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The Art of Happiness at Work

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Following the massive success of THE ART OF HAPPINESS, the Dalai Lama & Howard Cutler now bring their bestselling message to our working lives. Of the many Dalai Lama titles on sale, THE ART OF HAPPINESS - written with western psychiatrist Howard Cutler - is by far the biggest bestseller of them all. A huge international success, it has sold over 2 million copies worldwide Following the massive success of THE ART OF HAPPINESS, the Dalai Lama & Howard Cutler now bring their bestselling message to our working lives. Of the many Dalai Lama titles on sale, THE ART OF HAPPINESS - written with western psychiatrist Howard Cutler - is by far the biggest bestseller of them all. A huge international success, it has sold over 2 million copies worldwide, with nearly 300,000 of these in the UK alone. Now, this inspirational new book brings the successful East-meets-West pairing together again to provide a practical application of Tibetan Buddhist spiritual values to the world of work. In this wise and practical book, the Dalai Lama shows us how to place our working lives into the context of our lives as a whole. Rather than striving to find a role which suits us, we should allow our work to arise naturally from who we are - and what is most important to us. From here we reach a pathway that can lead us to true life fulfilment and purpose.


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Following the massive success of THE ART OF HAPPINESS, the Dalai Lama & Howard Cutler now bring their bestselling message to our working lives. Of the many Dalai Lama titles on sale, THE ART OF HAPPINESS - written with western psychiatrist Howard Cutler - is by far the biggest bestseller of them all. A huge international success, it has sold over 2 million copies worldwide Following the massive success of THE ART OF HAPPINESS, the Dalai Lama & Howard Cutler now bring their bestselling message to our working lives. Of the many Dalai Lama titles on sale, THE ART OF HAPPINESS - written with western psychiatrist Howard Cutler - is by far the biggest bestseller of them all. A huge international success, it has sold over 2 million copies worldwide, with nearly 300,000 of these in the UK alone. Now, this inspirational new book brings the successful East-meets-West pairing together again to provide a practical application of Tibetan Buddhist spiritual values to the world of work. In this wise and practical book, the Dalai Lama shows us how to place our working lives into the context of our lives as a whole. Rather than striving to find a role which suits us, we should allow our work to arise naturally from who we are - and what is most important to us. From here we reach a pathway that can lead us to true life fulfilment and purpose.

30 review for The Art of Happiness at Work

  1. 4 out of 5

    Laura Lynch

    This book was inspiring, so much so that I read it twice. The comments of the Dalai Lama on happiness at work are relevant and based on common sense and spirituality. One idea is that you have freedom to choose how you approach your career and your co-workers, although other aspects may be beyond your control.. Attitude and balance are also key along with finding your purpose at work. It can be as simple as smiling at people and offering encouragement. Lastly, look at problems both job and life This book was inspiring, so much so that I read it twice. The comments of the Dalai Lama on happiness at work are relevant and based on common sense and spirituality. One idea is that you have freedom to choose how you approach your career and your co-workers, although other aspects may be beyond your control.. Attitude and balance are also key along with finding your purpose at work. It can be as simple as smiling at people and offering encouragement. Lastly, look at problems both job and life related as opportunities to be pro-active in a positive way.

  2. 4 out of 5

    robin friedman

    The Dalai Lama And The Workplace In 1998, the Dalai Lama joined Dr. Howard C. Cutler, an American psychiatrist, in writing a book "The Art of Happiness" which became a best-seller. This book taught the importance of "looking within" and of controlling destructive emotions in living a good life and finding happiness. Dr. Cutler and the Dalai Lama have again collaborated in this follow-up book which applies the insights of the initial volume to life situations which are, typically, the sources of gr The Dalai Lama And The Workplace In 1998, the Dalai Lama joined Dr. Howard C. Cutler, an American psychiatrist, in writing a book "The Art of Happiness" which became a best-seller. This book taught the importance of "looking within" and of controlling destructive emotions in living a good life and finding happiness. Dr. Cutler and the Dalai Lama have again collaborated in this follow-up book which applies the insights of the initial volume to life situations which are, typically, the sources of great conflict. Several additional books, in addition to this book exploring the world of work, are underway. The book is based upon a series of conversations held between the Dalai Lama and Dr. Cutler over the course of several years. Dr. Cutler is responsible for the format and editing of the book. The final product was read and approved by the Dalai Lama's interpreter. Early in the volume, the Dalai Lama reminds Dr. Cutler that the focus of the inquiry is "secular ethics" (p.7) One of the most valuable features of the book is that it shows how the Dalai Lama can use his spiritual tradition to articulate values that can be shared by many people, whether or not they are religious believers. Another feature of the book is the significance of the subject matter. Many people trust and listen to the Dalai Lama where they will be reluctant to accept possibly similar advice from experts, such as psychiatrists, or from teachers in Western religious traditions. The book is deceptively simple in tone and teaching, but hard to realize. In a series of discussions Dr. Cutler explores with the Dalai Lama the reasons why many people tend to be bored or dissatisfied with their jobs. Dr. Cutler brings to bear many anecdotes from his work as a psychiatrist as well has his familiarity with much contemporary literature on job satisfaction. The Dalai Lama brings to bear his wisdom and insight. Time and again during the conversations, the Dalai Lama takes issue with Dr. Cutler, forcing him to redirect and rephrase his questions and assumptions, and to change the tenor of his approach to questions of happiness in the workplace. The Dalai Lama's approach is circumspect. He reiterates that the situation of every individual differs and that questions about work admit of no easy solution. In other words,it is not a case of "one size fits all." With that said the issues and insights in the book are valuable. Chief among these for me are the Dalai Lama's comments on self-understanding. Much difficulty at work is caused by having an overly inflated or an overly deflated view of ourselves and our abilities. This causes discontent because it gives a picture of our abilities and our expectations of ourselves that are out of touch with reality. Similarly, the Dalai's teachings in this book about patience, humility, self-control, and compassion for one's co-workers provide a great deal to think about in approaching the workplace. The Dalai Lama, in common with others who have thought about these matters, distinguishes between views of work as a "job", simply to support oneself, a "career", with the goal of advancement and growth, and a "calling" in which a person does what he or she finds important to be of service to others. People necessarily occupy different spaces on this continuum. For some people, the goal properly should be to learn the value of one's work and to move towards viewing it as a calling. The book also teaches that work and money-making are not the sole source of happiness and urges the reader to develop other interests, particularly a sense of connection to others through family or through interests and activities outside the workplace. Many of the criticisms of this book and its predecessor that I have seen turn on the respective roles of the Dalai Lama and Dr. Cutler. Dr. Cutler serves, I think, as a foil to the Dalai Lama. In the book, the voices of the two principal are distinct, allowing the reader to capture a good deal of the spirit of the Dalai Lama. There is also a tendency to criticize the book for its simplicity. I agree the teachings of the book are simple, but in practice they are difficult of realization. A virtue of the book is its very accessibility which makes it possible for the reader to try to use it for benefit in his or her own case. Finally, it should be pointed out again that this book does not purport to be an introduction to Buddhism. It is a work of secular (or applied) ethics. There are ample books available, including many works of the Dalai Lama, for those who would like a specifically Buddhist study. One can learn from this book regardless of commitment or lack of commitment to any religion. I thought this book helped me with questions that have bothered me for years. I also found that the book would probably be useful to many of my coworkers and, perhaps, useful as well, to management where I work. This book will not solve any person's workplace issues, but it will encourage the reader to reconsider and to sharpen his or her focus to address these issues. Robin Friedman

  3. 4 out of 5

    Erin Cisewski

    This book leaned heavily toward the experiences of upper class western industrial workers. Many examples seemed to be from corporate ladder climbers. The brief mention of working class women (who work in a supermarket) critiqued their attitude toward the customer/author whom they were serving. It criticized one worker's attitude and demeanor and how it affected the author/customer negatively, without giving space for a larger social analysis of the situation. I want to read the book written by t This book leaned heavily toward the experiences of upper class western industrial workers. Many examples seemed to be from corporate ladder climbers. The brief mention of working class women (who work in a supermarket) critiqued their attitude toward the customer/author whom they were serving. It criticized one worker's attitude and demeanor and how it affected the author/customer negatively, without giving space for a larger social analysis of the situation. I want to read the book written by this working class woman who sits down with the Dalai Lama to discuss the art of happiness at work.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Cat

    This got very repetitive, and ultimately I think the issue is Dr. Cutler was trying to get the Dalai Lama to opine on a subject he isn't an expert on. The Dalai Lama doesn't know how to be a happy cog in a capitalist wheel, anymore than Dr. Cutler knows how to be a Buddhist monk. I think if they'd leaned into that and explored that more, this might have been a satisfying book - but it would have needed a different title entirely. This got very repetitive, and ultimately I think the issue is Dr. Cutler was trying to get the Dalai Lama to opine on a subject he isn't an expert on. The Dalai Lama doesn't know how to be a happy cog in a capitalist wheel, anymore than Dr. Cutler knows how to be a Buddhist monk. I think if they'd leaned into that and explored that more, this might have been a satisfying book - but it would have needed a different title entirely.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Laurie

    This helped me to deal with a situation at work of being bullied by a co-worker. I also shared some of the principals with middle and high school students I work with, specifically the concept of working for the money vs. career aspirations/fame vs. a calling; that one must follow a calling to be truly happy and can combined with the other factors but not excluded.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Lisa RV

    Somewhat repetitive and redundant

  7. 4 out of 5

    Ali Hannah

    The Dali Lama offers timeless wisdom in this book. Great read on the train to the office each day.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Jill

    Quotes to remember: “He reminds us that if we can change some of the external conditions at the workplace that contribute to our dissatisfaction, we certainly should. If not, although it is not always easy or quick, it is still possible to be happy at work through reshaping our attitudes and outlook, through inner training.” Look at a tense situation as a way to improve yourself. Stay calm and react with dignity. “Our attitudes about money are more important than the amount we make. As always, in Quotes to remember: “He reminds us that if we can change some of the external conditions at the workplace that contribute to our dissatisfaction, we certainly should. If not, although it is not always easy or quick, it is still possible to be happy at work through reshaping our attitudes and outlook, through inner training.” Look at a tense situation as a way to improve yourself. Stay calm and react with dignity. “Our attitudes about money are more important than the amount we make. As always, in our pursuit of happiness, our inner resources assume a greater role than our material resources, unless of course we exist in abject poverty and are suffering from hunger or starvation.” – Choose the career you love, not where you will make the most money. “One should not just concentrate on job or money. That’s important.” “The principle of adaptation suggests that no matter what kind of success or good fortune we experience, or, alternatively, no matter what adversity or tragedy we encounter, sooner or later we tend to adapt to the new conditions and eventually migrate back to our customary levels of day-to-day and moment-to-moment happiness.” This is to not lose initiative. Need a balanced life. Help others. Job vs. Career vs. Calling. “whether we are obstructed from achieving our goals by overestimating or underestimating our abilities and skills, there is little doubt that the greater our self-understanding and self-awareness, the more our self-concept corresponds with reality, the happier we will be at work or at home.” “So if you’re looking for work and have a choice of a job, choose a job that allows the opportunity for some creativity, and for spending time with your family. Even if it means less pay, personally I think it is better to choose work that is less demanding, that gives you greater freedom, more time to e with your family, or to do other activities, read, engage in cultural activities, or just play. I think that’s best.” “It would seem reasonable that basing one’s identity on the essence rather than the external form would decrease the likelihood that one would be devastated by the loss of any particular role or job – after all, the essence is portable and can be transferred to any activity, any given relationship, hobby, or job.” “If you can, serve others. If not, at least refrain from harming them.” Now, if we sell software and may have had an unproductive day in terms of not having had a single sales, we can still have a sense of accomplishment if we have had some positive interactions with our customers or co-workers, if we’ve made their day just a little bit better. Our day is now transformed into a productive day that we can take pride in. Being of some benefit to others, may provide us with many new sources of satisfaction that can sustain our sense of price and accomplishment even during the inevitable slow periods of our career. “Even a simple smile can have some impact on my overall state of mind. So, everything is interconnected, interdependent. When you appreciate the interconnected nature of all aspects of your life, then you will understand how various factors – such as your values, your attitudes, your emotional state – can all contribute to your sense of fulfillment at work, and to your satisfaction and happiness in life.” Meditate – focus on breathing for 5-10 minutes. Acquire the ability to cultivate a settled mental state that you can then successfully direct to any chosen topic. In this way, you will be able to overcome many of the problems that arise simply as a results of an unfocused, undisciplined mental state.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Eve Kay

    There are several reasons for me to dislike this book so I'll do my best to keep it short. Firstly, I read it in the hopes of finding any kind of an answer to my current job situation. I did not find any. Also, it was apparent from the beginning I wasn't going to. Dalailama says on several occasions in the book that he hasn't got an answer to a question or that the question he is asked needs to be viewed from the person's view whom it concerns. He also gave vast amounts of answers I already knew m There are several reasons for me to dislike this book so I'll do my best to keep it short. Firstly, I read it in the hopes of finding any kind of an answer to my current job situation. I did not find any. Also, it was apparent from the beginning I wasn't going to. Dalailama says on several occasions in the book that he hasn't got an answer to a question or that the question he is asked needs to be viewed from the person's view whom it concerns. He also gave vast amounts of answers I already knew myself without having read any kind of book like this before. Which made me question my need for such books. I learned from the first chapter that I need to adjust my attitude to my work but there was no advice given what to do with colleagues who are aholes and do not care are you nice to them or not. Secondly, many of the topics discussed in this book do not concern me. For example the whole chapter on money. When there is a topic that I'd be intrested in, it's discussed from the wrong point of view for my case so it doesn't apply to me! For example they discussed how nice it is to have nice colleagues but my problem are colleagues who seem to do too much yacking and too little working. I go to work to work not to explain in detail what I did over the weekend, hence, I end up doing most of the work. There is also too much focus on things like the state of mind called flow state and it just went on for way too long. Lastly, I just hate the way the book is written and put together. I find it so annoying that the author has spent words and pages on describing how they had tea with Dalailama or how there was a pause before he answered or there was a certain look on his face. Just get to the point! What I did enjoy was Dalailama's honesty. What I got out of the book was that I just need to trust my inner voice. Dalailama's best advice to me was that I should get an easy job where I could have more time to myself and my hobbies, even if it pays less, and that is something I have been dreaming about for a long time.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Amanda

    This seemed like the perfect book to pick up and read. I have deep respect for The Dalai Lama and I really needed some advice on how to be happier at work. I used to really love my job. It was exciting, for the most part, and every day usually held something new and challenging in store. Nowadays, it's not like that. There's a distinct vibe of us vs. them in most cases, IT vs. Accountants. Some of the financial folk chose to think that anyone can program so they'll just take care of what they wan This seemed like the perfect book to pick up and read. I have deep respect for The Dalai Lama and I really needed some advice on how to be happier at work. I used to really love my job. It was exciting, for the most part, and every day usually held something new and challenging in store. Nowadays, it's not like that. There's a distinct vibe of us vs. them in most cases, IT vs. Accountants. Some of the financial folk chose to think that anyone can program so they'll just take care of what they want and ignore us programmers. The work isn't nearly challenging enough either, although the people are. Cutler interviews The Dalai Lama about various aspects of work in regards to happiness. For example, they chat about making money, the human factor of work, whether your job is just a job, a career or a calling, how to overcome boredom, how to have a right livelihood, etc. I appreciated his insight on all of the above. Unfortunately, while I think it's all good advice, it will be difficult to put into practice. In one chapter, and throughout others, the importance of being self-aware is emphasized. I think a lot of people have that problem, to be able to look at themselves and their abilities undistorted and with a critical eye. All in all, the way to achieve happiness, at work or otherwise, is to begin inwards, by readjusting your attitude to all things and remembering that it's just work and that doing good and helping others is more important.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Gloria

    A rather rapid read, actually, if you are somewhat familiar with some Buddhist concepts, but a life-time to master.... The book is "written" by the Dalai Lama, but essentially it is this doctor's interviews with the Dalai Lama, with a lot of his own commentary added. While it does seem a little of a bit of a misrepresentation, I don't think, if you can get over that, it is a *terrible* book, but a decent book. Actually, the interviewer gets to play the part of the naif, and one can appreciate it A rather rapid read, actually, if you are somewhat familiar with some Buddhist concepts, but a life-time to master.... The book is "written" by the Dalai Lama, but essentially it is this doctor's interviews with the Dalai Lama, with a lot of his own commentary added. While it does seem a little of a bit of a misrepresentation, I don't think, if you can get over that, it is a *terrible* book, but a decent book. Actually, the interviewer gets to play the part of the naif, and one can appreciate it in a weird way. A good reminder during tough times.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Beth Miller

    Here's the thing about this book that both I and my son Rob found irritating. It's too much of the co-author's perspective and not enough of the Dalai Lama. It's also incredibly surface level for a book whose subject should be a deeper examination of Tibetan Buddhism in the context of our work lives - our "right livelihood." I don't know. I found it fluffy and pop culturish, which the Dalai Lama is anything but. So...I can't say I'd really recommend it. Here's the thing about this book that both I and my son Rob found irritating. It's too much of the co-author's perspective and not enough of the Dalai Lama. It's also incredibly surface level for a book whose subject should be a deeper examination of Tibetan Buddhism in the context of our work lives - our "right livelihood." I don't know. I found it fluffy and pop culturish, which the Dalai Lama is anything but. So...I can't say I'd really recommend it.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Linda

    I generally like what I have read about/by the Dalai Lama, but I didn't like as much the interviews of him by this author. Maybe it was from too Western a perspective and tried to fit the DL's answers into a Western understanding. Or maybe the Dalai Lama has just never had to work with Harvard doctors. I generally like what I have read about/by the Dalai Lama, but I didn't like as much the interviews of him by this author. Maybe it was from too Western a perspective and tried to fit the DL's answers into a Western understanding. Or maybe the Dalai Lama has just never had to work with Harvard doctors.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Destiny

    I really enjoyed reading the Dalai Lama's perspective. However, I feel that he just has no concept of what it is like to live and work in the Western world. He never has, of course, so it is hard for me to find what he says helpful in any practical sort of way. I really enjoyed reading the Dalai Lama's perspective. However, I feel that he just has no concept of what it is like to live and work in the Western world. He never has, of course, so it is hard for me to find what he says helpful in any practical sort of way.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Tara Lynn

    I found the suggestions about Happiness at Work in this book to cover a broad range of jobs and people in a helpful and meaningful way.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Major Doug

    Listened to this book: somewhat confusing getting 'work' advice from someone who does 'nothing' for a living. Dr. Howie might be stretching this theme a bit... Listened to this book: somewhat confusing getting 'work' advice from someone who does 'nothing' for a living. Dr. Howie might be stretching this theme a bit...

  17. 5 out of 5

    Terry

    I read this book when I worked at Marsh. Alex loaned it to me. Should be a must read for high school and college graduates. One of my favorite books about calling and career.

  18. 5 out of 5

    April Newman

    I just can't bring myself to give anything that the Dalai Lama is involved with 2 stars, so the the three stars are for the general Buddhist advice and good cheer that the Dali Lama brought to the table. But overall, this is a lemon. How/why is the Dali Lama writing with this other dude? Cutler reviewed a lot of positive psychology stuff that I know about/agree with, but retold it in such a way that was irritating. Like how he pesters the Dali Lama about topics he does not give a s%^$ about and t I just can't bring myself to give anything that the Dalai Lama is involved with 2 stars, so the the three stars are for the general Buddhist advice and good cheer that the Dali Lama brought to the table. But overall, this is a lemon. How/why is the Dali Lama writing with this other dude? Cutler reviewed a lot of positive psychology stuff that I know about/agree with, but retold it in such a way that was irritating. Like how he pesters the Dali Lama about topics he does not give a s%^$ about and then tries to distill it into some meaningful advice for readers. There is most definite some white dude snobbery at work with Cutler too, some unexamined privilege. The moment where he lost me was when he was writing about his previous experience as an artist and went to art school, but then was questioned "what's the point?" And his realization was that art was pointless and didn't help anyone, so he gave it all up to be a doctor. A tad presumptive and problematic. Artists can do a lot for our society, but certainly ones with vision or something to say. It seemed like the Dali Lama recognized some Cutler's assumptions were not helpful, and he balked from making generalizations about subsets of people, which Cutler asked for time and again. So there was a lot of internal point of view drivel where Cutler is explaining why the Dali Lama does not get Western society, or what he wants the Dali Lama to talk about to be satisfied. If you can ignore the writer, this is not terrible, and just more reminders that life is about your own attitude for the most part, what you can control, and that you might just be a happier person if you choose relationships and helping people/the world over just money.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Ninna

    I really loved The Book of Joy by the Dalai Lama and Bishop Desmond Tutu so I found this which, of course, fits a prompt! I have to say that I was a little bit dubious going in because what exactly is the Dalai Lama's job aside from being the Dalai Lama? So, I wondered how he could relate to "regular" job issues that most people face. Of course, the gift that the Dalai Lama embodies and shares is his total compassion for all, and so, although he may never be in the position of a burger flipper o I really loved The Book of Joy by the Dalai Lama and Bishop Desmond Tutu so I found this which, of course, fits a prompt! I have to say that I was a little bit dubious going in because what exactly is the Dalai Lama's job aside from being the Dalai Lama? So, I wondered how he could relate to "regular" job issues that most people face. Of course, the gift that the Dalai Lama embodies and shares is his total compassion for all, and so, although he may never be in the position of a burger flipper or a data entry typist, he can always see the human aspect within all things. I found this quite amazing as I tend to fall into cynical pretty darn quickly. He pointed out that what brings happiness isn't really the job itself but, of course, the person's approach to it and what they expect to get out of it. One example that stood out to me was a cashier who was always so personable and really enjoyed interacting with the customers and how a co-worker talked about how all of their shifts are more fun and better when they work with her. That is really a gift and makes you think about how small little actions from each of us can really go a long way to helping each other and ourselves. The world needs more souls like the Dalai Lama but maybe if I can step back from life and take even just a few moments to remember that each day and work with that mind frame, it could help make my world a little better too.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Kate

    If you don't know much about Buddhist philosophy, you will find this book waffly and hard to absorb. If you do know a lot about Buddhist philosophy, you will this book waffly and frustrating as Cutler attempts ineptly to communicate with one of the best minds on the planet. I give this book two stars only because you can look really hard to find a few very obvious but good points (which you can learn much better from other texts). But overall, Howard Cutler puts a very small minded and personal i If you don't know much about Buddhist philosophy, you will find this book waffly and hard to absorb. If you do know a lot about Buddhist philosophy, you will this book waffly and frustrating as Cutler attempts ineptly to communicate with one of the best minds on the planet. I give this book two stars only because you can look really hard to find a few very obvious but good points (which you can learn much better from other texts). But overall, Howard Cutler puts a very small minded and personal interpretation on everything the Dalai Lama says in response to his questions. And, what's worse, the questions are so limited in scope and structured in a way to get what Cutler wants out of the conversation. I feel like the whole book was a missed opportunity. A better title would be "A narrow-minded Westerner's attempt at understanding the Dalai Lama's thoughts about human enterprise."

  21. 5 out of 5

    Jonathan Cavazos

    I like the Dalai Lama. He seems like a nice man, but there is definitely a culture clash. I feel like a lot of his responses were naive. Also, I did not like how the interviewer seemed to put words in his mouth. It seemed like sometimes they were talking in circles. I did like the meditation guide at the end of the book.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Christi

    This was a great continuation from the first book. And, I really enjoyed it while reading and thought it was quite thought provoking. However, in the week since finishing it, I really have a hard time remembering any of the takeaways from the book. So, this one ended up being more of a "fun" read that something that really helped with professional development as I hoped it would be This was a great continuation from the first book. And, I really enjoyed it while reading and thought it was quite thought provoking. However, in the week since finishing it, I really have a hard time remembering any of the takeaways from the book. So, this one ended up being more of a "fun" read that something that really helped with professional development as I hoped it would be

  23. 5 out of 5

    Brian

    I recommend sticking to the original Art of Happiness. Howard's questions and points of interest were a little annoying at times, sometimes unproductive. The one valuable insight I got through this was the Dalai Lama's perspective on challenges at work, and looking at them through a broader lens of one's life and other sources of fulfillment. I recommend sticking to the original Art of Happiness. Howard's questions and points of interest were a little annoying at times, sometimes unproductive. The one valuable insight I got through this was the Dalai Lama's perspective on challenges at work, and looking at them through a broader lens of one's life and other sources of fulfillment.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Ana Sorce

    This review is for the audio edition only. I couldn’t get past the fact that the Dalai Lama’s lines sounded like a parody. I am sure that he is cheerful and giggly in life and it comes from his enlightened state, but when the reader tries to imitate, it sounds silly and distracts from the message.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Dr. Gilberto Arantes

    As I already posted, this book is a must read for those who are interested to reflect upon what happiness at work means. My take away is simple - those moments when you feel “work is not work” those are the meaningful moments when work is fully integrated in life.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Rajarajan RJ

    Great book. Dalai lama’s excellence lies in his simplicity. He explains many hard concepts very easily. He is very open, practical and scientific as well. Will continue to read his other books as well!

  27. 4 out of 5

    Elena

    I enjoyed listening to this on Audio, especially since it’s done in semi-interview manner and the addition of B. D. Wong’s accent helped to make it feel like I was directly listeni

  28. 4 out of 5

    Unnur

    No new wisdom but inspiring nonetheless. The text flows easily which makes it even more of a pleasant read.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Steph

    This audiobook brought me so much peace during an otherwise anxiety-provoking week.

  30. 5 out of 5

    SS

    Good advice. Presentation has moments of flow and other areas where the momentum is lost. Overall helpful.

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