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The Marvel Age of Comics 1961-1978

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An Era of the Invincible The making of Marvel’s household heroes It was an age of mighty heroes, misunderstood monsters, and complex villains. With the publication, in November 1961, of Fantastic Four No. 1, comics giant Marvel inaugurated a transformative era in pop culture. Through the next two decades, the iconic Hulk, Spider-Man, Iron Man,and the X-Men leapt, darted, and An Era of the Invincible The making of Marvel’s household heroes It was an age of mighty heroes, misunderstood monsters, and complex villains. With the publication, in November 1961, of Fantastic Four No. 1, comics giant Marvel inaugurated a transformative era in pop culture. Through the next two decades, the iconic Hulk, Spider-Man, Iron Man,and the X-Men leapt, darted, and towered through its pages. Captain America was resurrected from his 1940s deep-freeze and the Avengers became the World’s Greatest Super Heroes. Daredevil, Dr. Strange, and dozens more were added to the pantheon, each with their own rogues’ gallery of malevolent counterparts. More than 50 years later, these thrilling characters from the ’60s and ’70s are more popular than ever, fighting the good fight in comics, toy aisles, and blockbuster movies around the world. The Marvel Age of Comics 1961–1978 takes you to the heart of this seminal segment in comic history―an age of triumphant character and narrative innovation that reinvented the super hero genre. With hundreds of images and insider insights, the book traces the birth of champions who were at once epic in their powers and adversaries and grounded in a world that readers recognized as close to their own; relatable heroes with the same problems, struggles, and shortcomings as everyone else. By the ’70s, we see how the House of Ideas also elevated horror, sword and sorcery, and martial arts in its stable of titanic demigods, introducing iconic characters like Man-Thing, Conan, and Shang-Chi and proving that their brand of storytelling could succeed and flourish outside of the capes and tights. Behind it all, we get to know the extraordinary Marvel architects whose names are almost as familiar as the mortals (and immortals!) they brought to life―Stan “The Man” Lee, Jack “King” Kirby, and Steve Ditko, along with a roster of greats like John Romita, John Buscema, Marie Severin, Jim Steranko, and countless others. The result is a behind-the-scenes treasure trove and a jewel for any comic fan’s library, brimming with the innovation and energy of an invincible era for Marvel and its heroes alike


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An Era of the Invincible The making of Marvel’s household heroes It was an age of mighty heroes, misunderstood monsters, and complex villains. With the publication, in November 1961, of Fantastic Four No. 1, comics giant Marvel inaugurated a transformative era in pop culture. Through the next two decades, the iconic Hulk, Spider-Man, Iron Man,and the X-Men leapt, darted, and An Era of the Invincible The making of Marvel’s household heroes It was an age of mighty heroes, misunderstood monsters, and complex villains. With the publication, in November 1961, of Fantastic Four No. 1, comics giant Marvel inaugurated a transformative era in pop culture. Through the next two decades, the iconic Hulk, Spider-Man, Iron Man,and the X-Men leapt, darted, and towered through its pages. Captain America was resurrected from his 1940s deep-freeze and the Avengers became the World’s Greatest Super Heroes. Daredevil, Dr. Strange, and dozens more were added to the pantheon, each with their own rogues’ gallery of malevolent counterparts. More than 50 years later, these thrilling characters from the ’60s and ’70s are more popular than ever, fighting the good fight in comics, toy aisles, and blockbuster movies around the world. The Marvel Age of Comics 1961–1978 takes you to the heart of this seminal segment in comic history―an age of triumphant character and narrative innovation that reinvented the super hero genre. With hundreds of images and insider insights, the book traces the birth of champions who were at once epic in their powers and adversaries and grounded in a world that readers recognized as close to their own; relatable heroes with the same problems, struggles, and shortcomings as everyone else. By the ’70s, we see how the House of Ideas also elevated horror, sword and sorcery, and martial arts in its stable of titanic demigods, introducing iconic characters like Man-Thing, Conan, and Shang-Chi and proving that their brand of storytelling could succeed and flourish outside of the capes and tights. Behind it all, we get to know the extraordinary Marvel architects whose names are almost as familiar as the mortals (and immortals!) they brought to life―Stan “The Man” Lee, Jack “King” Kirby, and Steve Ditko, along with a roster of greats like John Romita, John Buscema, Marie Severin, Jim Steranko, and countless others. The result is a behind-the-scenes treasure trove and a jewel for any comic fan’s library, brimming with the innovation and energy of an invincible era for Marvel and its heroes alike

30 review for The Marvel Age of Comics 1961-1978

  1. 5 out of 5

    Жор

    Текстът в книгата спокойно може да не се чете - наброява има-няма 40 страници общо и дори като тривия не предлага нищо нечувано на десетки други места. Но този том си струва дори само заради стотиците прекрасни изображения на Джак Кърби, Джон Бушема, Стийв Дитко и още половин дузина жестоки илюстратори от епохата, когато комиксите са правели поп-културна революция. Страхотна колекция с едни от най-емблематичните комиксови корици.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Pedro Pascoe

    A lovely visual Marvel puffpiece, written (as such) by 'Rascally' Roy Thomas, covering the Silver Age and early Bronze age of Marvel. While the brief passages written by Thomas do provide a few insights and behind the scenes glimpses into his view of Marvel from 1961 to 1978, this book is valuable as a tome of images from Marvel Comics during this explosive period with brief descriptive passages for context. I would personally hope for a companion volume covering 1979 to the end of the Copper Ag A lovely visual Marvel puffpiece, written (as such) by 'Rascally' Roy Thomas, covering the Silver Age and early Bronze age of Marvel. While the brief passages written by Thomas do provide a few insights and behind the scenes glimpses into his view of Marvel from 1961 to 1978, this book is valuable as a tome of images from Marvel Comics during this explosive period with brief descriptive passages for context. I would personally hope for a companion volume covering 1979 to the end of the Copper Age (1990 or so), but a delightful visual romp through a creative explosion in pop culture. 'Nuff Said.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Jose

    The Marvel Age Of Comics 1961-1978 Roy Thomas Beautiful Coffee Table Book Lavishly illustrated, Huge tome,love the cover,the artwork the history the way the book is done. The book should have left out the "timeline" carefully selected I am sure,typical of other Taschen books as far as politcally slanted. With honorable mentions towards A youthful president from the infamous Kennedy Clan and other causes and this is right when you open the book on the book itself. This book had potential of being The Marvel Age Of Comics 1961-1978 Roy Thomas Beautiful Coffee Table Book Lavishly illustrated, Huge tome,love the cover,the artwork the history the way the book is done. The book should have left out the "timeline" carefully selected I am sure,typical of other Taschen books as far as politcally slanted. With honorable mentions towards A youthful president from the infamous Kennedy Clan and other causes and this is right when you open the book on the book itself. This book had potential of being a great history for the BEST time in History for Comicbooks,for Marvel I still recommend the book to any Marvel fan worth their salt as I got myself a Copy for me and another a year ago as a gift. My two cents however I am disappointed.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Jaq Greenspon

    This is a great read. It’s fascinating in that it a completely objective look at the company, glossing over most of the controversies (which are handled elsewhere quite well) in favor of just glorifying the comics themselves.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Eddy Badrina

  6. 5 out of 5

    Simone

  7. 4 out of 5

    José Rafael

  8. 4 out of 5

    Steven J Kellogg

  9. 5 out of 5

    Zachary

  10. 5 out of 5

    Christian

  11. 4 out of 5

    Drprefontaine

  12. 4 out of 5

    Mike g

  13. 4 out of 5

    roblox fan (search salmonsamuel )

  14. 5 out of 5

    Shane Sanford

  15. 4 out of 5

    Jon

  16. 4 out of 5

    Astroboy

  17. 5 out of 5

    Robert Rodriguez

  18. 5 out of 5

    Polina Lyapustina

  19. 4 out of 5

    Lee Wochner

  20. 4 out of 5

    Kay

  21. 5 out of 5

    Marty

  22. 5 out of 5

    Michael Brady

  23. 4 out of 5

    Daniel Taylor

  24. 5 out of 5

    Ron

  25. 5 out of 5

    David Peek

  26. 4 out of 5

    Jpn

  27. 5 out of 5

    Scotty Railton

  28. 4 out of 5

    Tom Hora

  29. 4 out of 5

    Marie-Claude Taillon

  30. 5 out of 5

    Peter

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