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Beyond God the Father: Toward a Philosophy of Women's Liberation

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'Certainly one of the most promising theological statements of our time.' --The Christian Century 'Not for the timid, this brilliant book calls for nothing short of the overthrow of patriarchy itself.' --The Village Voice 'Certainly one of the most promising theological statements of our time.' --The Christian Century 'Not for the timid, this brilliant book calls for nothing short of the overthrow of patriarchy itself.' --The Village Voice


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'Certainly one of the most promising theological statements of our time.' --The Christian Century 'Not for the timid, this brilliant book calls for nothing short of the overthrow of patriarchy itself.' --The Village Voice 'Certainly one of the most promising theological statements of our time.' --The Christian Century 'Not for the timid, this brilliant book calls for nothing short of the overthrow of patriarchy itself.' --The Village Voice

30 review for Beyond God the Father: Toward a Philosophy of Women's Liberation

  1. 4 out of 5

    Erik Graff

    Daly was popular at seminary, but I didn't get around to reading her until years later. I was visiting an old high school friend in Springfield, Vermont, had finished the book I'd brought along for the trip and asked his wife for recommendations from their substantial library. She suggested Daly. If one defines "feminism" as the belief that everyone should have the same rights and opportunities, then pretty much everyone is a feminist, even some people who would reject the label. A number of youn Daly was popular at seminary, but I didn't get around to reading her until years later. I was visiting an old high school friend in Springfield, Vermont, had finished the book I'd brought along for the trip and asked his wife for recommendations from their substantial library. She suggested Daly. If one defines "feminism" as the belief that everyone should have the same rights and opportunities, then pretty much everyone is a feminist, even some people who would reject the label. A number of younger women I know do so, but they have been universally ignorant of how much the laws have changed in recent years and of outstanding income differentials and insurance policy inequities. What they are usually objecting to are particular radical feminists or parodies of them. By most accounts, Daly is a radical feminist, more radical in the years after she published Beyond God the Father than she was then. Indeed, her career might be profitably studied for an understanding of the evolution of radical feminist thought. Personally, I feel thankful that I started college just when gender issues were becoming publicly discussed and after Grinnell College had already developed a self-conscious feminist movement within its more generally progressive student organizations. Indeed, by the time I graduated there was also a men's movement allied to the feminists and substantially influenced, if not dominated, by guys who weren't simply heterosexual. I belonged to a men's discussion group there myself. The challenges posed by the radicals are much more subtle than matters of pay or legal equity. If effective, they raise to consciousness the tacit assumptions of society, the unconscious presuppositions about self and others. Some of these may be more than unconscious. They may be actively repressed, the kind of ideas which one would never want to be associated with. When challenged, one is prone to dismiss, if not aggressively deny, the challenge. In fact, one may earnestly seek the offensive factors and be unable to find them. Perhaps they aren't there. Perhaps, however, they are abundantly evident to others in one's behavior. Thus it is essential that some of the work of uncovering repressions be done in social settings with others. Books alone don't, can't do the job. It seems that most of my sexual, racial, class--one can go on and on--assumptions are deeply rooted in upbringing and culture. I am, perhaps inescapably, sexist, racist and elitist. Knowing this, knowing why and wherefrom, does allow me some greater measure of control, however. Such, in reference to Daly's focus, theology, is how I have been able to appropriate something meaningful from the traditional (since Augustine) Catholic doctrine of original sin: I am, by nature, imperfect. I am probably incapable of entirely overcoming impulses to act badly, but, knowing this, I am best able to attempt to act properly. Of course, I've got a long way to go in terms of self-understanding. I can imagine wanting to kill, even torture, others and have, so far, managed to avoid doing so or to avoid even falling into the rages which might result in such behavior. Here, the self-knowledge has been clearly helpful. I have trouble, however, relating to some kinds of sexual behavior and ideation. There are even things I come across that I'd never thought of before. For instance, a book I recently read about the "sexual revolution" got me to think for the first time about the motives of persons who want to change their genders by simply telling the stories of a few such persons in a sympathetic light. That opened a door for me, at least a crack. I am very much interested in being exposed to material which opens such doors and broadens my sense of self beyond the narrow confines of my known existence. A healthy, middle-class white male with a U.S. passport could go on and on about this kind of stuff. It is hard for us to appreciate what it feels like to put down, oppressed or negatively "profiled".

  2. 5 out of 5

    Anne

    This book is important. I think even those Christians who reject her ungendering of God (as I ultimately do) cannot fail to acknowledge what she says: "By making God man, we make man God." This is certainly how it has played out historically. I love the ardor and anger of this book. This book is important. I think even those Christians who reject her ungendering of God (as I ultimately do) cannot fail to acknowledge what she says: "By making God man, we make man God." This is certainly how it has played out historically. I love the ardor and anger of this book.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Heather

    Really intriguing ideas, but also very much White Feminism.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Debbie Hoskins

    I read this after I was getting over the love of my life. I agree with Carl Jung's quote that drugs and alcohol are a low level search for God. I've always been a seeker. So I read this trying to get over my lusts and find a God I could believe in. I read this after I was getting over the love of my life. I agree with Carl Jung's quote that drugs and alcohol are a low level search for God. I've always been a seeker. So I read this trying to get over my lusts and find a God I could believe in.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Michelle

    This book will make you NOT ever want to step into another church ever again...

  6. 4 out of 5

    MyLan

    Evil

  7. 5 out of 5

    Michelle Mueller

    My favorite theology book. Actually, my favorite book period.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Dwight Davis

    10/27/16, first impression: I realize this could be my patriarchy or male bias or whatever, but this feels like an adventure in burning down the house because a few rooms are pretty messed up. I'm much more persuaded by feminist theology that is more constructive and generous (i.e. She Who Is by Elizabeth Johnson) than a project that is purely deconstructive (which, really, this is how I feel about all thought, I have little patience for projects that find nothing good or positive to argue for). 10/27/16, first impression: I realize this could be my patriarchy or male bias or whatever, but this feels like an adventure in burning down the house because a few rooms are pretty messed up. I'm much more persuaded by feminist theology that is more constructive and generous (i.e. She Who Is by Elizabeth Johnson) than a project that is purely deconstructive (which, really, this is how I feel about all thought, I have little patience for projects that find nothing good or positive to argue for). I think that a lot of what Daly is doing with language is interesting as a way of breaking out of patriarchy by developing new meaning and language for feminist experience and I'm appreciative of the verve and bravery it takes to write a book like this at the time in which it was written. I guess it's just not for me. (Original rating: 2 stars) UPDATE 1/24/18 It's amazing how much of a difference a year and some change can make. As I've gotten progressively more theologically liberal over the past year, this book has come to mean something very different to me than it did at first blush. I don't see this work as purely deconstructive anymore. Neither would I be so harsh about such projects at this point, having produced a project that was mostly itself a project of deconstruction. What Daly is doing here is brilliant and forward-thinking and essential in conversations about patriarchy and Christianity. It's sort of astonishing to read this in 2018 and realize that so many of the ideas and conversations she takes to task are still happening almost 50 years after this was originally published. Patriarchy is alive and well, and Mary Daly's work is a valuable tool in combating patriarchy in Christian theology. I still have significant critiques of Daly. She's pretty transphobic, which is not the best. Her racial politics certainly leave a lot to be desired. Centering the oppression of women as the cause of all other oppressions is reductive and unhelpful, much more intersectional work needs to be done in that regard. I also still have significant critiques of her antichurch and anti-ritual/anti-liturgy approach to theology. But unfortunately many scholars have decided that Daly was too radical and too backwards to continue to be of any use. Her books are rapidly going out of print and her name rarely shows up in scholarship anymore (even if her ideas are clearly there and influential, it seems people are ashamed to attribute the ideas to her because of how out of vogue she has become). There seems to be a campaign to silence Daly and remove her thought from the theological and philosophical canons. This is highly unfortunate. Her originality in thought is so vital, and continues to be an incredible resource about God-talk and patriarchy. This book in particular presents so many interesting ideas about grammar as a way of overcoming oppression that should be widely embraced. Her critiques of complementarianism and male religious leadership are still entirely relevant. It's high time we return to Daly's work and take her seriously.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Natasha Snyder

    This book is a classic in feminist religious study. Daly does not pull any punches, and she skewers religion, politics, and every institution of our culture. I agree with most of what she says, and while I see that things are better in some ways than when she wrote the book in 1973, there are plenty of areas where things are just as bad if not worse. Daly calls upon women and forward thinking men to redefine religion. She makes the excellent point that it's not by simply calling God "Goddess" or This book is a classic in feminist religious study. Daly does not pull any punches, and she skewers religion, politics, and every institution of our culture. I agree with most of what she says, and while I see that things are better in some ways than when she wrote the book in 1973, there are plenty of areas where things are just as bad if not worse. Daly calls upon women and forward thinking men to redefine religion. She makes the excellent point that it's not by simply calling God "Goddess" or using gender neutral pronouns to talk about religion is change made. The entire structure of our religious bodies have to be changed to something non-hierarchical. As a Wiccan, it is an interesting consideration. Wicca claims to be gender equal, but most traditional covens HAVE just replaced the patriarchal God for a patriarchal Goddess. Traditional covens where the High Priestess has to be worshipped like the Goddess herself, do NOT fit Daly's idea of an egalatarian, non-hierarchical replacement for patriarchal religion. Daly seeks to redefine the entire concept of religion and religious structures (it could be argued that she really thinks there should be no structure at all to religion). It is a very heavy read, and it calls upon the reader to be familiar with many of the major feminist/anthropological writers of the 20th century. It is interesting though, and it definitely gives the reader plenty of things to think about. I would love to have learned her views on how the culture has shifted in some ways, for better or worse.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Lauren

    *2.5 stars* I had a difficult time rating this book. Daly makes some intriguing insights, but also often throws the proverbial baby out with the bathwater. I'm glad to have read her book (i.e., she wraps up one on-going conversation in just 3 sentences) but I'm also curious as to what conclusions later feminist scholars have reached, on the place of the church especially. *2.5 stars* I had a difficult time rating this book. Daly makes some intriguing insights, but also often throws the proverbial baby out with the bathwater. I'm glad to have read her book (i.e., she wraps up one on-going conversation in just 3 sentences) but I'm also curious as to what conclusions later feminist scholars have reached, on the place of the church especially.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Meredith

    this lady is out of her mind crazy fun!

  12. 4 out of 5

    Korri

    Scooped up a copy at the Lesbian Herstory Archives's annual book sale in December 2011. Scooped up a copy at the Lesbian Herstory Archives's annual book sale in December 2011.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Lady-raygah Soso

    great book i wish all my friends reading this book before three years ago i read it all and i like it much <3

  14. 5 out of 5

    Sarah Eyre

    "By making God man, we make man God" "By making God man, we make man God"

  15. 4 out of 5

    Dr. A

    --- Read this and reviews of other classics in Western Philosophy on the History page of www.BestPhilosophyBooks.org (a thinkPhilosophy Production). --- Mary Daly, radical feminist philosopher and theologist, has been a controversial figure both inside and outside of feminist philosophy. Nonetheless, she has inspired countless women to think deeply about spirituality and the link between spirituality, sexuality, and gender based oppressions. In Beyond God the Father: Toward a Philosophy of Women's --- Read this and reviews of other classics in Western Philosophy on the History page of www.BestPhilosophyBooks.org (a thinkPhilosophy Production). --- Mary Daly, radical feminist philosopher and theologist, has been a controversial figure both inside and outside of feminist philosophy. Nonetheless, she has inspired countless women to think deeply about spirituality and the link between spirituality, sexuality, and gender based oppressions. In Beyond God the Father: Toward a Philosophy of Women's Liberation, Daly offers a hereto unparalleled critique of Christianity that takes the religion back to its pagan roots and the spiritual practices based in women’s reproductive powers. The following review from an Amazon reader well sums up the text and the power it effects: “Some rebellious soul at my extremely fundamentalist college's library managed to procure a copy of this book when it first came out (1979 or 1980, I believe), and when I picked it up, I couldn't put it down. After I'd finished it, I began a little civil disobedience - putting up signs in the commissary to the effect that God was a sexist, the Rapture was a myth, etc. When the administration got wind of it, they called me into the Dean's office and I proudly told them I had come to realize Christianity was a sexist myth used mainly to keep women in their place. I (naively) showed him the book that had brought about this realization, Mary Daly's Beyond God the Father, and the poor guy almost had a heart attack right there in the office. The end result was, I was "allowed" to stay (though I was forbidden to post any more subversive signs) and the library was warned not to purchase any more books by that author. Fortunately, they ignored that directive, and I ignored mine, and as a result, had a much more exciting time in college than I'd ever dreamed. What a great book!” — Chrissy the Stooges Woman, Amazon Reader Review Written in an accessible but lyrical style, Beyond God the Father should not be missed. Readers as diverse as those interested in theology, the history of Christianity, radical feminist thought, and paganism will get a lot out of this book, even if it will likely be a shock to their system. --- Read this and reviews of other classics in Western Philosophy on the History page of www.BestPhilosophyBooks.org (a thinkPhilosophy Production). ---

  16. 4 out of 5

    Kelly Kidwell

    Mary Daly is a genius, though certainly commits the typical sins of our TERF mothers. I’ll address some of those sins first and then get into the good stuff. As Mary Daly puts it, “It is rapism that has spawned racism. It is gynocide that gives rise to genocide.” For Daly, because sexism is the first and most universal “-ism”, it takes absolute priority. All other revolutionary movements (black liberation, pacifism, Marxism, etc. are superficial because they don’t address sex and therefore stand Mary Daly is a genius, though certainly commits the typical sins of our TERF mothers. I’ll address some of those sins first and then get into the good stuff. As Mary Daly puts it, “It is rapism that has spawned racism. It is gynocide that gives rise to genocide.” For Daly, because sexism is the first and most universal “-ism”, it takes absolute priority. All other revolutionary movements (black liberation, pacifism, Marxism, etc. are superficial because they don’t address sex and therefore stand for only half of humanity at best. In her attempts to acknowledge black feminism, she highlights the work of Pauli Murray and Angela Davis, but she can’t seem to acknowledge the role of white women in perpetuating racism: “In the South, Negro women are sexually exploited by white men. Black men have often raped white women in revenge for their own degradation. Yet it was not women who brought slaves to America. Women have been pawns in the racial struggle…” Daly wants to have her cake and eat it too. She’s not wrong that black liberation that ignores gender or worse, argues for black male supremacy, isn’t enough for black women. But she fails to acknowledge the insufficiency of the radical feminist movement to fully address problems like race. She presumes that once sexism is fixed, everything else will be fixed too because the root of “the Other” is, and only is, sexism. How much better could Daly have been with a better understanding of intersectionality? Daly envisions a future that is non-binary and pansexual: “The categories of heterosexuality and homosexuality are patriarchal classifications. …doctrinaire insistence upon exclusive homosexuality…is not radical enough, for…it lends support to the notion that is *does* matter what the sex of your partner may be.” “By becoming whole persons” women (and consequently men challenge “the artificial polarization of human characteristics into sex-role identification… The becoming of androgynous human persons implies a radical change in the fabric of human consciousness and in styles of human behavior.” However, it should be clear in 2021, nearly 50 years after the book was written, that the growing visibility and acceptance (both self-acceptance and societal acceptance) of trans people is changing the fabric of human consciousness with relation to gender and sex in a radical way that a trans-exclusionary movement never could. The pioneering of non-binary identities (est at 1.2 million in the US this year) and increasing prevalence of pansexuality/bisexuality speak to this point. It is the utter rejection of sexual roles assigned at birth that both Mary Daly and trans activists are pushing for. Intersectionality is the missing piece of the puzzle in Mary Daly’s diagnosis of what is wrong with society. By integrating Daly’s best insights with the insights of more recent feminists, especially in regards to intersectionality and trans liberation, a higher form of radical feminism can start to emerge. So what are those insights that are worth keeping? It’s hard to do Daly justice in the space of a review. Her categorization as a “feminist philosopher” and therefore exclusion from Philosophy proper is a real shame. Her analysis is not just political (or even mostly political); it is theological, metaphysical, ontological. Daly is not interested in questions of voting rights or abortion (except as a practical example of her deeper point); she is interested in the ontological implications of sisterhood, alienation, nonbeing and Be-ing. She engages with thinkers as diverse as Aristotle, Aquinas, Augustine, Bachofen, Bacon, Berger, Berrigan, Bonhoeffer, Camus, de Beauvoir, Descartes, Eliade, Jung, Kant, Leibnitz, Marcuse, Metz, Mill, Moltmann, Nietzsche, Pannenberg, Roszak, Spinoza, Szasz, Teilhard de Chardin, Tillich, Weber, and Whitehead, to name just a few (seriously). Her style is continental and poetic but her analysis is rigorous. Her insights transcend the dichotomy between detached “armchair” theory and practical prescription. Her insights are far more individualist than one might expect to find in feminist philosophy. It is precisely this aspect of her worldview that feels the most important today, in a society obsessed with propping up a false dichotomy between freedom/autonomy/individualism and community/sisterhood/love. “I suggest that if one wishes to speak adequately of “convergence” then this has to have as a basic element in its meaning a coming together and harmonizing of *traits within individual human psyches* that have been split apart and objectified by sex role socialization. This fundamental convergence, or unity, or individuation will mean increasing human potential for participation in society as unique, diverse individuals. It will mean “divergence.”” She highlights the importance of community in achieving our full potential *as individuals.* “The bonding phenomenon among women, expressed by the word “sisterhood,” is… essential to the battle against false consciousness…To oppose the essential lovelessness of the sexually hierarchical society is the radically loving act. Seen for what it is, the struggle for justice opens the way to a situation in which more genuinely loving relationships are possible.” “…the women’s revolution is a communal phenomenon…a collective refusal to be “the Other.”” She criticizes the “pseudo-feminine” passive ethic of self-sacrifice, humility, meekness, and obedience that serve the interests of the oppressor at the expense of the oppressed, especially women, who should instead prioritize values like pride and self-esteem, and creativity. This is perhaps a loaded comparison, but it’s hard not to think of Ayn Rand here (and wonder whether she would have changed her views on feminism if she had encountered Mary Daly). Daly acknowledges the transitional nature of her place and time and leaves her philosophy open to further development and evolution. The Possible is still obscured by the oppressive structures of the Now, but we can start to live on the boundary. In this sense, Daly has a sort of courageous humility in her approach. She is not prescriptive. She diagnoses the present, and through this diagnoses, she opens up ways to an unknown future for which there is no existing model. “[The feminist movement] is the catalyst that enables women and men to break out of the prison of self-destructive dichotomies perpetuated by the institutional fathers… *this* movement *is* movement. Realization of this is already the beginning of a qualitative leap in be-ing. For the philosophers of senescence “the final cause” is in technical reason; it is the Father’s plan, an endless flow of Xerox copies of the past. But the final cause that *is movement* is in our imaginative-cerebral-emotional-active-creative being.” It is the transcendent nature of Daly’s philosophy that renders her aforementioned sins less relevant, (and makes this an unapologetically 5-star review), because her real insights into human nature and human possibility are so integrable into a worldview that *is* properly trans-inclusive and intersectional. “Participation in Be-ing is the final cause, and because this is “the end,” we can look forward to endless divergence.” God, therefore, is not the Father. God is not a being. God is the Verb. God is Be-ing.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Brandon

    I wish I had taken notes on this book as I went through it because there are definitely plenty of things to talk about once you finish this. Having met her a year or two before she died, I knew it was a once in a life time chance to see her speak and pick up a book. Most of my friends picked up her last book, but I was far more interested in this one dealing with religion... and I'm glad I picked it up and got it signed. There were plenty if things that were eye opening and there were plenty of I wish I had taken notes on this book as I went through it because there are definitely plenty of things to talk about once you finish this. Having met her a year or two before she died, I knew it was a once in a life time chance to see her speak and pick up a book. Most of my friends picked up her last book, but I was far more interested in this one dealing with religion... and I'm glad I picked it up and got it signed. There were plenty if things that were eye opening and there were plenty of things I wholeheartedly disagreed with, but I think that's what makes philosophy interesting. There were some pretty dense spots and others were a quick read. If you can put your mind to it, then I think it is worth the read. The last section in her conclusion I thought was particularly strong, powerful, and emotional. It was a fantastic conclusion.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Gloria

    I won't claim to have finished this, but did become reasonably acquainted with the contents. This is a historic (early 1970s)feminist look at theology. Strong statements reflect the passion of those times insisting that everyone, but women in particular, question the words they use and the actions they live by as they think about God, about culture and society, and ourselves. This is an author who emphasizes words by capitalizing, underlining, separating, etc. so there is strong notation include I won't claim to have finished this, but did become reasonably acquainted with the contents. This is a historic (early 1970s)feminist look at theology. Strong statements reflect the passion of those times insisting that everyone, but women in particular, question the words they use and the actions they live by as they think about God, about culture and society, and ourselves. This is an author who emphasizes words by capitalizing, underlining, separating, etc. so there is strong notation included. She suggests we have been fed a certain way to think and we need to wake up. This book made a big impact when first published. It is interesting that only recently are we beginning to see some of the changes she suggests are in order: female pastors, openly gay relationships in church, and more. Thought provoking. This is dense, heavy academic reading.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Holly

    Deeply thought-provoking. She begins from the assumption that theology itself, and the Church itself, are corrupted by misogyny not only in form but also in principle. From there, she makes a full critique and describes her vision of a way forward, out of patriarchal religion.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Daniela

    Very radical feminism, to the point of enchanting the reader with the outrageousness of her artful wit!

  21. 4 out of 5

    John schlue

    I must say that as a re-read I'm enjoying this more the second time around. Interesting perspective that Daly creates. I must say that as a re-read I'm enjoying this more the second time around. Interesting perspective that Daly creates.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Angela Joyce

    There is so much in this to enlighten and enrage a person. I wish it didn't have to be so true. There is so much in this to enlighten and enrage a person. I wish it didn't have to be so true.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Colleen

    While stimulating, I think that Mary Daly's views are hard to translate into practice. While stimulating, I think that Mary Daly's views are hard to translate into practice.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Pamela Boswell

    It takes a lot to blow my mind. My mind was blown and I was changed after reading this.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Juniperus

    I’ll start by saying I am aware of the author’s negative views on transgender people, but I don’t think reading an author should mean one necessarily agrees with everything they think. I am a firm believer that there’s something to learn from everything, and I think it’s counterproductive to cancel a dead person anyway, especially when I picked up this book used for $3. That being said, I did get a lot out of this book, and it definitely challenged me more than most of what I read. I am not in t I’ll start by saying I am aware of the author’s negative views on transgender people, but I don’t think reading an author should mean one necessarily agrees with everything they think. I am a firm believer that there’s something to learn from everything, and I think it’s counterproductive to cancel a dead person anyway, especially when I picked up this book used for $3. That being said, I did get a lot out of this book, and it definitely challenged me more than most of what I read. I am not in the habit of reading philosophy, so it was very hard to understand. I would take a few tries to understand a sentence, then a paragraph, and then have an aha! moment when I finally get what she was trying to convey. I really enjoyed engaging with the text actively this way; it felt like being back in school! But despite the many good points Daly made, I had trouble figuring out how they would tie back into the rest of the book, and I’m not exactly sure what the thesis was. The full title is Beyond God the Father: Toward a Philosophy of Women’s Liberation, but the whole thing is approached very theologically, so it seemed to be sort of an effort to establish a new feminist theology, which would in turn transform our own ontology because…? The best part about Beyond God the Father is that unlike most books of theory, it spends most of its time proposing solutions, instead of simply describing problems. Even if these solutions are discussed in an extremely vague sense, it’s better than the theorists who only complain. It gave me a lot to think about, especially on language — Daly calls it the “castrating of language” — reminding me of Monique Wittig’s Les Guérillères. Everything Daly proposes does seem to be within the context of those who are already some form of religious/spiritual, because nonbeing is apparently existentially terrifying, whereas most atheists I know have already confronted that idea and find it comforting. She makes a lot of criticisms within a Christian framework while claiming to reject that very thing, for example calling things she doesn’t like “idolatry”. Is this short-sighted, or is it a clever rhetorical tool to bring over dissenters? While a minor part of the book itself, the most glaring issue it had was in its discussion of race. Daly, like other second-wave feminists, draws comparisons between women’s liberation and black liberation, but unlike porto-intersectional feminists like Andrea Dworkin, certain biases are not addressed. Why exactly is a black god less revolutionary than a female god? What makes misogyny “the root and paradigm of various forms of oppression”? I agree that liberal feminists often outright ignore the existence of misogyny, and that it is a throughline to basically everything, but to not back up why it’s the origin of racism seems a very self-centered white way of thinking. Daly discusses minority mens’ capacity to perpetuate misogyny, but does not find it within herself to discuss the opposite, which Dworkin does extensively in Right Wing Women. Perhaps this is a question of authorship — Dworkin was jewish so she knew why true intersectional thinking is necessary. Daly’s most absurd assertion about race was that “it was not the women who brought slaves to America. Women have been pawns in the racial struggle.” Despite this book’s (and the author’s) shortcomings, the thesis that women’s liberation is going to help human nature as a whole is very inspiring and smart. I respect any book that makes me reflect and self-reflect this much, and would recommend it if you’re interested in a point-of-view that’s not often heard from.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Nwad

    For so many years there have been 3 Mary Daly titles on my bookshelf I've kept as little treasures without more than a cursory knowledge of what was inside. Isn't that odd? I guess it was difficult at first for me, the woman with a thousand urgent distractions, to find a method of aiming my entire attention at her rather scholarly writing. And that, my friend, was the absolutely necessary piece. It took several months for me to get through Beyond God the Father: Toward a Philosophy of Women's Li For so many years there have been 3 Mary Daly titles on my bookshelf I've kept as little treasures without more than a cursory knowledge of what was inside. Isn't that odd? I guess it was difficult at first for me, the woman with a thousand urgent distractions, to find a method of aiming my entire attention at her rather scholarly writing. And that, my friend, was the absolutely necessary piece. It took several months for me to get through Beyond God the Father: Toward a Philosophy of Women's Liberation reading it aloud in the bathroom where no one could completely interrupt me, but oh was it worth it. She has a powerful way of uniting strains of half comprehended fragments of information my brain has collected over the years into something cohesive that actually makes sense. Highly recommended.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Lucy

    [alcohol /] . . . . This book features some truly one-of-a-kind, refreshingly upending theological ideas...and an unsettling amount of transmisogyny and racism. Mary Daly was indomitable in her thought, for better in her dealings with the church and other institutions throughout her life, and for worse in terms of who she included in her fold. You will find yourself uncomfortable in ways you never knew you needed and in ways you definitely did not. On this note, some of her recurring key words may in [alcohol /] . . . . This book features some truly one-of-a-kind, refreshingly upending theological ideas...and an unsettling amount of transmisogyny and racism. Mary Daly was indomitable in her thought, for better in her dealings with the church and other institutions throughout her life, and for worse in terms of who she included in her fold. You will find yourself uncomfortable in ways you never knew you needed and in ways you definitely did not. On this note, some of her recurring key words may inspire one to roll their eyes, but a generous reader will blame at least half of that on the time. In the end, a worthwhile text for students of religious and/or gender studies or those interested, but to be read with several grains of salt. In fact, take some lemon and tequila with you, too.

  28. 5 out of 5

    fausto

    Is the second time I read this book, I must say that I think I wasn´t prepare the first time, and I did not appreciated the value and power of this work. Is a very important work in order to create a new philosophy of feminist trascendance, and many (if not all) the points Mary gave are still very contemporary.

  29. 5 out of 5

    lottie pike

    what an iconic book tbf. i actually didn't manage to finish it all because it was literally disintegrating and falling apart in my hands, which is v sad because it was a present from my phil teacher :/// but yes love mary daly <3 what an iconic book tbf. i actually didn't manage to finish it all because it was literally disintegrating and falling apart in my hands, which is v sad because it was a present from my phil teacher :/// but yes love mary daly <3

  30. 4 out of 5

    Paschal Uzukwu

    This is a radical piece of work. The writer should be understood from such radical feminist perspctive. However she did a good job in provoking readers into further reading and raising some questions on the course of womenhood in the world today.

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