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The Emperor's New Clothes

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Illustrated by the beloved creator of Mike Mulligan and His Steam Shovel, The Little House, and Katy and the Big Snow, here is a delightful version of the tale that boys and girls have loved for centuries. The Emperor himself, his court, and his clothes—or lack of them—are ridiculous as only the master storyteller Hans Christian Andersen can make them. Fifty-five years ago Illustrated by the beloved creator of Mike Mulligan and His Steam Shovel, The Little House, and Katy and the Big Snow, here is a delightful version of the tale that boys and girls have loved for centuries. The Emperor himself, his court, and his clothes—or lack of them—are ridiculous as only the master storyteller Hans Christian Andersen can make them. Fifty-five years ago, Virginia Lee Burton added to this tale of fun her own irrepressible humor in pictures and design. This brilliant new edition features Burton’s original illustrations photographed anew, freshly exhibiting her lively concoction of remarkable spirit and beauty.


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Illustrated by the beloved creator of Mike Mulligan and His Steam Shovel, The Little House, and Katy and the Big Snow, here is a delightful version of the tale that boys and girls have loved for centuries. The Emperor himself, his court, and his clothes—or lack of them—are ridiculous as only the master storyteller Hans Christian Andersen can make them. Fifty-five years ago Illustrated by the beloved creator of Mike Mulligan and His Steam Shovel, The Little House, and Katy and the Big Snow, here is a delightful version of the tale that boys and girls have loved for centuries. The Emperor himself, his court, and his clothes—or lack of them—are ridiculous as only the master storyteller Hans Christian Andersen can make them. Fifty-five years ago, Virginia Lee Burton added to this tale of fun her own irrepressible humor in pictures and design. This brilliant new edition features Burton’s original illustrations photographed anew, freshly exhibiting her lively concoction of remarkable spirit and beauty.

30 review for The Emperor's New Clothes

  1. 4 out of 5

    Ahmad Sharabiani

    Kejserens nye Klæder = The Emperor's New Clothes, Hans Christian Andersen The Emperor's New Clothes is a short tale written by Danish author Hans Christian Andersen, about two weavers who promise an emperor a new suit of clothes that they say is invisible to those who are unfit for their positions, stupid, or incompetent – while in reality, they make no clothes at all, making everyone believe the clothes are invisible to them. When the emperor parades before his subjects in his new "clothes", no Kejserens nye Klæder = The Emperor's New Clothes, Hans Christian Andersen The Emperor's New Clothes is a short tale written by Danish author Hans Christian Andersen, about two weavers who promise an emperor a new suit of clothes that they say is invisible to those who are unfit for their positions, stupid, or incompetent – while in reality, they make no clothes at all, making everyone believe the clothes are invisible to them. When the emperor parades before his subjects in his new "clothes", no one dares to say that they do not see any suit of clothes on him for fear that they will be seen as stupid. Finally, a child cries out, "But he isn't wearing anything at all!" The tale has been translated into over 100 languages. عنوانها: «لباس نو امپراتور»؛ «لباس جدید پادشاه»؛ نویسنده: هانس کریستین اندرسن؛ تاریخ نخستین خوانش: ماه جولای سال 1977میلادی عنوان: لباس نو امپراتور - دوزبانه فارسی انگلیسی؛ نویسنده: هانس کریستین اندرسن؛ مترجم: مهناز فصیحی؛ در 24ص؛ تاریخ نشر: نامعلوم عنوان: لباس جدید پادشاه؛ نویسنده: هانس کریستین اندرسن؛ مترجم: ملیحه جامی؛ بازنویس عباس شاکری؛ مشهد، پیک هدیه، 1383، در 12ص، مصور رنگی؛ شابک 9649563709؛ موضوع: داستانهای تخیلی از نویسندگان دانمارکی - سده 19م عنوان: لباس جدید پادشاه؛ نویسنده: هانس کریستین اندرسن؛ مترجم: اشرف دوستی؛ قصه پرداز: حسین طباطبائی؛ تصویرگر بابک تیموری؛ تهران، قصر کتاب، 1383، در 12ص، مصور رنگی؛ شابک 9648130108؛ نیز با ترجمه ی بانو سهیلا رمضانی، انتشارات شیرمحمدی، 1394، در 16ص؛ شابک 9789647678933؛ و بسیار بسیار دیگر از مترجمهای دیگر داستانی برای کودکان؛ اثر: «هانس کریستین اندرسون»، که بیشتر برای آموزش بزرگسالان نیز هست؛ داستان امپراتور و سیاستمداری ساده لوح و ظاهرپسند، و دهن بینی؛ که با چرب زبانی دو حیله گر، و دغلباز، خود را، در خیال خویش، و اطرافیان نانخور به نرخ روز، در لباسی فاخر میبیند؛ اما هماره حرف راست را از کودکان و بچه ها باید شنید؛ همان امپراتور خوشخیال ناگهان خود را در چشمان راستگوی یک پسربچه، در کوچه و بازار و پیش مردمان، لخت و عور و بی آبرو مییابد تاریخ بهنگام رسانی 08/07/1399هجری خورشیدی؛ ا. شربیانی

  2. 4 out of 5

    Muhtasin Fuad

    The Emperor's New Clothes by Hans Christian Andersen It is a literary folktale about a vain emperor who gets exposed before his subjects. Quite a funny tale that should be told more often to children of this era, when clothes are used for full of fashions. It will allow children to understand that- happiness is not at all lies in things but in humanity. Amusing. The Emperor's New Clothes by Hans Christian Andersen It is a literary folktale about a vain emperor who gets exposed before his subjects. Quite a funny tale that should be told more often to children of this era, when clothes are used for full of fashions. It will allow children to understand that- happiness is not at all lies in things but in humanity. Amusing.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Manny

    Conversation between two eight-year-old boys overheard the other day: KID 1: So what do your parents think of Donald Trump? KID 2: They can't stand him. What about yours? KID 1: My dad just thinks he's funny. I'm kinda worried. [The friend who told us the story promises this is true] Conversation between two eight-year-old boys overheard the other day: KID 1: So what do your parents think of Donald Trump? KID 2: They can't stand him. What about yours? KID 1: My dad just thinks he's funny. I'm kinda worried. [The friend who told us the story promises this is true]

  4. 5 out of 5

    Manny

    Fairyland Crisis Latest Fairyland was engulfed in new scandal yesterday when reports surfaced claiming that the Ambassador to Far Far Away had several times referred to the Emperor as "a butt naked idiot" in official correspondence. "I have total confidence in the Ambassador," said a visibly distressed Queen of Hearts, "but his private opinions in no way reflect those of the Fairyland government. Everyone knows that the Emperor is both highly intelligent and exceptionally well-dressed." As of pres Fairyland Crisis Latest Fairyland was engulfed in new scandal yesterday when reports surfaced claiming that the Ambassador to Far Far Away had several times referred to the Emperor as "a butt naked idiot" in official correspondence. "I have total confidence in the Ambassador," said a visibly distressed Queen of Hearts, "but his private opinions in no way reflect those of the Fairyland government. Everyone knows that the Emperor is both highly intelligent and exceptionally well-dressed." As of press time, the Ambassador could not be reached for comment. Inside: Georgie Porgie denies sex trafficking charges

  5. 4 out of 5

    Duane

    Reading other sources about this Andersen fable I came across terms like these: pluralistic ignorance, bystander effect, logical fallacies, and collective denial, all of which remind me more of our current presidential election than they do of this story. A quote that applies to this story is, "from the mouth of babes", might also be helpful in this election. Reading other sources about this Andersen fable I came across terms like these: pluralistic ignorance, bystander effect, logical fallacies, and collective denial, all of which remind me more of our current presidential election than they do of this story. A quote that applies to this story is, "from the mouth of babes", might also be helpful in this election.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Bionic Jean

    I can vividly remember the first time I read The Emperor's New Clothes, as a small child. I remember how excited I felt at opening the slim envelope, which was addressed to me personally ... and had come all the way from the North Pole! I could barely contain myself. My parents swore that they had had nothing to do with it. I had written a letter to Santa Claus and posted it in the post box, as they showed me. Now here it was, an actual reply from Father Christmas himself. And not only that, but I can vividly remember the first time I read The Emperor's New Clothes, as a small child. I remember how excited I felt at opening the slim envelope, which was addressed to me personally ... and had come all the way from the North Pole! I could barely contain myself. My parents swore that they had had nothing to do with it. I had written a letter to Santa Claus and posted it in the post box, as they showed me. Now here it was, an actual reply from Father Christmas himself. And not only that, but he had sent me a story in a little booklet. It was sheer magic! The story was well chosen. Hans Christian Andersen has a way of making a child feel that he is sitting next to them and speaking to them personally and to them alone. I loved this story. It made me giggle, and I read it over and over again in wonder at being especially singled out. (I was very young!) Everyone knows the story about an Emperor, who is so vain that he cares about nothing except wearing and displaying his fine fashionable clothes. He is conned by two scoundrels, who pretend to be weavers, and who promise to make him the most wonderful suit of clothes ever. They demand the finest silks and gold thread, claiming that their fabric will be incredibly beautiful - the best he has ever seen - but so fine that it will be invisible to anyone who is very stupid, or unfit for his position. Of course the reader is in the know all along. The weavers industriously weave their imaginary thread, and the Emperor sends his trusted ministers along, one at a time, to check on its progress. So we see the same confidence trick being played, over and over again. Nobody can bear to admit that they can see nothing. They all praise the thread highly, becoming more and more extravagent in their compliments. Nobody want to appear stupid, or to be deemed unfit for their position. The Emperor can't see anything either, obviously, but feels he has no choice but to do the same, or his shortcomings might be exposed. Eventually the tricksters say that they have finished weaving the thread, and they make a great show of making the suit. When all is ready, they continue the exaggerated mime, dressing him with great ceremony. Everyone involved at court plays along, paying flattering compliments. All the Emperor's subjects have by now heard of this wonderful fabric, and so they line the roads, waiting for him to parade before them. And on the day of the grand procession, yet again, the townsfolk play along with the pretence. Nobody wants to admit that they can't see anything, for fear that they will appear stupid, or unfit for their position. Illustration by Vilhelm Pedersen, Andersen's first illustrator (view spoiler)[However, a young child in the crowd, too young to conceal the truth, indignantly blurts out, "But he hasn't got anything on!" And after a great pause, and some whispering, the cry is taken up by others. A great cry then goes up in the crowd, that that the Emperor hasn't got anything on. And even though the Emperor secretly fears that this may be true, he has to go through with it all, and walks proudly on. (hide spoiler)] Hans Christian Andersen published this tale in 1837, along with "The Little Mermaid", as the third and final instalment of his "Fairy Tales Told for Children." The Emperor's New Clothes has been translated into over 100 languages, and adapted many times. As with most of these early tales, he did not invent the story. Instead, he based this one on a story from a medieval Spanish collection of cautionary tales rooted in Aesop, and in some Persian folktales. He had come across it as a German translation, "So ist der Lauf der Welt" ("So is the Running of the World.") This source tale is very similar. A king is duped by two weavers, who claim to be able to make a suit of clothes which is invisible to any man who is not the natural son of his father, but who instead is the result of adultery. Hans Christian Andersen's genius lay in altering the focus, so that the story is about pride and vanity, both in appearance and of intellect. It was also an inspiration to change the ending, (view spoiler)[so that it was a child who spotted the truth - and told it. We nearly did not have this ending, in fact, as Hans Christian Andersen's manuscript had got as far as the printer's before the brilliant idea suddenly hit him. He realised that a child's cry of truth would make for a much more powerful ending, exposing all the hypocrisy and snobbery, rather than just the admiration of the Emperor's subjects. (hide spoiler)] This increases the satire, and makes the story one of those rare creatures; a hilariously funny story by Hans Christian Andersen. The Emperor's New Clothes is one of the author's most straightforward and lighthearted stories. It established Hans Christian Andersen's reputation as an author whose children's stories taught valuable moral lessons to his audience. (view spoiler)[They often subsequently featured children who had the courage to challenge authority, and become empowered by speaking the truth. This feature also ensured that his stories often had particular appeal to children, who naturally empathise with such a romantic notion. (hide spoiler)] The phrase "Emperor's new clothes" is now in common use as a metaphor for anything which smacks of pretentiousness, pomposity, or hollow ostentatiousness. It is used to refer to social hypocrisy, or any collective denial. In this way, the story speaks to adults too, and can be extended to many of life's situations. I am put in mind of politicians' or diplomats' skill in selecting and obfuscating the truth. But also, in a subjective sense, one critic has pointed out the additional interpretion of the metaphor: that "whatever words we may use to clothe our fears, the fabric cannot protect us from them." And there is a third, oddly spiritual level to this comic satire. Every time in the story that the trick is played, and we read the heightened description of the wonderful, almost miraculous, cloth, it becomes more "real" in our imagination. It seems more palpable and substantial. It becomes perfect; a thing of immaculate beauty for us, even though it is a mere idea and has no material existence. The fact that this tale can thus be read with wonder and pleasure both as a child, and also speak to the reader as an adult, confirms to me that it is one of Hans Christian Andersen's true masterpieces.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Lisa

    The evergreen of the child who speaks truth to power is as relevant as ever! "But mum, he is naked!" "Hush, child, be quiet! Those are alternative clothes!" The evergreen of the child who speaks truth to power is as relevant as ever! "But mum, he is naked!" "Hush, child, be quiet! Those are alternative clothes!"

  8. 5 out of 5

    Dem

    A little of what you fancy does you good ( Free Audio book on Audible.uk) "Here are four of Hans Christian Andersen's best-loved short stories, specially adapted for young children and read by some of Britain's well-known actors. The Emperor's New Clothes: An emperor is promised a special suit of clothes by a pair of tailors. The Little Mermaid: A beautiful mermaid falls in love with a prince. The Fir Tree: A little fir tree is desperate to grow up and be like the other trees in the forest. Th A little of what you fancy does you good ( Free Audio book on Audible.uk) "Here are four of Hans Christian Andersen's best-loved short stories, specially adapted for young children and read by some of Britain's well-known actors. The Emperor's New Clothes: An emperor is promised a special suit of clothes by a pair of tailors. The Little Mermaid: A beautiful mermaid falls in love with a prince. The Fir Tree: A little fir tree is desperate to grow up and be like the other trees in the forest. The Wild Swans read by Penelope Wilton: A princess must rescue her brothers from a spell cast by a wicked queen. What an excellent audio book, I just loved the narrators who made the stories so atmospheric and brought them to life, The background sounds of the sea, birds and trees really were beautiful. I enjoyed this little book so much and would recommend it for anyone who enjoys going back to their childhood for a little reminisce.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Jess the Shelf-Declared Bibliophile

    A hilarious story about herd mentality. We see it so often these days in real life!

  10. 4 out of 5

    Ahmed Ejaz

    From the very beginning of the story I had gotten the idea. Because the same story I had seen in one of my most favourite serials, Hatim ( It is an old Indian serial not new. My Pakistani and Indian friends might have watched this ). I loved this serial and will love this throughout my life. OVERVIEW This is the story of an emperor who is very fond of new clothes. He wants new cloth in every next hour. One day, two pretenders come to him and claim that they can make a suit by which we can kno From the very beginning of the story I had gotten the idea. Because the same story I had seen in one of my most favourite serials, Hatim ( It is an old Indian serial not new. My Pakistani and Indian friends might have watched this ). I loved this serial and will love this throughout my life. OVERVIEW This is the story of an emperor who is very fond of new clothes. He wants new cloth in every next hour. One day, two pretenders come to him and claim that they can make a suit by which we can know if a person is right for his job or not. Or if a person is intelligent or not. If the answer of above questions is "No" then the suit will be invisible to that person. RANDOM THOUGHTS This story is reality. We have no confidence on our abilities. Just for the sake of pride we tend to accept which is said by our superiors. Even though we know this is not correct. But still we believe it. We think that by pointing out our superiors' mistakes to them will make us simpleton. ♡♡ 5 Stars ♡♡ January 8, 2017

  11. 5 out of 5

    Renée Paule

    I've been revisiting Hans Christian Andersen - what a wonderfully insightful author. I've been revisiting Hans Christian Andersen - what a wonderfully insightful author.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Shelley

    I ask my kids what they thought the moral of the story is. Here are their answers. The 14 year old: Don't be an idiot. Any moron should know that they are naked no matter what they are being told. The 11 year old: If you can't tell you are naked, you should not be king. Let the kid be king. At least he could see the truth. The 9 year old: Always tell the truth, even if it makes people sad or cry. So there you go. All three are girls and they all had a different take on it. I always liked this story I ask my kids what they thought the moral of the story is. Here are their answers. The 14 year old: Don't be an idiot. Any moron should know that they are naked no matter what they are being told. The 11 year old: If you can't tell you are naked, you should not be king. Let the kid be king. At least he could see the truth. The 9 year old: Always tell the truth, even if it makes people sad or cry. So there you go. All three are girls and they all had a different take on it. I always liked this story even though it was amazingly silly. It takes a kid though to stand up and tell the truth even though it was embarrassing to the ruler of your country. And good for the king who accepted the fact that he had been fooled and tricked and took it gracefully. Good cute book and one that I hope is around for a long time. The Emperor's New Clothes

  13. 5 out of 5

    Frog

    THIS STORY IS SO OFFENSIVE! If the little boy didn't like the emperor's new outfit why didn't he "just not say anything" and why did he have to "judge" the emperor like that? He must think he's soooo much better than everyone else. Doesn't he know diversity is what makes the world beautiful? (I feel the need to point out this review is sarcastic, because I know too many people who would legitimately say that... If not when the situation is in fairy tale form, I've seen it happen in real life way t THIS STORY IS SO OFFENSIVE! If the little boy didn't like the emperor's new outfit why didn't he "just not say anything" and why did he have to "judge" the emperor like that? He must think he's soooo much better than everyone else. Doesn't he know diversity is what makes the world beautiful? (I feel the need to point out this review is sarcastic, because I know too many people who would legitimately say that... If not when the situation is in fairy tale form, I've seen it happen in real life way too many times.)

  14. 5 out of 5

    Chelsey Connor

    Seriously, how dumb can you be and why would t someone just say something

  15. 4 out of 5

    Himanshu Karmacharya

    There are only few stories that you enjoy both as a child and as an adult. This particular story is one of them.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Kathryn

    Loved the Europe circa 1913 setting in the illustrations!!! The translations was nothing remarkable for me, but I've always loved this story and it was nice seeing it with it's "new clothes" (i.e., the refreshing illustrations) :-) Thanks, Chandra, for the recommendation! Loved the Europe circa 1913 setting in the illustrations!!! The translations was nothing remarkable for me, but I've always loved this story and it was nice seeing it with it's "new clothes" (i.e., the refreshing illustrations) :-) Thanks, Chandra, for the recommendation!

  17. 5 out of 5

    Sophie (BlameChocolate) *on hiatus*

    I have come to the conclusion that I have not grown out of fairy tales in the least. In fact, quite the opposite! I think I'm able to enjoy and understand the subtleties of them much better now that I'm an adult. This one, for instance, has such a delicious irony to it that made me laugh out loud quite a few times. A tiny little story like this and I was delighted while reading it! It really makes you think about all the charlatans that populate our world and con us every day. And they won't be n I have come to the conclusion that I have not grown out of fairy tales in the least. In fact, quite the opposite! I think I'm able to enjoy and understand the subtleties of them much better now that I'm an adult. This one, for instance, has such a delicious irony to it that made me laugh out loud quite a few times. A tiny little story like this and I was delighted while reading it! It really makes you think about all the charlatans that populate our world and con us every day. And they won't be nearly as in-our-faces as these! Overall, a splendid tale by Andersen, who seems to write drama just as well as comedy. 4 stars ~ This book grants an Outstanding (O) grade in Transfiguration (N.E.W.T.s) ~

  18. 5 out of 5

    Amina

    Two weavers promise the vain emperor new clothers tha only the unfit for their position can't see, when the emperor goes for the procession, the townsfolk play along with the pretense, not desiring to appear stupid or unfit for their position, and so did the emperor, until a child blurts out that the emperor is wearing nothing at all, the sentence is taken up by the crowed, but the emperor continues his procession. One of my favorite political satire ever! Two weavers promise the vain emperor new clothers tha only the unfit for their position can't see, when the emperor goes for the procession, the townsfolk play along with the pretense, not desiring to appear stupid or unfit for their position, and so did the emperor, until a child blurts out that the emperor is wearing nothing at all, the sentence is taken up by the crowed, but the emperor continues his procession. One of my favorite political satire ever!

  19. 5 out of 5

    Lisa (not getting friends updates) Vegan

    This has always been one of my favorite tales as I think its moral is so wise. In this edition, the illustrations are fabulous. I adored all the many dogs (mostly naked of course) that appear on nearly every page. (I was almost tempted to make a dogs shelf but then I’d feel obligated to add all my books about dogs, something I’ve successfully managed to resist doing thus far.)

  20. 4 out of 5

    Dannon Hewitt

    Was a cute fun book to read to my son.

  21. 4 out of 5

    John Martindale

    Like Anderson's short story "The Snow Queen" the Emperor's new clothes emphasizes the virtues of childlikeness in contrast to the pride of those who have grown up in all the wrong ways. I of course was vaguely familiar with the classic story, primarily with how it took a child to speak the obvious, but I knew none of the details, and they were delightful to learn and they made the story all the better. Like Anderson's short story "The Snow Queen" the Emperor's new clothes emphasizes the virtues of childlikeness in contrast to the pride of those who have grown up in all the wrong ways. I of course was vaguely familiar with the classic story, primarily with how it took a child to speak the obvious, but I knew none of the details, and they were delightful to learn and they made the story all the better.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Greg Brozeit

    Andersen's timeless story is the best summation of political behavior ever written. It should be required reading for every political science major and anyone interested in politics and government. Andersen predicted and distilled the essence of modern political campaigns, especially in the United States. Andersen's timeless story is the best summation of political behavior ever written. It should be required reading for every political science major and anyone interested in politics and government. Andersen predicted and distilled the essence of modern political campaigns, especially in the United States.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Jennifer B.

    I would definitely be the one shouting about the Emperor's new "clothes". Never lose your childish ability to question. I would definitely be the one shouting about the Emperor's new "clothes". Never lose your childish ability to question.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Raghdaa Morad

    Such a beautiful and amazing story full of lessons i loved it and absolutely gonna read it to my sweetie 6 years old nephew♥️

  25. 5 out of 5

    Abigail

    The Emperor's New Clothes, illustrated by Virginia Lee Burton. This edition of Hans Christian Andersen's classic tale, in which a vain emperor is taken in by two thieves posing as weavers, really takes me back! I'm not entirely sure, but I think it may be the version I had as a child, as Virginia Lee Burton's illustrations look so familiar. Then again, I had her Mike Mulligan and His Steam Shovel practically memorized as a girl, so perhaps it's simply that I know her style? In any case, it is The Emperor's New Clothes, illustrated by Virginia Lee Burton. This edition of Hans Christian Andersen's classic tale, in which a vain emperor is taken in by two thieves posing as weavers, really takes me back! I'm not entirely sure, but I think it may be the version I had as a child, as Virginia Lee Burton's illustrations look so familiar. Then again, I had her Mike Mulligan and His Steam Shovel practically memorized as a girl, so perhaps it's simply that I know her style? In any case, it is an engaging retelling, with an appealing, well-paced narrative, and charming illustrations set in the eighteenth century. Burton's paintings are colorful, and have an interesting "blurring" effect (perhaps because of the ink, or their small size?) that reminded me of Elizabeth Orton Jones' work in What Miranda Knew , my all-time favorite picture-book as a very young child. I wouldn't say that this style reflects my tastes as an adult, but there is no doubt that it has great nostalgic appeal for me. Those who feel the same will be delighted to know that this particular edition of The Emperor's New Clothes, first published in 1949, was reprinted in 2004.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Lisa James

    Classic story that teaches a morals lesson at the same time:) In this story, the Emperor ends up looking like a complete fool when he is talked into buying a suit of "invisible" clothing, & ends up walking around nude. It's humbling lesson for him, & he learns that rich men & wise men can be fooled by greed & pride. Classic story that teaches a morals lesson at the same time:) In this story, the Emperor ends up looking like a complete fool when he is talked into buying a suit of "invisible" clothing, & ends up walking around nude. It's humbling lesson for him, & he learns that rich men & wise men can be fooled by greed & pride.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Margaret

    I guess this story must have engendered the cynicism I retain to this day. A child should read this before being let loose on newspapers and adverts

  28. 5 out of 5

    Sidharth Vardhan

    "But he doesn't have anything on!" cried a little child. "But he doesn't have anything on!" cried a little child.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Red

    children, euphoria and truth come together here. debunking myths is for grownups a second nature as long it's not one of themself. children, euphoria and truth come together here. debunking myths is for grownups a second nature as long it's not one of themself.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Zain

    Funnier than I expected.

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