Hot Best Seller

Glastonbury: The Novel of Christian England

Availability: Ready to download

Glastonbury saw it all—armies marched, cultures clashed, kingdoms rose and fell—but through it all Glastonbury remained a place of serenity, prayer and reconciliation. Sweeping through 1500 years of tumultuous Celtic, Roman, Arthurian, Anglo-Saxon, Norman and Tudor history from the first confrontations between druids and Christians to the dissolution of the monasteries, th Glastonbury saw it all—armies marched, cultures clashed, kingdoms rose and fell—but through it all Glastonbury remained a place of serenity, prayer and reconciliation. Sweeping through 1500 years of tumultuous Celtic, Roman, Arthurian, Anglo-Saxon, Norman and Tudor history from the first confrontations between druids and Christians to the dissolution of the monasteries, this is a story of faith passed on from generation to generation. Joseph of Arimathea, Saint Patrick, Alfred the Great, Richard the Lionheart, Henry VIII… here in this epic novel of the triumph of Christianity through the darkest moments of history, many will find their own spiritual roots. As Austin Ringwode, last of the Glastonbury monks, searches back through the pages of recorded history in a valiant quest to find meaning in the struggles those broken arches stood witness to—seeking for the Holy Grail itself—so his odyssey becomes every person’s journey for the meaning of life.


Compare

Glastonbury saw it all—armies marched, cultures clashed, kingdoms rose and fell—but through it all Glastonbury remained a place of serenity, prayer and reconciliation. Sweeping through 1500 years of tumultuous Celtic, Roman, Arthurian, Anglo-Saxon, Norman and Tudor history from the first confrontations between druids and Christians to the dissolution of the monasteries, th Glastonbury saw it all—armies marched, cultures clashed, kingdoms rose and fell—but through it all Glastonbury remained a place of serenity, prayer and reconciliation. Sweeping through 1500 years of tumultuous Celtic, Roman, Arthurian, Anglo-Saxon, Norman and Tudor history from the first confrontations between druids and Christians to the dissolution of the monasteries, this is a story of faith passed on from generation to generation. Joseph of Arimathea, Saint Patrick, Alfred the Great, Richard the Lionheart, Henry VIII… here in this epic novel of the triumph of Christianity through the darkest moments of history, many will find their own spiritual roots. As Austin Ringwode, last of the Glastonbury monks, searches back through the pages of recorded history in a valiant quest to find meaning in the struggles those broken arches stood witness to—seeking for the Holy Grail itself—so his odyssey becomes every person’s journey for the meaning of life.

30 review for Glastonbury: The Novel of Christian England

  1. 4 out of 5

    Donna Crow

    GLASTONBURY, A Novel of The Holy Grail, is the book I was born to write. Just as the search for the Holy Grail is the centerpiece of this 820-page novel covering 1500 years of English history, so the stories of King Arthur have been a centering passion for my life. In 1992 the first edition of GLASTONBURY, The Novel of Christian England, was published by Crossway Books with its cover showing the broken arches of Glastonbury Abbey through a bower of leafy green. And then in 2000 GLASTONBURY was bro GLASTONBURY, A Novel of The Holy Grail, is the book I was born to write. Just as the search for the Holy Grail is the centerpiece of this 820-page novel covering 1500 years of English history, so the stories of King Arthur have been a centering passion for my life. In 1992 the first edition of GLASTONBURY, The Novel of Christian England, was published by Crossway Books with its cover showing the broken arches of Glastonbury Abbey through a bower of leafy green. And then in 2000 GLASTONBURY was brought back in a fully reedited edition with a beautiful black cover bordered with Celtic knotwork. And now, after 20 years in print, GLASTONBURY, The Novel of the Holy Grail, has a whole new life with yet another stunning cover in a version fully reedited for ebooks. And so the saga continues. My new publisher uses the strapline: The Holy Grail lies somewhere in Glastonbury! See more at: http://www.donnafletchercrow.com/inde... And I reply, "So does my heart."

  2. 4 out of 5

    Angie Thompson

    How do you write a single review for an epic like this? And I mean seriously epic in scope and magnitude, since the stories in this book span at least 1500 years of history! In one sense, it's a connected story--the history of Glastonbury--but that story is split into six books, some of which are further split into collections of short stories and novellas. The sheer size and scope of the book make it really hard to give it any kind of in-depth analysis, and of course there were portions of the How do you write a single review for an epic like this? And I mean seriously epic in scope and magnitude, since the stories in this book span at least 1500 years of history! In one sense, it's a connected story--the history of Glastonbury--but that story is split into six books, some of which are further split into collections of short stories and novellas. The sheer size and scope of the book make it really hard to give it any kind of in-depth analysis, and of course there were portions of the story I enjoyed more than others. (Along with the fact that there's no way I can remember all the details of all the individual stories...) So, before I started this book, I'm not sure I had ever heard of Glastonbury, and I found all the history really interesting, even though I had a hard time keeping all the historical details straight in my mind from book to book. I really liked the author's way of showing the possible origins of certain stories and legends, and it was interesting, although sometimes rather frustrating, to see how the stories changed across time. I really liked, for example, her portrayal of the Arthur legends and the way some of the more sordid portions were made into later inventions, rather than facts. Because of the way the stories and history are woven, I found myself correcting things in some of the later stories with, "That wasn't the way it happened!" and then having to remind myself that the earlier stories were also fiction... Speaking of history, I really loved the way the author infused the historical flavor into her stories! In a book spanning from a few years after Christ's death to the reign of Henry VIII, that in itself is a monumental undertaking. And yet she accomplished it without resorting to King James English or making her pre-Roman Celts sound exactly like a sixteenth-century courtier. And yet none of her characters in any period were stiff or hard to understand, and the progression flowed so smoothly that you felt the gradual change in the names, the speech cadence, and the vocabulary without being jerked around from one period to the next. This whole language and period-flavor aspect was definitely my favorite thing about the book! The only drawback would be that unfamiliar words and terms are sometimes thrown around with no explanation (although I did find a glossary in the back--after I'd finished the book :S), but if you're okay with picking things up from context or looking them up as you go along, it shouldn't be a problem. As I already stated, there were certain stories that I enjoyed more than others; in particular, I was saddened by the tragic endings of some of them. (Although if I had known more about the history and legends going in, I probably would have been better prepared...) But I did appreciate the way the author kept pointing back to the light of faith that shone even through tragic circumstances and to the persistence and rekindling of the flame even in the darkest times. The only things that I didn't really enjoy about the book were some references to various sexual sins that never went into detail but that are just hard things for me to read about in general, no matter how gently the author handles them. Some of them were historically unavoidable--for example, Henry VIII's relationships--while others formed part of fictional characters' backstories--for example, a boy is discovered to be an illegitimate son. The only scenes that really came close to the edge for me were one scene where a man takes a girl and "falls into the rushes" with her (the scene immediately closes) and one where a woman comes upon an illicit rendezvous in the forest (no details are given). There are scattered references to fertility rites, infertility, men keeping mistresses, accusations of adultery, etc., but all are handled with a pretty light touch. Also, the faith element in the book was very pervasive, very strong, and very suited to the times, and although the core Christian elements of God's grace and salvation through faith were stressed, there were also some elements that made my Protestant soul cringe a little--things like prayers to the saints, venerated relics, and people claiming visions of Jesus having dedicated a certain chapel to His mother. Honestly, I feel like the author did an excellent job of balancing historical reality with underlying truth in a way that I don't think would cause offense to either Protestants or Catholics, but still might not make either side entirely comfortable. It was interesting to note some of the church controversies that played into this history, too; I wanted to bang my head on the desk when a certain council was broken up because of a heated disagreement on the shape of the tonsure--and they were really serious! Historical detail, I'll tell you... There were also a couple of places where the "believer marrying an unbeliever" issue was brought up and then solved immediately by the conversion of the unbelieving party. Not that I object to that solution, but it did feel a bit...convenient. Overall (if there's such a thing as an overall rating for such a huge work), I give it four stars. And even though I know I won't be able to remember all the historical details, I'm sure the stories will pop back into my mind the next time I hear of St. George or the Arthur legends. ;) Content--see above for sexual and religious content; some mentions of pagan religions and their practices; battle scenes, including wounds, blood, and deaths; mentions of torture and executions; mentions of various superstitions; accusations of witchcraft; one use of "bastard" (in the literal sense), one use of "damned" (in the spiritual sense), a few uses of "deuce" or "devil"

  3. 5 out of 5

    Laura

    Given my love of British History and Church History, you might make the leap of faith to conclude that I’ve enjoyed this book. And, you would be right as I’ve loved reading this title! Ms. Crow has done a fabulous job taking bits of what we know of history and fleshing out stories that bring the different characters to life. Some of the protagonists were familiar (e.g. King Arthur, although in this book he is called Arthurious) and others were not well known to me. But, together their story pai Given my love of British History and Church History, you might make the leap of faith to conclude that I’ve enjoyed this book. And, you would be right as I’ve loved reading this title! Ms. Crow has done a fabulous job taking bits of what we know of history and fleshing out stories that bring the different characters to life. Some of the protagonists were familiar (e.g. King Arthur, although in this book he is called Arthurious) and others were not well known to me. But, together their story paints an elegant history of an area in Britain eventually known as Glastonbury which is seen as a holy place for all of known history, even before the coming of Christianity. This is not a quick read, though, with over 500 pages of text. Nor is it like one continuous novel with one set of characters to track. Glastonbury is almost like a series of novellas strung together as if an ancient historian is retelling each glimpse of time periods along the way. The nice thing about it is that I could easily set aside the book for the night when I reached a new jump in era without having an unsettling feeling about abandoning a favorite character or thread in the story. Yet, the more I read, the more drawn I was to the stories and even a desire to dig deeper into the history myself. (No, I haven’t done that, but the wheels are already spinning about when P should study British Literature and how much history we’ll include with it.) I would seriously recommend this title for any other lover of British history or even one of Church history who wants to witness the evolution of Christianity in England through the genre of historical fiction. Included in the front of the book (which I wish I’d printed out to have on hand while reading) is both a timeline of Glastonbury through the dissolution of the Abbey in 1539 and a genealogy of the families in Glastonbury from Joseph of Arimathea through the time period covered in this book.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Sheila

    An almost perfect blend of history, mythology, and excellent storytelling, Donna Fletcher Crow’s Glastonbury recreates ancient Britain from the time of Druids to the dissolution of the monasteries in the Middle Ages. The story splits into separate books, each complete in itself and each contributing an essential ingredient to the whole. It's a long read, certainly, but a rewarding one with such perfect stopping points you can pick it up again week after week, following tales of slavery and Roman An almost perfect blend of history, mythology, and excellent storytelling, Donna Fletcher Crow’s Glastonbury recreates ancient Britain from the time of Druids to the dissolution of the monasteries in the Middle Ages. The story splits into separate books, each complete in itself and each contributing an essential ingredient to the whole. It's a long read, certainly, but a rewarding one with such perfect stopping points you can pick it up again week after week, following tales of slavery and Roman rule with the curious wonders of Camelot and the quest for the Holy Grail. I’ve always loved English history and this novel satisfies that love as well as intriguing me delightfully with its depiction of early Christianity. Building on legends that Joseph of Arimathea came to England after the death of Christ, carrying the Holy Grail of Arthurian dreams, it invites the reader to wonder what is the grail, and who is Arthur? Is there power in the land? Donna Fletcher Crow deftly weaves a wealth of well-researched detail into a story that continually astounds with sudden awe and the caught breath of surprised recognition. There are no glaring signposts to remembered characters here; just wise and well-drawn images that bring those characters to life before you've fully recognized who you might be seeing. Glastonbury encompasses the detail and emotional power of a Rosemary Sutcliffe novel (one of my childhood favorites), the honest faith of a Taylor Caldwell book (favorites of my teenage years), and the scope and depth of an Edward Rutherford tome (one of my more recent favorites). It is is hugely satisfying, beautifully researched and convincingly told—a novel to read and reread and happily recommend. Disclosure: I was lucky enough to by an ecopy when it was free but I’ll have to look out for it in paperback now as I want a copy for my bookshelf.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Dale Harcombe

    This is a fascinating fictional, but based on history, account of the early Christian church in England. The story starts with a light that shone in the sky announcing a special king born, and then moves to the visit of Joseph of Arimathea to England after the death of Jesus Christ to take the gospel to the Celts. From the Celts the story transverses various stages in history such as Roman Britain, Arthurian Britain etc all the way to Tudor England and makes for a fascinating read. The Arthurian This is a fascinating fictional, but based on history, account of the early Christian church in England. The story starts with a light that shone in the sky announcing a special king born, and then moves to the visit of Joseph of Arimathea to England after the death of Jesus Christ to take the gospel to the Celts. From the Celts the story transverses various stages in history such as Roman Britain, Arthurian Britain etc all the way to Tudor England and makes for a fascinating read. The Arthurian story leaves out all the usual elements of magic and Merlin as a Wizard but is no less readable for that. One thing I did find I a little hard were unfamiliar names that were often times very similar. It was useful to have the Families of Glastonbury listed in the front and the glossary in the back of the book for unfamiliar terms. At almost 800 ages this is not a quick read but then you would hardly expect t to be given the huge amount of time covered. It is beautifully written and each time I had to put it down I found myself eager to get back to the story. I’d been trying to get hold of this book for a while but it had been unavailable so I was very pleased to see it reprinted. If you want a good look at English History and the beginning of the Christian church with its positive aspects and also its failings, this is an excellent place to start. It is a beautifully presented book and I loved the cover. It is just so rich, in keeping with the story. My one regret was at times I would have liked to stay with certain families and their story a little longer which shows how involved with the characters I was, but that would have made for an even longer story. What is has done is prompt me to investigate further some of the stories that this novel contains and I’m glad Donna gave a few suggestions of source materials to consult. Highly recommended.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Sherry Sharpnack

    This book about the history of Glastonbury Abbey, the holiest site in English Christendom, was HUGE, and I loved every minute of it. If you don’t profess Christianity, you just might after reading this. The book begins w/ Joseph of Arimathea—supposedly Jesus of Nazareth’s Uncle — taking the gospel to the world by moving to the island of Logres. He established a home at Ynis Withrin w/ its lovely great tor, a very holy place even then. Then you follow the Tor and it’s association w/ the gospel of C This book about the history of Glastonbury Abbey, the holiest site in English Christendom, was HUGE, and I loved every minute of it. If you don’t profess Christianity, you just might after reading this. The book begins w/ Joseph of Arimathea—supposedly Jesus of Nazareth’s Uncle — taking the gospel to the world by moving to the island of Logres. He established a home at Ynis Withrin w/ its lovely great tor, a very holy place even then. Then you follow the Tor and it’s association w/ the gospel of Christ through the ages, w/ the book being divided into smaller books which address different time periods and how the gospel was spread or accepted by the main characters of the individual books. In fact, the early books aren’t about “Glastonbury” at all: it doesn’t BECOME Glastonbury for many centuries. I love the author’s use of the languages and place names that would have been used at the time, instead of the modern ones. The books are connected by being a history of Glastonbury written by one of the monks turned out by Henry VIII’s dissolution of the monasteries. The whole book ends w/ the Abbey being burned to the ground by Cromwell’s emissaries. I had to actually stop to realize that the book from the Norman era was further from Christ than we are now from the Norman era...! My especial favorite book was about King Arthurius and his Knights and Queen. We all know the story of King Arthur but this version is just wonderful and so touching! I loved how the author wove stories of all the major British saints into the history of the Abbey also. And I actually cried as the Abbey was burning at the end. Just a wonderful book. I wish I could give it ten out of five stars.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Loraine Bailor

    Just when I thought I was making progress, I realized I was at 24%, and a week later, had had enough at around 40%. Lots of great historical details, but too long to keep track of all the characters and after a while, it just plodded along. With the different generations, it just felt like we were going to crawl through another 100 characters without finishing, so I cried "Uncle." Learned a lot, enjoyed the early characters, just had no idea this book was soooooo long and hard to track. Just when I thought I was making progress, I realized I was at 24%, and a week later, had had enough at around 40%. Lots of great historical details, but too long to keep track of all the characters and after a while, it just plodded along. With the different generations, it just felt like we were going to crawl through another 100 characters without finishing, so I cried "Uncle." Learned a lot, enjoyed the early characters, just had no idea this book was soooooo long and hard to track.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Maureen D. Hunter

    Excellent read! Great story! I thoroughly enjoyed this book. Having been to Glastonbury, climbed the Tor and drunk from the chalice well, I loved reading about its continuing place in history. I would have liked an afterword about the historical sources employed in writing this novel

  9. 4 out of 5

    Courtney Carlson

    So much of this was amazing!

  10. 4 out of 5

    Patricia

    Let this sweep you away, as it did me I received this book free from one of the book sites. I do not remember which one! This is my honest and voluntary review. An epic book that overcomes the reader with tears of joy and of despair. Read about the wars, the kings, the legends, and the birth of English religious abbey Glastonbury. Most importantly, read of the faith that imbued the land of Avalon. Each part of this epic work details historical wars and raids made in the land of the future Englan Let this sweep you away, as it did me I received this book free from one of the book sites. I do not remember which one! This is my honest and voluntary review. An epic book that overcomes the reader with tears of joy and of despair. Read about the wars, the kings, the legends, and the birth of English religious abbey Glastonbury. Most importantly, read of the faith that imbued the land of Avalon. Each part of this epic work details historical wars and raids made in the land of the future England. Read of the good and the traitorous. Read of the ebb and flow of the abbey over generations. Read of those who would serve God on earth. The characters from history are done in an accurate way, but it is the fictional characters that bring emotions to the imagination. This is no small task that the author gave herself. From the time of the Romans to the court of King Henry the VIII, this book spans generations and sweeps the reader out of the present and into a tumultuous past. There was not always war and there was not always peace, but there was always the abbey and faith. Take the most incredible journey through time and read this book. This is a keeper and I must order one to keep in my home. Yes, the book is long, but it is so full that it seems to read fast. I thank the author for taking the time and effort to write such a marvelous work. I highly recommend this book to you.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Madeleine Myers

    Panoramic view of Britain's place in Christian history My favorite historical novels are those which are rooted in fact, but which also skillfully blend the myths and legends surrounding the facts with credible and appealing characters in a richly visualized setting: the kind that take us back in time but leave us curious enough to want to take a trip or two back, and find out what we missed. I found this novel after having read two others in which some of these characters appeared and in which G Panoramic view of Britain's place in Christian history My favorite historical novels are those which are rooted in fact, but which also skillfully blend the myths and legends surrounding the facts with credible and appealing characters in a richly visualized setting: the kind that take us back in time but leave us curious enough to want to take a trip or two back, and find out what we missed. I found this novel after having read two others in which some of these characters appeared and in which Glastonbury figured prominently in the enveloping action. Although some of the periods depicted seemed sketchier than others, my reading lingered on a few that I knew very little about, especially the initial story of Joseph of Arimathea, whom I had only heard of in the Biblical account, and since learned he may have been close to Jesus and his family from the beginning, and his story abounds in legends and speculation, yet he comes across as a vivid personality here. I will be looking for more stories and legends surrounding many of the other characters, I am sure. And as long as this novel is, it is so beautifully written I took my time with the reading of it, and read the last chapter wistfully, a bit regretful that it would end.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Karin Jenkins

    This is similar in concept to Rutherford's books such a London where the history of an area is told through a series of stories in different generations but with a particular focus on the Christian history and legends of England. It starts with Joseph of Arimathea and the legend that he traded with Cornish tin miners and finishes with the dissolution of the monasteries and in between we meet saints and kings and ordinary folk at various times in history. I got a bit lost in the Dark Ages, but th This is similar in concept to Rutherford's books such a London where the history of an area is told through a series of stories in different generations but with a particular focus on the Christian history and legends of England. It starts with Joseph of Arimathea and the legend that he traded with Cornish tin miners and finishes with the dissolution of the monasteries and in between we meet saints and kings and ordinary folk at various times in history. I got a bit lost in the Dark Ages, but that may just have been me, and I wished I had the book in paper rather than digital format as I think it would have been useful to be able to easily flick back and remind myself of things that happened in previous sections. One of the cleverest things to me was the way she showed how stories evolve over time or are subverted by people with agendas, a slightly different version becomes the received wisdom, and it gets much harder to disentangle fact from story the further we get from events. She was also good at showing how there were sincere Christians as well as people hungry for power on all sides of the mess Henry VIII caused.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Lorraine Shelstad

    I enjoyed reading this book and learning more about the history of England, especially how Christianity came to England and the struggles over the years. It took me a long time to read but then it does cover the time of Joseph of Arimathea coming to England to the destruction of the monasteries by Henry VIII. I found it interesting how the author cleverly wove what are considered legends into the story in a way that made them entirely believable. Donna Crow did a tremendous amount of research an I enjoyed reading this book and learning more about the history of England, especially how Christianity came to England and the struggles over the years. It took me a long time to read but then it does cover the time of Joseph of Arimathea coming to England to the destruction of the monasteries by Henry VIII. I found it interesting how the author cleverly wove what are considered legends into the story in a way that made them entirely believable. Donna Crow did a tremendous amount of research and I found it interesting how she presented both sides of the Catholic/Protestant controversy in a non-biased way. I could not tell which side of the fence she is on.

  14. 4 out of 5

    edith wherton

    Interesting Wonderful book, no doubt. Usually ,I despise the idea of a series and think that story should be told in one go. Sadly in this case,I am wrong. Each section would have made a lovely novel. Please consider rereleasing it as several separate volumes. By the time I got about 3/4 through I was losing the will to live. But.... I found it enjoyable and extremely interesting. It makes the old legends seem quite possible when put into historical context. I would have actually given six stars Interesting Wonderful book, no doubt. Usually ,I despise the idea of a series and think that story should be told in one go. Sadly in this case,I am wrong. Each section would have made a lovely novel. Please consider rereleasing it as several separate volumes. By the time I got about 3/4 through I was losing the will to live. But.... I found it enjoyable and extremely interesting. It makes the old legends seem quite possible when put into historical context. I would have actually given six stars for writing and content but the length....oh my.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Data

    Seems that most of the people reading this really love it. I have nothing but respect for the hard work and thoughtful writing of the author, but I still can't get the high enthusiasm going. I think from my personal perspective, I am simply uncomfortable with the way religion is used throughout history. I read about it (and certainly you can't tell a historical story of England without writing about Christianity), but I find the easy acceptance is not there for me. Many characters in the book st Seems that most of the people reading this really love it. I have nothing but respect for the hard work and thoughtful writing of the author, but I still can't get the high enthusiasm going. I think from my personal perspective, I am simply uncomfortable with the way religion is used throughout history. I read about it (and certainly you can't tell a historical story of England without writing about Christianity), but I find the easy acceptance is not there for me. Many characters in the book struggle with this acceptance, so I don't find it hard to read, just hard to accept.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Cheyenne Langevelde

    From the landing Joseph of Arimathea on the shores of Britannia to the persecution under King Henry VIII and disbanding of the monasteries, Donna Fletcher Crow weaves six fascinating narratives that are realistic, moving, and teach so much about British history and Christianity. Truth be told, this is actually six books in one, including the tale of King Arthur, St. Patrick, the Norman Conquest, and so much more. Highly recommend to any historical fiction lover, but especially those who love Bri From the landing Joseph of Arimathea on the shores of Britannia to the persecution under King Henry VIII and disbanding of the monasteries, Donna Fletcher Crow weaves six fascinating narratives that are realistic, moving, and teach so much about British history and Christianity. Truth be told, this is actually six books in one, including the tale of King Arthur, St. Patrick, the Norman Conquest, and so much more. Highly recommend to any historical fiction lover, but especially those who love British history.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Amanda

    I really enjoyed Glastonbury. It's actually a collection of books spanning 1500 years. The first books tells of Joseph of Arimethia leaving the Holy Land and settling in Glastonbury with a small group of believers shortly after Christ's crucifixion. The final book takes place during the reign of King Henry VIII. along the way, there was a book centered on St George, one on St Patrick, and one on King Arthur. The books sometimes skipped past great spans of time, but they all took place in the sam I really enjoyed Glastonbury. It's actually a collection of books spanning 1500 years. The first books tells of Joseph of Arimethia leaving the Holy Land and settling in Glastonbury with a small group of believers shortly after Christ's crucifixion. The final book takes place during the reign of King Henry VIII. along the way, there was a book centered on St George, one on St Patrick, and one on King Arthur. The books sometimes skipped past great spans of time, but they all took place in the same location and had many threads connecting them. I really enjoyed reading this.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Esther Koncyk Mortensen

    A good time to read I often find myself getting a bit lost with so many different characters but that was not the case here. For the most part, I was able to follow through due to the author's style of writing. It was interesting how she incorporated King Arthur and its many tales told through history. The author also appears to have a good grasp on what people of faith are truly about. A good time to read I often find myself getting a bit lost with so many different characters but that was not the case here. For the most part, I was able to follow through due to the author's style of writing. It was interesting how she incorporated King Arthur and its many tales told through history. The author also appears to have a good grasp on what people of faith are truly about.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Charlene Clevenger

    Fascinating As a Christian and somewhat of an anglophile, I was very interested to read the history of the place where Christianity first came to England. The balance of history and creative fiction weave a beautiful tapestry in this story. It is long, and with many unfamiliar words, it took me a long time to finish, but overall I was enchanted and inspired by the dedication of the characters to Christ.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Lo Anne

    The depth and breadth of the heart of Glastonbury I bought this treasure because I was going to Glastonbury on a quest. I didn't finish the book until I returned home. I wish I had read it first! The depth and breadth of this story brings to life the spiritual magic Glastonbury that lives in my heart. The depth and breadth of the heart of Glastonbury I bought this treasure because I was going to Glastonbury on a quest. I didn't finish the book until I returned home. I wish I had read it first! The depth and breadth of this story brings to life the spiritual magic Glastonbury that lives in my heart.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Laura

    Too much Christianity for my tastes. The version I downloaded is called ‘A Novel Of The Holy Grail’, but it appears it’s also known as ‘A Novel of Christian England’. Had I known that, I wouldn’t have downloaded it. DNF

  22. 5 out of 5

    Linda Testerman

    Great This book is long and I had to take breaks and read something else. A lot of information to digest. I knew some of it, but glad to learn more. Anyone with an interest in how England and Ireland got the Gospel of Jesus, should read this.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Shirley Procter

    Wonderful, inspired story I utterly loved this story, it is inspirational, and filled with God's love for people. I thoroughly enjoyed reading about Glastonbury and it's history as the birthplace of faith in England. Wonderful, inspired story I utterly loved this story, it is inspirational, and filled with God's love for people. I thoroughly enjoyed reading about Glastonbury and it's history as the birthplace of faith in England.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Sharon

    Amazing work and information! Thank you for this walk through time. I have read and felt this moving history. I will look at my Bible differently.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Kevin B. Attwater

    A long epic but an excellent novel and historical review of early Christian England

  26. 5 out of 5

    Jim

    Not recommended.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Karen

    Remarkable book. The history of England up to the Tudors all written around a small cup called the Holy Grail. Each time period is treated according to its reality as far as is known. The characters are real, the details of the various times are accurate. There is no hyperbole. It is a long book but worth reading.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Adam Graham

    This historical epic follows the history of Christianity in England from the first Century to the time of the reformation through the lens of Glastonbury, the site where Christianity first came to the British Isle. The book is thoroughly researched by Crow who manages to separate fact from myth and craft an engaging tale of English history that falls a long line of kings and peoples through Glastonbury. Along the way, we meet such figures as Joseph of Arimathea, King Arthur, Alfred the Great, and This historical epic follows the history of Christianity in England from the first Century to the time of the reformation through the lens of Glastonbury, the site where Christianity first came to the British Isle. The book is thoroughly researched by Crow who manages to separate fact from myth and craft an engaging tale of English history that falls a long line of kings and peoples through Glastonbury. Along the way, we meet such figures as Joseph of Arimathea, King Arthur, Alfred the Great, and St. Patrick. The stories are encouraging. While some negative reviews have cited the fact that many of the characters went through similar struggles, I actually viewed this as a key feature of the book. The fact that in different ages, spiritual leaders came along had to confront the structural decline of Glastonbury as well as its spiritual decline shows that many of our problems. far from being modern inventions, are the exact same thing that holy men and women of old had to confront and by God's grace, deal with. All sections were not equally compelling. My favorites were those involving Arthurian England and the section of the book focusing on King Alfred. The Arthurian Section makes Arthur a believable historical figure of his time rather than the more fanciful legend manufactured during the time of the Normans. I thought the Alfred the Great section was a little too short, but then again I don't if anyone could have done enough on Alfred the Great for my liking. While not my favorite, the best piece of writing in the book is the section on Tudor England and the actions of Henry VIII. The events of the English Reformation under Henry are often reduced to caricature, but Crow is able to tell a very handed story by choosing a narrator named Giles who finds himself caught in the middle. Giles makes friends with ardent Catholics, committed Lutherans, and is trying to establish a place in the court of Henry VIII. Giles like some aspects of the Reformation such as the introduction of the Bible to people in English while at the same time recoiling at the greed and excess of Henry and Lord Thomas Cromwell, as well as the destruction of abbeys and monasteries that Henry wrought that in fact ravaged English history and heritage, and hurt the poor who depended on these monasteries for assistance. As an American, I can see how the actions of Henry and the precedents he set ultimately would lead man English to free to the new world. Henry, in order to obtain his divorce married church and state in a way that placed the King over God. Nothing illustrated that better than Henry demanding tribute from churches and monasteries. Thus you had a king demanding a tithe of God. Overall, the book is engaging and helps readers to understand the role that faith played in English history, and how that faith continues to effect the world today.

  29. 5 out of 5

    KyBunnies

    Review: I have always loved reading about the Holy Grail. It has such amazing interest. People wonder where it is located and if it is real. When an interesting novel comes along that is rich in history, I am always going to read it no matter what. Well, this is one of those novels. Get ready for several weeks in reading this one; you will need it, skip nothing while reading. This is necessary read for historical fiction lovers. This novel starts out in a druid village or township. A druid chief i Review: I have always loved reading about the Holy Grail. It has such amazing interest. People wonder where it is located and if it is real. When an interesting novel comes along that is rich in history, I am always going to read it no matter what. Well, this is one of those novels. Get ready for several weeks in reading this one; you will need it, skip nothing while reading. This is necessary read for historical fiction lovers. This novel starts out in a druid village or township. A druid chief is trying to figure out the bright light in the sky after the earth has shook. One student in his charge believes they should offer a sacrifice to the god to appease them. While another student believes, the entrails from a night creature ought to be read to determine what is happening. The chief is determined that no blood be shed. He explains to them that one day there will be one sacrifice that will be satisfying to the gods for all times. The students ask how this is possible. He simply states it must be a great king. The students say this is unthinkable. Yes, that is an edited version of the prologue. Has it piped your interest? I hope it has. I fell in love with this book after seeing the cover, then after reading the blurb, I knew I had to read no matter what. I knew I would love this book. I feel like I could read it all again and probably see everything different. No, I am not a scholar of anything, just someone who loves to read and knows an amazing book. This book is rich in history. Along with that, history is some folklore. If you know anything about history then you know that folklore was common practice at one time. Does King Author and his round table make you wonder about magic, swords, dragons, knights, Lancelot, and Guinevere? This novel will take readers on a journey from the heavenly stars in the sky announcing the birth of a great King to 5th Century Britannia to over two millennia later. If you are interested in traveling through time, then honestly read this book. When reading this book be prepared to be swept away to a time that has been forgotten. Glastonbury is more than just a name, a place, or a book. Glastonbury was once a great monastery burned to the ground and left to crumble. However, this once holy place still stands creating hope for future generations. Thank you for a truly amazing read Donna. The bunnies and I give this book 4 carrots. . I was gifted a copy for a VBT. I received no compenstation for readin/reviewing this book. The above opinion is my own and not a paid review. To form your own opinion please purchase a copy and support the author.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Meagan Myhren-Bennett

    Glastonbury A Novel of the Holy Grail by Donna Fletcher Crow Have you ever wished history wasn't so dry and boring? Well, Donna Fletcher Crow has brought it to life with Glastonbury. Travel back to the early days of England when a star in the East announced the birth of a king of great power. More than thirty years pass when a darkness descends and a great shaking of the earth occurs that the Druid wisdom of old cannot explain. Druid England waits for the sacrifice that will satisfy the gods for al Glastonbury A Novel of the Holy Grail by Donna Fletcher Crow Have you ever wished history wasn't so dry and boring? Well, Donna Fletcher Crow has brought it to life with Glastonbury. Travel back to the early days of England when a star in the East announced the birth of a king of great power. More than thirty years pass when a darkness descends and a great shaking of the earth occurs that the Druid wisdom of old cannot explain. Druid England waits for the sacrifice that will satisfy the gods for all times - the sacrifice of a great king. When Joseph of Arimathea and eleven believers arrive in Britain seeking refuge from Roman persecution and to fulfill the Lord's commission the land is waiting to hear of the One who brought the way to everlasting life. Glastonbury follows the descendants of Joseph of Arimathea through the centuries as Christianity struggles against the tides of darkness to bring light to the island nations that are Britain. Discover the truth behind the legends and get to know Saint George and Saint Patrick. Struggle against raiders as Britain fights for her identity as Rome falls to the Visigoths. Be there when Arthur comes to power and accepts the sword Caliburnus from the Lady of the Lake. But throughout the holy isle of Avalon is central to the history of Christendom. From a druid holy place to the first Christian settlement to a monastery to the ruins of today. The history of Glastonbury is related by the last monk of Glastonbury - Austin Ringwode. Glastonbury is the history book you wanted to have in high school history class! Delve into this delightful book and discover the treasure of history and the quest for the Holy Grail. I received a copy of this book in conjunction with the blog tour organized by Pump Up Your Book!

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...