writing about "unimportant things", while praising authors such as James Joyce and Thomas Hardy. At the same time, the importance of writing about life, and writing on your own interests in your own way (that is, not following a particular method) is stressed. We have advanced in terms of techniques and technology - so it is time to make progress, is basically her message to contemporary and future writers.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Rita

    I gave this essay two stars not because it was a bad thing to read but because it's - mostly- an informative essay and it was, well, ok. I read this to write another essay for my english literature class and I have yet to read "The Dead" by James Joyce. Still I'm looking forward to read more Virginia Woolf. I gave this essay two stars not because it was a bad thing to read but because it's - mostly- an informative essay and it was, well, ok. I read this to write another essay for my english literature class and I have yet to read "The Dead" by James Joyce. Still I'm looking forward to read more Virginia Woolf.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Aya Ebrahim

    In ‘Modern Fiction’ (1919), Virginia Woolf takes issue with those Edwardian novelists writing in the early years of the twentieth century who, in a way, might be seen as relics of the nineteenth-century realism outlined above: her three targets, Arnold Bennett, John Galsworthy, and H. G. Wells, are all labeled ‘materialists’ because of their preoccupation with predictable and plausible plots and their interest in describing the exterior details – the clothes a character wears, the furniture in a In ‘Modern Fiction’ (1919), Virginia Woolf takes issue with those Edwardian novelists writing in the early years of the twentieth century who, in a way, might be seen as relics of the nineteenth-century realism outlined above: her three targets, Arnold Bennett, John Galsworthy, and H. G. Wells, are all labeled ‘materialists’ because of their preoccupation with predictable and plausible plots and their interest in describing the exterior details – the clothes a character wears, the furniture in a room – when what Woolf, as a reader, really wants to know is what is going on the heads of their characters, she more focused on the interior of a character. Woolf wanted writers to focus on the awkwardness of life and craved originality in their work. Woolf's overall hope was to inspire modern fiction writers to write what interested them, wherever it may lead . But we never get this from Arnold Bennett and his ‘materialist’ peers. In the essay she labels these Edwardian writers as materialistic, she says: “If we tried to formulate our meaning in one word we should say that these writers are materialistic.” Writers need to turn away from the material and instead embrace what she calls the ‘spiritual’ in order to make fiction new and relevant. Woolf mentions a short story by the Russian writer Anton Chekhov (1860-1904), ‘Gusev’, in which nothing much happens: the story is based on mood and character rather than action or plot. Such a story points a way forward for Woolf and other writers, whom she labels ‘Georgian’ – i.e. more ‘modern’ and progressive than the materialist Edwardians. In short, we can say that Virginia Woolf is demanding the writers to acknowledge that the thoughts and ideas of individuals are more important than the thoughts and desires of the society. And that there should not be this idea that writers are different from normal people, they too have the same feelings so they should attempt to describe the feeling of their fictional characters since they are supposedly real in a literary sort of way.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Júlia Freitas

    I think I will forever be fascinated about what this woman writes, at what time she wrote it and with the talent she develops everything, every single point is completely understandable and easy to comprehend.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Sohail

    There are some good remarks in this essay, but she ends up drawing red lines and making rules for something that she proposes should be limited by no bounds.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Brooke Eubanks

    Love her and love this! This essay explains why she contradicts boundaries placed on fiction, such as in "Kew Gardens" and "Mrs. Dalloway." She claims modern fiction needs to analyze and resemble reality, not be materialistic. Life does not build up to a culmination/climax. Nor does it have a solution, genres, or plot structure. Thus, a fiction writer needs to focus on matters of the soul and the state of consciousness, rather than expectations for fiction. What's a character's purpose for livin Love her and love this! This essay explains why she contradicts boundaries placed on fiction, such as in "Kew Gardens" and "Mrs. Dalloway." She claims modern fiction needs to analyze and resemble reality, not be materialistic. Life does not build up to a culmination/climax. Nor does it have a solution, genres, or plot structure. Thus, a fiction writer needs to focus on matters of the soul and the state of consciousness, rather than expectations for fiction. What's a character's purpose for living?

  14. 4 out of 5

    Eugenie Shin

  15. 5 out of 5

    Dee

  16. 4 out of 5

    Alison

  17. 4 out of 5

    James Munro

  18. 5 out of 5

    Abigail Perschall

  19. 5 out of 5

    Matilda H

  20. 4 out of 5

    Lurjana Krasniqi

  21. 4 out of 5

    Mila

  22. 5 out of 5

    Alessia Cipro

  23. 5 out of 5

    Elena

  24. 5 out of 5

    sara

  25. 4 out of 5

    Ian Clenshaw

  26. 4 out of 5

    Daisy Reeves

  27. 5 out of 5

    Mary

  28. 5 out of 5

    stien

  29. 4 out of 5

    Sarah Ling

  30. 4 out of 5

    Emily

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...