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Anne Frank's Diary: The Graphic Novel

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The only graphic novelization of Anne Frank's diary that has been authorized by the Anne Frank Foundation and that uses text from the diary--it will introduce a new generation of young readers to this classic of Holocaust literature. This adaptation of Anne Frank's Diary of a Young Girl into a graphic version for a young readership, maintains the integrity and power of The only graphic novelization of Anne Frank's diary that has been authorized by the Anne Frank Foundation and that uses text from the diary--it will introduce a new generation of young readers to this classic of Holocaust literature. This adaptation of Anne Frank's Diary of a Young Girl into a graphic version for a young readership, maintains the integrity and power of the original work. With stunning, expressive illustrations and ample direct quotation from the diary, this edition will expand the readership for this important and lasting work of history and literature.


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The only graphic novelization of Anne Frank's diary that has been authorized by the Anne Frank Foundation and that uses text from the diary--it will introduce a new generation of young readers to this classic of Holocaust literature. This adaptation of Anne Frank's Diary of a Young Girl into a graphic version for a young readership, maintains the integrity and power of The only graphic novelization of Anne Frank's diary that has been authorized by the Anne Frank Foundation and that uses text from the diary--it will introduce a new generation of young readers to this classic of Holocaust literature. This adaptation of Anne Frank's Diary of a Young Girl into a graphic version for a young readership, maintains the integrity and power of the original work. With stunning, expressive illustrations and ample direct quotation from the diary, this edition will expand the readership for this important and lasting work of history and literature.

30 review for Anne Frank's Diary: The Graphic Novel

  1. 5 out of 5

    Nat

    The only graphic novelization of Anne Frank’s diary that has been authorized by the Anne Frank Foundation and that uses text from the diary–it will introduce a new generation of young readers to this classic of Holocaust literature. This one isn't an easy one to quickly wrap my mind (or words) around. There's so much to be said and done that it all sits so heavy on my heart. I'll begin by mentioning that I received the opportunity to read the original Hebrew version of this book, courtesy of The only graphic novelization of Anne Frank’s diary that has been authorized by the Anne Frank Foundation and that uses text from the diary–it will introduce a new generation of young readers to this classic of Holocaust literature. This one isn't an easy one to quickly wrap my mind (or words) around. There's so much to be said and done that it all sits so heavy on my heart. I'll begin by mentioning that I received the opportunity to read the original Hebrew version of this book, courtesy of a lovely librarian at my local library. And I'll go on to admit that I struggled quite a lot with the start of this graphic diary. In particular, I had trouble with Anne Frank's hurtful depiction of the eight people surrounding her, from those forced into hiding with her, as well as the disrespect targeted at her own family members. I was particularly struck when I read the page declaring, quite bluntly so, that she considered the relationship with her mother so unstable that she wouldn’t care if her mother died. It was one of the cruelest sayings, especially under their utterly dire circumstance. And then it rolled on to her nonstop ridicule of Mrs. Van Daan... And I couldn't stand by idly reading about all the above, knowing that these are real people that died the most horrendous of deaths and cannot defend their honor; all that remains of them are these jarring depictions of their behavior under the most inhumane circumstances, and it was painful to read. So I was relieved when Anne Frank acknowledged in later journey entries that her previous uncompromising points of view on her family was less than unfair. Empathy is key in familial discourse. It's true, she didn't understand me, but I didn't understand her either. With that admission in mind, the book did a turning point for me, where I could finally feel myself growing more attached to Anne as a person, from finding a loyal companion in the blank pages of her notebook to seeing herself as an aspiring writer to capturing her rightful hate towards Nazi Germans (that depicts my own), assessing her self-awareness, which had me so enraptured while reading that it deserves to be shared: In everything I do, I can watch myself as if I were a stranger. I can stand across from the everyday Anne and, without being biased or making excuses, watch what she’s doing, both the good and the bad. This self-awareness never leaves me, and every time I open my mouth, I think, ‘You should have said that differently’ or ‘That’s fine the way it is.’ I condemn myself in so many ways that I’m beginning to realize the truth of my Father’s adage: ‘Every child has to raise itself.’ Parents can only advise their children or point them in the right direction. Ultimately, people shape their own characters. As well as her line on trying to do and be better: I know exactly how I'd like to be, how I am . . . on the inside. But unfortunately I'm only like that with myself. There's so much more to be said, but I'll just share the pages that got it all right: Note: I'm an Amazon Affiliate. If you're interested in buying Anne Frank's Diary: The Graphic Diary, just click on the image below to go through my link. I'll make a small commission! Support creators you love. Buy a Coffee for nat (bookspoils) with Ko-fi.com/bookspoils

  2. 5 out of 5

    Greta G

    Israeli movie director - screen writer Ari Folman and illustrator - art director David Polonsky aren’t amateurs and it shows. This is a gorgeous, brilliant adaptation of Anne Frank’s diary and I’m in awe of the result. I have to say that I’m unable to compare it with the original diary, because I couldn’t finish it when I tried to read it as a young girl myself, and I’ve always been reluctant to try it again. At the time, I had no interest whatsoever in reading the writings of a teenage girl who Israeli movie director - screen writer Ari Folman and illustrator - art director David Polonsky aren’t amateurs and it shows. This is a gorgeous, brilliant adaptation of Anne Frank’s diary and I’m in awe of the result. I have to say that I’m unable to compare it with the original diary, because I couldn’t finish it when I tried to read it as a young girl myself, and I’ve always been reluctant to try it again. At the time, I had no interest whatsoever in reading the writings of a teenage girl who seemed to be incessantly whining about boys, her parents and just about everyone else in her life. Obviously, I simply wasn’t ready for this book. Anne still whines a great deal in this adaptation, but at least I now have a better understanding of the menacing situation and the distressing conditions she continuously found herself in for almost two years. And the authors did an amazing job in making Anne and the other 7 people with whom she lived together in hiding, come alive. There’s a surprisingly large amount of humor to be found in the illustrations which made the often depressing diary entries considerably more digestible. The humor is supposed to represent Anne’s own sarcasm and there seems to be no lack of that in her diary! Understandably, not all diary entries were included, but several long passages of them were reproduced in their entirety. I thought this added value and authenticity to this already marvelous graphic adaptation. The authors are currently working on the animated feature film ‘Where is Anne Frank?’, which will be released in 2020, and if you’re familiar with their previous, award-winning movie ‘Waltz with Bashir’ (and ‘The Congress’ which I haven’t watched yet), you know it will be equally excellent.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Matthew

    I recently listened to The Diary of Anne Frank. A co-worker suggested to me, since she knew I also like graphic novels, that I also try out this version of the story. I am glad that I decided to read it so soon after listening so I was easily able to compare the two. While I would always recommend the original material first, I think this version did a great job using the graphic novel format. Also, maybe someone who would never take the time to read the diary directly in Anne's words might be wi I recently listened to The Diary of Anne Frank. A co-worker suggested to me, since she knew I also like graphic novels, that I also try out this version of the story. I am glad that I decided to read it so soon after listening so I was easily able to compare the two. While I would always recommend the original material first, I think this version did a great job using the graphic novel format. Also, maybe someone who would never take the time to read the diary directly in Anne's words might be willing to try it out as a graphic novel. I think this is a great thing as it means a wider audience will learn this important story. Story wise, it is very close to the original diary. If you know it in Anne's words, you will not find it too much different. The main thing is some entries in the diary might be summarized in one page/one image. Other parts might have been edited out to promote the flow of the graphic novel. But, I don't feel like any content or meaning was lost. Also, sometimes something described by Anne without much detail may have been reimagined by the artist with a new, creative twist (example: at one point the Nazis are depicted as Egyptians watching over Jewish slaves building pyramids - Anne never said anything like this specifically in her Diary) Speaking of artwork - I think the artist did a great job of creating eye catching images while remaining respectful to the source material. A lot of dialogue from the diary was kept in tact and integrated well with the imagery. In fact, if you frequently read graphic novels, you will find a lot more words within the art than normal. This is an important story and everyone should read it. If the full diary is not for you, but this sounds interesting, give it a go. If you enjoyed the diary and gave thought about revisiting it, this is not a bad way to do so.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Dave Schaafsma

    Yes, of course read the latest, updated version of The Diary of Anne Frank (there one that millions, like me, read which was edited in his favor and to his tastes by her father). But as with any dramatic or filmic (or dance) rendition of the text, a comics version of this text--authorized by the Anne Frank Foundation, adapted by Ari Folman and beautifully and playfully illustrated by David Polonsky using all the resources of sequential storytelling available to him--is welcome indeed. What do we Yes, of course read the latest, updated version of The Diary of Anne Frank (there one that millions, like me, read which was edited in his favor and to his tastes by her father). But as with any dramatic or filmic (or dance) rendition of the text, a comics version of this text--authorized by the Anne Frank Foundation, adapted by Ari Folman and beautifully and playfully illustrated by David Polonsky using all the resources of sequential storytelling available to him--is welcome indeed. What do we gain by this supplement to the familar story we know through the Diary? We get a real sense of Anne as a real teenaged girl and not a saint, a feisty, saucy Anne we can find in her diary, too. In addition to including several key passages from the Diary itself, we are able to visualize the space in which the Franks and VanDaans lived in their time in hiding in Amsterdam. We get montages of Anne's imagined escapes from the annex, and we get a sad view of the bright future Anne might have had as a writer. It's really a surprisingly energized addition to the Frank canon, moving and fun and sad and of course horrific but also inspiring. I suggest you take a look at it even if you--like me--have read Frank's Diary many many times and think you know all about this story. This will be a useful addition to any community or school library and a supplement for teaching the Diary, of course. One minute video preview of the book: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=C-TJl...

  5. 5 out of 5

    Hilary

    I had doubts that a graphic novel version could in any way live up to Anne Frank's original wonderful account of her life in hiding but this was amazing and comes endorsed by the Anne Frank Foundation and when goodreads friend Lisa Vegan recommended it I knew it would be good. I loved reading Anne's diary as a teenager and feel that reading a version that didn't do the original justice would be insulting to Anne's memory. I loved the artwork, the faces, expressions and depictions the illustrator I had doubts that a graphic novel version could in any way live up to Anne Frank's original wonderful account of her life in hiding but this was amazing and comes endorsed by the Anne Frank Foundation and when goodreads friend Lisa Vegan recommended it I knew it would be good. I loved reading Anne's diary as a teenager and feel that reading a version that didn't do the original justice would be insulting to Anne's memory. I loved the artwork, the faces, expressions and depictions the illustrator has used are brilliant, I love the way they have got across emotions so well. There's a series of drawings of Anne next to Margot, Margot looking patient and saintly next to Anne in various poses of despair to steam coming out of her ears that really seemed to portray beautifully how Anne felt about her personality compared with her sister whom she was always comparing herself to and being compared to unfavorably. Despite being sad and disturbing, this book also shows Anne's great humour, the illustrations do a wonderful job of getting this across. The scene at the table where they turn into animals is so skilfully shown, they still look like their characters physical appearance whilst looking like an animal and displaying their personality traits, brilliant! The way this book has taken parts of Anne's diary and illustrated what is happening really conveyed the situation well, although this has lots of illustrations there is also a lot of text and I think the team creating this have done an excellent job getting across these peoples plight, their daily lives and Anne's personal thoughts, struggles and philosophies without feeling that they have missed out or added to the original story. The afterword takes you through what happened after liberation and life for those who survived after the war. It is obvious to say the death of Anne and her sister is all the more tragic whenever I look at the dates they managed to hide until and the last days of their lives were only around 4 weeks before the camp they were in was liberated. Reading Anne's words again made me realise again how wonderful Anne's writing and thinking was for a girl of her age, how wonderful we have her story to remember her by and how heartbreaking she (and obviously others) didn't live to see the end of the war, see her diary in print and go on to write more. I think Anne would have loved this book.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Caroline

    Anne Frank may be the face of the Holocaust, and this graphic novel, by adapter Ari Folman and illustrator David Polonsky, is a beautiful adaptation of her famous diary. Adapting Frank's diary couldn't have been easy--and, as Folman and Polonsky explain in the end notes, the pressure was on to do the diary justice--but they did it with great skill. Folman chose select entries to highlight and worked closely with Polonsky to bring those to life. For entries that seemed to beg to be included in to Anne Frank may be the face of the Holocaust, and this graphic novel, by adapter Ari Folman and illustrator David Polonsky, is a beautiful adaptation of her famous diary. Adapting Frank's diary couldn't have been easy--and, as Folman and Polonsky explain in the end notes, the pressure was on to do the diary justice--but they did it with great skill. Folman chose select entries to highlight and worked closely with Polonsky to bring those to life. For entries that seemed to beg to be included in total, Folman did just that. It's an inspired take that should please all who’ve read the source material. The illustrations are detailed and expressive, but most of all, they’re some of the most inventive I've seen in a graphic novel. I was so impressed by how Polonsky tackled the daunting task of taking Frank's wise-beyond-her-years observations and thoughts and translating them into a concrete depiction. He did it perfectly. Adapter and illustrator worked very well as a team, and it’s obvious that this graphic novel was a labor of love that they were determined to get right. Folman and Polonsky emphasized just how human Frank was. What comes across over and over is that Frank was remarkably astute for her age; there’s a predestined feel to her diary, as if her pen was guided by a future that knew her diary would eventually become one of the best-selling books of all time. But Frank was also very much a typical adolescent, and her adolescent, mundane musings live alongside her mature, wiser ones. Her early entries express outrage over the--as she saw it--unrelenting criticism she received from the adults around her. She struggled to relate to her mom and felt closer to her dad. She was sometimes jealous of the positive attention Margot got and annoyed by suggestions that she emulate her. She thought about Peter van Daan and their budding romance. Later entries have a slightly different tone and focus, hinting that Frank resolved many of her past grievances. This graphic novel isn’t solely about Frank, however, and Folman and Polonsky didn’t sugar-coat life in the attic. They showed boring, difficult life in hiding: meager food rations, lack of privacy, and general tension that comes with living in close quarters. Zooming out, they also highlighted the frequent bombings, precariousness of the living situation, terrifying close calls, and so much else. The source material contains a lot, and as good as this graphic adaptation is, it’s very abridged. The adapter couldn't include everything in Frank’s diary, and he didn’t quote most parts in their entirety. It also has a loose chronology that may confuse those who haven't read the diary. Most importantly, it doesn’t deliver quite the same gut-punch that the diary does at the end, when it abruptly stops after the reader has gotten to know Frank so intimately. It is, however, an exceptional companion work. I also recommend the moving Anne Frank: Her life in words and pictures from the archives of The Anne Frank House, which contains lots of photos of the Frank family and succeeds in really humanizing them as a regular, normal family doing regular, normal things. These two, read alongside the diary, will provide a complete, satisfying portrait. (Note: An animated Anne Frank movie is now available: https://forward.com/culture/472841/a-... )

  7. 5 out of 5

    Lisa Vegan

    I read this book only because it’s officially approved by the Anne Frank Foundation and because it has gotten such positive reviews. Otherwise I’d have been skeptical. There is a lovely and informative adaptor’s note on pages 148-149 in the hardcover edition at the end of the book and I decided to read it when I was part way through the book and I actually recommend reading it first, but okay to read at the end, but do read it. It's brilliant! The book is gorgeous! I absolutely loved the illustrat I read this book only because it’s officially approved by the Anne Frank Foundation and because it has gotten such positive reviews. Otherwise I’d have been skeptical. There is a lovely and informative adaptor’s note on pages 148-149 in the hardcover edition at the end of the book and I decided to read it when I was part way through the book and I actually recommend reading it first, but okay to read at the end, but do read it. It's brilliant! The book is gorgeous! I absolutely loved the illustrations. They were perfect. Incredibly well-done adaptation! Phenomenal! I think it’s a complete success as far as getting Anne’s own story right. In fact, even though I’ve read the diary about 4 times, I felt as though this adaptation gave me more information about and understanding of her. So, Anne was such a good writer, so bright and thoughtful, and I appreciate how introspective she was at 13-15, maybe because I was too. When I first read her diary at age 11 (a year or two too early, for me, but my mother wanted me to read it while she was alive, I realized after, as it had meant a lot to her) I liked it but wasn’t wild about it. As an adult, rereading it, after reading other teens’ diaries, I realized how great it was. It’s so superior to most of the diaries I’ve read by other people that age. These excerpts from Anne’s diary and the wonderful accompanying artwork and the extra explanatory notes, made me sadder than ever that she did not survive. It’s such a huge tragedy. Her and so many others including some who will remain unknown. I’m so curious about what she would have done with her life had she not died so close to liberation. I expect she might have made herself known, likely as a writer, hopefully with a Holocaust memoir included at some point. I’ve read so many books about/by Anne. I’ve always felt we would not have been friends prior to her going into hiding but that from that point on we might have been. The story of these 8 people in this book do what other books about individuals have done: properly personalize what otherwise seems overwhelming – the suffering of millions during the Nazi era and other atrocities affecting more millions. Highly recommended for those who want to read more about/by Anne Frank, or life in hiding during the Holocaust, those who enjoy reading graphic non-fiction books, some reluctant readers, and those who will love the artwork as much as I did. I’d say for everyone 12 & all the way up, but it depends on the person of course. Even though Anne talks about what’s going on outside their hiding place and she knew a fair amount, there was something about the visuals that make this book even more disturbing. I also found it even more amusing, so there is that.

  8. 4 out of 5

    leynes

    Here in Berlin there's a great institution (the Landeszentrale für Politische Bildung) where students can get up to five books for free every three months. So, three days ago I saw in their online catalogue that they added the graphic diary of Anne Frank to their collection. Immediately, I knew that I would take my bike to the facility and get myself this beautiful book. I had seen the graphic adaption of this classic in bookshops before but was too chintzy to get it for myself (... I mean 20€ is Here in Berlin there's a great institution (the Landeszentrale für Politische Bildung) where students can get up to five books for free every three months. So, three days ago I saw in their online catalogue that they added the graphic diary of Anne Frank to their collection. Immediately, I knew that I would take my bike to the facility and get myself this beautiful book. I had seen the graphic adaption of this classic in bookshops before but was too chintzy to get it for myself (... I mean 20€ is not nothing, especially since I've already read the original diary). I liked the art style and I always appreciate it when historic documents are made accessible to a younger generation through the art of comic books and graphic novels. They're just such a great teaching tool. And whilst I would, of course, still advise everyone to read Anne's original diary, this graphic adaption is a nice addition. Ari Flomen and David Polonsky worked wonders to encapture Anne's personality and her outlook on life. Sometimes, they mixed different journal entries together for the sake of condensing the narrative, but oftentimes they printed full passages, because Anne is simply that great of a writer and her outlook on life is fascinating and inspiring. We can learn so much from this 12- to 14-year-old girl. Anne poured her heart out to her diary. She talked about her strenuous relationship to her mother and her sister Margot. The envy, the anger, the emotional turmoil. She reflects on what living in the rear building, in total isolation from the world, does to her and the other inhabitants. It's a heartbreaking read, really, when you look at the circumstances that this innocent family was put through. She and her family spent their lives in hiding from 1942 to 1944, during the German occupation of the Netherlands in World War II. All the inhabitants of the rear building were arrested by the Gestapo in August 1944 and deported to concentration camps. In October or November 1944, Anne and her sister, Margot, were transferred from Auschwitz to Bergen-Belsen concentration camp, where they died (probably of typhus) a few months later. Anne's last entry is from 1 August 1944. I couldn't help but cry and feel an immense pain reading the last words she ever wrote down in her diary, without even knowing that this would be her last entry. Anne's diary is a great reminder that we – and us Germans in particular – should never forget the atrocities committed in Nazi Germany. It is more than just necessary that Anne's legacy lives on. This young girl, who stands for so much that is good in the world, let's always remember her!

  9. 5 out of 5

    Avani ✨

    Loved it ! The illustrations are so good.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Reading_ Tamishly

    I would highly suggest you to pick up the original book first before reading the graphic novel. This graphic novel is well adapted considering that it includes the very basic information and some of the whole Kitty diary entries. The character presentation seems accurate and it's a whole new world different from the experience of reading the original book. More pronounced in this adaptation are the vivid illustrations of their living conditions during those days, the characters and Anne's fears and I would highly suggest you to pick up the original book first before reading the graphic novel. This graphic novel is well adapted considering that it includes the very basic information and some of the whole Kitty diary entries. The character presentation seems accurate and it's a whole new world different from the experience of reading the original book. More pronounced in this adaptation are the vivid illustrations of their living conditions during those days, the characters and Anne's fears and feelings towards different people around her. Her difficult relationship with her mother, her closeness with her father and the difficulties she had to deal with which the adults didn't seem to understand. Living with anxiety and depression everyday with difficult people around, Anne seemed to struggle a lot specially when she had questions which she needed. The pangs and the curiousity of growing up, parts of this book show about her sexuality and love interests. The book ends abruptly as was the diary entries. There's an afterword which helps. But I wanted to read more. I love this graphic novel adaptation. The illustrations are so good!

  11. 5 out of 5

    Jon Nakapalau

    This graphic adaptation puts you in hiding with Anne as she tries to cope with the uniquely horrible situation she finds herself in: coming of age in isolation and fear. I truly think this book adds a new perspective to her diaries and provides a visual narrative that will sharpen the diary entries in a way that has not been explored before. A heartbreaking story of hope that should never be forgotten.

  12. 4 out of 5

    But_i_thought_

    Reading the original diary of Anne Frank as a teen was a defining moment of my (childhood) reading life — not only did it bring alive the horrors of World War II, it articulated the universal frustrations of adolescence so well — the battles with Mom, the tentative genesis of an independent worldview, the feelings of isolation, the yearning to be understood, the continual struggle against the self. This newly illustrated edition — by film maker Ari Folman and illustrator David Polonsky — provide Reading the original diary of Anne Frank as a teen was a defining moment of my (childhood) reading life — not only did it bring alive the horrors of World War II, it articulated the universal frustrations of adolescence so well — the battles with Mom, the tentative genesis of an independent worldview, the feelings of isolation, the yearning to be understood, the continual struggle against the self. This newly illustrated edition — by film maker Ari Folman and illustrator David Polonsky — provides a visual distillation of that experience, notable for its focus on moods and internal states. Accompanied by excerpts of Anne’s writings, we get a visual guide to the historical events leading up to the Franks’ confinement, a tour of the layout of the secret annex, observations and anecdotes on all seven co-inhabitants, and detailed depictions of the agony of life spent in hiding. These accounts are interspersed with occasional two-page spreads of pure visual poetry, illuminating the emotional undercurrents of the narrative. Most of all, the images and text thoughtfully recapture Anne’s voice — her energy, acerbic wit, acute observations, droll humour and astonishing self-awareness. By necessity severely shortened, the book obviously does not capture the full character arc (from carefree teen to contemplative young woman), nor the full extent of hardships experienced. Thus, recommended as a supplement to — rather than replacement of — the original text. Mood: Introspective, harrowing but also hopeful Rating: 9/10 Also on Instagram.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Neil R. Coulter

    I think this is a brilliant adaptation of Anne Frank's diary. It's no substitute for the original text, because the reader has to already know the fuller version of the book in order to really appreciate this one; but it's a tremendous companion. The illustrations are sometimes clever, sometimes gorgeous (some of the two-page spreads are completely stunning), and I can imagine that Anne herself would enjoy how her story has been brought to graphic novel form. Her humor and emotions and intellect I think this is a brilliant adaptation of Anne Frank's diary. It's no substitute for the original text, because the reader has to already know the fuller version of the book in order to really appreciate this one; but it's a tremendous companion. The illustrations are sometimes clever, sometimes gorgeous (some of the two-page spreads are completely stunning), and I can imagine that Anne herself would enjoy how her story has been brought to graphic novel form. Her humor and emotions and intellect are present all throughout. The illustrations of an imagined grown-up Anne in the future are heartrending. I couldn't put this down—read it all in one sitting. Thanks to my beautiful wife for giving this book to me for Christmas. :)

  14. 4 out of 5

    M. Reads Books and Fics

    This is beautiful and tragic all at the same time

  15. 4 out of 5

    Melissasfandomworld

    WOW! That's the first thing I want to say right now. I'm truly impressed and in awe of the wonderful job the creators/illustrator did on this graphic novel adaptation of 'Het Achterhuis'/Anne Frank's Diary. --- Anne Frank's story is well known all over the world. Of course, being a Dutchie and European Citizen, I've grew up learning about World War 2 and the horrors that occured as well, with Anne Frank being mentioned and talked about a lot during that education. My grandmother was a young gir WOW! That's the first thing I want to say right now. I'm truly impressed and in awe of the wonderful job the creators/illustrator did on this graphic novel adaptation of 'Het Achterhuis'/Anne Frank's Diary. --- Anne Frank's story is well known all over the world. Of course, being a Dutchie and European Citizen, I've grew up learning about World War 2 and the horrors that occured as well, with Anne Frank being mentioned and talked about a lot during that education. My grandmother was a young girl, barely a teenager when Germany invaded our country - we live 10minutes away from the German border, in the most southern part of the Netherlands - and I've heard many stories from her, firsthand about how life was like for them at the time, which was quite scary. Let alone how life must've been for the Jewish people - my heart still breaks for them whenever I think about it. It's soul crushing. So when in school, while growing up, there was lots of attention given to education about World War 2, like I said, and that eventually - when I was about 10/11 years old - led to paying a visit to 'Het Achterhuis' in Amsterdam where Anne went into hiding with her family, the 'van Daan' family and Albert Dussel and visiting this place where she hid, walking past the rooms where Anne has hid with her family and the other people was a bone chilling experience... This place, where they eventually were betrayed and find out and sent to concentration camps, just less than a year shy before the Netherlands was freed, left a soul deep mark on me as did reading Anne's diary as well of course. Anne's way of writing is amazingly beautiful, especially seeing her age when she started the diary > 13 years old. Visiting Het Achterhuis was, with knowing her story and what she wrote in her diary, made for a truly emotionally heavy and impactful experience. It's been years since I've last read anything about Anne and this graphic novel adaption of Anne Frank's diary has been on my wishlist quite a while. When I came across it by chance earlier today when I was in a local bookstore, I didn't doubt once and grabbed myself a copy right away. I started reading it just a couple of hours ago and finished it just now. Reading the story through these stunning illustrations - the style the artist uses is truly beautiful and fits Anne's story so well I think - made for a really extraordinary reading experience. It was a very emotional read. It never ceases to amaze me how immensely touched I am by it, when I get around to read about it, and how mournful and sorrowful I always feel then > and reading the graphic novel adaption was no exception. It was every bit as emotional and heartbreaking as it always has been. The illustrations just make it an even more intense reading experience. I highly recommend getting a copy of this if you're interested in Anne's story. As I said before; The illustrator and creators in general did a truly remarkable job on this. They've captured the essence of Anne and her diary perfectly and this graphic novel adaption that was published in honor of the 70th anniversary since Anne's diary was first published is a must have to add to everyone's book collection!

  16. 5 out of 5

    Eva

    -English below- Anne spat van het papier af in deze graphic novel adaptatie van haar wereldberoemde dagboek. Grappig, springerig, vrolijk, vol humor en wijs voor het leeftijd. De twee artiesten hebben haar goed getroffen. In het begin overheerst humor ondanks de spanning. Zoals wanneer Anne omschrijft op welke fronten ze allemaal net niet zo goed is als haar zus. Of als ze kapsels van beroemde filmsterren nadoet. Hoe langer het onderduiken duurt, hoe dieper de bespiegelingen. Anne denkt na over z -English below- Anne spat van het papier af in deze graphic novel adaptatie van haar wereldberoemde dagboek. Grappig, springerig, vrolijk, vol humor en wijs voor het leeftijd. De twee artiesten hebben haar goed getroffen. In het begin overheerst humor ondanks de spanning. Zoals wanneer Anne omschrijft op welke fronten ze allemaal net niet zo goed is als haar zus. Of als ze kapsels van beroemde filmsterren nadoet. Hoe langer het onderduiken duurt, hoe dieper de bespiegelingen. Anne denkt na over zichzelf, over haar relatie met haar ouders, over haar sterke en zwakke punten en over de toekomst. Vooral dat laatste is indrukwekkend, wetend wat er komen gaat. Vooral als ze zichzelf tekent als succesvolle journaliste, als veertiger. Het breekt je hart. Al die levenslust. Echt een knap staaltje werk van Ari Folman en David Polonsky. Het lijkt me niet gemakkelijk om je te wagen aan een dergelijk iconisch boek. Hopelijk zorgt het ervoor dat nog meer mensen die bijzondere verhaal onder ogen krijgen. Het is overigens zeker geen boek voor jonge kinderen. Ik zou zeggen vanaf 10/11 jaar. ENGLISH Anne splashes off the paper in this graphic novel adaptation of her world-famous diary. Funny, jumpy, cheerful, full of humor and wise for her age. The two artists have portrayed her well. In the beginning, humor prevails despite the tension. Like when Anne describes on which fronts she is lacking compared to her sister. Or if she remakes hairstyles of famous movie stars. The longer the hiding lasts, the deeper the reflections. Anne thinks about herself, about her relationship with her parents, about her strengths, weaknesses and about the future. Especially the latter is impressive, knowing what is to come. Especially when she fantasizes herself as a successful journalist, of about forty. It breaks your heart. All that zest for life. Really a wonderful work by Ari Folman and David Polonsky. It must not have been easy, such an iconic book. Hopefully it will ensure that even more people get to know this special story. It is certainly not a book for young children. I would say from 10/11 years on.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Tina

    This is an graphic novel adaptation of the Anne Frank's Diary. I read Anne Frank's diary when I was in High School, and I fell in love with it. Anne Frank's Diary is the reason I love historical fiction and WWII books to this day. I have to say I love the pictures in this book. I do feel that so much was left out this book, and the beginning took so long to get to the heart of this story. I just think this Graphic Adaptation fell short of being really good. (*) This is an graphic novel adaptation of the Anne Frank's Diary. I read Anne Frank's diary when I was in High School, and I fell in love with it. Anne Frank's Diary is the reason I love historical fiction and WWII books to this day. I have to say I love the pictures in this book. I do feel that so much was left out this book, and the beginning took so long to get to the heart of this story. I just think this Graphic Adaptation fell short of being really good. (*)

  18. 4 out of 5

    Cheryl

    Amazing. Very moving, effective. I read the original decades ago and don't much remember it, but nonetheless I feel confident that this adaptation is true to Anne as a person and to her legacy. I don't have the right words to discuss it. All I can find to say is that I highly recommend it and will consider other works by the creators. Amazing. Very moving, effective. I read the original decades ago and don't much remember it, but nonetheless I feel confident that this adaptation is true to Anne as a person and to her legacy. I don't have the right words to discuss it. All I can find to say is that I highly recommend it and will consider other works by the creators.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Teresa

    This book is excellent—even for someone like me who has read the original too many times to count, or maybe especially for someone like me. One day I'll probably reread this too; even looking at just the pictures is a pleasure. Folman and Polonsky have done a superb job of telling Anne’s story through their choice of scenes, as well as through the astounding, inventive images. For anyone who's read this adaptation and hasn’t read The Diary of a Young Girl, I hope it leads you to the original. A This book is excellent—even for someone like me who has read the original too many times to count, or maybe especially for someone like me. One day I'll probably reread this too; even looking at just the pictures is a pleasure. Folman and Polonsky have done a superb job of telling Anne’s story through their choice of scenes, as well as through the astounding, inventive images. For anyone who's read this adaptation and hasn’t read The Diary of a Young Girl, I hope it leads you to the original. As evidenced by Anne's own words used near the end of this adaptation, you will be amazed at the growth of this adolescent who spent formative years in hiding. As always, when I get to the end of Anne’s story, I miss her.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Tammy

    5 ☆ I don’t normally read graphic novels but I really enjoyed this one. And of course now that I’ve read this book... I have to go back and re-watch the 1965 movie!

  21. 5 out of 5

    Rod Brown

    This very strong adaptation of one of the most famous diaries in history works best when the creators trust their instincts and use the graphic novel format to truly visualize Anne's life, thoughts and dreams. They drop in large blocks of text from Anne's diaries a few too many times, but when they actually adapt, we are given a playful and imaginative look into a life which was rich in so much even while lived in confinement and with a scarcity of supplies. The most moving moment for me was a po This very strong adaptation of one of the most famous diaries in history works best when the creators trust their instincts and use the graphic novel format to truly visualize Anne's life, thoughts and dreams. They drop in large blocks of text from Anne's diaries a few too many times, but when they actually adapt, we are given a playful and imaginative look into a life which was rich in so much even while lived in confinement and with a scarcity of supplies. The most moving moment for me was a portrait late in the book of a grown-up Anne surrounded by the mementos of the writing career that should have been. Devastating. I look forward to the animated movie being produced in conjunction with this graphic adaptation.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Sylvester

    Anyone with doubts about the value of a graphic version of a classic book should read this one. In my mind, this is the very best of it's kind. Superlative. The way Anne's story is presented visually is beautifully imaginative and moving. I can't say enough about it. See for yourself as soon as you can. I highly recommend it. Anyone with doubts about the value of a graphic version of a classic book should read this one. In my mind, this is the very best of it's kind. Superlative. The way Anne's story is presented visually is beautifully imaginative and moving. I can't say enough about it. See for yourself as soon as you can. I highly recommend it.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Beatriz Pires

    5 ⭐️ What an amazing graphic diary. The history, the testimonies written by Anne, the cruelty lived at the time, the writing and the self aware Anne shows is incredible. I think the drawings were very faithfully the original version, and it will reach younger generations.

  24. 5 out of 5

    ally

    oh yeah I forgot that I also finished this I absolutely loved this I loved the drawing and the story and I MIGHT read the actual book I'll ask my friend if I can borrow it from her But I love how she calls her diary kitty =^-^= yes ... oh yeah I forgot that I also finished this I absolutely loved this I loved the drawing and the story and I MIGHT read the actual book I'll ask my friend if I can borrow it from her But I love how she calls her diary kitty =^-^= yes ...

  25. 5 out of 5

    Deb (Readerbuzz) Nance

    I recently read Anne Frank's diary for the first time, and when I posted my review, several people urged me to read the graphic novel. I'm so glad they did, and I'm glad I was able to read it. The illustrations add vibrancy to the story. Anne imagines herself grownup and condescending toward those who were cruel toward her, and we see her as she will never be but might have been, a strong and productive woman. The hostility on the faces of those in the community toward the Jews heightens the fear I recently read Anne Frank's diary for the first time, and when I posted my review, several people urged me to read the graphic novel. I'm so glad they did, and I'm glad I was able to read it. The illustrations add vibrancy to the story. Anne imagines herself grownup and condescending toward those who were cruel toward her, and we see her as she will never be but might have been, a strong and productive woman. The hostility on the faces of those in the community toward the Jews heightens the fear surrounding the family. The diagram of the shelter helps make the setting clear. The depictions of the people around Anne in the shelter as wind-up dolls...the very Anne-centric pictures of the famous actresses of the day...animals around the dinner table...the Anne-Margo contrasts as seen in paintings...wonderful, wonderful.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Brooke

    I haven’t read Anne Frank’s original diary in many years, so when I saw this adaptation I knew I had to pick it up. I’m glad it exists, as it will bring Anne’s story to a new set of readers; however, as mentioned in the Adapter’s Note, so much of Anne’s diary had to be left out. Due to this, I think the graphic adaptation is a fantastic starting point or accompaniment, but it can not replace the original diary.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Elizabeth☮

    This is a beautiful book to hold. When you open it and are drawn into the world of the annex, it is so full of emotion. The images add to the text rather than detract from it. There are many pages where the image dominates and others where the text speaks for itself. The notes indicate that many parts of the diary were chunked for the sake of space, but I think this works for the format. I am so glad I read this one.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Laura

    I had forgotten all that was written and how well this diary was written. She was so young and yet wrote so well. I guess when you are going through difficult and unimaginable things it makes you grow up. I really liked the illustrations the artist did a great job. Very well done.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Genevieve

    I read The Diary of Anne Frank a long, long time ago when I was much younger. So I'd forgotten many, if not all, the details of the book. I remember just the gist of it - family goes into hiding during WW2, deprivations suffered during that period, family gets captured just before the war ends. Reading this graphic novel was like reading something I'd never read before. Anne's diary entries, her introspection, her assessments of everyone in the Annexe, they were all such a surprise to me. I had I read The Diary of Anne Frank a long, long time ago when I was much younger. So I'd forgotten many, if not all, the details of the book. I remember just the gist of it - family goes into hiding during WW2, deprivations suffered during that period, family gets captured just before the war ends. Reading this graphic novel was like reading something I'd never read before. Anne's diary entries, her introspection, her assessments of everyone in the Annexe, they were all such a surprise to me. I had to keep reminding myself that these entries were made by a young girl. A girl who had just turned into a teenager. Her views were so mature, precise and detailed. I doubt very many adults could write as she did. This graphic adaptation of The Diary of Anne Frank was an extremely different experience from reading the book. More visceral I think, in that, it really made me SEE the horrors of a WW2 experience. When you read a book, your mind imagines what you read so what you see in your mind depends entirely on whether you have a wild imagination or a staid one. It made it that much harder reading it in this form.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Beth Bonini

    The Diary of Anne Frank is a book that I vividly remember reading for the first time. Together with the 1978 miniseries Holocaust, it formed my earliest impressions of the Jewish Holocaust during World War II. Because I was very close to Anne’s age when I read her diary, I was particularly struck by the horror of her living conditions (the claustrophobia, boredom and constant fear). I tried to imagine myself coping in that situation, and I knew that I would not fare well. Her feelings - her worr The Diary of Anne Frank is a book that I vividly remember reading for the first time. Together with the 1978 miniseries Holocaust, it formed my earliest impressions of the Jewish Holocaust during World War II. Because I was very close to Anne’s age when I read her diary, I was particularly struck by the horror of her living conditions (the claustrophobia, boredom and constant fear). I tried to imagine myself coping in that situation, and I knew that I would not fare well. Her feelings - her worries and her struggles, both internal and external - seemed as real to me as my own. Years later, I tried to teach this book to 12 year olds and I surprised by their very lukewarm reaction to it. Most of them found her voice too ‘annoying’ and distant to feel relatable, and perhaps more constant exposure to the events of World War II rendered them less susceptible to the book’s horrors and message. I’m only guessing, really, but I remember being saddened that the book did not seem to have the power that it had for my generation. I provide this personal background as a sort of context to my reading of the new graphic adaptation by Ari Folman and illustrator David Polonsky. If you know the diary well, you will find enough of the original text to connect it to its familiar source. And certainly this adaptation does present the factual aspects of the story - the real-life ‘characters’ and the time-line of events - quite faithfully. There are some unexpected additions, although most of them are positive and did add to the emotional impact of the story. Folmon and Polonsky did take a few surprisingly liberties with the original source material, though - for instance, the description of female sexual parts. Perhaps I am being overly squeamish? As I read about the attraction which develops between Anne and Peter (the only teenager in the annexe other than Anne and her sister Margot), it struck me how little privacy they all had, for one thing, and also the inevitability of curiousity at that age. Perhaps Anne would have been completely forthright about such matters. I did find there were too many fart jokes and too many visual gags about Madame van Daan and her chamber pot, but no doubt the illustrator and writer were playing to their audience. I’ve not read many graphic novels, but I did admire the ingenious ways that Anne’s emotional state and her observations and occasional sharp sense of humour were rendered through illustrations. There is a particularly effective illustration of all of the characters at the dinner table, and everyone has the head of an animal and an apt thought bubble relating to their attitude towards food (pp. 74-75). The emotional volatility that Anne suffered from at age 13 and 14, just because of her age, really, was so magnified because of the close quarters and living conditions. Anne’s physical illnesses and bouts of depression were also emphasised more by being portrayed graphically and symbolically. This aspect of her story is so relatable, still, despite the (hopefully) unreal conditions which exacerbated Anne’s suffering. The graphic adaptation also fills in some background knowledge which adds a lot to the story. This ranges from the privileged lives of Anne’s parents, who had grown up in wealthy German families, to more detailed descriptions of the Dutch ‘angels’ who enable them to survive in an attic for nearly three years, to background about what was happening in Amsterdam as the war dragged on and conditions worsened for everyone, not just the Jews. I would like to think that if I taught this story again, using the graphic adaptation, my students would find that the imaginative and very visceral illustrations would enable them to bridge the gap between their own adolescence and Anne Frank’s. I don’t like to think of this adaptation being read instead of the original diary, but I think it is a very effective and affecting secondary source. 4.5 stars Thanks to Penguin and Viking Books for a free copy of this book.

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