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The Kids: The Children of LGBTQ Parents in the USA

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Judges, academics, and activists keep wondering how children are impacted by having gay parents. Maybe it's time to ask the kids. For the past four years, award-winning photographer Gabriela Herman, whose mother came out when Herman was in high school and was married in one of Massachusetts' first legal same-sex unions, has been photographing and interviewing children and Judges, academics, and activists keep wondering how children are impacted by having gay parents. Maybe it's time to ask the kids. For the past four years, award-winning photographer Gabriela Herman, whose mother came out when Herman was in high school and was married in one of Massachusetts' first legal same-sex unions, has been photographing and interviewing children and young adults with one or more parent who identify as lesbian, gay, trans, or queer. Building on images featured in a major article for the New York Times Sunday Review and The Guardian and working with the Colage organization, the only national organization focusing on children with LGBTQ parents, The Kids brings a vibrant energy and sensitivity to a wide range of experiences. Some of the children Herman photographed were adopted, some conceived by artificial insemination. Many are children of divorce. Some were raised in urban areas, other in the rural Midwest and all over the map. These parents and children juggled silence and solitude with a need to defend their families on the playground, at church, and at holiday gatherings. This is their story.


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Judges, academics, and activists keep wondering how children are impacted by having gay parents. Maybe it's time to ask the kids. For the past four years, award-winning photographer Gabriela Herman, whose mother came out when Herman was in high school and was married in one of Massachusetts' first legal same-sex unions, has been photographing and interviewing children and Judges, academics, and activists keep wondering how children are impacted by having gay parents. Maybe it's time to ask the kids. For the past four years, award-winning photographer Gabriela Herman, whose mother came out when Herman was in high school and was married in one of Massachusetts' first legal same-sex unions, has been photographing and interviewing children and young adults with one or more parent who identify as lesbian, gay, trans, or queer. Building on images featured in a major article for the New York Times Sunday Review and The Guardian and working with the Colage organization, the only national organization focusing on children with LGBTQ parents, The Kids brings a vibrant energy and sensitivity to a wide range of experiences. Some of the children Herman photographed were adopted, some conceived by artificial insemination. Many are children of divorce. Some were raised in urban areas, other in the rural Midwest and all over the map. These parents and children juggled silence and solitude with a need to defend their families on the playground, at church, and at holiday gatherings. This is their story.

46 review for The Kids: The Children of LGBTQ Parents in the USA

  1. 4 out of 5

    Sara

    I am so grateful for Gabriela Hernandez and her willingness to explore what life for kids of LGBTQ parents is like. The interviews hit on so many facets of coming of age, and provide sharp insight into the ways in which kids are affected by having queer parents. As a queer parent myself, I am excited to be raising a daughter in a world that is even more progressive than the eras in which Hernandez’s subjects grew up. This book is a beacon of hope.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Maya Norton

    Simply put, I loved this book. It felt like a reward to read it. I also discovered several folks from the community I was raised in, more from the community where I live now, and a few more from college (none that I knew personally). But the whole collection felt honest, and special, and relatable. I am so glad that I happened to find it. Read in one sitting.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Phoebe

    Totally one-of-a-kind. This is a skillful, insightful, honest look at some adults in a generation of Americans raised in same-sex households. Growing up in the 80’s and 90’s on the Jersey shore, I didn’t know a single kid with same-sex parents and the first out adult I met was during my high school after-school job. As my awareness and ally-ship grew, throughout high school, college, and early adulthood, I started getting curious about the children who probably came up with me -or who were a dec Totally one-of-a-kind. This is a skillful, insightful, honest look at some adults in a generation of Americans raised in same-sex households. Growing up in the 80’s and 90’s on the Jersey shore, I didn’t know a single kid with same-sex parents and the first out adult I met was during my high school after-school job. As my awareness and ally-ship grew, throughout high school, college, and early adulthood, I started getting curious about the children who probably came up with me -or who were a decade or so younger- who were members of these families. A favorite colleague at my 1st out of college job revealed to me that he had two moms, and he was just the sweetest guy (proving to me that a mostly feminine influence is positive, despite all the media hysteria about kids without dads.) I was hooked by the intrigue —where were the other young adults like him? This book laid to rest some of my wondering and proved, in a gentle way, through the words of those kids themselves and skillful, warm photography, that those families have been out there, struggling along, and for the most part, the kids are alright.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Sarah

    Moving, raw, honest, tender, beautiful. This work offers the opportunity to look into the eyes of "the kids" and listen to their experiences. It deeply honors the complexity and diversity of family, identity and relationships. Moving, raw, honest, tender, beautiful. This work offers the opportunity to look into the eyes of "the kids" and listen to their experiences. It deeply honors the complexity and diversity of family, identity and relationships.

  5. 5 out of 5

    David P. Craig

    This is a book you can judge by its cover ... it's great! Thanks to the librarian at the University of Idaho who selected this book for display in the 'new books' section as it was a perfect study break from writing my Spring 2020 lesson plans. Some of my students are 'The Kids' and I'll be a better professor for reading this book. The text is full of compelling portraits of many kinds of families as told through short essays written by an adult child who had an LGBTQ parent or parents. The phot This is a book you can judge by its cover ... it's great! Thanks to the librarian at the University of Idaho who selected this book for display in the 'new books' section as it was a perfect study break from writing my Spring 2020 lesson plans. Some of my students are 'The Kids' and I'll be a better professor for reading this book. The text is full of compelling portraits of many kinds of families as told through short essays written by an adult child who had an LGBTQ parent or parents. The photographs complement the words perfectly and add the depth of "a thousand words."

  6. 4 out of 5

    Megan

    It’s interesting to see the differences between generations and the effects of having to be closeted about your own family. Also, stories of the kids who lived through the AIDS epidemic and lost their dads and/or communities were heartbreaking — that’s not a part of that story I’d seen represented anywhere before.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Melissa

  8. 4 out of 5

    Schokofrosch

  9. 5 out of 5

    Melora

  10. 5 out of 5

    Tempest B

  11. 5 out of 5

    Tom Schuitema

  12. 4 out of 5

    Anna

  13. 4 out of 5

    Melissa

  14. 5 out of 5

    Mary Auldridge

  15. 5 out of 5

    Alex

  16. 4 out of 5

    Jessica

  17. 5 out of 5

    Summer

  18. 5 out of 5

    holly

  19. 5 out of 5

    Prince Hazel

  20. 5 out of 5

    Tay

  21. 4 out of 5

    Ivan

  22. 4 out of 5

    Kevin

  23. 5 out of 5

    Teresa Savage

  24. 5 out of 5

    Dawn

  25. 4 out of 5

    Hannah

  26. 5 out of 5

    Lawrence Riesenbach

  27. 4 out of 5

    Anique Aburaad

  28. 4 out of 5

    Ace

  29. 4 out of 5

    Prince Hazel

  30. 4 out of 5

    Erin

  31. 4 out of 5

    Jasmine

  32. 5 out of 5

    J9

  33. 5 out of 5

    Jenifer

  34. 4 out of 5

    Mel

  35. 4 out of 5

    Katy Boucher

  36. 5 out of 5

    Aleks

  37. 5 out of 5

    Tyler

  38. 5 out of 5

    slauderdale

  39. 5 out of 5

    Dawn

  40. 5 out of 5

    Alex The Ninja Squirrel

  41. 5 out of 5

    Yahn Wuthstrack

  42. 5 out of 5

    Bridget Ball

  43. 5 out of 5

    Priscilla

  44. 5 out of 5

    Micielle

  45. 4 out of 5

    Greg

  46. 5 out of 5

    Sami

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