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Thursday's Children

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A novel telling the story of Doone Penny and his fight to use his gift of dancing against mounting opposition.


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A novel telling the story of Doone Penny and his fight to use his gift of dancing against mounting opposition.

30 review for Thursday's Children

  1. 5 out of 5

    Sherwood Smith

    Books about ballet I read whenever I find them, and this one, I simply inhaled. I don't know why I didn't come across this one years ago--but then Rumer Godden has not always been a easy find in this country; by the time I was cruising the library shelves, a lot of her books had gone the way of the library discard and weren't replaced. The upside is the delight when I do discover them, and this book I read cover to cover in spite of a headache. I shouldn't have been reading at all, but I couldn't Books about ballet I read whenever I find them, and this one, I simply inhaled. I don't know why I didn't come across this one years ago--but then Rumer Godden has not always been a easy find in this country; by the time I was cruising the library shelves, a lot of her books had gone the way of the library discard and weren't replaced. The upside is the delight when I do discover them, and this book I read cover to cover in spite of a headache. I shouldn't have been reading at all, but I couldn't resist this tale of Doone Penny, a boy obsessed with ballet, and his complicated sister Crystal, who is groomed from babyhood to be the family star. Nobody is a two-dimensional white or black hat, and the extremely competitive world of ballet is examined unflinchingly, and yet with not only passion, but insight into what drives artists of any kind to make the choices they do.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Abigail

    A similarity in title and theme had led me to suppose, looking back after all these many years, that this book was written by Noel Streatfeild, an English writer best known in the United States as the author of the "Shoes" books. Imagine my surprise (and delight) when a recent online conversation helped me to realize that Rumer Godden, another English author whose work I admire, was the one responsible for this wonderful children's novel... The story of Doone Penny, a young boy who longs to study A similarity in title and theme had led me to suppose, looking back after all these many years, that this book was written by Noel Streatfeild, an English writer best known in the United States as the author of the "Shoes" books. Imagine my surprise (and delight) when a recent online conversation helped me to realize that Rumer Godden, another English author whose work I admire, was the one responsible for this wonderful children's novel... The story of Doone Penny, a young boy who longs to study ballet like his older sister, Thursday's Children is a moving portrait of a sensitive and artistic child, and his journey of self-discovery. Ridiculed for his desire to pursue such an "unmanly" occupation, discouraged by his jealous sister and mother, and abused by his father, Doone quickly discovers that pursuing a dream - particularly one that sets you apart - comes at a high cost. It has been more than twenty years since I read Godden's novel, which is named for the famous nursery rhyme: "Monday's child is fair of face, Tuesday's child is full of grace, Wednesday's child is full of woe, Thursday's child has far to go." But despite the passage of time, I can still remember the poignant sense of loneliness that it conjured up, just as the feeling of terror, evoked by the scene in which Doone is beaten by his father, has stayed with me to this day. I think it may have been my first exposure to the tragedy of child abuse.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Alaina

    There's just something about books that feature ballet that somehow suck me in. Not sure how many I've truly read throughout my life but I always find it soothing. Even if there's a murder mystery or fairy-tale twist. I think it's just the sport in general because when you watch ballet.. it's kind of peaceful. Or maybe that's me and I'm weird. In Thursday's Children, you will meet Doone Penny. Now he's a boy with a slight obsession: Ballet. Of course there's some drama because his sister, Crystal, There's just something about books that feature ballet that somehow suck me in. Not sure how many I've truly read throughout my life but I always find it soothing. Even if there's a murder mystery or fairy-tale twist. I think it's just the sport in general because when you watch ballet.. it's kind of peaceful. Or maybe that's me and I'm weird. In Thursday's Children, you will meet Doone Penny. Now he's a boy with a slight obsession: Ballet. Of course there's some drama because his sister, Crystal, is the star of the family. I, for one, am all for sibling rivalry - it's healthy competition to me. I also felt bad for Doone because he the black sheep within his own family. It's not his fault that he was born a baby boy when his own mother wanted another girl. She should still love him equally. Both characters definitely grew throughout this book. Out of the two, I really enjoyed getting to see Doone shine through ballet. Crystal was okay but she was definitely spoiled due to how her family basically said she was the best at every little thing. She definitely needed to be knocked down a peg or two to seem more relatable and likable. In the end, it was hard to find this book but I am happy that I dove into it.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Julie Davis

    This is one of Rumer Godden's books which focus on the world of ballet dancing, which she knew well from her own personal experience. We see the story of a brother and sister, one of whom is clearly born a dancer and one who is moved by other motivations but nonetheless who is also focused on dance. Godden's work, as always, can be heartbreaking in places but that is a result of her innate honesty. This is one of my favorite of her books and showcases her fine writing. This is one of Rumer Godden's books which focus on the world of ballet dancing, which she knew well from her own personal experience. We see the story of a brother and sister, one of whom is clearly born a dancer and one who is moved by other motivations but nonetheless who is also focused on dance. Godden's work, as always, can be heartbreaking in places but that is a result of her innate honesty. This is one of my favorite of her books and showcases her fine writing.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Emily

    Thursday's Children should be read as part of our greater Rumer Godden revival. I dug it out of the misc. female authors pile by the desk when I was looking for something exquisitely beautiful to read a few weeks ago. The only other adult book I've read of Ms. Godden's was The Lady and the Unicorn, which turns out to be her first and worst book, but Holly and Ivy is one of the best Christmas orphan stories of all time (Christmas orphans!) and the Japanese doll books are incredible. Thursday's Ch Thursday's Children should be read as part of our greater Rumer Godden revival. I dug it out of the misc. female authors pile by the desk when I was looking for something exquisitely beautiful to read a few weeks ago. The only other adult book I've read of Ms. Godden's was The Lady and the Unicorn, which turns out to be her first and worst book, but Holly and Ivy is one of the best Christmas orphan stories of all time (Christmas orphans!) and the Japanese doll books are incredible. Thursday's Children is certainly a book for grown-ups with grown-up comments and asides, but it is about children, which makes me wonder why anyone bothers with adult fiction when it's about children half the time anyway. It's structured in an interesting way, the only other place I've seen this is The Secret Garden, where one character arc spans half the book until its resolution when another character picks up the plot torch and runs another hundred pages to the end. (Thursday's Children is without the last Hail-Mary-redemption-of-the-hunchback-father-pass that rounds out Secret Garden). Concerning the Penny family, they're a greengrocer and wife in North London sometime back when the people were simple but middle class affluence was creeping in. Mrs. Penny desperately wants a daughter whom she can groom to be a famous dancer. Four sons later, she finally gets her daughter, Crystal, who is absolutely beautiful and everything her mother ever wanted and, while she's busy turning Crystal into Honey Boo Boo, she becomes accidentally pregnant with something she has no interest at all in and he ends up named Doone, as the parents were going to call him Lorna had he been a girl. Nobody wants Doone or bothers about him much except Beppo, the Italian tumbler who lives in the shed. Besides Beppo, with his early admonitions to keep limber and practice every day, Doone is a parasite on the side of whoever's stuck minding him, like Crystal who makes him carry her shoes when she goes to dance lessons at Madame Tamara's, where Doone is first enchanted by the ballet. Mrs. Penny is aggressive about Crystal's supposed prodigy and Doone tags along until he's accidentally noticed, and from then on Mrs. Penny makes them a package deal. Everyone hides this from Mr. Penny, who, when he does find out, can say that ballerinos are queers and he'll have none of it, because this is a book for grown-ups. Doone is bereft, but his life is one of exclusion and hard knocks so any one setback isn't as shattering as a combination of all the other setbacks together. His arc continues back to ballet school and up to the school of the Royal Ballet where he's finally found his place, and Crystal's story takes over. She's bound and determined to do something but she's also a moody adolescent whose passion isn't really ballet even though she's almost as talented as Doone and she's been raised to think she's the best. She's a bit spoiled and she's also in love with Yuri the special guest teacher at the Royal Ballet. And Crystal is great. Doone remains a child to the end of the book, he's still eleven or so, but Crystal manages to turn Thursday's Children into an awkward, early adolescent bildungsroman and it's perfect. http://surfeitofbooks.blogspot.com/20...

  6. 4 out of 5

    Rebecca

    Rumer Godden is a good story teller from my childhood and frequent trips to the Alvin Bolster Ricker Memorial LIbrary and Community House in Poland, Maine, where any book about a place that wasn't Poland, Maine was exciting. Her writing is just that: plain old good story telling. She's sort of Anne Tyler with less bitter in the sweet, Rosamund Pilcher in 150 fewer pages, Mary Stewart without the heavy romance, Angela Thirkell without the uppercrust. I like her, but I'd almost completely forgotte Rumer Godden is a good story teller from my childhood and frequent trips to the Alvin Bolster Ricker Memorial LIbrary and Community House in Poland, Maine, where any book about a place that wasn't Poland, Maine was exciting. Her writing is just that: plain old good story telling. She's sort of Anne Tyler with less bitter in the sweet, Rosamund Pilcher in 150 fewer pages, Mary Stewart without the heavy romance, Angela Thirkell without the uppercrust. I like her, but I'd almost completely forgotten about her, until I found two books by her at the church rummage sale in December, and here she is back! First off, this edition of THursday's Children has, hands down, the ugliest cover I have ever had the misfortune of seeing. I am not an artist, and I am pretty sure I could draw a more normal looking child's face than the one adorning both front and back of the book. I finally removed the paper cover and threw it away--far to painful to look at! Secondly, the story focused on ballet, and two kids in the same family who love it. As I think back through it, I realize that the characters are quite flat, the characterization virtually always direct, and Doone and his sister Crystal are both unrealistic children, but: I looked forward to curling up with the book for a few evenings. The book was published in 1984, which startled me: it feels like it was written in the 30's - 50's for some reason. Anyway. A pleasant read, so: three stars it is!

  7. 4 out of 5

    Sally

    Unexpectedly charming! I loved this book, although I actually didn't care much for Billy Elliott which obviously tells a similar story. Unexpectedly charming! I loved this book, although I actually didn't care much for Billy Elliott which obviously tells a similar story.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Line Magnus

    This was one of my favorite books when I was young, and I'm happy to say that it is still just as great when reading it as an adult. If you like Billy Elliot, you'll definitely love this. This was one of my favorite books when I was young, and I'm happy to say that it is still just as great when reading it as an adult. If you like Billy Elliot, you'll definitely love this.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Kirsty

    Rumer Godden is the author of over sixty works of fiction and non-fiction, for both children and adults. Virago have recently reprinted a handful of her books to add to their impressive canon of women’s fiction. First published in 1984, Thursday’s Children is amongst the newest offerings. As its title suggests, this novel is based upon the childhood rhyme ‘Monday’s Child’, in which ‘Thursday’s child has far to go’ – a definite precedent for the story which Godden has woven. Thursday’s Children fo Rumer Godden is the author of over sixty works of fiction and non-fiction, for both children and adults. Virago have recently reprinted a handful of her books to add to their impressive canon of women’s fiction. First published in 1984, Thursday’s Children is amongst the newest offerings. As its title suggests, this novel is based upon the childhood rhyme ‘Monday’s Child’, in which ‘Thursday’s child has far to go’ – a definite precedent for the story which Godden has woven. Thursday’s Children focuses upon a young boy named Doone Penny, who was ‘born to dance’. His sister Crystal, also a dancer, receives much of the attention in the Penny family, and Doone’s brothers and father look upon him with something akin to contempt at times, believing that any boy who enjoys ballet is the worst kind of ‘sissy’. He is the youngest child in rather a large family, a surprise baby who was born to a mother who wanted her beloved daughter, born after four boys, to be her last. ‘To be the youngest in a family is supposed to be enviable, but that is in fairy-tales; with four older brothers and an important older sister, Doone rarely had a chance to speak’. From the start, Doone is not treasured as he should have been: ‘… he was an unsatisfactory child… [he] was persistently ragamuffin, his socks falling down, his shoes scuffed… he was often puzzled and, often, when spoken to seemed curiously absent, too dreamy to be trusted with the simplest message. He was to be a failure at school – every term a worse report – did not learn to read properly till he was ten and was so silent that he seemed to Ma secretive’. The first part of the novel opens with Doone’s spoilt elder sister complaining about having to take her brother along to the dance class which she attends. Since his early childhood, Doone has been largely ignored by those around him, and even his mother sees him as somewhat of a burden. He is an incredibly musical child and is taught to play the mouth organ when a tiny little boy by a wonderfully crafted little man named Beppo who helps out in his father’s North London grocery shop. When Beppo is forced to leave his employment, Doone realises ‘that now there was nobody who wanted him’. When the eldest brother, Will, suggests that he should be given lessons in his beloved mouth organ as it is unfair that the majority of the family’s money is spent on Crystal and her dancing, Ma Penny says, ‘… when, in a family, one child has real talent, the rest have to make some sacrifice’. Doone’s own love of dancing is realised when he is given the opportunity to attend a professional ballet performance with his mother. He begins to have clandestine dance classes along with four other London boys. It is a coming of age novel of the most satisfying type. We see Doone, our protagonist, grow before our eyes, and triumph over the situations and family members which try to overcome him. Dance runs throughout the entire book, as one might expect given the storyline. However, Godden has gone further than merely to write about dance. Indeed, the novel is presented as something akin to a theatre programme, outlining the ‘cast list’ before it begins, and opening with a ‘Prelude’, which sets out the ‘World Premiere of Yuri Koszorz’s “Leda and the Swan”‘. Here, Doone has been cast as a cygnet: ‘No boy of that age, in Mr Max’s remembrance, had been entrusted with dancing a solo role in a ballet at the Royal Theatre’. Despite this prelude merely being Doone’s dream, these nice touches to the book launch us straight into the life of the ballet. Godden’s writing is marvellous. She weaves an absorbing story and intersperses it with touching anecdotes about its characters, pitch perfect dialogue and the loveliest of descriptions. The settings which she uses come to life in the mind of the reader: ‘It was only a prelude; the music changed, the clouds came down, and Doone could feel an almost magnetic stir in the audience beyond the orchestra pit’, and ‘the Royal Theatre, for an English-born dancer, was not only the Mecca, the peak of ambition, but also home’. Her love of dancing and the theatre shines through on every page: ‘the music, the lights, the little girls – it seemed to him a hundred little girls – all in party dresses and dancing shoes, moving to the music in what seemed to him a miracle of marching, running, leaping’. Her character descriptions, too, give us a real feel for the leading men and women of the book: ‘It was difficult to believe Pa had once been a romantic young man who, when he was not learning to be a greengrocer, willingly went without tea or supper to go to a musical or a revue’.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Barb

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. Set in London, England in an undesignated time, (though clues point to late 1960s or early 1970s), Thursday's Children is a double narrative of two young dancers, Doone and his older sister Crystal. Crystal is the much-doted upon daughter of the middle-class Penny family, the long-desired girl following four older brothers; Doone is her younger brother - an unwelcome "afterthought" child - decidedly unplanned for and viewed with bemusement and a shade of resentment by Maud ("Ma") Penny, whose fa Set in London, England in an undesignated time, (though clues point to late 1960s or early 1970s), Thursday's Children is a double narrative of two young dancers, Doone and his older sister Crystal. Crystal is the much-doted upon daughter of the middle-class Penny family, the long-desired girl following four older brothers; Doone is her younger brother - an unwelcome "afterthought" child - decidedly unplanned for and viewed with bemusement and a shade of resentment by Maud ("Ma") Penny, whose family yearnings were more than fulfilled by Crystal's appearance. Turns out that Ma was once a dancing chorus girl; her ambitions for Crystal are much grander - nothing but ballet lessons with the "Russian" Madame Tamara (who incidentally started out life as plain old English Minnie Price) will do. Doone, dragged along by an unwilling Crystal to her Saturday morning dance classes, falls in love with the music and the movement, and away our story goes on its predictable little track. Rumer Godden proceeds to work her charms with the material at hand. Doone is almost too good for belief; not only is he a piano-playing prodigy and a natural dancer, he is a thoroughly sweet, sensitive, and likeably nice child as well, despite his family's dual neglect and bullying. Doone, unsupported by his own family in his quest, is providentially blessed with a series of understanding artsy unrelated adults who instantly recognize his budding genius and smooth his path at every turn. I find that though his dogged "goodness" occasionally annoys, in general I quite like Doone; he shows occasional flashes of wit and bad temper which redeem him from total Little Loud Fauntleroyism. Crystal, on the other hand, is a far from likeable child. Vain, fickle and scheming, she manipulates everyone in her little world, especially her besotted mother. Jealous of Doone's recognition by their shared teachers, Crystal actively plots his thwarting, though her schemes are immediately recognized by those omnipotent adults as the two siblings rise through the ranks to their eventual placements in the exclusive Royal Ballet School. The characters are allowed to develop in a reasonably natural way, and they surprise us occasionally by their responses, which keeps things interesting though in the main our predictions prove to be correct. Crystal is eventually allowed her chance at redemption; rather a Rumer Godden specialty - she does go to some lengths to allow her characters to show multiple personality facets. Rumer Godden herself had a life-long involvement with dance, as a long-time dance student who returned to England to train as a teacher, eventually running her own dance school in Calcutta, so all of the technical talk rings true. Many of the figures in the novel are inspired by actual personages in the British dance world; Yuri Koszorz is a direct take-off of Rudolf Nureyev, and the author has dedicated the book to the legendary Ninette de Valois. This is a novel in which nothing much happens; the characters are important mostly to themselves and their adventures are the small adventures of ordinary people, but as a simple story competently told it can be counted as one of Rumer Godden's more satisfying minor novels.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Felicity

    I absolutely loved this book. Donne is the youngest of 6 children and by watching his sister's dancing lessons realises he loves to dance. But he's got to convince his parents he's good and deserves lessons and that's not easy when you are youngest and your parents don't have much money. I would have loved this in my childhood and it reminds me of Noel Streatfeild who was one of my favourite authors growing up. It's well written, has brilliant characters and explores family relationships, and the I absolutely loved this book. Donne is the youngest of 6 children and by watching his sister's dancing lessons realises he loves to dance. But he's got to convince his parents he's good and deserves lessons and that's not easy when you are youngest and your parents don't have much money. I would have loved this in my childhood and it reminds me of Noel Streatfeild who was one of my favourite authors growing up. It's well written, has brilliant characters and explores family relationships, and the dancing industry. A brilliant read for any child and any adult and a must read for fans of Noel Streatfeild.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Thannasset

    Really fine coming-of-age novel, story of family life, examination of child-parent and sibling relationships, valuable look at the education and growth of gifted children..and all that makes it sound terribly worthy and dull. Not so! Very good story, and this author never over-writes. May be her best book. Often has her work categorized as 'children's' or 'young adult' because she often writes about children. Does this make sense to anyone out there? Really fine coming-of-age novel, story of family life, examination of child-parent and sibling relationships, valuable look at the education and growth of gifted children..and all that makes it sound terribly worthy and dull. Not so! Very good story, and this author never over-writes. May be her best book. Often has her work categorized as 'children's' or 'young adult' because she often writes about children. Does this make sense to anyone out there?

  13. 4 out of 5

    Cindy

    A fine story of the fierce desire for ballet by a young boy. Love of dance and music with hard work and sacrifice; learning how to be yourself.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Monica Mpolela

    this book is really good .

  15. 4 out of 5

    Polly

    Charming. I think I may have read this when I was a child, but I'm not sure. Doone is a lovely character! Charming. I think I may have read this when I was a child, but I'm not sure. Doone is a lovely character!

  16. 5 out of 5

    Louise Culmer

    Doone Penny is the youngest child in a large family of brothers and one sister. His mother, weary of having boys, is thrilled when she has a daughter at last. She adores her daughter Crystal and doesn't want another child, still less another boy, so when Doone turns up she is not pleased. She hopes that pretty, talented Crystal will fulfill her own dream of being a dancer. But it is Doone who has a real passion for dancing, and longs to learn ballet with Crystal. And it is Doone who turns out to Doone Penny is the youngest child in a large family of brothers and one sister. His mother, weary of having boys, is thrilled when she has a daughter at last. She adores her daughter Crystal and doesn't want another child, still less another boy, so when Doone turns up she is not pleased. She hopes that pretty, talented Crystal will fulfill her own dream of being a dancer. But it is Doone who has a real passion for dancing, and longs to learn ballet with Crystal. And it is Doone who turns out to have the great talent for dance, much to Crystal's annoyance. this is quite an entertaining story, though personally I found Doone a bit too good to be true - he's so talented, sensitive, good etc that I began to sympathise with Crystal, who finds him very annoying. Once Doone has overcome the initial objection to him learning ballet, there is nothing to stop his steady path to success. Not even a glimmer of uncetainty that he will be a star. crystal, with all her faults, is actually a more interesting character.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Susan

    I have loved this book for years, ever since I first got it from the library. Now the libraries no longer have it (it's too OLD, I guess), so I have ordered it to have as my own. I've just finished reading it three times in a row (get to the end, go back to beginning and start over.) I have no idea why I enjoy this book so much, but I always want more when I get to the end. Since there is no sequel (that I know of), the only answer is to read it again! The personalities of the two children are b I have loved this book for years, ever since I first got it from the library. Now the libraries no longer have it (it's too OLD, I guess), so I have ordered it to have as my own. I've just finished reading it three times in a row (get to the end, go back to beginning and start over.) I have no idea why I enjoy this book so much, but I always want more when I get to the end. Since there is no sequel (that I know of), the only answer is to read it again! The personalities of the two children are beautifully drawn, and the descriptions make you see them. I find myself paging back just to read a description of something when it is mentioned again later in the book. Just a wonderful read. Having another read, while taking a break and waiting for the next Dresden Files to arrive: 5/28/16 And again.... 02/08/17. I can't get enough of this book! Another reread April 2022

  18. 5 out of 5

    Verity W

    It's not often you get a ballet book about a boy - or at least with a boy as the central character. And Doone is thoroughly engaging (unlike his monstrous sister) and you're rooting for him as he tries to follow his dream and over come all the obstacles in his path. I haven't read a lot of Rumer Godden's books, but this is a cracker. I will say however that I was thinking about lending this on to my niece - but I think it's a little too grown up for her. Young Adult really in the latter stages ra It's not often you get a ballet book about a boy - or at least with a boy as the central character. And Doone is thoroughly engaging (unlike his monstrous sister) and you're rooting for him as he tries to follow his dream and over come all the obstacles in his path. I haven't read a lot of Rumer Godden's books, but this is a cracker. I will say however that I was thinking about lending this on to my niece - but I think it's a little too grown up for her. Young Adult really in the latter stages rather than 8-12.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Rachel Neumeier

    If you'd like a story that revolves around ballet, you'll love this. If you think you'd hate a story that revolves around ballet, you're (probably) mistaken: like all great stories, this one is actually about life and family and finding your place in the world and what it means to be successful. And, yes, it also involves ballet. It's a beautiful story and well worth the effort it takes to track it down. If you'd like a story that revolves around ballet, you'll love this. If you think you'd hate a story that revolves around ballet, you're (probably) mistaken: like all great stories, this one is actually about life and family and finding your place in the world and what it means to be successful. And, yes, it also involves ballet. It's a beautiful story and well worth the effort it takes to track it down.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Judith

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. Young Doone Penny want to practice ballet more than anything else and has a gift for it. Though his father doesn't want him to do ballet and though his sister is very jealous at his obvious talent, he persists and gets one of the most important roles a young boy can get in the world of ballet. This is a story of remarkable talent and daring to do what you love, no matter what the world around you thinks. Young Doone Penny want to practice ballet more than anything else and has a gift for it. Though his father doesn't want him to do ballet and though his sister is very jealous at his obvious talent, he persists and gets one of the most important roles a young boy can get in the world of ballet. This is a story of remarkable talent and daring to do what you love, no matter what the world around you thinks.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Vikki

    The copyright date on this book is 1984. This is the first Rumer Godden book that I read. I absolutely loved it. I got so caught up in the art world of ballet and piano. This is the story of Doone and his sister Crystal. Doone is full of talent and "went far". (Thursdays child has far to go.) This was a really good book. The copyright date on this book is 1984. This is the first Rumer Godden book that I read. I absolutely loved it. I got so caught up in the art world of ballet and piano. This is the story of Doone and his sister Crystal. Doone is full of talent and "went far". (Thursdays child has far to go.) This was a really good book.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Karen Levay

    I’ve enjoyed every Rumer Godden book I’ve read. Thursday’s Child follows a brother and sister as they enter the tough ballet world. The tale of the innocent yet persistent and extremely talented Doone and the spoiled entitled Crystal from early childhood through their training is hard to put down.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Emma Harrison

    Sometimes reading a children's book takes you back and makes you appreciate what amazing things books are and what a privilege it is to be able to read them. The first book I really remember enjoying reading was by this author and I loved reading this one too. Sometimes reading a children's book takes you back and makes you appreciate what amazing things books are and what a privilege it is to be able to read them. The first book I really remember enjoying reading was by this author and I loved reading this one too.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Elizabeth

    Great story of a young man who wants to be a ballet dancer at White Lodge, the school in England. For Ballet lovers only.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Karen

    I enjoy Rumer Godden's book so much. Thursday's Children reminds me of her other book Pippa Passes. I enjoy Rumer Godden's book so much. Thursday's Children reminds me of her other book Pippa Passes.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Wangũi

    Loved it, loved it, loved it! Doone simply endears you to himself with his childlike innocence!

  27. 5 out of 5

    Sara

    Godden explores the strength and vulnerability of children, but best of all, true passion for dance.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Anne

    I read this book years ago, before I even started ballet. The title stayed with me to this day, so I think that tells you something about the impact it had.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Regina

    Very original story.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Rosemary

    Very nearly as good as "She shall have music". Good ballet story which I believe predates Billy Elliot. :) Very nearly as good as "She shall have music". Good ballet story which I believe predates Billy Elliot. :)

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