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Algunos fantasmas chinos

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Algunos fantasmas chinos es una colección de antiguas narraciones sobre la vida después de la muerte. Cuentos que han nutrido la literatura de Borges, Bioy Casares, de Dick y Kafka. Historias que, además de ser un parte del imaginario sobrenatural de Oriente, expresan una sabiduría similar a la de nuestro propios pueblos ancestrales: no hay «más allá», sino una comunicació Algunos fantasmas chinos es una colección de antiguas narraciones sobre la vida después de la muerte. Cuentos que han nutrido la literatura de Borges, Bioy Casares, de Dick y Kafka. Historias que, además de ser un parte del imaginario sobrenatural de Oriente, expresan una sabiduría similar a la de nuestro propios pueblos ancestrales: no hay «más allá», sino una comunicación directa, un flujo, entre el mundo de los vivos y el de los muertos.


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Algunos fantasmas chinos es una colección de antiguas narraciones sobre la vida después de la muerte. Cuentos que han nutrido la literatura de Borges, Bioy Casares, de Dick y Kafka. Historias que, además de ser un parte del imaginario sobrenatural de Oriente, expresan una sabiduría similar a la de nuestro propios pueblos ancestrales: no hay «más allá», sino una comunicació Algunos fantasmas chinos es una colección de antiguas narraciones sobre la vida después de la muerte. Cuentos que han nutrido la literatura de Borges, Bioy Casares, de Dick y Kafka. Historias que, además de ser un parte del imaginario sobrenatural de Oriente, expresan una sabiduría similar a la de nuestro propios pueblos ancestrales: no hay «más allá», sino una comunicación directa, un flujo, entre el mundo de los vivos y el de los muertos.

30 review for Algunos fantasmas chinos

  1. 4 out of 5

    Gaspar Alvarez

    Los dos últimos textos son brillantes, en especial "La tradición de la planta del té" Los dos últimos textos son brillantes, en especial "La tradición de la planta del té"

  2. 5 out of 5

    Brett

    not the one

  3. 5 out of 5

    tineke

    This book almost did it for me. The last two stories, were, as some other reviews here have mentioned, a bit of a drag for me personally. But reading not only the short stories themselves, but also the stories behind them, was interesting. Finding out how the author crafted these tales based off of traditional folk tales, and gave them detail and certain twists, was pretty nice. As for the stories themselves, the first few were enjoyable.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Snail in Danger (Sid) Nicolaides

    I really like the first story. But after that, none were grabbing me. (You can read them all for free here. This version has a nice introduction. Okay, mainly it sticks out in my mind for its quotation of Sir Walter Scott on the supernatural in stories. I'm tempted to try to track down the full work, assuming it came from an essay. (Possibly "On the Supernatural in Fictitious Composition"?) I really like the first story. But after that, none were grabbing me. (You can read them all for free here. This version has a nice introduction. Okay, mainly it sticks out in my mind for its quotation of Sir Walter Scott on the supernatural in stories. I'm tempted to try to track down the full work, assuming it came from an essay. (Possibly "On the Supernatural in Fictitious Composition"?)

  5. 4 out of 5

    Hiipatiia

    El secreto de la muerta Jikininki La doncella del espejo El espíritu de la gran campana La historia de Ming-Y Aullido ... Son mis relatos favoritos de este interesante libro. Estos espectros orientales son muy curiosos y a la par inquietantes; no te darán un infarto de muerte, pero te dejarán la sospecha oscura.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Olivia

    like any short story collection, the quality and impact varies throughout but i read the Story of Min Ying last and it brought me to tears. truly gorgeous prose

  7. 4 out of 5

    Gala

    Lafcadio reconstruye estas leyendas a partir de algunos otros libros y enciclopedias. Mis favoritas fueron las de Ming-Y y la del Dios de la Porcelana. En esta última le encargan a un obrero muy genio de la alfarería que construya una vasija que imite el aspecto de la carne y que se mueva cuando alguien le diga cosas. Lo que es diferente de estas leyendas es que no son todas sobre el origen de algo de la Naturaleza (como por ejemplo las leyendas americanas sobre los ríos, las flores, el colibrí) Lafcadio reconstruye estas leyendas a partir de algunos otros libros y enciclopedias. Mis favoritas fueron las de Ming-Y y la del Dios de la Porcelana. En esta última le encargan a un obrero muy genio de la alfarería que construya una vasija que imite el aspecto de la carne y que se mueva cuando alguien le diga cosas. Lo que es diferente de estas leyendas es que no son todas sobre el origen de algo de la Naturaleza (como por ejemplo las leyendas americanas sobre los ríos, las flores, el colibrí) sino que muestran como el origen de la figura de un fantasma o un dios, la creencia sobre un fantasma o un dios.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Dani

    Desde que vi la película "Kwaidan" que quería leer a Lafcadio Hearn. El libro me pareció interesante, sobre todo los primeros cuatro cuentos, ya que los dos finales no son tan narrativos. Sin embargo, me parece muy valorable el ejercicio del autor de querer traer a Occidente relatos míticos que dan a entender un poco sobre la cultura del país (su relación con el honor, el esfuerzo, el sacrificio, la belleza, etc.) Desde que vi la película "Kwaidan" que quería leer a Lafcadio Hearn. El libro me pareció interesante, sobre todo los primeros cuatro cuentos, ya que los dos finales no son tan narrativos. Sin embargo, me parece muy valorable el ejercicio del autor de querer traer a Occidente relatos míticos que dan a entender un poco sobre la cultura del país (su relación con el honor, el esfuerzo, el sacrificio, la belleza, etc.)

  9. 4 out of 5

    Mattias

    While these stories are entertaining, I don't think they're very Chinese. The book was published in 1887, while Lafcadio Hearn was living in New Orleans and working as a journalist, years before he ever went to Asia - he never went to China, although he lived in Japan for many years, where he wrote Kwaidan, a book of supposedly Japanese folktales and the work he's best known for. I don't know enough about Japanese folktales to be sure how faithful Kwaidan is to them, but there are a lot of eleme While these stories are entertaining, I don't think they're very Chinese. The book was published in 1887, while Lafcadio Hearn was living in New Orleans and working as a journalist, years before he ever went to Asia - he never went to China, although he lived in Japan for many years, where he wrote Kwaidan, a book of supposedly Japanese folktales and the work he's best known for. I don't know enough about Japanese folktales to be sure how faithful Kwaidan is to them, but there are a lot of elements in Kwaidan that are also in Hearn's earlier non-Japanese work, so I have doubts. Hearn admits, in his notes at the end of the book, to basing these "Chinese" stories on translations of Chinese tales by early Orientalists, and on his own imagination. Mostly, I think, the latter. (view spoiler)[Almost all of the ghosts (and other supernatural beings) are female, and they work miracles for those (men) who deserve them. A girl throws herself into a vat of molten metal for her father's sake and lives on; a young tutor falls in love with an enchantress, but is not punished for it; a young man is rewarded for his piety and selflessness with a supernatural wife and riches and a son. These stories remind me strongly of English translations of Alf Layla wa Layla (not Burton's, thank God. Mostly Lane's). There are a few other stories that don't fit that mold: a faithful official's corpse, saint-like, does not decay; an origin story for the tea-plant (seemingly not a story known in China); an origin story for porcelain. (hide spoiler)] The descriptions are vivid and flowery and the places and characters leap off the page. There are a lot of transliterated Chinese words which I think are there for decoration and to give these very Victorian stories an "Asian" flavour and authenticity, but he cuts down on them after the first page or so of each story. He does give explanations of them in the glossary (this book is nearly one-third appendices); as far as I can find out he didn't understand any Chinese language, but he liked the sound and the exoticism of the foreign words. From the opening of the first story, The Soul of the Great Bell: The water-clock marks the hour in the Ta-chung sz',—in the Tower of the Great Bell: now the mallet is lifted to smite the lips of the metal monster,—the vast lips inscribed with Buddhist texts from the sacred Fa-hwa-King, from the chapters of the holy Ling-yen-King! Hear the great bell responding!—how mighty her voice, though tongueless!—KO-NGAI! All the little dragons on the high-tilted eaves of the green roofs shiver to the tips of their gilded tails under that deep wave of sound; all the porcelain gargoyles tremble on their carven perches; all the hundred little bells of the pagodas quiver with desire to speak. KO-NGAI!—all the green-and-gold tiles of the temple are vibrating; the wooden goldfish above them are writhing against the sky; the uplifted finger of Fo shakes high over the heads of the worshippers through the blue fog of incense! KO-NGAI!—What a thunder tone was that! All the lacquered goblins on the palace cornices wriggle their fire-colored tongues! And after each huge shock, how wondrous the multiple echo and the great golden moan and, at last, the sudden sibilant sobbing in the ears when the immense tone faints away in broken whispers of silver,—as though a woman should whisper, "Hiai!" You can read the whole book for free via Project Gutenberg.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Eustacia Tan

    I borrowed this book thinking it was going to be scary (from the cover, and experience reading True Singapore Ghost Stories), and Chinese, but it turned out to be decidedly non-scary, and not that Chinese after all. This is what I get for not looking at the author name when picking stories. Chinese Ghost Stories is actually Lafcadio Hearn's version of certain Chinese legends (which according to him are actually Chinese), written before he came to Asia. I think. That's what the introduction said a I borrowed this book thinking it was going to be scary (from the cover, and experience reading True Singapore Ghost Stories), and Chinese, but it turned out to be decidedly non-scary, and not that Chinese after all. This is what I get for not looking at the author name when picking stories. Chinese Ghost Stories is actually Lafcadio Hearn's version of certain Chinese legends (which according to him are actually Chinese), written before he came to Asia. I think. That's what the introduction said anyway. And since it's written in 1886, according to the preface, the language is very flowery, and does not remind me of Chinese in any way. There are six stories in this book, and I think my favourites were the first few. The last few books, especially the last two - The Tradition of the Tea Plant and The Tale of the Porcelain God, were rather confusing and uninteresting to me. Anyway, a short rundown of each book: The Soul of the Great Bell: I liked this story. It's about filial piety, and rather sad, thought completely not scary. It's about sacrifice and making a huge bell with metals that don't mix; if I say anymore, I'll give away the entire story. The Story of Ming Yi and The Story of Zhi Nu: These are both love stories of humans with the not-quite human. It's a bit like Madam White Snake, but short and perhaps not as famous in Chinese lore. The Return of Yan Zhenjing: This is about loyalty to country. Actually a ghost story (the others just involved death or non-humans, and not actually ghosts), but again, not scary. The Tradition of the Tea Plant: This is a retelling of the legend of how tea came to be, which is a monk cutting his eyelids off and throwing them to the ground, from which the tea leaf appears. There's a love story in here, which I don't get, and where is the ghost? The Tale of the Porcelain God: I did not get this. It's a bit like the The Soul of the Great Bell, but less clearly written. I kinda skipped the first three or four pages, which were lists of porcelains. The glossary too, is suspect. I skimmed through it, but I saw an entry which said: "JIA - "House"; but especially the house of the dead - a tomb" Now, I'm just guessing, but the character is probably 家 (jia). It just means house, and I've never heard it being used as a house of the dead, much less "especially" used as the house of the dead. I asked my family, and the closest we got was that according to my grandma, people in Singapore in the past (when she was young) didn't really have places to live, so some people lived above the cemeteries and used tombstones as tables. But the definition after the semi-colon seems to be very off. In the author's defence, this was written before he went to Asia. He did eventually make it to Japan, marry a Japanese girl and write a lot of famous ghost stories. I will probably give them a go, if I come across them, though after this experience, I can't say that I'll intentionally seek them out. This review was first posted at Inside the mind of a Bibliophile

  11. 4 out of 5

    Helmut

    Schwülstig und veraltet Ich bin ein großer Verehrer der alten chinesischen Literatur, und insbesondere des Liaozhai Zhiyi des Pu Songling, einer Sammlung von Geistergeschichten aus der ausgehenden Ming-Zeit. Hearns Sammlung ist zwar deutlich neueren Datums, aber keineswegs als modern zu bezeichnen - während der Plot dieser Erzählungen sich zwar durchaus an diese alten Geschichten anlehnt, so ist der Stil doch durch und durch viktorianisch verquast und heutzutage kaum mehr lesbar. Schwülstig, labe Schwülstig und veraltet Ich bin ein großer Verehrer der alten chinesischen Literatur, und insbesondere des Liaozhai Zhiyi des Pu Songling, einer Sammlung von Geistergeschichten aus der ausgehenden Ming-Zeit. Hearns Sammlung ist zwar deutlich neueren Datums, aber keineswegs als modern zu bezeichnen - während der Plot dieser Erzählungen sich zwar durchaus an diese alten Geschichten anlehnt, so ist der Stil doch durch und durch viktorianisch verquast und heutzutage kaum mehr lesbar. Schwülstig, laberig und exotisierend wirkt dieser Text aus dem 19. Jahrhundert dadurch viel älter und verbrauchter als Pus klarer, reiner Stil aus dem 16. Jahrhundert. Zwischendurch schimmert ab und zu etwas wie Atmosphäre durch, die dann aber im nächsten Absatz zu tode geplappert wird. Sogar für Leser, die gerne so alte chinesische Geistergeschichten lesen, ist dieser Titel überspringenswert. Dazu kommt eine eBook-Aufbereitung, die zu wünschen übrig lässt und die Einzelgeschichten einfach so aneinanderklatscht ohne eine einzige Zeile Weißraum.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Madeline O'Rourke

    I was quite surprised when I read the forward to find out that Chinese Ghost Stories is a lot older than I thought. As a result, the language definitely required more focus and attention to understand, but nonetheless, I liked the collection. I particularly liked the first four stories, especially The Return of Yan Zhenjing. However, I found the last two stories dragged on and were a bit boring, moreso The Tradition of the Tea Plant, though. I did find them all to be interesting, overall, and was I was quite surprised when I read the forward to find out that Chinese Ghost Stories is a lot older than I thought. As a result, the language definitely required more focus and attention to understand, but nonetheless, I liked the collection. I particularly liked the first four stories, especially The Return of Yan Zhenjing. However, I found the last two stories dragged on and were a bit boring, moreso The Tradition of the Tea Plant, though. I did find them all to be interesting, overall, and was fascinated the recurring idea of one sacrificing themselves for their art or beliefs. In the end, I wouldn't say the title "Tales of the Supernatural" accurately reflects the contents of the collection, but it is still very interesting, particularly from a cultural perspective.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Bonnie

    The stories in this book were probably groundbreaking when they were first released in the late 1800s. The amount of time and care to translate these stories must have been amazing; with so many translated works at our fingertips today, I think that we forget how small and insulated the world was a few hundred years ago. However, time and technology has pretty much rendered this pedestrian. That being said, the selected works here are not all of the same quality; only a couple held my interest.

  14. 5 out of 5

    robyn

    No scary ghosts in this one. Not even all ghosts, really, not in the traditional sense. People committing suicide and being made into the substance of bells and vases made up two of the stories. There were two I quite liked about supernatural brides. But a very brief and somewhat unsatisfactory read overall. I expect when Hearn translated these, they had the virtue of originality for his audience.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Saara

    In all honesty, I expected more from this book. The stories were interesting, sure, but the execution simply did not resonate with me. I shan't let this turn me off from oriental horror, however. The volume includes a glossary at the back, which is nice. In all honesty, I expected more from this book. The stories were interesting, sure, but the execution simply did not resonate with me. I shan't let this turn me off from oriental horror, however. The volume includes a glossary at the back, which is nice.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Anthony

    I enjoyed this, some interesting mythical tales from China. The story of the author - Lafcadio Hearn - sounded fascinating in the short forward. Someone to find more about in the future. :)

  17. 5 out of 5

    Kiran

    Boring!

  18. 4 out of 5

    saïd

    Look... it was first published in 1887. Look... it was first published in 1887.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Kabila Thiagaraj

    Ghost stories in the title is a little bit misleading. It is not in the horror genre, it a book with mythological a tales.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Jordan

    I am actually reading this and other Hearn in the Library of America edition and loving it.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Glenn Hammer

    I wanted to like this, and one of the stories was OK. The subtitle "Curious Tales..." would have been a better title the chinese ghost stories. I wanted to like this, and one of the stories was OK. The subtitle "Curious Tales..." would have been a better title the chinese ghost stories.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Daveinnova

    Great fun. Yes, it is a cultural relic. Let it go and enjoy it as a period piece.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Nela

    Bellas historias de fantasmas, algunas románticas, otras con sacrificios, pero todas muestran respeto a las tradiciones, a la lealtad, al amor y a valores tradicionales que se han ido perdiendo

  24. 4 out of 5

    Erin Bracken

    absolutely fascinating author. I'm going to continue reading his work and try to find a copy of his biography THE WANDERING GHOST. absolutely fascinating author. I'm going to continue reading his work and try to find a copy of his biography THE WANDERING GHOST.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Rebeca F.

    Cuando compré este libro no me fijé que era de Hearn. Creo que ese fue el problema. Esperaba algo distinto, pues aunque siempre he pensado que el predecesor de Soseki en la cátedra de literatura inglesa de la Universidad Imperial de Tokio resulta interesante y disfruto bastante sus textos sobre leyendas y fantasía nipona, China es otro cuento. Según tengo entendido Hearn ni siquiera visitó nunca ese país. Me pareció que el estilo era distinto de su prosa habitual, probablemente en un intento por Cuando compré este libro no me fijé que era de Hearn. Creo que ese fue el problema. Esperaba algo distinto, pues aunque siempre he pensado que el predecesor de Soseki en la cátedra de literatura inglesa de la Universidad Imperial de Tokio resulta interesante y disfruto bastante sus textos sobre leyendas y fantasía nipona, China es otro cuento. Según tengo entendido Hearn ni siquiera visitó nunca ese país. Me pareció que el estilo era distinto de su prosa habitual, probablemente en un intento por imitar la cadencia y calidad lírica y evocativa característica de los relatos chinos tradicionales, pero sólo conseguía sonar artificial y muy distante de su empeño. Mejor quedarse con las fuentes originales.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Benja Calderon

    Colección de cinco relatos de corte fantastico, donde los espíritus sinoistas hacen de las suyas, ya sea llevando el arte a un nivel superlativo o como amantes en tiempos de necesidad Una pequeña puerta a la cultura china, con sus décadas de antigüedad, que de una u otra forma, se viste de fabula, ya que algo podemos aprender de cada de relato, como el valor que dan los dioses a la abnegación con los padres, la relevancia del sacrificio en post de la excelencia, entre otros elementos de honra par Colección de cinco relatos de corte fantastico, donde los espíritus sinoistas hacen de las suyas, ya sea llevando el arte a un nivel superlativo o como amantes en tiempos de necesidad Una pequeña puerta a la cultura china, con sus décadas de antigüedad, que de una u otra forma, se viste de fabula, ya que algo podemos aprender de cada de relato, como el valor que dan los dioses a la abnegación con los padres, la relevancia del sacrificio en post de la excelencia, entre otros elementos de honra para el hombre común Edición preciosa, con notas sobre los cuentos y un pequeño glosario para contextualizar algunos personajes y/o lugares poco conocidos para el lector occidental

  27. 5 out of 5

    Jessica

    tbh dnf after the foreword but im counting it. the incredible foreword by Victoria Cass starts "Lafcadio Hearn was a thief of myth" and that about sums it up! reminds me of how e asian studies is such a bizarre experience built upon translation and theft and reductive analysis and trying to undo past damage with limited success tbh dnf after the foreword but im counting it. the incredible foreword by Victoria Cass starts "Lafcadio Hearn was a thief of myth" and that about sums it up! reminds me of how e asian studies is such a bizarre experience built upon translation and theft and reductive analysis and trying to undo past damage with limited success

  28. 4 out of 5

    Ros

    Un compendio de cuentos orientales sobre sueños y fantasmas escritos con mucha dulzura y que ayudan a hacer una introducción a la tradición espiritual de China y Japón. Mención especial para “el aullido” un cuento distinto al resto. Se trata de una reflexión del propio autor sobre filosofía y espiritualidad protagonizado por un perro muy querido de su vecindario. Muy recomendable.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Herto Bastian Abul

    I like all the stories inside. Reading this book was like reading a collection of fairytales except for the choice of words that is not so simple. It wasn’t like reading a scary book. Sacrifice, commitment, love, hard work and perseverance are some of the values that we will find in the stories.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Sue_Me Ally

    Very different read from my customary genre of books but quite alluring. There's not much scare to the ghostly stories but more folklore-like tales. I did think the author did a good job compiling and navigating his way through sharing these "supernatural tales." Very different read from my customary genre of books but quite alluring. There's not much scare to the ghostly stories but more folklore-like tales. I did think the author did a good job compiling and navigating his way through sharing these "supernatural tales."

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